National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vortex induced vibrations

  1. Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

    2006-06-30

    Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

  2. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernitsas, Michael M.; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2011-11-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  3. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Water Currents | Department of Energy Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE is funding Vortex Hydro Energy to commercialize the Vortex Induced Vibration Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) converter, which is a University of Michigan-patented marine and hydrokinetic energy device designed to harness the

  4. EERE Success Story-Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents | Department of Energy Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents EERE Success Story-Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE is funding Vortex Hydro Energy to commercialize the Vortex Induced Vibration Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) converter, which is a University of Michigan-patented marine and

  5. MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power...

  6. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  7. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures (Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy

  8. Vortex and structural dynamics of a flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Vortex and structural dynamics of a flexible cylinder in cross-flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vortex and structural dynamics of a flexible cylinder in cross-flow A low-density, flexible cantilevered cylinder was permitted to vibrate freely under the influence of vortex shedding in the laminar flow regime. We find that the vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible cantilever depart from those of a flexible cylinder that

  9. ANL-85-51 ANL-85-51 FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION OF CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vibration on Fretting in Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers," Flow- Induced Vibration of Power Plant Components PVP-41, pp. 1-18, 1980, Table 1. Permission granted by the American...

  10. Advanced Integration of Power Take-off in Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simiao, Gus

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review of a river and ocean device converting hydrokinetic energy.

  11. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

  12. Picture of the Week: Supercomputing the vortex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This computer simulation of vortex induced motion (VIM) from Los Alamos National Laboratory shows how ocean currents affect offshore oil rigs. The large size and complex physics of ...

  13. Collision-induced vibrational absorption in molecular hydrogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, S.P.

    1993-05-01

    Collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of the first overtone bands of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD have been recorded for gas densities up to 500 amagat at 77-300 K. Analyses of these spectra reveal that (1) contrary to the observations in the fundamental bands, the contribution of the isotropic overlap interaction to the first overtone bands is negligible, (2) the squares of the matrix elements B{sub 32}(R)/ea{sub o} [= {lambda}{sub 32} exp(-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) + 3 (R/a{sub o}){sup -4}] where the subscripts 3 and 2 represent L and {lambda}, respectively, account for the absorption intensity of the bands and (3) the mixed term, 2,3 {lambda}{sub 32} exp (-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) <{vert_bar}Q{vert_bar}> <{alpha}> (R/a){sup -4}, gives a negative contribution. In the CIA spectra of H{sub 2} in its second overtone region recorded at 77, 201 and 298 K for gas densities up to 1000 amagat, a dip in the Q branch with characteristic Q{sub p} and Q{sub R} components has been observed. The analysis of the absorption profiles reveals, in addition to the previously known effects, the occurrence of the triple-collision transitions of H{sub 2} of the type Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) for the first time. From the profile analysis the absorption coefficient of these transitions is obtained.

  14. Vortex and structural dynamics of a flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Jessica K., E-mail: jshang@princeton.edu; Stone, Howard A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Smits, Alexander J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-05-15

    A low-density, flexible cantilevered cylinder was permitted to vibrate freely under the influence of vortex shedding in the laminar flow regime. We find that the vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible cantilever depart from those of a flexible cylinder that is fixed at both ends. In particular, we find discontinuous regions of VIV behavior here called states as a function of the reduced velocity U{sup *}. These states are demarcated by discrete changes in the dominant eigenmodes of the structural response as the cylinder vibrates in progressively higher structural modes with increasing U{sup *}. The contribution of structural modes can be identified readily by a modal projection of the cylinder oscillation onto known cantilever beam modes. Oscillation frequencies do not monotonically increase with U{sup *}. The wake response between different states is also found to have distinct characteristics; of particular note is the occurrence of a P+S wake over one of these regions, which is associated with a high-amplitude vibration of the cylinder that is due to the constructive interference of contributing eigenmodes.

  15. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  16. Vortex diode jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  17. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  18. Experimental investigation of magnetic anisotropy in spin vortex discs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garraud, N. Arnold, D. P.

    2014-05-07

    We present experimental 2D vector vibrating sample magnetometer measurements to demonstrate the shape anisotropy effects occurring in micrometer-diameter supermalloy spin vortex discs. Measurements made for different disc sizes and orientations confirm the out-of-plane susceptibility is several orders of magnitude smaller than the in-plane susceptibility. These results validate with a high certitude that spin vortices with high diameter to thickness ratio retain in-plane-only magnetization, even when subjected to fields in the out-of-plane direction. These results contribute to further computational simulations of the dynamics of spin vortex structures in colloidal suspensions where external fields may be applied in any arbitrary direction.

  19. Will water act as a photocatalyst for cluster phase chemical reactions? Vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Zeb C.; Takahashi, Kaito; Skodje, Rex T.; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-04-28

    The possibility of water catalysis in the vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol is investigated using ab initio dynamical simulations of small methanediol-water clusters. Quantum chemistry calculations employing clusters with one or two water molecules reveal that the barrier to dehydration is lowered by over 20 kcal/mol because of hydrogen-bonding at the transition state. Nevertheless, the simulations of the reaction dynamics following OH-stretch excitation show little catalytic effect of water and, in some cases, even show an anticatalytic effect. The quantum yield for the dehydration reaction exhibits a delayed threshold effect where reaction does not occur until the photon energy is far above the barrier energy. Unlike thermally induced reactions, it is argued that competition between reaction and the irreversible dissipation of photon energy may be expected to raise the dynamical threshold for the reaction above the transition state energy. It is concluded that quantum chemistry calculations showing barrier lowering are not sufficient to infer water catalysis in photochemical reactions, which instead require dynamical modeling.

  20. Vortex Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vortex Energy Place: Germany Sector: Wind energy Product: German wind farm developer. References: Vortex Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  1. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  2. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  3. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  4. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Experimental investigation of vibration-induced bulk solids transport and segregation. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosato, A.D.; Dave, R.N.

    1996-05-01

    In the first phase of this research, we have finished the simulation studies to support the experimental work in the area of particle transport in vibrated granular beds. Representative results are briefly summarized in the attached short paper. Based on the results obtained, in particular the interesting phenomena such as heaping, arching and bifurcation in the flow regime, we have decided to carry put the initial set of experiments in a two dimensional rectangular bed. A schematic diagram of this is also attached. This rectangular cell will allow us to make the necessary observations, in particular the optical observations made through the use of Kodak EkatPro1000 high-speed video camera. A student, supported by the Institute as a match to this grant is in tile process of completing the fabrication of this cell, and has collected all the pertinent literature in this area. We have also obtained specifications and quotations for the vibration unit to be used in this experiments, and it will be ordered in the near future. In addition to the use of the two dimensional rectangular bed, we have also developed a three dimensional cylindrical cell for the study of segregation behavior. A nonintrusive tracking system will be used in measuring the trajectories of tile rising large particle, and at present all the calibration jigs, and software have been developed. We anticipate collecting the experimental data in the next few weeks.

  6. Wavevortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrdinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yuan Bhler, Oliver

    2014-02-15

    This is a theoretical study of wavevortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrdinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wavevortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wavevortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

  7. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  8. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, Franklin D.; Middlebrooks, Willis B.; DeMario, Edmund E.

    1994-01-01

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube.

  9. Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oscillation Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd Address: Volochaevskaya Street 40 b Flat 38 Place: Moscow Zip: 111033 Region: Russian...

  10. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting...

  11. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and...

  12. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a...

  13. Vortex Hydro Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Address: 4870 West Clark Rd Suite 108 Place: Ypsilanti Zip: 48197 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  14. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  15. MHK Technologies/SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine.jpg Technology Profile...

  16. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water ...

  17. Vibration dissipation mount for motors or the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Small, Thomas R. (Brookeville, MD)

    1987-01-01

    A vibration dissipation mount which permits the mounting of a motor, generator, or the like such that the rotatable shaft thereof passes through the mount and the mount permits the dissipation of self-induced and otherwise induced vibrations wherein the mount comprises a pair of plates having complementary concave and convex surfaces, a semi-resilient material being disposed therebetween.

  18. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  19. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arenholz, A. Doran, A.T. Young, A. Scholl, C. Hwang, H.W. Zhao, J. Bokor, and Z.Q. Qiu, "Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex states in CoOFeAg(001) discs,"...

  20. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  1. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  2. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  3. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  4. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  5. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  6. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study

  7. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around

  8. OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, O. M.

    1980-03-14

    Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

  9. Vortex operators in gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polchinski, J.

    1980-07-01

    Several related aspects of the 't Hooft vortex operator are studied. The current picture of the vacuum of quantum chromodynamics, the idea of dual field theories, and the idea of the vortex operator are reviewed first. The Abelian vortex operator written in terms of elementary fields and the calculation of its Green's functions are considered. A two-dimensional solvable model of a Dirac string is presented. The expression of the Green's functions more neatly in terms of Wu and Yang's geometrical idea of sections is addressed. The renormalization of the Green's functions of two kinds of Abelian looplike operators, the Wilson loop and the vortex operator, is studied; for both operators only an overall multiplicative renormalization is needed. In the case of the vortex this involves a surprising cancellation. Next, the dependence of the Green's functions of the Wilson and 't Hooft operators on the nature of the vacuum is discussed. The cluster properties of the Green's functions are emphasized. It is seen that the vortex operator in a massive Abelian theory always has surface-like clustering. The form of Green's functions in terms of Feynman graphs is the same in Higgs and symmetric phases; the difference appears in the sum over all tadpole trees. Finally, systems having fields in the fundamental representation are considered. When these fields enter only weakly into the dynamics, a vortex-like operator is anticipated. Any such operator can no longer be local looplike, but must have commutators at long range. A U(1) lattice gauge theory with two matter fields, one singly charged (fundamental) and one doubly charged (adjoint), is examined. When the fundamental field is weakly coupled, the expected phase transitions are found. When it is strongly coupled, the operator still appears to be a good order parameter, a discontinuous change in its behavior leads to a new phase transition. 18 figures.

  10. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J. (late of San Francisco, CA); Fox, Jack N. (San Jose, CA); Weissinger, Robert B. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  11. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  12. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  13. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  14. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  15. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  16. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  17. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  18. General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-06-15

    In his study of superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Svistunov [Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)] derived a Hamiltonian equation for the self-induced motion of a vortex filament. Under the local induction approximation (LIA), the Svistunov formulation is equivalent to a nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation. In this paper, we consider a family of rotating vortex filament solutions for the LIA reduction of the Svistunov formulation, which we refer to as the 2D LIA (since it permits a potential formulation in terms of two of the three Cartesian coordinates). This class of solutions holds the well-known Hasimoto-type planar vortex filament [H. Hasimoto, Motion of a vortex filament and its relation to elastica, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 31, 293 (1971)] as one reduction and helical solutions as another. More generally, we obtain solutions which are periodic in the space variable. A systematic analytical study of the behavior of such solutions is carried out. In the case where vortex filaments have small deviations from the axis of rotation, closed analytical forms of the filament solutions are given. A variety of numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the wide range of rotating filament behaviors possible. Doing so, we are able to determine a number of vortex filament structures not previously studied. We find that the solution structure progresses from planar to helical, and then to more intricate and complex filament structures, possibly indicating the onset of superfluid turbulence.

  19. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cericola, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Doggett, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Ernest, Terry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Priddy, Tommy G. (Rockville, MD)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  20. On the evolution of vortex rings with swirl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naitoh, Takashi, E-mail: naitoh.takashi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics and Mechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Okura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ohkura@meijo-u.ac.jp [Department of Vehicle and Mechanical Engineering, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Gotoh, Toshiyuki, E-mail: gotoh.toshiyuki@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Scientific and Engineering Simulation, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kato, Yusuke [Controller Business Unit Engineering Division 1, Engineering Department 3, Denso Wave Incorporated, 1 Yoshiike Kusagi Agui-cho, Chita-gun Aichi 470-2297 (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    A laminar vortex ring with swirl, which has the meridional velocity component inside the vortex core, was experimentally generated by the brief fluid ejection from a rotating outlet. The evolution of the vortex ring was investigated with flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in order to find the influence of swirling flow in particular upon the transition to turbulence. Immediately after the formation of a vortex ring with swirl, a columnar strong vortex along the symmetric axis is observed in all cases of the present experiment. Then the characteristic fluid discharging from a vortex ring with swirl referred to as peeling off appears. The amount of discharging fluid due to the peeling off increases with the angular velocity of the rotating outlet. We conjectured that the mechanism generating the peeling off is related to the columnar strong vortex by close observations of the spatio-temporal development of the vorticity distribution and the cutting 3D images constructed from the successive cross sections of a vortex ring. While a laminar vortex ring without swirl may develop azimuthal waves around its circumference at some later time and the ring structure subsequently breaks, the swirling flow in a vortex ring core reduces the amplification rate of the azimuthal wavy deformation and preserved its ring structure. Then the traveling distance of a vortex ring can be extended using the swirl flow under certain conditions.

  1. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, R. M. da; Domnguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  2. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.

  3. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row ofmore » vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.« less

  4. Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films Authors: Winchester, B. 1 ; Balke, ... Author Affiliations Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania ...

  5. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    setting), scientists are looking farther down the road at completely new ways to encode binary information. Magnetic vortex cores, being thermally stable and measuring just...

  6. Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex State in Ni80Fe20 Nanodisks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Statistical Behavior of...

  7. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Wednesday, 28 March 2007 00:00 In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to

  8. Dynamics and efficiency of magnetic vortex circulation reversal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Dynamics and efficiency of magnetic vortex circulation reversal This content will become publicly available on March 15, 2016 Prev Next ...

  9. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ronald J. (Latham, NY)

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  11. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  12. Large amplitude spin torque vortex oscillations at zero external field using a perpendicular spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dussaux, A.; Rache Salles, B.; Jenkins, A. S.; Bortolotti, P.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.; Khvalkovskiy, A. V.; Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Yuasa, S.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate the microwave response of a spin transfer vortex based oscillator in a magnetic tunnel junction with an in-plane reference layer combined with a spin valve with an out-of-plane magnetization spin polarizing layer. The main advantage of this perpendicular spin polarizer is to induce a large spin transfer force even at zero magnetic field, thus leading to a record emitted power (up to 0.6 μW) associated to a very narrow spectral linewidth of a few hundreds of kHz. The characteristics of this hybrid vortex based spin transfer nano-oscillator obtained at zero field and room temperature are of great importance for applications based on rf spintronic devices as integrated and tunable microwave source and/or microwave detector.

  13. Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea ice, the mechanism that links sea ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhance the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January- February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  14. Mining machine having vibration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.R.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a mining machine having means for sensing property variations of the materials associated with a seam of a mine comprising: a cutting tool including a member rotatable about an axis, at least one cutter carried by the rotatable member at a point spaced from the axis for cutting material from the seam, a conductor rod carried by the rotatable member and held in releasable engagement with the cutter, the rod extending to the axis of the rotatable member to conduct to the axis, strain waves which are induced by variations in cutter vibration as the cutter encounters property variations of the materials associated with the seam, and a transducer located at the axis of the rotatable member in communication with the conductor rod to convert the strain waves in the rod to electric signals.

  15. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can

  16. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  17. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sohal, Manohar S. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-12-20

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  18. Coupled particle dispersion by three-dimensional vortex structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troutt, T.R.; Chung, J.N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to obtain understanding concerning the role of three-dimensional vortex structures in the dispersion of particles and droplets in free shear flows. This research program builds on previous studies which focused on the nature of particle dispersion in large scale quasi two-dimensional vortex structures. This investigation employs time dependent experimental and numerical techniques to provide information concerning the particulate dispersion produced by three dimensional vortex structures in free shear layers. The free shear flows investigated include modified plane mixing layers, and modified plane wakes. The modifications to these flows involve slight perturbations to the initiation boundary conditions such that three-dimensional vortex structures are rapidly generated by the experimental and numerical flow fields. Recent results support the importance of these vortex structures in the particle dispersion process.

  19. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  20. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barna, B.A.

    1987-07-07

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  1. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barna, Basil A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration.

  2. Ferroelectric nanostructure having switchable multi-stable vortex states

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naumov, Ivan I. (Fayetteville, AR); Bellaiche, Laurent M. (Fayetteville, AR); Prosandeev, Sergey A. (Fayetteville, AR); Ponomareva, Inna V. (Fayetteville, AR); Kornev, Igor A. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2009-09-22

    A ferroelectric nanostructure formed as a low dimensional nano-scale ferroelectric material having at least one vortex ring of polarization generating an ordered toroid moment switchable between multi-stable states. A stress-free ferroelectric nanodot under open-circuit-like electrical boundary conditions maintains such a vortex structure for their local dipoles when subject to a transverse inhomogeneous static electric field controlling the direction of the macroscopic toroidal moment. Stress is also capable of controlling the vortex's chirality, because of the electromechanical coupling that exists in ferroelectric nanodots.

  3. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  4. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  5. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redmond, James M. (Albuquerque, NM); Barney, Patrick S. (Albuquerque, NM); Parker, Gordon G. (Hougton, MI); Smith, David A. (Gainesville, FL)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  6. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  7. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  8. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  9. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

  10. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Charles C. (San Diego, CA); Pytanowski, Gregory P. (San Diego, CA); Vendituoli, Jonathan S. (San Diego, CA)

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  11. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  12. Fuel injection of coal slurry using vortex nozzles and valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holmes, Allen B.

    1989-01-01

    Injection of atomized coal slurry fuel into an engine combustion chamber is achieved at relatively low pressures by means of a vortex swirl nozzle. The outlet opening of the vortex nozzle is considerably larger than conventional nozzle outlets, thereby eliminating major sources of failure due to clogging by contaminants in the fuel. Control fluid, such as air, may be used to impart vorticity to the slurry and/or purge the nozzle of contaminants during the times between measured slurry charges. The measured slurry charges may be produced by a diaphragm pump or by vortex valves controlled by a separate control fluid. Fluidic circuitry, employing vortex valves to alternatively block and pass cool slurry fuel flow, is disclosed.

  13. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. ... and their possible application to data storage technologies. ... Is there a physical limit to how far this process can go? At ...

  14. X-ray imaging of Nonlinear Resonant Gyrotropic Magnetic Vortex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray imaging of Nonlinear Resonant Gyrotropic Magnetic Vortex Core Motion in Circular Permalloy Disks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray imaging of Nonlinear...

  15. Phase Imprinting in Equilibrating Fermi Gases: The Transience of Vortex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rings and Other Defects (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Phase Imprinting in Equilibrating Fermi Gases: The Transience of Vortex Rings and Other Defects « Prev Next » Title: Phase Imprinting in Equilibrating Fermi Gases: The Transience of Vortex Rings and Other Defects Authors: Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavić, Karmela ; Rançon, Adam ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ; Levin, K. Publication Date: 2014-09-16 OSTI Identifier: 1180434 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical

  16. Phase Imprinting in Equilibrating Fermi Gases: The Transience of Vortex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rings and Other Defects (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Phase Imprinting in Equilibrating Fermi Gases: The Transience of Vortex Rings and Other Defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Phase Imprinting in Equilibrating Fermi Gases: The Transience of Vortex Rings and Other Defects Authors: Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavić, Karmela ; Rançon, Adam ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ; Levin, K. Publication Date: 2014-09-16 OSTI Identifier: 1180434 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

  17. Effects of quadrupole vibration of the fragments on. mu. - final state probabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Guo-tong; Wang Yan-sen; Yuan Zu-shu; Qiu Zhi-hong

    1988-01-01

    The muon final-state probabilities after muon-induced fission of /sup 238/U are calculated by using the LCAO (Linear Combination of Atomic Orbital) method. The ordinary viscosity of the fissioning nucleus, the deformations and quadrupole vibrations of the two fragments are taken into account. The calculated results are compared with those obtained by neglecting the quadrupole vibration

  18. All-optical switching in optically induced nonlinear waveguide couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebel, Falko Boguslawski, Martin; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia; Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2014-06-30

    We experimentally demonstrate all-optical vortex switching in nonlinear coupled waveguide arrays optically induced in photorefractive media. Our technique is based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams to induce various types of waveguide configurations. Using double- and quadruple-well potentials, we demonstrate precise control over the coupling strength between waveguides, the linear and nonlinear dynamics and symmetry-breaking bifurcations of guided light, and a power-controlled optical vortex switch.

  19. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing requirements by increasing harvested power, shifting optimal conditioning impedance, inducing significant voltage supply fluctuations and ultimately rendering idealized sinusoidal and random analyses insufficient.

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We find that the vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible cantilever depart from ... by a modal projection of the cylinder oscillation onto known cantilever beam modes. ...

  1. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

  2. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

  3. Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme magnetic fields Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of...

  4. Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme magnetic fields Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme magnetic ...

  5. Degassing of molten alloys with the assistance of ultrasonic vibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou (Knoxville, TN); Xu, Hanbing (Knoxville, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-23

    An apparatus and method are disclosed in which ultrasonic vibration is used to assist the degassing of molten metals or metal alloys thereby reducing gas content in the molten metals or alloys. High-intensity ultrasonic vibration is applied to a radiator that creates cavitation bubbles, induces acoustic streaming in the melt, and breaks up purge gas (e.g., argon or nitrogen) which is intentionally introduced in a small amount into the melt in order to collect the cavitation bubbles and to make the cavitation bubbles survive in the melt. The molten metal or alloy in one version of the invention is an aluminum alloy. The ultrasonic vibrations create cavitation bubbles and break up the large purge gas bubbles into small bubbles and disperse the bubbles in the molten metal or alloy more uniformly, resulting in a fast and clean degassing.

  6. Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BiFeO3 thin films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 4, 2016 Title: Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films Authors: Winchester, B. [1] ; Balke, N. [2] ; Cheng, X. X. [1] ; Morozovska, A. N. [3] ; Kalinin, S. [2] Search SciTech Connect for author "Kalinin,

  7. Temporal evolution characteristics of an annular-mode gliding arc discharge in a vortex flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Song, Yuan-Hong; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2014-05-15

    An annular-mode gliding arc discharge powered by a 50?Hz alternating current (ac) supply was studied in a vortex flow of dry and humid air. Its temporal evolution characteristics were investigated by electrical measurement, temporally resolved imaging, and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements. Three discharge stages of arc-ignition, arc-gliding, and arc-extinction were clearly observed in each half-cycle of the discharge. During the arc-gliding stage, the intensity of light emission from the arc root at the cathode was remarkably higher than that at other areas. The spectral intensity of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}?{sub u}?B{sup 3}?{sub g}) during the arc-ignition stage was much higher than that during the arc-gliding stage, which was contrary to the temporal evolutions of spectral intensities for N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}?{sub u}{sup +}?X{sup 2}?{sub g}{sup +}) and OH(A{sup 2}?{sup +}?X{sup 2}?{sub i}). Temporally resolved vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} were also presented and decreased with increasing the water vapor content.

  8. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  9. Patent: Actively controlled vibration welding system and method |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEpatents Actively controlled vibration welding system and method Citation Details Title: Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

  10. Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Joseph W. (East Aurora, NY); Homicz, Gregory F. (Getzville, NY); Bergman, Richard C. (Corfu, NY)

    1989-01-01

    Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

  11. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  12. Quantum correlation dynamics in photosynthetic processes assisted by molecular vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, G.L.; Roncaglia, M.; Raffa, F.A.; Genovese, M.

    2015-10-15

    During the long course of evolution, nature has learnt how to exploit quantum effects. In fact, recent experiments reveal the existence of quantum processes whose coherence extends over unexpectedly long time and space ranges. In particular, photosynthetic processes in light-harvesting complexes display a typical oscillatory dynamics ascribed to quantum coherence. Here, we consider the simple model where a dimer made of two chromophores is strongly coupled with a quasi-resonant vibrational mode. We observe the occurrence of wide oscillations of genuine quantum correlations, between electronic excitations and the environment, represented by vibrational bosonic modes. Such a quantum dynamics has been unveiled through the calculation of the negativity of entanglement and the discord, indicators widely used in quantum information for quantifying the resources needed to realize quantum technologies. We also discuss the possibility of approximating additional weakly-coupled off-resonant vibrational modes, simulating the disturbances induced by the rest of the environment, by a single vibrational mode. Within this approximation, one can show that the off-resonant bath behaves like a classical source of noise.

  13. Highly efficient electron vortex beams generated by nanofabricated phase holograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano

    2014-01-27

    We propose an improved type of holographic-plate suitable for the shaping of electron beams. The plate is fabricated by a focused ion beam on a silicon nitride membrane and introduces a controllable phase shift to the electron wavefunction. We adopted the optimal blazed-profile design for the phase hologram, which results in the generation of highly efficient (25%) electron vortex beams. This approach paves the route towards applications in nano-scale imaging and materials science.

  14. Magnetic vortex-antivortex dynamics on a picosecond timescale in a rectangular Permalloy pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.-H.; Mesler-Lai, B.; Anderson, E.; Fischer, P.; Moon, J.-H.; Lee, K.-J.

    2009-06-25

    We report our experimental finding that there exists a pair of magnetic vortex and antivortex generated during an excited motion of a magnetic vortex core. Two vortices structure in 2 x 4 {micro}m{sup 2} rectangular Permalloy pattern is excited by an external field pulse of 1-ns duration, where each vortex is excited and followed by the vortex core splitting. X-ray microscopy with high spatiotemporal resolution enables us to observe a linking domain between two temporarily generated pairs of vortex-antivortex cores only surviving for several hundreds of picoseconds. The linking domain structure is found to depend on the combinational configuration of two original vortex cores, which is supported by micromagnetic simulations with a very good agreement.

  15. Magnetic vortex dynamics on a picosecond timescale in a hexagonal permalloy pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, J.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.; Moon, J.-H.; Lee, K.-J.; Anderson, E. H.; Fischer, P.

    2009-12-02

    We have observed a motion of magnetic vortex core in a hexagonal Permalloy pattern by means of Soft X-ray microscopy. Pump-probe stroboscopic observation on a picosecond timescale has been carried out after exciting a ground state vortex structure by an external field pulse of 1 ns duration. Vortex core is excited off from the center position of the hexagonal pattern but the analysis of the core trajectory reveals that the motion is nongyrotropic.

  16. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core

  17. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical...

  18. Method and apparatus for enhancing vortex pinning by conformal crystal arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janko, Boldizsar; Reichhardt, Cynthia; Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan

    2015-07-14

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for strongly enhancing vortex pinning by conformal crystal arrays. The conformal crystal array is constructed by a conformal transformation of a hexagonal lattice, producing a non-uniform structure with a gradient where the local six-fold coordination of the pinning sites is preserved, and with an arching effect. The conformal pinning arrays produce significantly enhanced vortex pinning over a much wider range of field than that found for other vortex pinning geometries with an equivalent number of vortex pinning sites, such as random, square, and triangular.

  19. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  20. How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide Calculations Confirm Material's Potential for Next-Generation Electronics, Energy November 10, 2014 Contact: Dawn Levy, levyd@ornl.gov, 865.576.6448 Budaivibe Vanadium atoms (blue) have unusually large thermal vibrations that stabilize the metallic state of a vanadium dioxide crystal. Red depicts oxygen atoms. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory For more than 50 years, scientists have

  1. Vibration Power Harvesting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vibration Power Harvesting Vibration Power Harvesting New Technology Captures Freely Available Vibration Energy to Power Wireless Sensors The industrial market for wireless sensors is growing rapidly but is constrained by implementation costs and compatibility with existing wireless networks. Typical wireless sensors and transmitters depend on batteries, which require periodic maintenance to change the battery. Maintenance costs for battery use in wireless sensor applications are estimated at

  2. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  3. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  4. Mixing characteristics of compressible vortex rings interacting with normal shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetegen, B.M. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Hermanson, J.C. )

    1995-01-01

    Current interest in the interaction between compressible vortical flows and shock waves is largely motivated by the need to promote rapid, loss-effective mixing and combustion of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels for supersonic combustor applications. The instability mechanisms and mixing enhancement arising from the interaction of a compressible vortex ring with a normal shock wave were studied in a colinear, dual-shock tube. This flow geometry simulates features of the interaction of a shock wave with a jet containing streamwise vorticity, a configuration of significant interest for supersonic combustion applications. Flow visualization and quantitative concentration measurements were performed by planar laser Rayleigh scattering. For a given primary shock strength, interfacial instability is more evident in a weak vortex ring than in a strong vortex ring. In all cases, the identity of the vortex ring is lost after a sufficiently long time of interaction. The probability density function of the mixed fluid changes rapidly from a bimodal distribution to a single peak upon processing by a shock wave. The most probable concentration decreases with time, indicating a rapid increase in mixing and dilution of the vortex fluid. The mixing enhancement is most rapid for the case of a strong vortex ring interacting with a strong shock wave, somewhat slower for a weak vortex ring and a strong shock wave, and significantly slower for the case of a strong vortex ring and a weaker shock wave. These observations are consistent with the earlier numerical predictions.

  5. Interaction of Josephson Junction and Distant Vortex in Narrow Thin-Film Superconducting Strips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2014-01-31

    The phase difference between the banks of an edge-type planar Josephson junction crossing the narrow thin-film strip depends on wether or not vortices are present in the junction banks. For a vortex close to the junction this effect has been seen by Golod, Rydh, and Krasnov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 227003 (2010)], who showed that the vortex may turn the junction into ? type. It is shown here that even if the vortex is far away from the junction, it still changes the 0 junction to a ? junction when situated close to the strip edges. Within the approximation used, the effect is independent of the vortex-junction separation, a manifestation of the topology of the vortex phase which extends to macroscopic distances of superconducting coherence.

  6. Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, L.F.

    1993-04-20

    Apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

  7. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  8. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-10-31

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the Jan-March report1. Most of the components have been received and assembly was nearly complete at the end of the period. Testing started in October and results will be submitted in the next report. The field testing component of this Phase has been rethought. The current plan is to adapt the laboratory prototype for use in a drilling laboratory and run a series of controlled drilling tests with and without the DVMCS. This should give a more quantitative evaluation of its value, which will help us sign a commercialization partner. While this testing is underway, we will order and begin machining parts for full field prototypes to be use in Phase III. A modification application is being submitted in October to reflect these changes.

  9. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  10. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  11. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  12. The vibrational dependence of dissociative recombination: Rate constants for N{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2014-11-28

    Dissociative recombination rate constants are reported with electron temperature dependent uncertainties for the lowest 5 vibrational levels of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ground state. The rate constants are determined from ab initio calculations of potential curves, electronic widths, quantum defects, and cross sections. At 100 K electron temperature, the rate constants overlap with the exception of the third vibrational level. At and above 300 K, the rate constants for excited vibrational levels are significantly smaller than that for the ground level. It is shown that any experimentally determined total rate constant at 300 K electron temperature that is smaller than 2.0 10{sup ?7} cm{sup 3}/s is likely to be for ions that have a substantially excited vibrational population. Using the vibrational level specific rate constants, the total rate constant is in very good agreement with that for an excited vibrational distribution found in a storage ring experiment. It is also shown that a prior analysis of a laser induced fluorescence experiment is quantitatively flawed due to the need to account for reactions with unknown rate constants. Two prior calculations of the dissociative recombination rate constant are shown to be inconsistent with the cross sections upon which they are based. The rate constants calculated here contribute to the resolution of a 30 year old disagreement between modeled and observed N{sub 2}{sup +} ionospheric densities.

  13. Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts Presentation about...

  14. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure...

  15. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, Charles J. (Rexford, NY); Rhudy, Ralph G. (Scotia, NY); Bushman, Ralph E. (Lathem, NY)

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  16. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  17. Accurate potential energy, dipole moment curves, and lifetimes of vibrational states of heteronuclear alkali dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Dmitry A.; Varganov, Sergey A.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-14

    We calculate the potential energy curves, the permanent dipole moment curves, and the lifetimes of the ground and excited vibrational states of the heteronuclear alkali dimers XY (X, Y = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) in the X{sup 1}?{sup +} electronic state using the coupled cluster with singles doubles and triples method. All-electron quadruple-? basis sets with additional core functions are used for Li and Na, and small-core relativistic effective core potentials with quadruple-? quality basis sets are used for K, Rb, and Cs. The inclusion of the coupled cluster non-perturbative triple excitations is shown to be crucial for obtaining the accurate potential energy curves. A large one-electron basis set with additional core functions is needed for the accurate prediction of permanent dipole moments. The dissociation energies are overestimated by only 14 cm{sup ?1} for LiNa and by no more than 114 cm{sup ?1} for the other molecules. The discrepancies between the experimental and calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are less than 1.7 cm{sup ?1}, and the discrepancies for the anharmonic correction are less than 0.1 cm{sup ?1}. We show that correlation between atomic electronegativity differences and permanent dipole moment of heteronuclear alkali dimers is not perfect. To obtain the vibrational energies and wave functions the vibrational Schrdinger equation is solved with the B-spline basis set method. The transition dipole moments between all vibrational states, the Einstein coefficients, and the lifetimes of the vibrational states are calculated. We analyze the decay rates of the vibrational states in terms of spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission and absorption induced by black body radiation. In all studied heteronuclear alkali dimers the ground vibrational states have much longer lifetimes than any excited states.

  18. Observation of coupled vortex gyrations by 70-ps-time and 20-nm-space- resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hyunsung; Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Bocklage, Lars; Vogel, Andreas; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-09-01

    We employed time-and space-resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to observe vortex-core gyrations in a pair of dipolar-coupled vortex-state Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) disks. The 70 ps temporal and 20 nm spatial resolution of the microscope enabled us to simultaneously measure vortex gyrations in both disks and to resolve the phases and amplitudes of both vortex-core positions. We observed their correlation for a specific vortex-state configuration. This work provides a robust and direct method of studying vortex gyrations in dipolar-coupled vortex oscillators.

  19. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-07-15

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite value. These decaying Kelvin waves correspond to wave number below the critical value for the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, and hence our results on the Schwarz quantum LIA correspond exactly to what one would expect from prior work on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability.

  20. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  1. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  2. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  3. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  4. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  5. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  6. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic

  7. Fast chirality reversal of the magnetic vortex by electric current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, W. L. Liu, R. H.; Urazhdin, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Erokhin, S. G.; Berkov, D.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of high-density information encoding in magnetic materials by topologically stable inhomogeneous magnetization configurations such as domain walls, skyrmions, and vortices has motivated intense research into mechanisms enabling their control and detection. While the uniform magnetization states can be efficiently controlled by electric current using magnetic multilayer structures, this approach has proven much more difficult to implement for inhomogeneous states. Here, we report direct observation of fast reversal of magnetic vortex by electric current in a simple planar structure based on a bilayer of spin Hall material Pt with a single microscopic ferromagnetic disk contacted by asymmetric electrodes. The reversal is enabled by a combination of the chiral Oersted field and spin current generated by the nonuniform current distribution in Pt. Our results provide a route for the efficient control of inhomogeneous magnetization configurations by electric current.

  8. Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

    2005-10-04

    A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

  9. Recent Triplet Vibration Studies in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieberger, P.; Bonati, R.; Corbin, G.; Jain, A.; Minty, M.; McIntyre, G.; Montag, C.; Muratore, J.; Schultheiss, C.; Seberg, S.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2010-05-23

    We report on recent developments for mitigating vibrations of the quadrupole magnets near the interaction regions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). High precision accelerometers, geophones, and a laser vibrometer were installed around one of the two interaction points to characterize the frequencies of the mechanical motion. In addition actuators were mounted directly on the quadrupole cryostats. Using as input the locally measured motion, dynamic damping of the mechanical vibrations has been demonstrated. In this report we present these measurements and measurements of the beam response. Future options for compensating the vibrations are discussed.

  10. Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-28

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

  11. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in nanometer-scale magnetic films. At the core of each vortex, the magnetization can point vertically up or down out of the film, thereby providing a possible new data storage...

  12. Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex State in Ni80Fe20 Nanodisks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Keisuke, Yamada; Kasai, Shinya

    2011-01-14

    Magnetic vortices in magnetic nanodots, which are characterized by an in-plane (chirality) and an out-of-plane (polarity) magnetizations, have been intensively attracted because of their high potential for technological application to data storage and memory scheme as well as their scientific interest for an understanding of fundamental physics in magnetic nanostructures. Complete understanding of the formation process of vortex state in magnetic vortex systems is very significant issue to achieve storage and memory technologies using magnetic vortices and understand intrinsic physical properties in magnetic nanostructures. In our work, we have statistically investigated the formation process of vortex state in permalloy (Py, Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) nanodisks through the direct observation of vortex structure utilizing a magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy (MTXM) with a high spatial resolution down to 20 nm. Magnetic imaging in Py nanodots was performed at the Fe L{sub 3} (707 eV) absorption edge. Figure 1 shows in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic components observed in 40 nm thick nanodot arrays with different dot radius of r = 500 and 400 nm, respectively. Vortex chirality, either clockwise (CW) or counter-clockwise (CCW), and polarity, either up or down, are clearly visible in both arrays. To investigate the statistical behavior in formation process of the vortex state, the observation of vortex structure at a remanant state after saturation of nanodots by an external magnetic field of 1 kOe has been repeatedly performed over 100 times for each array. The typical MTXM images of vortex chirality taken in two successive measurements together with their overlapped images in nanodot arrays of r = 500 and 400 nm are displayed in Fig. 2. Within the statistical measurement, the formation process of chirality of either CW or CCW is quite stochastic in each nanodot. Similar behavior is also witnessed in the formation of vortex polarity observed in consecutive experiments of the same arrays. Interestingly, a particular selectivity between the circulation sense of chirality and orientation sense of polarity for each other is found in the formation process of vortex state despite of their respective stochastic generation in repeated measurements. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (D-M) interaction in magnetic nanodisks, which is inevitably generated due to the breaking of inversion symmetry at surface/interface in magnetic thin layers, is mainly responsible for the experimentally witnessed selectivity between chirality and polarity in a formation of vortex structure.

  13. Dual vortex theory of strongly interacting electrons: A non-Fermi liquid

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with a twist (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dual vortex theory of strongly interacting electrons: A non-Fermi liquid with a twist Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dual vortex theory of strongly interacting electrons: A non-Fermi liquid with a twist As discovered in the quantum Hall effect, a very effective way for strongly repulsive electrons to minimize their potential energy is to aquire nonzero relative angular momentum. We pursue this mechanism for interacting

  14. Using piezo-electric material to simulate a vibration environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jepsen, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Davie, Neil T. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vangoethem, Douglas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Edward F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-14

    A target object can be vibrated using actuation that exploits the piezo-electric ("PE") property. Under combined conditions of vibration and centrifugal acceleration, a centrifugal load of the target object on PE vibration actuators can be reduced by using a counterweight that offsets the centrifugal loading. Target objects are also subjected to combinations of: spin, vibration, and acceleration; spin and vibration; and spin and acceleration.

  15. Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

    2008-10-21

    A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

  16. The universal criterion for switching a magnetic vortex core in soft magnetic nanodots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.-S.; Kim, S.-K.; Yu, Y.-S.; Choi, Y.-S.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Jung, H.; Fischer, P.

    2008-10-01

    The universal criterion for ultrafast vortex core switching between core-up and -down vortex bi-states in soft magnetic nanodots was empirically investigated by micromagnetic simulations and combined with an analytical approach. Vortex-core switching occurs whenever the velocity of vortex core motion reaches a critical value, which is {nu}{sub c} = 330 {+-} 37 m/s for Permalloy, as estimated from numerical simulations. This critical velocity was found to be {nu}{sub c} = {eta}{sub c}{gamma} {radical}A{sub ex} with A{sub ex} the exchange stiffness, {gamma} the gyromagnetic ratio, and an estimated proportional constant {eta}{sub c} = 1.66 {+-} 0.18. This criterion does neither depend on driving force parameters nor on the dimension or geometry of the magnetic specimen. The phase diagrams for the vortex core switching criterion and its switching time with respect to both the strength and angular frequency of circular rotating magnetic fields were derived, which offer practical guidance for implementing vortex core switching into future solid state information storage devices.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  18. The internal structure of a vortex in a two-dimensional superfluid with long healing length and its implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Avraham; Aleiner, Igor L.; Agam, Oded

    2014-07-15

    We analyze the motion of quantum vortices in a two-dimensional spinless superfluid within Popovs hydrodynamic description. In the long healing length limit (where a large number of particles are inside the vortex core) the superfluid dynamics is determined by saddle points of Popovs action, which, in particular, allows for weak solutions of the GrossPitaevskii equation. We solve the resulting equations of motion for a vortex moving with respect to the superfluid and find the reconstruction of the vortex core to be a non-analytic function of the force applied on the vortex. This response produces an anomalously large dipole moment of the vortex and, as a result, the spectrum associated with the vortex motion exhibits narrow resonances lying within the phonon part of the spectrum, contrary to traditional view.

  19. Quantification of ceramic preconverter hot vibration durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locker, R.J.; Sawyer, C.B.; Schad, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    The hot vibration durability of ceramic preconverters was examined in this study. Two preconverter designs were investigated. A Generation 1 design, utilizing 4,070 g/m{sup 2} intumescent mat, was examined at 900 C/75g. A Generation 2 design, possessing 6,200 g/m{sup 2} intumescent mat and insulated end cones, was evaluated at 1,050 C/75g. Three consecutive Generation 1 samples passed 900 C/75g exposures of 100 hours. Three Generation 2 preconverters tested at 1,050 C/75g similarly passed 100 hour exposures. The residual shear strength of each preconverter tested in hot vibration was measured to quantify durability. Hot push shear evaluations were performed to obtain the residual shear strength. Following 900 C/75g hot vibration exposures, the Generation 1 samples possessed an average residual shear strength of 450 kPa. Generation 2 samples, tested at 1,050 C/75g retained an average mat shear strength of 61 kPa. A minimum calculated shear strength of 15 kPa is required. An alternative thermal aging technique was applied to new sets of Generation 1 and 2 specimens. These samples did not experience mechanical vibration. Results of hot push shear measurements on these components indicated that the residual shear strengths were similar to those obtained for specimens exposed to hot vibration. These results indicated that the thermal conditions were the primary cause of Mat deterioration in hot vibration. The supplemental test methods investigated in this study represent an economical and quantitative alternative to hot vibration testing.

  20. Implausibility of the vibrational theory of olfaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Block, Eric; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Jang, Seogjoo; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Sekharan, Sivakumar; Dethier, Berenice; Gundala, Sivaji; Pan, Yi; Li, Shengju; Li, Zhen; et al

    2015-04-21

    The vibrational theory of olfaction assumes that electron transfer occurs across odorants at the active sites of odorant receptors (ORs), serving as a sensitive measure of odorant vibrational frequencies, ultimately leading to olfactory perception. A previous study reported that human subjects differentiated hydrogen/deuterium isotopomers (isomers with isotopic atoms) of the musk compound cyclopentadecanone as evidence supporting the theory. Here, we find no evidence for such differentiation at the molecular level. In fact, we find that the human musk-recognizing receptor, OR5AN1, identified using a heterologous OR expression system and robustly responding to cyclopentadecanone and muscone, fails to distinguish isotopomers of thesemore » compounds in vitro. Furthermore, the mouse (methylthio)methanethiol (MTMT)-recognizing receptor, MOR244-3, and other selected human and mouse ORs, responded similarly to normal, deuterated, and ¹³C isotopomers of their respective ligands, paralleling our results with the musk receptor OR5AN1. These findings suggest that the proposed vibration theory does not apply to the human musk receptor OR5AN1, mouse thiol receptor MOR244-3, or other ORs examined. Also, contrary to the vibration theory predictions, muscone-d₃₀ lacks the 1,380-1,550 cm⁻¹ IR bands claimed to be essential for musk odor. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis shows that the proposed electron transfer mechanism of the vibrational frequencies of odorants could be easily suppressed by quantum effects of non-odorant molecular vibrational modes. As a result, these and other concerns about electron transfer at ORs, together with our extensive experimental data, argue against the plausibility of the vibration theory.« less

  1. Implausibility of the vibrational theory of olfaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, Eric; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Jang, Seogjoo; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Sekharan, Sivakumar; Dethier, Berenice; Gundala, Sivaji; Pan, Yi; Li, Shengju; Li, Zhen; Lodge, Stephene N.; Ozbil, Mehmet; Jiang, Huihong; Penalba, Sonia Flores; Batista, Victor S.; Zhuang, Hanyi

    2015-04-21

    The vibrational theory of olfaction assumes that electron transfer occurs across odorants at the active sites of odorant receptors (ORs), serving as a sensitive measure of odorant vibrational frequencies, ultimately leading to olfactory perception. A previous study reported that human subjects differentiated hydrogen/deuterium isotopomers (isomers with isotopic atoms) of the musk compound cyclopentadecanone as evidence supporting the theory. Here, we find no evidence for such differentiation at the molecular level. In fact, we find that the human musk-recognizing receptor, OR5AN1, identified using a heterologous OR expression system and robustly responding to cyclopentadecanone and muscone, fails to distinguish isotopomers of these compounds in vitro. Furthermore, the mouse (methylthio)methanethiol (MTMT)-recognizing receptor, MOR244-3, and other selected human and mouse ORs, responded similarly to normal, deuterated, and C isotopomers of their respective ligands, paralleling our results with the musk receptor OR5AN1. These findings suggest that the proposed vibration theory does not apply to the human musk receptor OR5AN1, mouse thiol receptor MOR244-3, or other ORs examined. Also, contrary to the vibration theory predictions, muscone-d?? lacks the 1,380-1,550 cm? IR bands claimed to be essential for musk odor. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis shows that the proposed electron transfer mechanism of the vibrational frequencies of odorants could be easily suppressed by quantum effects of non-odorant molecular vibrational modes. As a result, these and other concerns about electron transfer at ORs, together with our extensive experimental data, argue against the plausibility of the vibration theory.

  2. Low-emission vortex combustion of biomass and fossil fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finker, F.Z.; Kubischkin, I.B.; Akhmedov, D.B.

    1995-11-01

    The article introduces the results of development and industrial experience of low-emission vortex combustion technology (LEVC) of biomass and fossil fuel in industrial and utility boilers in Russian timber and paper industries and Polish power plants. The LEVC technology is based on aerodynamics method of multiple circulation of gases and fuel in the furnaces. LEVC technology accumulates the advantages of conventional and fluidized bed combustion technology. Existing boilers could be easily retrofitted for the application of LEVC technology without requiring major investment. The repowering of boiler with LEVC was the result the reduction NOx emission to the level 170g/GJ without installation additional flue gas cleaning equipment and it gave the opportunity for an injection of sulfur sorbent in the furnace. The authors discussed Russian-Polish experiment on utility boiler retrofitted with the application of LEVC. As the result the efficiency of the boiler increased in 2%. The reduction of the emission is: NOx-40%, SO2-17%.

  3. Dynamics of vortex dipoles in anisotropic Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Roy H.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.

    2015-04-14

    We study the motion of a vortex dipole in a Bose-Einstein condensate confined to an anisotropic trap. We focus on a system of ODEs describing the vortices' motion, which is in turn a reduced model of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation describing the condensate's motion. Using a sequence of canonical changes of variables, we reduce the dimension and simplify the equations of motion. In this study, we uncover two interesting regimes. Near a family of periodic orbits known as guiding centers, we find that the dynamics is essentially that of a pendulum coupled to a linear oscillator, leading to stochastic reversals in the overall direction of rotation of the dipole. Near the separatrix orbit in the isotropic system, we find other families of periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic trajectories. In a neighborhood of the guiding center orbits, we derive an explicit iterated map that simplifies the problem further. Numerical calculations are used to illustrate the phenomena discovered through the analysis. Using the results from the reduced system, we are able to construct complex periodic orbits in the original, PDE, mean-field model for Bose-Einstein condensates, which corroborates the phenomenology observed in the reduced dynamical equations.

  4. Dynamics of vortex dipoles in anisotropic Bose-Einstein condensates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Goodman, Roy H.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.

    2015-04-14

    We study the motion of a vortex dipole in a Bose-Einstein condensate confined to an anisotropic trap. We focus on a system of ODEs describing the vortices' motion, which is in turn a reduced model of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation describing the condensate's motion. Using a sequence of canonical changes of variables, we reduce the dimension and simplify the equations of motion. In this study, we uncover two interesting regimes. Near a family of periodic orbits known as guiding centers, we find that the dynamics is essentially that of a pendulum coupled to a linear oscillator, leading to stochastic reversals inmore » the overall direction of rotation of the dipole. Near the separatrix orbit in the isotropic system, we find other families of periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic trajectories. In a neighborhood of the guiding center orbits, we derive an explicit iterated map that simplifies the problem further. Numerical calculations are used to illustrate the phenomena discovered through the analysis. Using the results from the reduced system, we are able to construct complex periodic orbits in the original, PDE, mean-field model for Bose-Einstein condensates, which corroborates the phenomenology observed in the reduced dynamical equations.« less

  5. Hot vibration durability of ceramic preconverters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locker, R.J.; Schad, M.J.; Sawyer, C.B.

    1995-12-31

    The advent of thermally durable catalyst technologies has created the opportunity to move catalytic converters closer to the engine, providing a potential solution for cold start emissions. Close-coupled positioning exposes the converter to higher exhaust gas temperatures than experienced in underbody applications, permitting earlier catalyst light-off. The proximity of the converter to the engine will result in increased exposure to the vibrational energy created by combustion processes as well as intake and exhaust valve dynamics. This study investigated the thermo-mechanical challenges of mounting a ceramic substrate under severe conditions. In some instances ceramic substrates have been overlooked for application in the more demanding close-coupled environment. It will be shown that ceramic substrates mounted with standard intumescent mats survive under the most severe hot vibration testing conditions in the industry. Hot vibration testing is a very expensive activity. Therefore, testing a statistically significant sample population is not cost effective. Additional testing techniques were employed in this study to quantify hot vibration performance. These tests show promise in predicting hot vibration durability.

  6. Model for characterization of a vortex pair formed by shock passage over a light-gas inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Kubota, T.; Zukoski, E.E.

    1994-01-01

    This work investigates the two-dimensional flow of a shock wave over a circular light-gas inhomogeneity in a channel with finite width. The pressure gradient from the shock wave interacts with the density gradient at the edge of the inhomogeneity to deposit vorticity around the perimeter, and the structure rolls up into a pair of counter-rotating vortices. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the scaling laws for the flow field produced by this interaction at times long after the passage of the shock across the inhomogeneity. Numerical simulations are performed for various initial conditions and the results are used to guide the development of relatively simple algebraic models that characterize the dynamics of the vortex pair, and that allow extrapolation of the numerical results to conditions more nearly of interest in practical situations. The models are not derived directly from the equations of motion but depend on these equations and on intuition guided by the numerical results. Agreement between simulations and models is generally good except for a vortex-spacing model which is less satisfactory. A practical application of this shock-induced vortical flow is rapid and efficient mixing of fuel and oxidizer in a SCRAMJET combustion chamber. One possible injector design uses the interaction of an oblique shock wave with a jet of light fuel to generate vorticity which stirs and mixes the two fluids and lifts the burning jet away from the combustor wall. Marble proposed an analogy between this three-dimensional steady flow and the two-dimensional unsteady problem of the present investigation. Comparison is made between closely corresponding three-dimensional steady and two-dimensional unsteady flows, and a mathematical description of Marble`s analogy is proposed. 17 refs.

  7. Mechanical vibration to electrical energy converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellogg, Rick Allen (Tijeras, NM); Brotz, Jay Kristoffer (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-03

    Electromechanical devices that generate an electrical signal in response to an external source of mechanical vibrations can operate as a sensor of vibrations and as an energy harvester for converting mechanical vibration to electrical energy. The devices incorporate a magnet that is movable through a gap in a ferromagnetic circuit, wherein a coil is wound around a portion of the ferromagnetic circuit. A flexible coupling is used to attach the magnet to a frame for providing alignment of the magnet as it moves or oscillates through the gap in the ferromagnetic circuit. The motion of the magnet can be constrained to occur within a substantially linear range of magnetostatic force that develops due to the motion of the magnet. The devices can have ferromagnetic circuits with multiple arms, an array of magnets having alternating polarity and, encompass micro-electromechanical (MEM) devices.

  8. Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

  9. Transition between vortex rings and MAP solutions for electrically charged magnetic solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Khai-Ming; Soltanian, Amin; Teh, Rosy

    2014-03-05

    We consider the bifurcation and transition of axially symmetric monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and vortex ring solutions in the presence of electric charge for the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs field theory. Here we investigate the properties of MAP/vortex ring solutions with n = 3,? = 0.65, for different Higgs field strength ?. For ? < 4.93, there is only one fundamental branch of vortex ring solution, but at the critical value of ?{sub b} = 4.93, branching happens and 2 sets of new solutions appeared. The new branch with less energy is a full MAP solution while the branch with higher energy contains MAP at the beginning and separation between poles of MAP on the z-axis reduces gradually and at another critical value of ?{sub t} = 14.852, they merge together at z = 0. Beyond this point the solutions change to the vortex ring solutions and a transitions between MAP and vortex ring solutions happens at this branch.

  10. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  11. A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wireless sensor systems (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems Vibration energy harvesting is now receiving more interest as a means for powering intelligent wireless sensor systems. In this paper, a resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (VEH) employing

  12. Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment Methodology | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment Methodology Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment Methodology This appendix provides detailed information on the methodology DOE used to develop the assessment of potential impacts from noise and vibration described in Sections 4.2.8 and 4.3.8 of the Rail Alignment EIS (DOE/EIS-0639D). PDF icon Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment Methodology More Documents & Publications Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for

  13. X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Kasai, S.; Yamada, K.; Ono, T.; Thiaville, A.

    2011-02-11

    Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analysed by high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex core radius was observed, from #24; ~38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

  14. Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, H.; Choi, Y. -S.; Yoo, M. -W.; Im, M. -Y.; Kim, S. -K.

    2010-10-13

    We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency {omega}{sub D} for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that {sigma}=1/{omega}{sub D} and {Delta}t={pi}/2 p/{omega}{sub D} . The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. This work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

  15. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  16. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  17. Evaluation of a vibration source detection scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1992-04-01

    When the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility is commissioned, there will be many potential sources of local ground motion excitation (near-field sources). Some of these may be of sufficient amplitude and at a specific frequency so as to be detrimental to the stability of the storage ring beamline. A sampling of possible sources is as follows: 2500-hp chillers in the utility building; six cooling-tower fans that are powered by 75-hp electric motors; various water circulation pumps; power supplies, controllers, and transformers; and air-handling units and associated fans. To detect equipment that causes excessive ground excitation at a site as large as the APS, it will be necessary to have a validated source detection scheme. When performing low-amplitude vibration testing in and around Building 335 of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we observed a cyclic 8-Hz vibration. The cyclic nature of the signal is apparent in Fig. 1, which represents data measured on the floor at the main level of Building 335 on March 31, 1992. A simple vibration source location scheme, based on triangulation, was evaluated as a means to locate the source of the 8-Hz vibration and is the subject of this technical note. 1 ref.

  18. Optical vibration detection spectral analysis assembly and method for detecting vibration in an object of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, T.C.; Telschow, K.L.

    1998-10-27

    A vibration detection assembly is described which includes an emitter of light which has object and reference beams, the object beam reflected off of a vibrating object of interest; and a photorefractive substance having a given response time and which passes the reflected object beam and the reference beam, the reference beam and the object beam interfering within the photorefractive substance to create a space charge field which develops within the response time of the photorefractive substance. 6 figs.

  19. Optical vibration detection spectral analysis assembly and method for detecting vibration in an object of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Thomas C. (Los Alamos, NM); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A vibration detection assembly is described which includes an emitter of light which has object and reference beams, the object beam reflected off of a vibrating object of interest; and a photorefractive substance having a given response time and which passes the reflected object beam and the reference beam, the reference beam and the object beam interfering within the photorefractive substance to create a space charge field which develops within the response time of the photorefractive substance.

  20. Single-vortex pinning and penetration depth in superconducting NdFeAsO1-xFx

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Kim, Jeehoon; Huefner, Magdalena; Ye, Cun; Kim, Stella; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Auslaender, Ophir M.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2015-10-12

    We use a magnetic force microscope (MFM) to investigate single vortex pinning and penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, one of the highest-Tc iron-based superconductors. In fields up to 20 Gauss, we observe a disordered vortex arrangement, implying that the pinning forces are stronger than the vortex-vortex interactions. We measure the typical force to depin a single vortex, Fdepin ≃ 4.5 pN, corresponding to a critical current up to Jc ≃ 7×105 A/cm2. As a result, our MFM measurements allow the first local and absolute determination of the superconducting in-plane penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, λab = 320 ± 60 nm, which ismore » larger than previous bulk measurements.« less

  1. VORTEX CREEP AGAINST TOROIDAL FLUX LINES, CRUSTAL ENTRAINMENT, AND PULSAR GLITCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ggercino?lu, Erbil; Alpar, M. Ali E-mail: alpar@sabanciuniv.edu

    2014-06-10

    A region of toroidally oriented quantized flux lines must exist in the proton superconductor in the core of the neutron star. This region will be a site of vortex pinning and creep. Entrainment of the neutron superfluid with the crustal lattice leads to a requirement of superfluid moment of inertia associated with vortex creep in excess of the available crustal moment of inertia. This will bring about constraints on the equation of state. The toroidal flux region provides the moment of inertia necessary to complement the crust superfluid with postglitch relaxation behavior fitting the observations.

  2. Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasma (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a plasma Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 12, 2017 Title: Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a plasma Authors: Chai, Kil-Byoung [1] Search SciTech Connect for author "Chai, Kil-Byoung" Search SciTech Connect for ORCID "0000000296339150" Search orcid.org for

  3. Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnetic fields (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme magnetic fields Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Approaching isotropy in the vortex system of SmFeAs(O,F) at extreme magnetic fields Authors: Moll, Philip J.W. [1] ; Zhidadlo, Nikolai D. [1] ; Karpinski, J. [1] ; Batlog, B. [1] ; Balakirev, Fedor F. [2] ; McDonald, Ross David [2] ; Betts, Jonathan B. [2] + Show Author Affiliations ETH Zurich, Switzerland [ETH

  4. Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasma (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a plasma This content will become publicly available on February 12, 2017 Title: Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a plasma Authors: Chai, Kil-Byoung [1] Search DOE PAGES for author "Chai, Kil-Byoung" Search DOE PAGES for ORCID "0000000296339150" Search orcid.org for ORCID "0000000296339150" ; Bellan, Paul M. [1]

  5. CX-011455: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-011454: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-011457: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-011456: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. Performance of improved magnetostrictive vibrational power generator, simple and high power output for practical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Toshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    Vibration based power generation technology is utilized effectively in various fields. Author has invented novel vibrational power generation device using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beam structure consisting of a rod of iron-gallium alloy wound with coil and yoke accompanied with permanent magnet. When bending force is applied on the tip of the device, the magnetization inside the rod varies with induced stress due to the inverse magnetostrictive effect. In vibration, the time variation of the magnetization generates voltage on the wound coil. The magnetostrictive type is advantageous over conventional such using piezoelectric or moving magnet types in high efficiency and high robustness, and low electrical impedance. Here, author has established device configuration, simple, rigid, and high power output endurable for practical applications. In addition, the improved device is lower cost using less volume of Fe-Ga and permanent magnet compared to our conventional, and its assembly by soldering is easy and fast suitable for mass production. Average power of 3 mW/cm{sup 3} under resonant vibration of 212?Hz and 1.2?G was obtained in miniature prototype using Fe-Ga rod of 2 0.5 7?mm{sup 3}. Furthermore, the damping effect was observed, which demonstrates high energy conversion of the generator.

  10. Methods of performing downhole operations using orbital vibrator energy sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Jack H.; Weinberg, David M.; Wilson, Dennis R.

    2004-02-17

    Methods of performing down hole operations in a wellbore. A vibrational source is positioned within a tubular member such that an annulus is formed between the vibrational source and an interior surface of the tubular member. A fluid medium, such as high bulk modulus drilling mud, is disposed within the annulus. The vibrational source forms a fluid coupling with the tubular member through the fluid medium to transfer vibrational energy to the tubular member. The vibrational energy may be used, for example, to free a stuck tubular, consolidate a cement slurry and/or detect voids within a cement slurry prior to the curing thereof.

  11. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polarization. In this experiment, the researchers applied a small (0.1-mT) sinusoidal magnetic field to induce gyrotropic motion in a square Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) sample. The...

  12. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  13. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  14. Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

    2013-06-06

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

  15. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases and phase transitions in condensed matter systems with random pinning. The broader impact of the program includes the training of future generation of neutron scientists, and further development of neutron scattering and complementary techniques for studies of superconducting materials. The graduate and undergraduate students participating in this project will learn the state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques, acquire a wide range of materials research experiences, and participate in the frontier research of superconductivity. This should best prepare the students for future careers in academia, industry, or government.

  16. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-28

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H{sub 2}CS. It covers 41?809 rovibrational levels for states up to J{sub max} = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm{sup ?1} and provides the energies and line intensities for 547?926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  17. Couplings between dipole and quadrupole vibrations in tin isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simenel, C.; Chomaz, Ph.

    2009-12-15

    We study the couplings between collective vibrations such as the isovector giant dipole and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in tin isotopes in the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a Skyrme energy density functional. These couplings are a source of anharmonicity in the multiphonon spectrum. In particular, the residual interaction is known to couple the isovector giant dipole resonance with the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance built on top of it, inducing a nonlinear evolution of the quadrupole moment after a dipole boost. This coupling also affects the dipole motion in a nucleus with a static or dynamical deformation induced by a quadrupole constraint or boost, respectively. Three methods associated with these different manifestations of the coupling are proposed to extract the corresponding matrix elements of the residual interaction. Numerical applications of the different methods to {sup 132}Sn are in good agreement with each other. Finally, several tin isotopes are considered to investigate the role of isospin and mass number on this coupling. A simple 1/A dependence of the residual matrix elements is found with no noticeable contribution from the isospin. This result is interpreted within the Goldhaber-Teller model.

  18. Nightmare from which you will never awake: Electronic to vibrational spectra!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Silva, Nuwon

    2013-05-15

    The theoretical background of ab initio methods and density functional theory is provided. The anharmonicity associated with weakly bound metal cation dihydrogen complexes is examined using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method and the interaction between a hydrogen molecule and a metal cation is characterized. A study of molecular hydrogen clustering around the lithium cation and their accompanied vibrational anharmonicity employing VSCF is illustrated. A qualitative interpretation is provided of solvent-induced shifts of amides and simulated electronic absorption spectra using the combined time-dependent density functional theory/effective fragment potential method (TDDFT/EFP). An excited-state solvent assisted quadruple hydrogen atom transfer reaction of a coumarin derivative is elucidated using micro solvated quantum mechanical (QM) water and macro solvated EFP water. A dispersion correction to the QM-EFP1 interaction energy is presented.

  19. Alfven seismic vibrations of crustal solid-state plasma in quaking paramagnetic neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastrukov, S.; Xu, R.-X.; Molodtsova, I.; Takata, J.; Chang, H.-K.

    2010-11-15

    Magneto-solid-mechanical model of two-component, core-crust, paramagnetic neutron star responding to quake-induced perturbation by differentially rotational, torsional, oscillations of crustal electron-nuclear solid-state plasma about axis of magnetic field frozen in the immobile paramagnetic core is developed. Particular attention is given to the node-free torsional crust-against-core vibrations under combined action of Lorentz magnetic and Hooke's elastic forces; the damping is attributed to Newtonian force of shear viscose stresses in crustal solid-state plasma. The spectral formulas for the frequency and lifetime of this toroidal mode are derived in analytic form and discussed in the context of quasiperiodic oscillations of the x-ray outburst flux from quaking magnetars. The application of obtained theoretical spectra to modal analysis of available data on frequencies of oscillating outburst emission suggests that detected variability is the manifestation of crustal Alfven's seismic vibrations restored by Lorentz force of magnetic field stresses.

  20. Communication: The influence of vibrational parity in chiral photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powis, Ivan

    2014-03-21

    A pronounced vibrational state dependence of photoelectron angular distributions observed in chiral photoionization experiments is explored using a simple, yet realistic, theoretical model based upon the transiently chiral molecule H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The adiabatic approximation is used to separate vibrational and electronic wavefunctions. The full ionization matrix elements are obtained as an average of the electronic dipole matrix elements over the vibrational coordinate, weighted by the product of neutral and ion state vibrational wavefunctions. It is found that the parity of the vibrational Hermite polynomials influences not just the amplitude, but also the phase of the transition matrix elements, and the latter is sufficient, even in the absence of resonant enhancements, to account for enhanced vibrational dependencies in the chiral photoionization dynamics.

  1. A two-dimensional broadband vibration energy harvester using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnetoelectric transducer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A two-dimensional broadband vibration energy harvester using magnetoelectric transducer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A two-dimensional broadband vibration energy harvester using magnetoelectric transducer In this study, a magnetoelectric vibration energy harvester was demonstrated, which aims at addressing the limitations of the existing approaches in single dimensional operation with narrow working bandwidth. A

  2. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  3. The equilibrium vortex melting transition in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.K.; Fendrich, J.A.; Veal, B.W.

    1996-10-01

    The dynamic and thermodynamic experimental evidence supporting first order vortex melting in clean crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} is reviewed.

  4. Memory-bit selection and recording by rotating fields in vortex-core cross-point architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. -S.; Jung, H.; Lee, K. -S.; Fischer, P.; Kim, S. -K.

    2010-10-21

    In one of our earlier studies [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 022509 (2008)], we proposed a concept of robust information storage, recording and readout, which can be implementaed in nonvolatile magnetic random-access memories and is based on the energetically degenerated twofold ground states of vortex-core magnetizations. In the present study, we experimentally demonstrate reliable memory-bit selection and information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture, specifically using a two-by-two vortex-state disk array. In order to efficiently switch a vortex core positioned at the intersection of crossed electrodes, two orthogonal addressing electrodes are selected, and then two Gaussian pulse currents of optimal pulse width and time delay are applied. Such tailored pulse-type rotating magnetic fields which occurs only at the selected intersection is prerequisite for a reliable memory-bit selection and low-power-consumption recording of information in the existing cross-point architecture.

  5. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  6. Theoretical investigation of the vibrational properties of BeH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculated vibrational density of states revealed the origin of the observed major ... DENSITY; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; NEUTRONS; ORIGIN; SCATTERING; SPACE GROUPS Word Cloud More ...

  7. IN OTHER CATEGORIES; MACHINERY; MASS BALANCE; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    world Bracher, B. 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; MACHINERY; MASS BALANCE; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; MAINTENANCE; REPAIR Field balancing can achieve significant...

  8. A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    double cantilever to convert low-frequency vibration energy into electrical energy is presented. The VEH is made up of two cantilever beams, a coil, and magnetic circuits. ...

  9. A two-dimensional broadband vibration energy harvester using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A circular cross-section cantilever rod, not a conventional thin cantilever beam, was adopted to extract vibration energy in arbitrary in-plane motion directions. The magnetic ...

  10. Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on October 7, 2016 Title: Lattice Vibrations ... become publicly available on October 7, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1103...

  11. System for damping vibrations in a turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts III, Herbert Chidsey; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-11-24

    A system for damping vibrations in a turbine includes a first rotating blade having a first ceramic airfoil, a first ceramic platform connected to the first ceramic airfoil, and a first root connected to the first ceramic platform. A second rotating blade adjacent to the first rotating blade includes a second ceramic airfoil, a second ceramic platform connected to the second ceramic airfoil, and a second root connected to the second ceramic platform. A non-metallic platform damper has a first position in simultaneous contact with the first and second ceramic platforms.

  12. A new reversal mode in exchange coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic disks: distorted viscous vortex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Ye, Li; Varea, Aïda; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; del Valle, Nuria; Navau, Carles; López-Barbera, José Francisco; Buchanan, Kristen S.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sánchez, Alvar; Sort, Jordi; Liu, Kai; Nogués, Josep

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic vortices have generated intense interest in recent years due to their unique reversal mechanisms, fascinating topological properties, and exciting potential applications. In addition, the exchange coupling of magnetic vortices to antiferromagnets has also been shown to lead to a range of novel phenomena and functionalities. Here we report a new magnetization reversal mode of magnetic vortices in exchange coupled Ir20Mn80/Fe20Ni80 microdots: distorted viscous vortex reversal. In contrast to the previously known or proposed reversal modes, the vortex is distorted close to the interface and viscously dragged due to the uncompensated spins of a thin antiferromagnet, which leads to unexpected asymmetries in the annihilation and nucleation fields. These results provide a deeper understanding of the physics of exchange coupled vortices and may also have important implications for applications involving exchange coupled nanostructures.

  13. Laws of convective vortex formation behind a flame front during its propagation in a tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrukov, S.A.; Samsonov, V.P.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines laws and conditions of convective vortex formation in combustion products during the propagation of a slow, stable flame in a vertical, half-open tube. The main element of the experimental unit was the reaction tube and weightless conditions were created in a freely falling container holding the reaction tube. Propane-air and CO-air mixtures were used. The structure of the flow behind the flame front was studied by the interferometric method. Frames are show from an interference film illustrating the typical pattern of vortex formation behind the flame front when the flame propagates upward at a velocity of 7 cm/sec. Analyses of the interferograms shows that the flame is stable before the vortices appear and that the flow of combustion products is laminar.

  14. Compensated vibrating optical fiber pressure measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Goff, David R. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1987-01-01

    A microbending optical fiber is attached under tension to a diaphragm to se a differential pressure applied across the diaphragm which it causes it to deflect. The fiber is attached to the diaphragm so that one portion of the fiber, attached to a central portion of the diaphragm, undergoes a change in tension; proportional to the differential pressure applied to the diaphragm while a second portion attached at the periphery of the diaphragm remains at a reference tension. Both portions of the fiber are caused to vibrate at their natural frequencies. Light transmitted through the fiber is attenuated by both portions of the tensioned sections of the fiber by an amount which increases with the curvature of fiber bending so that the light signal is modulated by both portions of the fiber at separate frequencies. The modulated light signal is transduced into a electrical signal. The separate modulation signals are detected to generate separate signals having frequencies corresponding to the reference and measuring vibrating sections of the continuous fiber, respectively. A signal proportional to the difference between these signals is generated which is indicative of the measured pressure differential across the diaphragm. The reference portion of the fiber is used to compensate the pressure signal for zero and span changes resulting from ambient temperature and humidity effects upon the fiber and the transducer fixture.

  15. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, L.; Li, F.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H{sub 2}O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Frster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  16. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  17. Vibration Budget for SuperB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsche, K; Wittmer, W.; Bolzon, B.; Brunetti, L.; Jeremie, A.; Esposito, M.; Tomassini, S.; /Frascati

    2011-04-05

    We present a vibration budget for the SuperB accelerator. We include ground motion data, motion sensitivity of machine components, and beam feedback system requirements. The SuperB accelerator design attains at least 50 times higher than current B-factories due to smaller beam sizes and a crabbed waist crossing angle scheme at the IP (interaction point). The beam size (1{sigma}) at the IP will be about 10 {micro}m (horizontal) by 40 nm (vertical). These small beam sizes will make the luminosity very sensitive to mechanical vibration and electrical noise. Relative vertical misalignment of the two beams at the IP by only 8 nm will result in a 1% reduction in luminosity. The corresponding horizontal alignment tolerance of is 250x looser (2 {micro}m). The vertical beam angle at the IP for a 1% luminosity loss is fairly loose at 200 {micro}rad, and the horizontal beam angle tolerance is looser still. We will focus on vertical beam position at the IP, since this presents the greatest alignment challenge. The values presented here are for a closed orbit with tunes near a half-integer in the SuperB v.12 lattice.

  18. Magnetic vortex crystal formation in the antidot complement of square artificial spin ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, C. I. L. de Silva, R. C.; Ribeiro, I. R. B.; Nascimento, F. S.; Felix, J. F.; Ferreira, S. O.; Moura-Melo, W. A.; Pereira, A. R.; Ml, L. A. S.

    2014-03-03

    We have studied ferromagnetic nickel thin films patterned with square lattices of elongated antidots that are negative analogues of square artificial spin ice. Micromagnetic simulations and direct current magnetic moment measurements reveal in-plane anisotropy of the magnetic hysteresis loops, and the formation of a dense array of magnetic vortices with random polarization and chirality. These multiply-connected antidot arrays could be superior to lattices of disconnected nanodisks for investigations of vortex switching by applied electric current.

  19. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hale, Thomas C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  20. Comment on General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hietala, Niklas Hnninen, Risto

    2014-11-15

    Van Gorder considers a formulation of the local induction approximation, which allows the vortex to move in the direction of the reference axis [General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation, Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]. However, in his analytical and numerical study he does not use it. A mistake in the torsion of a helical vortex is also corrected.

  1. Adaptive vibration control using synchronous demodulation with machine tool controller motor commutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, David James

    2008-05-13

    A control system and method for actively reducing vibration in a spindle housing caused by unbalance forces on a rotating spindle, by measuring the force-induced spindle-housing motion, determining control signals based on synchronous demodulation, and provide compensation for the measured displacement to cancel or otherwise reduce or attenuate the vibration. In particular, the synchronous demodulation technique is performed to recover a measured spindle housing displacement signal related only to the rotation of a machine tool spindle, and consequently rejects measured displacement not related to spindle motion or synchronous to a cycle of revolution. Furthermore, the controller actuates at least one voice-coil (VC) motor, to cancel the original force-induced motion, and adapts the magnitude of voice coil signal until this measured displacement signal is brought to a null. In order to adjust the signal to a null, it must have the correct phase relative to the spindle angle. The feedback phase signal is used to adjust a common (to both outputs) commutation offset register (offset relative to spindle encoder angle) to force the feedback phase signal output to a null. Once both of these feedback signals are null, the system is compensating properly for the spindle-induced motion.

  2. 2010 GRC VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 6, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks Pate

    2010-08-06

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, and medicine. The theory of molecular vibrational motion and its connection to spectroscopic signatures and chemical reaction dynamics is the third major theme of the meeting. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules and nanomaterials.

  3. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosch, Sebastian E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca; Ashgriz, Nasser E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca

    2015-04-15

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  4. Reusable vibration resistant integrated circuit mounting socket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Craig N. (Irwin, PA)

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a novel form of socket for integrated circuits to be mounted on printed circuit boards. The socket uses a novel contact which is fabricated out of a bimetallic strip with a shape which makes the end of the strip move laterally as temperature changes. The end of the strip forms a barb which digs into an integrated circuit lead at normal temperatures and holds it firmly in the contact, preventing loosening and open circuits from vibration. By cooling the contact containing the bimetallic strip the barb end can be made to release so that the integrated circuit lead can be removed from the socket without damage either to the lead or to the socket components.

  5. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner, Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  6. Vibration control for precision manufacturing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnerichs, T.; Martinez, D.

    1995-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performs R and D in structural dynamics and vibration suppression for precision applications in weapon systems, space, underwater, transportation and civil structures. Over the last decade these efforts have expanded into the areas of active vibration control and ``smart`` structures and material systems. In addition, Sandia has focused major resources towards technology to support weapon product development and agile manufacturing capability for defense and industrial applications. This paper will briefly describe the structural dynamics modeling and verification process currently in place at Sandia that supports vibration control and some specific applications of these techniques to manufacturing in the areas of lithography, machine tools and flexible robotics.

  7. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string using a magnetorheological damper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Houston, TX); Burgess, Daniel E. (Portland, CT); Barbely, Jason R. (East Islip, NY)

    2012-01-03

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a magnetorheological fluid valve assembly having a supply of a magnetorheological fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil for inducing a magnetic field that alters the resistance of the magnetorheological fluid to flow between the first and second chambers, thereby increasing the damping provided by the valve. A remnant magnetic field is induced in one or more components of the magnetorheological fluid valve during operation that can be used to provide the magnetic field for operating the valve so as to eliminate the need to energize the coils during operation except temporarily when changing the amount of damping required, thereby eliminating the need for a turbine alternator power the magnetorheological fluid valve. A demagnetization cycle can be used to reduce the remnant magnetic field when necessary.

  8. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  9. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA); Mauger, Joseph (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Eric H. (Mountain View, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  10. Vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen near Herschel 36

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachford, Brian L. [Department of Physics, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 3700 Willow Creek Road, Prescott, AZ 86301-3720 (United States); Snow, Theodore P. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Ross, Teresa L., E-mail: rachf7ac@erau.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We present the first high resolution UV spectra toward Herschel 36, a Trapezium-like system of high-mass stars contained within the Lagoon Nebula (M8, NGC 6523). The spectra reveal extreme rovibrational excitation of molecular hydrogen in material at a single velocity or very small range of velocities, with this component presumably lying near the star system and undergoing fluorescent excitation. The overall H{sub 2} excitation is similar to, but apparently larger than, that seen toward HD 37903 which previously showed the largest vibrationally excited H{sub 2} column densities seen in UV absorption spectra. While the velocities of the highly excited H{sub 2} lines are consistent within each observation, it appears that they underwent a ?60 km s{sup 1} redshift during the 3.6 yr between observations. In neither case does the velocity of the highly excited material match the velocity of the bulk of the line-of-sight material which appears to mostly be in the foreground of M8. Recent work shows unusually excited CH and CH{sup +} lines and several unusually broad diffuse interstellar bands toward Herschel 36. Along with the H{sub 2} excitation, all of these findings appear to be related to the extreme environment within ?0.1 pc of the massive young stellar system.

  11. Vibration Model Validation for Linear Collider Detector Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsche, Kirk; Amann, J.W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Oriunno, M.; Weidemann, A.; White, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    The ILC and CLIC reference designs incorporate reinforced-concrete platforms underneath the detectors so that the two detectors can each be moved onto and off of the beamline in a Push-Pull configuration. These platforms could potentially amplify ground vibrations, which would reduce luminosity. In this paper we compare vibration models to experimental data on reinforced concrete structures, estimate the impact on luminosity, and summarize implications for the design of a reinforced concrete platform for the ILC or CLIC detectors.

  12. Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. No abstract prepared. Authors: Nelson, Thomas Robert ; Urayama, Junji

  13. Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Accepted Manuscript: Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy This content will become publicly available on October 7, 2016 Title: Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy Magnetocaloric (MC) materials present an avenue for chemical-free, solid state refrigeration through cooling via adiabatic demagnetization. We have used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the lattice dynamics in the MC material

  14. Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report. A few of the many applications for nanowires are

  15. Single-vortex pinning and penetration depth in superconducting NdFeAsO1-xFx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Kim, Jeehoon; Huefner, Magdalena; Ye, Cun; Kim, Stella; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Auslaender, Ophir M.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2015-10-12

    We use a magnetic force microscope (MFM) to investigate single vortex pinning and penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, one of the highest-Tc iron-based superconductors. In fields up to 20 Gauss, we observe a disordered vortex arrangement, implying that the pinning forces are stronger than the vortex-vortex interactions. We measure the typical force to depin a single vortex, Fdepin ? 4.5 pN, corresponding to a critical current up to Jc ? 7105 A/cm2. As a result, our MFM measurements allow the first local and absolute determination of the superconducting in-plane penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, ?ab = 320 60 nm, which is larger than previous bulk measurements.

  16. Critical current density and mechanism of vortex pinning in KxFe2-ySe₂ doped with S

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2011-08-15

    We report the critical current density Jc in KxFe2-ySe2-zSz crystals. The Jc can be enhanced significantly with optimal S doping (z=0.99). For K0.70(7)Fe1.55(7)Se1.01(2)S0.99(2), the weak fishtail effect is found for H II c. The normalized vortex pinning forces follow the scaling law with a maximum position at 0.41 of the reduced magnetic field. These results demonstrate that the small size normal point defects dominate the vortex pinning mechanism.

  17. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCluskey, M D

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  18. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and laptop'' computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components.

  19. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. |

    1991-12-31

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and ``laptop`` computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components.

  20. Settling of loose-fill insulations due to vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.; Wright, J.W.

    1981-12-01

    Vibration and impact testing of loose-fill cellulosic, fiberglass, and rock wool insulations has been carried out to provide a data base for settled density tests. The ratio of final density to initial density for the three materials has been determined for repeated 19-mm (0.75-in.) drops, repeated 152-mm (6.0-in.) drops, and vibrations at frequencies from 10 to 60 Hz with displacements from 0.1 mm (0.004 in.) to 6.35 mm (0.25 in.). Repeated 19-mm or 152-mm drops increased the density ratio for rock wool insulation specimens the most, while the cellulosic insulation specimens were affected the least. Density ratios after 200 19-mm drops averaged 1.75 for loose-fill rock wool, 1.45 for loose-fill fiberglass, and 1.27 for loose-fill cellulosic insulations. Vibration tests for 7200 s at 0.1-mm displacement and 15 Hertz produced negligible changes in the densities of all three loose-fill insulations. An 1800-s vibration test at 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) and 10 Hz resulted in average density ratios of 1.05, 1.11, and 1.18 for specimens of loose-fill cellulosic, rock wool, and fiberglass insulations, respectively. Changes in either frequency of vibration, displacement, or test duration can be used to achieve a wide range of laboratory results. Efforts to correlate laboratory results with in situ density measurements are presented.

  1. Settling of loose-fill insulations due to vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Wright, J.H.; McElroy, D.L.; Scanlan, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    Vibration and impact testing of loose-fill cellulosic, fiberglass, and rock wool insulations has been carried out to provide a data base for settled density tests. The ratio of final density to initial density for the three materials has been determined for repeated 19-mm (0.75-in.) drops, repeated 152-mm (6.0-in.) drops, and vibrations at frequencies from 10 to 60 Hz with displacements from 0.1 mm (0.004 in.) to 6.35 mm (0.25 in.). Repeated 19-mm or 152-mm drops increased the density ratio for rock wool insulation specimens the most, while the cellulosic insulation specimens were affected the least. Density ratios after 200 19-mm drops averaged 1.75 for loose-fill rock wool, 1.45 for loose-fill fiberglass, and 1.27 for loose-fill cellulosic insulations. Vibration tests for 7200 s at 0.1-mm displacement and 15 Hertz produced negligible changes in the densities of all three loose-fill insulations. An 1800-s vibration test at 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) and 10 Hz resulted in average density ratios of 1.05, 1.11, and 1.18 for specimens of loose-fill cellulosic, rock wool, and fiberglass insulations, respectively. Changes in either frequency of vibration, displacement, or test duration can be used to achieve a wide range of laboratory results. Efforts to correlate laboratory results with in situ density measurements are presented.

  2. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  3. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, Ralph (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  4. Analytic treatment of vortex states in cylindrical superconductors in applied axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludu, A.; Van Deun, J.; Cuyt, A.; Milosevic, M. V.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-08-15

    We solve the linear Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation in the presence of a uniform magnetic field with cylindrical symmetry and we find analytic expressions for the eigenfunctions in terms of the confluent hypergeometric functions. The discrete spectrum results from an implicit equation associated to the boundary conditions and it is resolved in analytic form using the continued fractions formalism. We study the dependence of the spectrum and the eigenfunctions on the sample size and the surface conditions for solid and hollow cylindrical superconductors. Finally, the solutions of the nonlinear GL formalism are constructed as expansions in the linear GL eigenfunction basis and selected by minimization of the free energy. We present examples of vortex states and their energies for different samples in enhancing/suppressing superconductivity surroundings.

  5. Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn₅ with H⊥c

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; et al

    2012-02-23

    We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn₅ with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, Γ=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition,more »an increased disordering of the VL is observed.« less

  6. Vortex precession frequency and its amplitude-dependent shift in cylindrical nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metlov, Konstantin L.

    2013-12-14

    Frequency of free magnetic vortex precession in circular soft ferromagnetic nano-cylinders (magnetic dots) of various sizes is an important parameter, used in design of spintronic devices (such as spin-torque microwave nano-oscillators) and characterization of magnetic nanostructures. Here, using a recently developed collective-variable approach to non-linear dynamics of magnetic textures in planar nano-magnets, this frequency and its amplitude-dependent shift are computed analytically and plotted for the full range of cylinder geometries. The frequency shift is positive in large planar dots, but becomes negative in smaller and more elongated ones. At certain dot dimensions, a zero frequency shift is realized, which can be important for enhancing frequency stability of magnetic nano-oscillators.

  7. Method for the detection of a magnetic field utilizing a magnetic vortex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Buchanan, Kristen (Batavia, IL)

    2010-04-13

    The determination of the strength of an in-plane magnetic field utilizing one or more magnetically-soft, ferromagnetic member, having a shape, size and material whereas a single magnetic vortex is formed at remanence in each ferromagnetic member. The preferred shape is a thin circle, or dot. Multiple ferromagnetic members can also be stacked on-top of each other and separated by a non-magnetic spacer. The resulting sensor is hysteresis free. The sensor's sensitivity, and magnetic saturation characteristics may be easily tuned by simply altering the material, size, shape, or a combination thereof to match the desired sensitivity and saturation characteristics. The sensor is self-resetting at remanence and therefore does not require any pinning techniques.

  8. Alternative method to control radiative vortex forces in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiersnowski, K.; Kawalec, T.; Dohnalik, T.

    2006-06-15

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of controlling the atomic spatial distributions in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). With a diaphragm we can vary the waist and power of one of the cooling laser beams and we can change parameters of large-diameter, parallelogram-shaped atomic orbits. We show that the radiative force generated by the repumping MOT laser has to be taken into consideration. Computer simulations of atomic trajectories explain the observed spatial structures, and we employ these simulations to present potential applications of controlling the diaphragm diameter as a function of time. A potential use of controlled vortex forces seems to have a great significance in recently presented important new methods to investigate cold atom collisions in the MOT, which were recently published.

  9. Simulations of vibrational relaxation in dense molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holian, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    In the understanding of high-temperatre and -pressure chemistry in explosives, first step is the study of the transfer of energy from translational degrees of freedom into internal vibrations of the molecules. We present new methods using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) for measuring vibrational relaxation in a diatomic fluid, where we expect a classical treatment of many-body collisions to be relevant because of the high densities (2 to 3 times compressed compared to the normal fluid) and high temperatures (2000 to 4000 K) involved behind detonation waves. NEMD techniques are discussed, including their limitations, and qualitative results presented.

  10. Calculated vibrational states of ozone up to dissociation (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Calculated vibrational states of ozone up to dissociation Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 17, 2017 Title: Calculated vibrational states of ozone up to dissociation Authors: Ndengué, Steve [1] ; Dawes, Richard [1] ; Wang, Xiao-Gang [2] ; Carrington, Jr., Tucker [2] Search SciTech Connect for author "Carrington, Jr., Tucker" Search SciTech Connect for ORCID "0000000252002353" Search orcid.org for

  11. Resonant Inelastic Scattering Spectra of Free Molecules with Vibrational Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennies, Franz; Pietzsch, Annette; Berglund, Martin; Foehlisch, Alexander; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir; Karlsson, Hans O.; Andersson, Joakim; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2010-05-14

    Inelastic x-ray scattering spectra excited at the 1s{sup -1{pi}}* resonance of gas phase O{sub 2} have been recorded with an overall energy resolution that allows for well-resolved vibrational progressions. The nuclear wave packet dynamics in the intermediate state is reflected in vibrational excitations of the electronic ground state, and by fine-tuning the excitation energy the dissociation dynamics in the predissociative B{sup '} {sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} final state is controlled.

  12. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E.; Perry, Carl Allison

    2012-08-14

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  13. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E.; Perry, Carl Allison

    2011-08-16

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  14. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E; Perry, Carl Allison

    2014-03-04

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  15. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E.; Perry, Carl Allison

    2008-05-27

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  16. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E.; Perry, Carl Allison

    2007-05-22

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  17. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E; Perry, Carl Allison

    2015-02-03

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  18. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    generator (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator To scavenge energy from ambient vibrations with arbitrary in-plane motion directions and over a wide frequency range, a novel electromagnetic vibration energy harvester is designed and optimized. In the harvester, a circular cross-section

  19. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kloucek, Petr (Houston, TX); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Oakland, CA)

    2009-03-24

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  20. Fluid-thermoacoustic vibration of a gas turbine recuperator tubular heat exchanger system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisinger, F.L. )

    1994-07-01

    Low-frequency acoustic vibration of a vertical gas turbine recuperator during cold start-up is described. The vibration was identified as fluid-thermoacoustic instability driven by a modified Sondhauss tube-like thermoacoustic phenomenon. The problem and its underlying theoretical basis are described. A design guideline for prevention of instability and alternative solutions for the elimination of the vibration are given.

  1. Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

  2. Reconstruction of the constituent distribution and trends in the Antarctic polar vortex from ER-2 flight observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Lait, L.R. ); Newman, P.A.; Martin, R.L. ); Proffitt, M.H. ); Hartmann, D.L. ); Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.; Strahan, S.E.; Chan, K.R. ); Anderson, J. ); Gary, B. )

    1989-11-30

    Ozone, chlorine monoxide, and nitrous oxide concentrations have been measured in the south polar region. These measurements have been analyzed using conservative coordinate transformations to potential temperature-N{sub 2}O and potential temperature-potential vorticity space. The latter transformation is equivalent to interpreting trace species observations within the modified Lagrangian mean (MLM) coordinate system. The analysis shows that the MLM transformed ozone concentration decreases at about 0.06 ppmv (parts per million by volume) per day between 20 and 16 km altitude inside the polar vortex during the mid-August to mid-September period. These ozone changes must be chemical in origin; they are also collocated with the region of high CIO. Outside the CPR (chemically perturbed region) at the highest aircraft altitudes, ozone systematically increases, suggesting a diabatic cooling of the order of 0.3-0.6 K/d. Within the CPR the cooling rate appears to be less than 0.2 K/d. The MLM analysis technique creates a picture of the general chemical structure of the Austral polar vortex which shows that air deep within the chemically perturbed region has subsided substantially in relation to the air outside. However, there is also a tongue of high ozone air which extends from mid-latitudes downward along the stratospheric jet at 65{degree}W and 60{degree}S. An examination of the last three flight days, September 20-22, 1987, shows that during this period the polar vortex shifts systematically equatorward along the Antarctic Peninsula. Apparent changes in the constituents measured over this period result from sampling air progressively further into the vortex.

  3. Flame-vortex interaction driven combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altay, H. Murat; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-05-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-hydrogen mixtures are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We systematically vary the equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and fuel composition to determine the stability map of the combustor. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio entering the flame is temporally and spatially uniform, and the combustion dynamics are governed only by flame-vortex interactions. Four distinct dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. At high but lean equivalence ratios, the flame is unstable and oscillates strongly as it is wrapped around the large unsteady wake vortex. At intermediate equivalence ratios, weakly oscillating quasi-stable flames are observed. Near the lean blowout limit, long stable flames extending from the corner of the step are formed. At atmospheric inlet temperature, the unstable mode resonates at the 1/4 wavemode of the combustor. As the inlet temperature is increased, the 5/4 wavemode of the combustor is excited at high but lean equivalence ratios, forming the high-frequency unstable flames. Higher hydrogen concentration in the fuel and higher inlet temperatures reduce the equivalence ratios at which the transitions between regimes are observed. We plot combustion dynamics maps or the response curves, that is the overall sound pressure level as a function of the equivalence ratio, for different operating conditions. We demonstrate that numerical results of strained premixed flames can be used to collapse the response curves describing the transitions among the dynamic modes onto a function of the heat release rate parameter alone, rather than a function dependent on the equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and fuel composition separately. We formulate a theory for predicting the critical values of the heat release parameter at which quasi-stable to unstable and unstable to high-frequency unstable modes take place. (author)

  4. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Elkassabgi, Yousri M.; De Leon, Gerardo I.; Fetterly, Caitlin N.; Ramos, Jorge A.; Cunningham, Richard Burns

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental results show similar trends as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results presented in this report; however, some differences exist that will need to be assessed in future studies. The results of this testing will be used to improve the diode design to be tested in the liquid salt loop system.

  5. Investigation of vortex generators for augmentation of wind turbine power performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, D.A. [Lynette (R.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This study focuses on the use of vortex generators (VGs) for performance augmentation of the stall-regulated AWT-26 wind turbine. The goal was to design a VG array which would increase annual energy production (AEP) by increasing power output at moderate wind speeds, without adversely affecting the loads or stall-regulation performance of the turbine. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at the University of Washington to evaluate the effect of VGs on the AWT-26 blade, which is lofted from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) S-series airfoils. Based on wind-tunnel results and analysis, a VG array was designed and then tested on the AWT-26 prototype, designated P1. Performance and loads data were measured for P1, both with and without VGs installed. the turbine performance with VGs met most of the design requirements; power output was increased at moderate wind speeds with a negligible effect on peak power. However, VG drag penalties caused a loss in power output for low wind speeds, such that performance with VGs resulted in a net decrease in AEP for sites having annual average wind speeds up to 8.5 m/s. While the present work did not lead to improved AEP for the AWT-2 turbine, it does provide insight into performance augmentation of wind turbines with VGs. The safe design of a VG array for a stall-regulated turbine has been demonstrated, and several issues involving optimal performance with VGs have been identified and addressed. 15 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. vibration environment Segalman, D.J.; Fulcher, C.W.G.; Reese...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; CALCULATION METHODS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FOURIER ANALYSIS An efficient method is presented for calculation of RMS von Mises stresses...

  7. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower symmetry Authors: Feng, Yanqing ; Zhou, Wei ; Wang, Yaojia ; Zhou, Jian ; Liu, Erfu ; Fu, Yajun ; Ni, ...

  8. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Farhang Ostadan Nan Deng Lisa Anderson Bechtel National, Inc. USDOE NPH Workshop October 2014

  9. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  10. Comment on Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hietala, Niklas Hnninen, Risto

    2014-01-15

    We comment on the paper by Van Gorder [Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation, Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)]. We point out that the flow of the normal fluid component parallel to the vortex will often lead into the DonnellyGlaberson instability, which will cause the amplification of the Kelvin wave. We explain why the comparison to local nonlinear equation is unreasonable, and remark that neglecting the motion in the x-direction is not reasonable for a Kelvin wave with an arbitrary wavelength and amplitude. The correct equations in the general case are also derived.

  11. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  12. Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) tested two identical gearboxes. One was tested on the NWTCs 2.5 MW dynamometer and the other was field tested in a turbine in a nearby wind plant. In the field, the test gearbox experienced two oil loss events that resulted in damage to its internal bearings and gears. Since the damage was not severe, the test gearbox was removed from the field and retested in the NWTCs dynamometer before it was disassembled. During the dynamometer retest, some vibration data along with testing condition information were collected. These data enabled NREL to launch a Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin project, as described in this report. The main objective of this project was to evaluate different vibration analysis algorithms used in wind turbine condition monitoring (CM) and find out whether the typical practices are effective. With involvement of both academic researchers and industrial partners, the project sets an example on providing cutting edge research results back to industry.

  13. Combined passive magnetic bearing element and vibration damper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium and dampen transversely directed vibrations. Mechanical stabilizers are provided to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. In a improvement over U.S. Pat. No. 5,495,221, a magnetic bearing element is combined with a vibration damping element to provide a single upper stationary dual-function element. The magnetic forces exerted by such an element, enhances levitation of the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations, and suppresses the effects of unbalance or inhibits the onset of whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. Concurrently, this equilibrium is made stable against displacement-dependent drag forces of the rotating object from its equilibrium position.

  14. Quantifying uncertainty in material damage from vibrational data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, T.; Huhtala, A.; Juntunen, M.

    2015-02-15

    The response of a vibrating beam to a force depends on many physical parameters including those determined by material properties. Damage caused by fatigue or cracks results in local reductions in stiffness parameters and may drastically alter the response of the beam. Data obtained from the vibrating beam are often subject to uncertainties and/or errors typically modeled using probability densities. The goal of this paper is to estimate and quantify the uncertainty in damage modeled as a local reduction in stiffness using uncertain data. We present various frameworks and methods for solving this parameter determination problem. We also describe a mathematical analysis to determine and compute useful output data for each method. We apply the various methods in a specified sequence that allows us to interface the various inputs and outputs of these methods in order to enhance the inferences drawn from the numerical results obtained from each method. Numerical results are presented using both simulated and experimentally obtained data from physically damaged beams.

  15. A survey on application of representation theory to molecular vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakasa, Yohenry E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id

    2014-03-24

    Representations Theory is used extensively in many of the physical sciences as every physical system has a symmetry group G. Various differential equations determine the vibration of a molecule, and the symmetry group of the molecule acts on the space of solutions of these equations. In this paper we use CH{sub 4} (methane) molecule, which has four hydrogen atoms at the corners of a regular tetrahedron, and a carbon atom at the center of the tetrahedron. The four hydrogen atoms in CH{sub 4} are permuted by the action of the symmetry group and this action fixes the carbon atom. At each of the 5 vertices, we assign three unit vectors, called the standard basis vectors in directions of the three edges which are joined to the vertex. The symmetry group G of the molecules permutes the 15 standard basis vectors, so we may regard Q{sup 15} as a GG By expressing Q{sup 15} as a direct sum of irreducible GG-modules, the problem of finding the normal modes of vibration is reduced to that of computing the eigenvectors of some small matrices.

  16. Testing in a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2004-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  17. Response to Comment on General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-15

    In R. A. Van Gorder, General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation, Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, Comment on General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  18. USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

    2014-09-29

    The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a casks internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

  19. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7?kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  20. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2011-10-20

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper.A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.

  1. Modification of vortex dynamics and transport properties of transitional axisymmetric jets using zero-net-mass-flux actuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    nder, Asim; Meyers, Johan

    2014-07-15

    We study the near field of a zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) actuated round jet using direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number of the jet Re{sub D} = 2000 and three ZNMF actuators are used, evenly distributed over a circle, and directed towards the main jet. The actuators are triggered in phase, and have a relatively low momentum coefficient of C{sub ?} = 0.0049 each. We study four different control frequencies with Strouhal numbers ranging from St{sub D} = 0.165 to St{sub D} = 1.32; next to that, also two uncontrolled baseline cases are included in the study. We find that this type of ZNMF actuation leads to strong deformations of the near-field jet region that are very similar to those observed for non-circular jets. At the end of the jet's potential core (x/D = 5), the jet-column cross section is deformed into a hexagram-like geometry that results from strong modifications of the vortex structures. Two mechanisms lead to these modifications, i.e., (i) self-deformation of the jet's primary vortex rings started by distortions in their azimuthal curvature by the actuation, and (ii) production of side jets by the development and subsequent detachment of secondary streamwise vortex pairs. Further downstream (x/D = 10), the jet transforms into a triangular pattern, as the sharp corner regions of the hexagram entrain fluid and spread. We further investigate the global characteristics of the actuated jets. In particular when using the jet preferred frequency, i.e., St{sub D} = 0.33, parameters such as entrainment, centerline decay rate, and mean turbulent kinetic energy are significantly increased. Furthermore, high frequency actuation, i.e., St{sub D} = 1.32, is found to suppress the mechanisms leading to large scale structure growth and turbulent kinetic energy production. The simulations further include a passive scalar equation, and passive scalar mixing is also quantified and visualized.

  2. Effects of longitudinal vibration on tensile properties of weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, S.P.; Shanker, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the effect of longitudinal vibration, frequency and amplitude on yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, breaking strength and percentage of elongation on weldments prepared by the shielded metal arc process. The frequency range selected was 0 to 400 Hz, and the amplitude range was 0 to 40 [mu]m. It was found that the tensile properties of the weldments improved when compared with the static welded test specimens, but there was a reduction in the percentage of elongation for specimens prepared under vibratory conditions. Increased frequency resulted in better tensile properties, but the percentage of elongation was reduced with an increase in frequency. Frequency in the range of 0 to 400 Hz and amplitude from 5 to 30 [mu]m gave good results.

  3. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability in "molecular wires" are discussed.

  4. Free vibrations of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2014-05-07

    Contact resonance atomic force microscope (AFM) methods have been used to quantify the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a variety of materials such as polymers, ceramics, biological materials, and metals with spatial resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. This approach involves measurement of the resonant frequencies of the AFM probe both for the free case and the case for which the tip is in contact with a sample. Vibration models of the probe and tip-sample contact models are then used to determine the sample properties from the frequency behavior and to create images of the sample properties. This work has been primarily focused on rectangular, single-beam probes for which the vibration models are relatively simple. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have been developed to allow local heating of samples and the resonances of these probes are much more complex. In this article, a simplified analytical model of these U-shaped probes is described. This three beam model includes two beams clamped at one end and connected with a perpendicular cross beam at the other end. The beams are assumed only to bend in flexure and twist but their coupling allows a wide range of possible dynamic behavior. Results are presented for the first ten modes and the mode shapes are shown to have complex coupling between the flexure and twisting of the beams, particularly for the higher modes. All resonant frequency results are in good agreement with finite element results for the three probe designs and two values of thickness considered (all wavenumbers are within 3.0%). This work is anticipated to allow U-shaped probes to be used eventually for quantitative measurements of sample material properties during heating using a contact resonance approach.

  5. Non-Equilibrium Vibrational Kinetics in Radiofrequency H2 Plasmas: a Comparison Between Theoretical and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capitelli, M.; De Pascale, O.; Shakatov, V.; Hassouni, K.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.

    2005-05-16

    Vibrational and rotational experimental temperatures of molecular hydrogen obtained by Coherent Anti-Stokes Spectroscopy (CARS) in Radiofrequency Inductive Plasmas have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of vibration, electron, dissociation-recombination and attachment kinetics. The analysis clarifies the role of atomic hydrogen and its heterogeneous recombination in affecting the vibrational content of the molecules.

  6. Spatially resolved penetration depth measurements and vortex manipulation in the ferromagnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wulferding, Dirk; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Lee, Minkyung; Choi, Hee Cheul; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-07-31

    We present a local probe study of the magnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C, using magnetic force microscopy at sub-Kelvin temperatures. ErNi2B2C is an ideal system to explore the effects of concomitant superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At 500 mK, far below the transition to a weakly ferromagnetic state, we directly observe a structured magnetic background on the micrometer scale. We determine spatially resolved absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth λ and study its temperature dependence as the system undergoes magnetic phase transitions from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and to weak ferromagnetic, all within the superconducting regime. We estimate the absolute pinning force of Abrikosovmore » vortices, which shows a position dependence and temperature dependence as well, and discuss the possibility of the purported spontaneous vortex formation.« less

  7. Dynamic modeling of injection-induced fault reactivation and ground motion and impact on surface structures and human perception

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frederic; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Godano, Maxime

    2014-12-31

    We summarize recent modeling studies of injection-induced fault reactivation, seismicity, and its potential impact on surface structures and nuisance to the local human population. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling, dynamic wave propagation modeling, seismology theories, and empirical vibration criteria from mining and construction industries. We first simulated injection-induced fault reactivation, including dynamic fault slip, seismic source, wave propagation, and ground vibrations. From co-seismic average shear displacement and rupture area, we determined the moment magnitude to about Mw = 3 for an injection-induced fault reactivation at a depth of about 1000 m. We then analyzed the ground vibration results in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and frequency content, with comparison to the U.S. Bureau of Mines vibration criteria for cosmetic damage to buildings, as well as human-perception vibration limits. For the considered synthetic Mw = 3 event, our analysis showed that the short duration, high frequency ground motion may not cause any significant damage to surface structures, and would not cause, in this particular case, upward CO2 leakage, but would certainly be felt by the local population.

  8. Dynamic modeling of injection-induced fault reactivation and ground motion and impact on surface structures and human perception

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frederic; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Godano, Maxime

    2014-12-31

    We summarize recent modeling studies of injection-induced fault reactivation, seismicity, and its potential impact on surface structures and nuisance to the local human population. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling, dynamic wave propagation modeling, seismology theories, and empirical vibration criteria from mining and construction industries. We first simulated injection-induced fault reactivation, including dynamic fault slip, seismic source, wave propagation, and ground vibrations. From co-seismic average shear displacement and rupture area, we determined the moment magnitude to about Mw = 3 for an injection-induced fault reactivation at a depth of about 1000 m. We then analyzed themore » ground vibration results in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and frequency content, with comparison to the U.S. Bureau of Mines’ vibration criteria for cosmetic damage to buildings, as well as human-perception vibration limits. For the considered synthetic Mw = 3 event, our analysis showed that the short duration, high frequency ground motion may not cause any significant damage to surface structures, and would not cause, in this particular case, upward CO2 leakage, but would certainly be felt by the local population.« less

  9. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lifeng, E-mail: walfe@nuaa.edu.cn; Hu, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2014-06-21

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  10. Vibrational spectra of the YbB{sub 12} Kondo insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybina, A. V. Alekseev, P. A.; Nemkovski, K. S.; Nefeodova, E. V.; Mignot, J.-M.; Bewley, R. I.

    2007-09-15

    The density of phonon states for the YbB{sub 12} Kondo insulator is calculated from the inelastic neutron scattering spectra of this compound. It is established that thermal vibrations of rare-earth atoms predominantly occur in the low-energy range. These atoms are most weakly bound in the crystal structure of the YbB{sub 12} Kondo insulator. The high-energy part of the vibrational spectrum is determined by thermal vibrations of the boron atoms forming a rigidly connected structure of the compound. It is revealed that the temperature dependence of the intensity of the phonon peak attributed to thermal vibrations of the ytterbium atoms exhibits an anomalous behavior. This circumstance suggests that the magnetoelastic coupling occurring in the structure of the YbB{sub 12} Kondo insulator is relatively strong and can contribute to the magnetic excitation spectrum of this compound.

  11. The low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djamal, Mitra; Sanjaya, Edi; Islahudin; Ramli

    2012-06-20

    Vibration like an earthquake is a phenomenon of physics. The characteristics of these vibrations can be used as an early warning system so as to reduce the loss or damage caused by earthquakes. In this paper, we introduced a new type of low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element that we have developed. Its working principle is based on position change of a seismic mass that put in front of a flat coil element. The flat coil is a part of a LC oscillator; therefore, the change of seismic mass position will change its resonance frequency. The results of measurements of low frequency vibration sensor in the direction of the x axis and y axis gives the frequency range between 0.2 to 1.0 Hz.

  12. The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of Continuous and Discrete Systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effect of the...

  13. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In the harvester, a circular cross-section elastic rod, not a traditional thin cantilever beam, is used to extract ambient vibration energy because of its capability to collect ...

  14. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hougen, J.T.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  15. A quasi-classical mapping approach to vibrationally coupled electron transport in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H.; Wilner, Eli Y.; Thoss, Michael

    2014-03-14

    We develop a classical mapping approach suitable to describe vibrationally coupled charge transport in molecular junctions based on the Cartesian mapping for many-electron systems [B. Li and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 154107 (2012)]. To properly describe vibrational quantum effects in the transport characteristics, we introduce a simple transformation rewriting the Hamiltonian in terms of occupation numbers and use a binning function to facilitate quantization. The approach provides accurate results for the nonequilibrium Holstein model for a range of bias voltages, vibrational frequencies, and temperatures. It also captures the hallmarks of vibrational quantum effects apparent in step-like structure in the current-voltage characteristics at low temperatures as well as the phenomenon of Franck-Condon blockade.

  16. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the lengthmore » scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.« less

  17. Length Scale Selects Directionality of Droplets on Vibrating Pillar Ratchet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, Pat; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the length scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. The ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.

  18. Evaluation of Transportation Vibration Associated with Relocation of Work in Process As Part of KCRIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, Troy

    2013-04-01

    During relocation of the Kansas City Plant (KCP) from the site at Bannister Road to the site at Botts Road, work in process (WIP) within a production department must be transported. This report recommends packaging to mitigate vibration levels experienced by products during between-facility transportation. Measurements and analysis demonstrate that this mitigation results in vibration levels less than those experienced by the product during routine production processes within potentially damaging frequency ranges.

  19. In-situ characterization of plasma modified surfaces by vibrational sum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    frequency generation spectroscopy. (Conference) | SciTech Connect In-situ characterization of plasma modified surfaces by vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-situ characterization of plasma modified surfaces by vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. No abstract prepared. Authors: Hebner, Gregory Albert ; Barnat, Edward V. ; Farrow, Darcie Publication Date: 2010-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1027046 Report Number(s):

  20. PV QA Task Group #2: Thermal and Mechanical Fatigue Including Vibration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy QA Task Group #2: Thermal and Mechanical Fatigue Including Vibration PV QA Task Group #2: Thermal and Mechanical Fatigue Including Vibration Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado PDF icon pvmrw13_tmf_taskgroup2.pdf More Documents & Publications Linkage to Previous International PV Module QA Task Force Workshops: Proposal for Rating System Agenda for the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden,

  1. The Effect of the Contact Model on Predicting Impact-Vibration Response.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: The Effect of the Contact Model on Predicting Impact-Vibration Response. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effect of the Contact Model on Predicting Impact-Vibration Response. Authors: Brake, Matthew Robert Publication Date: 2012-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1064253 Report Number(s): SAND2012-5215C DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the ASME 2012

  2. Consistent multi-internal-temperature models for vibrational and electronic nonequilibrium in hypersonic nitrogen plasma flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, Aurlien Bourdon, Anne Perrin, Marie-Yvonne

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a state-to-state vibrational and electronic collisional model is developed to investigate nonequilibrium phenomena behind a shock wave in an ionized nitrogen flow. In the ionization dynamics behind the shock wave, the electron energy budget is of key importance and it is found that the main depletion term corresponds to the electronic excitation of N atoms, and conversely the major creation terms are the electron-vibration term at the beginning, then replaced by the electron ions elastic exchange term. Based on these results, a macroscopic multi-internal-temperature model for the vibration of N{sub 2} and the electronic levels of N atoms is derived with several groups of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and electronic levels of N with their own internal temperatures to model the shape of the vibrational distribution of N{sub 2} and of the electronic excitation of N, respectively. In this model, energy and chemistry source terms are calculated self-consistently from the rate coefficients of the state-to-state database. For the shock wave condition studied, a good agreement is observed on the ionization dynamics as well as on the atomic bound-bound radiation between the state-to-state model and the macroscopic multi-internal temperature model with only one group of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and two groups of electronic levels of N.

  3. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability in "molecular wires" are discussed.« less

  4. 2012 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  5. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jin Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Zhao, Nian; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Qiu, Jing

    2014-09-21

    To scavenge energy from ambient vibrations with arbitrary in-plane motion directions and over a wide frequency range, a novel electromagnetic vibration energy harvester is designed and optimized. In the harvester, a circular cross-section elastic rod, not a traditional thin cantilever beam, is used to extract ambient vibration energy because of its capability to collect vibration from arbitrary in-plane motion directions. The magnetic interaction between magnets and the iron core contributes to a nonlinear oscillation of the rod with increased frequency bandwidth. The influences of the structure configurations on the electrical output and the working bandwidth of the harvester are investigated using Ansoft's Maxwell 3D to achieve optimal performance. The experimental results show that the harvester is sensitive to vibrations from arbitrary in-plane directions and it exhibits a bandwidth of 5.7 Hz and a maximum power of 13.4 mW at an acceleration of 0.6 g (with g=9.8 ms?).

  6. Vibration suppression in cutting tools using collocated piezoelectric sensors/actuators with an adaptive control algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radecki, Peter P; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Bement, Matthew T

    2008-01-01

    The machining process is very important in many engineering applications. In high precision machining, surface finish is strongly correlated with vibrations and the dynamic interactions between the part and the cutting tool. Parameters affecting these vibrations and dynamic interactions, such as spindle speed, cut depth, feed rate, and the part's material properties can vary in real-time, resulting in unexpected or undesirable effects on the surface finish of the machining product. The focus of this research is the development of an improved machining process through the use of active vibration damping. The tool holder employs a high bandwidth piezoelectric actuator with an adaptive positive position feedback control algorithm for vibration and chatter suppression. In addition, instead of using external sensors, the proposed approach investigates the use of a collocated piezoelectric sensor for measuring the dynamic responses from machining processes. The performance of this method is evaluated by comparing the surface finishes obtained with active vibration control versus baseline uncontrolled cuts. Considerable improvement in surface finish (up to 50%) was observed for applications in modern day machining.

  7. Zero-point energy, tunneling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-09

    Abstract: Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review [Aldegunde et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3169 (2013)] of the thermal and vibrationally-stateselected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the BornOppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally-state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates and why vibrationally nonadiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunneling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  8. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. N.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2010-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) Beamline of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-lI) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state of the art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored in order to be utilized in supporting endstation instruments. This paper presents results of the various study aspects and their influence on the HXN design optimization.

  9. Chaos concepts as diagnostic tools for assessing rotating machinery vibration signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, M.L.; Loparo, K.A.

    1996-06-01

    Chaos content in measured vibration signals is of some practical importance in rotordynamical systems. Of particular interest is the relationship between the occurrence of determinsite chaos and the diagnosis of mechanical failures in rotating machinery. Two nonlinear rotordynamical systems were studied using simulation and various forms of subharmonic, quasiperiodic and chaotic vibrations were observed. Different routes into and out of chaos show important signs for wear assessment and failure prediction. Experimental test facilities are currently under development and the next steps involve experimental verification of the simulation results and the development of signal processing techniques for extracting the dynamical features of the vibration signatures from measured time series data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Numerical Investigation of Flapwise-Torsional Vibration Model of a Smart Section Blade with Microtab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Nailu; Balas, Mark J.; Yang, Hua; Jiang, Wei; Magar, Kaman T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a method to develop an aeroelastic model of a smart section blade equipped with microtab. The model is suitable for potential passive vibration control study of the blade section in classic flutter. Equations of the model are described by the nondimensional flapwise and torsional vibration modes coupled with the aerodynamic model based on the Theodorsen theory and aerodynamic effects of the microtab based on the wind tunnel experimental data. The aeroelastic model is validated using numerical data available in the literature and then utilized to analyze the microtab control capability on flutter instability case and divergence instabilitymore » case. The effectiveness of the microtab is investigated with the scenarios of different output controllers and actuation deployments for both instability cases. The numerical results show that the microtab can effectively suppress both vibration modes with the appropriate choice of the output feedback controller.« less

  11. Ab initio investigation of electronic and vibrational contributions to linear and nonlinear dielectric properties of ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casassa, S.; Baima, J.; Mahmoud, A.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-06-14

    Electronic and vibrational contributions to the static and dynamic (hyper)polarizability tensors of ice XI and model structures of ordinary hexagonal ice have been theoretically investigated. Calculations were carried out by the finite field nuclear relaxation method for periodic systems (FF-NR) recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, using the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach (CPKS) for evaluating the required electronic properties. The effect of structure on the static electronic polarizabilities (dielectric constants) and second-hyperpolarizabilities is minimal. On the other hand, the vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities were found to be significant. A reliable evaluation of these (ionic) contributions allows one to discriminate amongst ice phases characterized by different degrees of proton-order, primarily through differences caused by librational motions. Transverse static and dynamic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities were found by extrapolating calculations for slabs of increasing size, in order to eliminate substantial surface contributions.

  12. Measurement of concrete E-modulus evolution since casting: A novel method based on ambient vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azenha, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.azenha@civil.uminho.p [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); ISISE - Institute for Sustainability and Innovation in Structural Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Escola de Engenharia, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Magalhaes, Filipe [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Rui [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Cunha, Alvaro [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-07-15

    The use of ambient vibration tests to characterize the evolution of E-modulus of concrete right after casting is investigated in this paper. A new methodology is proposed, which starts by casting a concrete cylindrical beam inside a hollow acrylic formwork. This beam is then placed horizontally, simply supported at both extremities, and vertical accelerations resulting from ambient vibration are measured at mid-span. Processing these mid-span acceleration time series using power spectral density functions allows a continuous identification of the first flexural frequency of vibration of the composite beam, which in turn is correlated with the evolutive E-modulus of concrete since casting. Together with experiments conducted with the proposed methodology, a complementary validation campaign for concrete E-modulus determination was undertaken by static loading tests performed on the composite beam, as well as by standard compressive tests of concrete cylinders of the same batch loaded at different ages.

  13. Process of Equiaxed Grains of RE-Al Alloy under Slope Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Shikun; Yi Rongxi; Pan Xiaoliang; Zheng Xiaoqiu; Guo Xiuyan [School of Engineering, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, 343009 (China)

    2010-06-15

    A new technique using slope vibration casting process during heating and isothermal holding period to prepare Al-7Si-2RE alloy has been studied. The small, near-spherical and non-dendritic microstructure with the semi-solid processing requirements has been obtained. Experiments show that the cooling method, pouring process and the convection of melt caused by slope vibration had significant effects on the formation of near-spherical primary gains. The water-cooled copper mold casting with slope vibration at the temperature near liquidus can obtain Al-7Si-2RE alloy with small homogeneous equiaxed grains, the average grain diameter is 48.3 mum, and the average grain roundness is 1.92.

  14. The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Continuous and Discrete Systems. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of Continuous and Discrete Systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of Continuous and Discrete Systems. Authors: Brake, Matthew Robert Publication Date: 2012-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1064318 Report Number(s): SAND2012-5619J DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource

  15. ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

    2003-11-01

    This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine removal activity. The tool cannot operate in this condition and remains in the well. There was no response measured during or afterwards to either the produced fluids from the five production wells or in the injection characteristics of the two injection wells in the pilot test area. Monitoring the pilot area injection and production wells ceased when the field test was terminated March 14, 2003. Thus, a key goal of this project, which was to determine the effects of vibration stimulation on improving oil recovery from a mature waterflood, was not obtained. While there was no improved oil recovery effect measured, there was insufficient vibration stimulation time to expect a change to occur. No conclusion can be drawn about the effectiveness of vibration stimulation in this test.

  16. Los Alamos computer simulation improves offshore drill rig safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 24, 2015 A simulation of vortex induced motion shows how ocean currents affect offshore oil rigs. A simulation of vortex induced motion shows how ocean currents affect ...

  17. Attenuation due to hysteretic damage in the free vibration of a beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, Daniel A.; Pecorari, Claudio

    2014-02-18

    We present an asymptotic analysis of nonlinear free vibration of a beam with a damage plane represented by nonlinear hysteretic bending and shear springs. The perturbation parameter is the product of the ratio of the nonlinear to linear parts of the stiffness times the amplitude of the free vibration. The loss of energy and ensuing attenuation due to hysteresis is accounted for by reducing the amplitude of vibration after each cycle by an amount such that the loss in total system energy equals the work done to traverse the hysteresis loop. A new Fourier representation for each cycle of the hysteresis and the deflection solution is used for this purpose and leads to higher harmonics, an evolving complex stiffness and corrected natural frequency that are linked to the attenuation. The frequency increases to its linear value from an initially reduced value. The damage parameter, frequency shift and fundamental amplitudes are presented as functions of the initial damage parameter and time (cycles of vibration). The amplitudes of several of the higher harmonics are also presented as functions of time. Many of the results exhibit sufficient sensitivity with respect to the damage parameter that they should be able to be used to characterize the damage.

  18. Mechanisms of self-excitation of thermoacoustic vibrations in two-phase bubble flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalozubov, V.I. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the mechanisms of self-excitation of thermoacoustic vibrations in two-phase bubble flows are described. It is shown that a theory of this process must take into consideration the work performed by bubbles traveling in the acoustic wave. The results of the theory herein developed agree with previous experimental data of the author.

  19. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely collected during pre-installation tests and screened for: Critical speeds or resonance, Imbalance of rotating parts, Shaft misalignment, Fluid whirl or lubrication break down, Bearing damages, and Other component abnormalities. Examples of previous changes in operating parameters and fabrication tolerances and extension of equipment life resulting from the SRS vibration analysis program include: (1) Limiting operational speeds for some pumps to extend service life without design or part changes; (2) Modifying manufacturing methods (tightening tolerances) for impellers on slurry mixing pumps based on vibration data that indicated hydraulic imbalance; (3) Identifying rolling element mounting defects and replacing those components in pump seals before installation; and (4) Identifying the need for bearing design modification for SRS long-shaft mixing pump designs to eliminate fluid whirl and critical speeds which significantly increased the equipment service life. In addition, vibration analyses and related analyses have been used during new equipment scale-up tests to identify the need for design improvements for full-scale operation / deployment of the equipment in the full size tanks. For example, vibration analyses were recently included in the rotary micro-filtration scale-up test program at SRNL.

  20. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the OD stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the OD stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of OD vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing OD stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the OD stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the OD stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the OD stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating OD stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the OD stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the OD stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the OD stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this computational approach will be of critical use in interpreting linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies of HDO molecule that is considered as an excellent local probe for monitoring local electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding environment in not just salt but also other confined and crowded solutions.

  1. Annular vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nieh, Sen (Burtonsville, MD); Fu, Tim T. (Camarillo, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for burning coal water fuel, dry ultrafine coal, pulverized l and other liquid and gaseous fuels including a vertically extending outer wall and an inner, vertically extending cylinder located concentrically within the outer wall, the annnular space between the outer wall and the inner cylinder defining a combustion chamber and the all space within the inner cylinder defining an exhaust chamber. Fuel and atomizing air are injected tangentially near the bottom of the combustion chamber and secondary air is introduced at selected points along the length of the combustion chamber. Combustion occurs along the spiral flow path in the combustion chamber and the combined effects of centrifugal, gravitational and aerodynamic forces cause particles of masses or sizes greater than the threshold to be trapped in a stratified manner until completely burned out. Remaining ash particles are then small enough to be entrained by the flue gas and exit the system via the exhaust chamber in the opposite direction.

  2. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  3. Effect of Triplet Magnet Vibrations on RHIC Performance with High Energy Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M.

    2010-05-23

    In this report we present recent experimental data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) illustrating effects resulting from {approx}10 Hz vibrations of the triplet quadrupole magnets in the interactions regions and evaluate the impact of these vibrations on RHIC collider performance. Measurements revealed modulation of the betatron tunes of appreciable magnitude relative to the total beam-beam parameter. Comparison of the discrete frequencies in the spectra of the measured beam positions and betatron tunes confirmed a common source. The tune modulations were shown to result from feed-down in the sextupole magnets in the interaction regions. In addition we show that the distortions to the closed orbit of the two counter-rotating beams produced a modulated crossing angle at the interaction point(s).

  4. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  5. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ν(C≡N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of moleculesmore » to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.« less

  6. Effect of nonuniformity of subcooled boiling flow on the onset of thermoacoustic vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerliga, V.A.; Skalozubov, V.I.; Lesin, V.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper develops the hypothesis that the factor responsible for the onset of thermoacoustic vibrations in two-phase bubble flow is positive work by bubbles condensing in the flow core. It is shown that the predicted threshold of generation of these vibrations depends strongly on the accuracy of description of the steady-state distribution of parameters of bubbles and the liquid. The results predicted on the basis of a two-zone nonequilibrium polydisperse model are compared with those given by the uniform-flow model and an equation representing the condition of applicability of one-dimensional models for predicting the steady-state parameters of nonequilibrium boiling flows is derived.

  7. Theoretical structural and vibrational study of 5-trifluoromethyluracil. A comparison with uracil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudyk, Roxana; Ramos, Mara E.; Checa, Mara A.; Brandn, Silvia A.; Chamorro, Eduardo E.

    2014-10-06

    In the present work, a comparative study on the structural and vibrational properties of the 5-trifluoromethyluracil (TFMU) derivative with those corresponding to uracil in gas and aqueous solution phases was performed combining the available H{sup 1}-NMR, C{sup 13}-NMR, F{sup 19}-NMR and FTIR spectra with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Three stable conformers were theoretically determined in both media by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. The solvent effects were simulated by means of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method employing the integral equation formalism variant (IEFPCM). Complete assignments of the vibrational spectra in both phases were performed combining the internal coordinates analysis and the DFT calculations with the Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field (SQMFF) methodology. The atomic charges, bond orders, solvation energies, dipole moments, molecular electrostatic potentials and force constants parameters were calculated for the three conformers of TFMU in gas phase and aqueous solution.

  8. Suppression of chaotic vibrations in a nonlinear half-car model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusset, ngelo Marcelo E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Piccirillo, Vincius E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Janzen, Frederic Conrad E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Lenz, Wagner Barth E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Balthazar, Jos Manoel; Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. da

    2014-12-10

    The present work investigates the nonlinear response of a half-car model. The disturbances of the road are assumed to be sinusoidal. After constructing the bifurcation diagram, we using the 0-1 test for identify the chaotic motion. The principal objective of this study is to eliminate the chaotic behaviour of the chassis and reduce its vibration, and for this reason a control system for semi-active vehicle suspension with magnetorheological damper is proposed. The control mechanism is designed based on SDRE technique, where the control parameter is the voltage applied to the coil of the damper. Numerical results show that the proposed control method is effective in significantly reducing of the chassis vibration, increasing therefore, passenger comfort.

  9. Effect of vibrations on the density of loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Wright, J.H.

    1981-05-01

    Testing results of the three major loose-fill insulation products marketed in this country subjected to a variety of vibrations and impacts in a laboratory setting to determine the magnitude of the resultant density increases, are presented. Results show repeated drops of 19 mm (.75 inch) and 152 mm (6 inch) produced density increases of up to 75% for fiberglass, 45% for rock wool, and 27% for cellulosic materials. The three insulation products were also subjected to vibrations ranging from 0.1 mm (.004 inch) to 6.35 mm (.25 inch) to obtain ratios of final density over initial density. Under the test conditions studied it was observed that the lighter materials settled more percentagewise than the dense materials.

  10. Theoretical investigation of the vibrational properties of BeH{sub 2} and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Li{sub 2}BeH{sub 4}. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Theoretical investigation of the vibrational properties of BeH{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}BeH{sub 4}. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theoretical investigation of the vibrational properties of BeH{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}BeH{sub 4}. First-principles calculations of BeH{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}BeH{sub 4} were performed and compared to inelastic neutron scattering. The crystal structure (P2{sub 1}/c space group) of Li{sub 2}BeH{sub 4}

  11. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, S.L.

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linearization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications. 6 figures.

  12. Vibration Testing of the Pluto/New Horizons Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles D. Griffin

    2006-06-01

    The Radioisotopic Thermal Generator (RTG) for the Pluto/New Horizons spacecraft was subjected to a flight dynamic acceptance test to demonstrate that it would perform successfully following launch. Seven RTGs of this type had been assembled and tested at Mound, Ohio from 1984 to 1997. This paper chronicles major events in establishing a new vibration test laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory and the nineteen days of dynamic testing.

  13. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schrodinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  14. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  15. TANK VIBRATION LIMIT STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE VADOSE ZONE DRILLING OPERATION [SEC 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STURGES, M.H.

    2005-01-18

    The analysis contained herein supports the 0.1 g vibration limit that is currently established for the tanks. The natural frequency distributions and mode shapes for several different tank-soil models are presented. These frequencies can be compared to the natural frequencies from the measured test data. The best tank-soil model can then be selected for further study. This document is provided for historical information and has not been reviewed and checked beyond originator.

  16. Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 12.14.15

  17. Apparatus and method for suppressing vibration and displacement of a bellows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Flexible bellows are utilized between two systems, such as a pumping system and a process station, to partially absorb system vibrations and to compensate for misalignment between the systems. It is common practice to either clamp a rigid spacer between flanges of the two systems to separate them from each other, or to maintain the bellows in unsupported relationship between these systems. In the former bellows arrangement, the rigid spacer transmits vibratory energy between the two systems and the bellows tends to function as an undamped or underdamped unit that resonates at its own frequency to create additional vibratory energy, transmitted to the systems. In the latter, unsupported bellows arrangement, the pressure differential prevalent between the fluid flowing through the bellows and ambient normally causes extension or retraction of the bellows and resulting misalignment problems. The present invention substantially solves the above vibration and misalignment problems by providing an inflatable tube in surrounding relationship about a bellows to suppress vibration and displacement thereof. A method for isolating first and second systems from each other to prevent the transmission of vibratory energy therebetween comprises the steps of attaching at least one flexible bellows between the systems, surrounding the bellows with an inflatable tube, and maintaining a predetermined pressure in the tube to urge the tube in flexible contact with at least some of the convolutions of the bellows.

  18. Apparatus and method for suppressing vibration and displacement of a bellows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Flexible bellows are utilized between two systems, such as a pumping system and a process station, to partially absorb system vibrations and to compensate for misalignment between the systems. It is common practice to either clamp a rigid spacer between flanges of the two systems (FIG. 3B) to separate them from each other, or to maintain the bellows in unsupported relationship between these systems (FIG. 4B). In the former bellows arrangement, the rigid spacer transmits vibratory energy between the two systems and the bellows tends to function as an undamped or underdamped unit that resonates at its own frequency to create additional vibratory energy, transmitted to the systems. In the latter, unsupported bellows arrangement (FIG. 4B), the pressure differential prevalent between the fluid flowing through the bellows and ambient normally causes extension or retraction of the bellows and resulting misalignment problems. The present invention substantially solves the above vibration and misalignment problems by providing an inflatable tube (20) in surrounding relationship about a bellows (14) to suppress vibration and displacement thereof. A method for isolating first and second systems (11,12) from each other to prevent the transmission of vibratory energy therebetween comprises the steps of attaching at least one flexible bellows (14) between the systems (11,12), surrounding the bellows with an inflatable tube (20), and maintaining a predetermined pressure in the tube (20) to urge the tube in flexible contact with at least some of the convolutions of the bellows (14).

  19. Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfister, Thorsten; Guenther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Juergen

    2010-05-28

    Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

  20. Structural, electronic, vibrational, and dielectric properties of LaBGeO{sub 5} from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaltaf, R. Juwhari, H. K.; Hamad, B.; Khalifeh, J.; Rignanese, G.-M.; Gonze, X.

    2014-02-21

    Structural, electronic, vibrational, and dielectric properties of LaBGeO{sub 5} with the stillwellite structure are determined based on ab initio density functional theory. The theoretically relaxed structure is found to agree well with the existing experimental data with a deviation of less than 0.2%. Both the density of states and the electronic band structure are calculated, showing five distinct groups of valence bands. Furthermore, the Born effective charge, the dielectric permittivity tensors, and the vibrational frequencies at the center of the Brillouin zone are all obtained. Compared to existing model calculations, the vibrational frequencies are found in much better agreement with the published experimental infrared and Raman data, with absolute and relative rms values of 6.04?cm{sup ?1}, and 1.81%, respectively. Consequently, numerical values for both the parallel and perpendicular components of the permittivity tensor are established as 3.55 and 3.71 (10.34 and 12.28), respectively, for the high-(low-)frequency limit.

  1. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG`S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG`S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria.

  2. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study 15134

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L; Scaglione, John M

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  3. Experimental determination of lateral vibration of the 708 MVA Westinghouse vertical hydro generators at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    The damped rotor bearing system of large vertical shaft systems presents special problems for high speed storage installations. The results of the first test of its kind have given experimental data contributing to this technology. Synchronous and non-synchronous vibrations were found to contribute to runout loading. Measurements on the pivot pad hydrodynamic bearings gave stiffness characteristics. Measurements showed that balancing the rotor reduced vibration levels. 1 ref.

  4. Vibrational coherence and energy transfer in two-dimensional spectra with the optimized mean-trajectory approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alemi, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2015-06-07

    The optimized mean-trajectory (OMT) approximation is a semiclassical method for computing vibrational response functions from action-quantized classical trajectories connected by discrete transitions that represent radiation-matter interactions. Here, we extend the OMT to include additional vibrational coherence and energy transfer processes. This generalized approximation is applied to a pair of anharmonic chromophores coupled to a bath. The resulting 2D spectra are shown to reflect coherence transfer between normal modes.

  5. Driven assembly with multiaxial fields. Creating a soft mode in assemblies of anisometric induced dipoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, James E.; Swol, Frank Van

    2015-07-10

    We show that multiaxial fields can induce time-averaged, noncentrosymmetric interactions between particles having polarization anisotropy, yet the multiaxial field itself does not exert either a force or a torque on an isolated particle. These induced interactions lead to particle assemblies whose energy is strongly dependent on both the translational andorientational degrees of freedom of the system. The situation is similar to a collection of permanent dipoles, but the symmetry of the time-averaged interaction is quite distinct, and the scale of the system energy can be dynamically controlled by the magnitude of the applied multiaxial field. In our paper, the case of polarizable rods is considered in detail, and it is suggested that collections of rods embedded in spheres can be used to create a material with a dynamically tunable magnetic permeability or dielectric permittivity. We report on Monte Carlo simulations performed to investigate the behavior of assemblies of both multiaxial-field induced dipoles and permanent dipoles arranged onto two-dimensional lattices. The ground state of the induced dipoles is an orientational soft mode of aligned dipoles, whereas that of the permanent dipoles is a vortex state.

  6. Driven assembly with multiaxial fields. Creating a soft mode in assemblies of anisometric induced dipoles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martin, James E.; Swol, Frank Van

    2015-07-10

    We show that multiaxial fields can induce time-averaged, noncentrosymmetric interactions between particles having polarization anisotropy, yet the multiaxial field itself does not exert either a force or a torque on an isolated particle. These induced interactions lead to particle assemblies whose energy is strongly dependent on both the translational andorientational degrees of freedom of the system. The situation is similar to a collection of permanent dipoles, but the symmetry of the time-averaged interaction is quite distinct, and the scale of the system energy can be dynamically controlled by the magnitude of the applied multiaxial field. In our paper, the casemore » of polarizable rods is considered in detail, and it is suggested that collections of rods embedded in spheres can be used to create a material with a dynamically tunable magnetic permeability or dielectric permittivity. We report on Monte Carlo simulations performed to investigate the behavior of assemblies of both multiaxial-field induced dipoles and permanent dipoles arranged onto two-dimensional lattices. The ground state of the induced dipoles is an orientational soft mode of aligned dipoles, whereas that of the permanent dipoles is a vortex state.« less

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore »is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  8. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  9. Comprehensive Fe-ligand vibration identification in {FeNO}6 Hemes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Jianfeng; Peng, Qian; Oliver, Allen G.; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sage, J. Timothy; Scheidt, W. Robert

    2014-12-09

    Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) has been used to obtain all iron vibrations in two {FeNO}6 porphyrinate complexes, five-coordinate [Fe(OEP)(NO)]ClO4 and six-coordinate [Fe(OEP)(2-MeHIm)(NO)]ClO4. A new crystal structure was required for measurements of [Fe(OEP)(2-MeHIm)(NO)]ClO4, and the new structure is reported herein. Single crystals of both complexes were oriented to be either parallel or perpendicular to the porphyrin plane and/or axial imidazole ligand plane. Thus, the FeNO bending and stretching modes can now be unambiguously assigned; the pattern of shifts in frequency as a function of coordination number can also be determined. The pattern is quite distinct from those foundmore » for CO or {FeNO}7 heme species. This is the result of unchanging Fe–NNO bonding interactions in the {FeNO}6 species, in distinct contrast to the other diatomic ligand species. DFT calculations were also used to obtain detailed predictions of vibrational modes. Predictions were consistent with the intensity and character found in the experimental spectra. The NRVS data allow the assignment and observation of the challenging to obtain Fe–Im stretch in six-coordinate heme derivatives. Furthermore, NRVS data for this and related six-coordinate hemes with the diatomic ligands CO, NO, and O2 reveal a strong correlation between the Fe–Im stretch and Fe–NIm bond distance that is detailed for the first time.« less

  10. Physical mechanisms of megahertz vibrations and nonlinear detection in ultrasonic force and related microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosse, J. L.; Huey, B. D.; Tovee, P. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2014-04-14

    Use of high frequency (HF) vibrations at MHz frequencies in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) advanced nanoscale property mapping to video rates, allowed use of cantilever dynamics for mapping nanomechanical properties of stiff materials, sensing ?s time scale phenomena in nanostructures, and enabled detection of subsurface features with nanoscale resolution. All of these methods critically depend on the generally poor characterized HF behaviour of AFM cantilevers in contact with a studied sample, spatial and frequency response of piezotransducers, and transfer of ultrasonic vibrations between the probe and a specimen. Focusing particularly on Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), this work is also applicable to waveguide UFM, heterodyne force microscopy, and near-field holographic microscopy, all methods that exploit nonlinear tip-surface force interactions at high frequencies. Leveraging automated multidimensional measurements, spectroscopic UFM (sUFM) is introduced to investigate a range of common experimental parameters, including piezotransducer excitation frequency, probed position, ultrasonic amplitude, cantilever geometry, spring constant, and normal force. Consistent with studies of influence of each of these factors, the data-rich sUFM signatures allow efficient optimization of ultrasonic-AFM based measurements, leading to best practices recommendations of using longer cantilevers with lower fundamental resonance, while at the same time increasing the central frequency of HF piezo-actuators, and only comparing results within areas on the order of few ?m{sup 2} unless calibrated directly or compared with in-the-imaged area standards. Diverse materials such as Si, Cr, and photoresist are specifically investigated. This work thereby provides essential insight into the reliable use of MHz vibrations with AFM and provides direct evidence substantiating phenomena such as sensitivity to adhesion, diminished friction for certain ultrasonic conditions, and the particular benefit of UFM and related methods for nanoscale mapping of stiff materials.

  11. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Charlton (Calabasas, CA); Subbaraman, Maria R. (Canoga Park, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  12. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  13. SBIR Grant: œNo-Vibration Agile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SBIR Grant: No-Vibration ... this Phase I proposal directly addressed the ... Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: ThermoDynamic ...

  14. INVESTIGATION OF PIPELINES INTEGRITY ASSOCIATED WITH PUMP MODULES VIBRATION FOR PUMPING STATION 9 OF ALYESKA PIPELINE SERVICE COMPANY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2009-09-01

    Since the operation of PS09 SR module in 2007, it has been observed that there is vibration in various parts of the structures, on various segments of piping, and on appurtenance items. At DOT Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) request, ORNL Subject Matter Experts support PHMSA in its review and analysis of the observed vibration phenomenon. The review and analysis consider possible effects of pipeline design features, vibration characteristics, machinery configuration, and operating practices on the structural capacity and leak tight integrity of the pipeline. Emphasis is placed on protection of welded joints and machinery against failure from cyclic loading. A series of vibration measurements were carried out by the author during the site visit to PS09, the power of the operating pump during the data collection is at about 2970KW, which is less than that of APSC's vibration data collected at 3900KW. Thus, a first order proportional factor of 4900/2970 was used to project the measured velocity data to that of APSC's measurement of the velocity data. It is also noted here that the average or the peak-hold value of the measured velocity data was used in the author's reported data, and only the maximum peak-hold data was used in APSC's reported data. Therefore, in some cases APSC's data is higher than the author's projective estimates that using the average data. In general the projected velocity data are consistent with APSC's measurements; the examples of comparison at various locations are illustrated in the Table 1. This exercise validates and confirms the report vibration data stated in APSC's summary report. After the reinforcement project for PS09 Station, a significant reduction of vibration intensity was observed for the associated pipelines at the SR Modules. EDI Co. provided a detailed vibration intensity investigation for the newly reinforced Pump Module structures and the associated pipelines. A follow-up review of EDI's report was carried out by the author. The comments and questions regarding the EDI report are categorized into four subjects, namely (1) piping vibration severity, (2) pulsation and its impact on the PS09 structure and piping, (3) strain-gage stress history profiles, and (4) the cavitation potential investigation, where the questions are stated at the end of the comments for further follow-on investigations.

  15. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2002-06-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-14, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI, Brett Davidson and Tim Spanos, Prism Production Technologies, were the instructors. The sixteen attendees also participated in the half-day field trip to the test facility near Tulsa.

  16. Twenty Five Years of Vibrational Kinetics and Negative Ion Production in H2 Plasmas: Modelling Aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capitelli, M.; De Pascale, O.; Diomede, P.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.; Pagano, D.; Gicquel, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2005-04-06

    Different approaches to study vibrational kinetics coupled to electron one for modeling different kinds of negative ion sources are presented. In particular two types of sources are investigated. The first one is a classical negative ion source in which the plasma is generated by thermoemitted electrons; in the second one, electrons already present in the mixture are accelerated by an RF field to sufficiently high energy to ionize the gas molecules. For the first kind of ion source a new computational scheme is presented to couple heavy particle and electron kinetics. Moreover models developed for an RF inductive discharge and for a parallel plate discharge are described.

  17. Vibration mills in the manufacturing technology of slurry fuel from unbeneficiated coal sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.G. Gorlov; A.I. Seregin; G.S. Khodakov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russia)

    2008-08-15

    Coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) is economically viable provided that its ash content does not exceed 30% and the amount water in the fuel is at most 45%. Two impoundments were revealed that have considerable reserves of waste coal useful for commercial manufacture of CWSF without the beneficiation step. One of the CWSF manufacture steps is the comminution of coal sludge to have a particle size required by the combustion conditions. Vibration mills, which are more compact and energy-intensive that drum mills, can be used in the CWSG manufacture process. The rheological characteristics of CWSF obtained from unbeneficiated waste coal were determined.

  18. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-12-31

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period September 30, 2001 to December 31, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well was permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed standard core analysis on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. Phillips has begun the sonic stimulation core tests. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has been to collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and has been run in a shallow well for initial power source testing. This testing was done in a temporarily abandoned well, Wynona Waterflood Unit, Well No.20-12 operated by Calumet Oil Co both in October and December 2001. The data acquisition system, and rod rotating equipment performed as designed. However, the DHVT experienced two internal failures during vibration operations. The DHVT has been repaired with modifications to improve its functionality. A proposed technical paper abstract has been accepted by the SPE to be presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, 13-17 April 2002. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors.

  19. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-09-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

  20. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-06-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  1. LANGEVIN DYNAMICS OF THE TWO STAGE MELTING TRANSITION OF VORTEX MATTER IN Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} IN THE PRESENCE OF STRAIGHT AND OF TILTED COLUMNAR DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOLDSCHMIDT, YADIN Y.; LIU, Jin-Tao

    2007-08-07

    In this paper we use London Langevin molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the vortex matter melting transition in the highly anisotropic high-temperature superconductor material Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}#14; in the presence of low concentration of columnar defects (CDs). We reproduce with further details our previous results obtained by using Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations that showed that the melting of the nanocrystalline vortex matter occurs in two stages: a first stage melting into nanoliquid vortex matter and a second stage delocalization transition into a homogeneous liquid. Furthermore, we report on new dynamical measurements in the presence of a current that identifies clearly the irreversibility line and the second stage delocalization transition. In addition to CDs aligned along the c-axis we also simulate the case of tilted CDs which are aligned at an angle with respect to the applied magnetic field. Results for CDs tilted by 45{degree} with respect to c-axis show that the locations of the melting and delocalization transitions are not affected by the tilt when the ratio of flux lines to CDs remains constant. On the other hand we argue that some dynamical properties and in particular the position of the irreversibility line should be affected.

  2. In situ Probing of Solid-Electrolyte Interfaces with Nonlinear Coherent Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Lagutchev, Alexei; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) is used for in situ probing of molecular vibrations at interfaces associated with solid-electrolyte interphases (SEI) in systems relevant to lithium-ion batteries. SFG is interface-selective and can suppress nonresonant signals from metal electrodes. Two interfaces were observed: the electrode-SEI interface and the electrolyte-SEI interface. The SEI was formed on Au or Cu by potential cycling from 2.0 V0.2 V (vs. Li/Li+) in ethylene carbonate (EC) and LiClO? in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Li deposition occurs on Au but not on Cu. SFG of the electrolyte-SEI interface with Cu shows EC transitions whose intensities oscillate during potential cycling. The smaller oscillations are attributed to EC potential-dependent reorientation; the larger to an optical interference effect associated with the SEI layer thickness. The larger EC interference oscillations seen on Cu are absent on Au because the SEI on Au is thicker and more opaque. Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (LiEDC) and possibly ethylene oxide are observed at the electrode-SEI interface. This interfacial structure varies little after the first cycle of SEI formation. THF is also observed at the electrode interface with a degree of mobility that increases during the first few four potential cycles and then levels off.

  3. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahoon, James Francis

    2008-12-16

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and CpFe(CO){sub 2} have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO){sub 5}[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO){sub 5} have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  4. Multiscale wireless sensor node for impedance-based SHM and low-frequency vibration data acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R; Todd, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in an extremely compact, wireless impedance sensor node (WID3, Wireless Impedance Device) at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in impedance-based structural health monitoring (SHM), Sensor diagnostics and low-frequency vibrational data acquisition. The current generation WID3 is equipped with an Analog Devices AD5933 impedance chip that can resolve measurements up to 100 kHz, a frequency range ideal for many SHM applications. An integrated set of multiplexers allows the end user to monitor seven piezoelectric sensors from a single sensor node. The WID3 combines on-board processing using an Atmega1281 microcontroller, data storage using flash memory, wireless communications capabilities, and a series of internal and external triggering options into a single package to realize a truly comprehensive, self-contained wireless active-sensor node for SHM applications. Furthermore, we recently extended the capability of this device by implementing low-frequency analog to digital and digital and analog converters so that the same device can measure structural vibration data. The WID3 requires less than 70 mW of power to operate, and it can operate in various wireless network paradigms. The performance of this miniaturized and portable device is compared to our previous results and its broader capabilities are demonstrated.

  5. The vibrational spectrum of FeO{sub 2}{sup +} isomersTheoretical benchmark and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, Toni M.; Boese, A. Daniel; Sauer, Joachim; Wende, Torsten; Fagiani, Matias; Asmis, Knut R.

    2014-05-28

    Infrared photodissociation is used to record the vibrational spectrum of FeO{sub 2}{sup +}(He){sub 24} which shows three bands at 1035, 980, and 506 cm{sup ?1}. Quantum chemical multi-reference configuration interaction calculations (MRCISD) of structures and harmonic frequencies show that these bands are due to two different isomers, an inserted dioxo complex with Fe in the +V oxidation state and a side-on superoxo complex with Fe in the +II oxidation state. These two are separated by a substantial barrier, 53 kJ/mol, whereas the third isomer, an end-on complex between Fe{sup +} and an O{sub 2} molecule, is easily converted into the side-on complex. For all three isomers, states of different spin multiplicity have been considered. Our best energies are computed at the MRCISD+Q level, including corrections for complete active space and basis set extension, core-valence correlation, relativistic effects, and zero-point vibrational energy. The average coupled pair functional (ACPF) yields very similar energies. Density functional theory (DFT) differs significantly from our best estimates for this system, with the TPSS functional yielding the best results. The other functionals tested are BP86, PBE, B3LYP, TPSSh, and B2PLYP. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) performs better than DFT, but less good than ACPF.

  6. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2003-09-02

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  7. Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-07-23

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  8. Observation of ?-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ??Dy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, C. -H.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Almond, J. M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cooper, N.; Curien, D.; Gall, B. J. P.; Garrett, P. E.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kondev, F. G.; Kulp, W. D.; Lauritsen, T.; McCutchan, E. A.; Miller, D.; Piot, J.; Redon, N.; Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Werner, V.; Wang, X.; Wood, J. L.; Majola, S. N. T.; Zhu, S.

    2015-03-26

    The exact nature of the lowest K?=2? rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the ? degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such ?-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ??Dy, using the ??Nd(C,4n)??Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting ?-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the ?=2? ?-band are observed to 32? and 31? respectively. This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible ?-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28? and 27?. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24?, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0?? state at 676 keV. As a result, the crossing of this band with the 0?? band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0?? band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.

  9. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-12-15

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH{sub 2}, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH{sub 2} signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the only spectral feature was in the range of the free OH or free OD. From the absence of SFG spectra of ice-like structure we conclude that surface hydroxides are formed and no liquid water is present on the surface. Other than model catalysis, gas phase anion photoelectron spectroscopy of the Cl + H{sub 2} van der Waals well, silicon clusters, germanium clusters, aluminum oxide clusters and indium phosphide clusters were studied. The spectra help to map out the neutral potential energy surfaces of the clusters. For aluminum oxide, the structures of the anions and neutrals were explored and for silicon, germanium and indium phosphide the electronic structure of larger clusters was mapped out.

  10. Controlling the optical dipole force for molecules with field-induced alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, S. M.; Barker, P. F.

    2010-09-15

    We measure the role of field-induced alignment on the dipole force for molecules using a single focused nonresonant laser beam. We show that through the alignment process we can modify the effective polarizability by field polarization and thus control the center-of-mass motion of the molecule. We observe a maximum change of 20% in the dipole force on CS{sub 2} molecules when changing from linearly to circularly polarized light. Additionally, the effect of the dipole force on different vibrational states is also studied.

  11. Reversible Bending Fatigue Test System for Investigating Vibration Integrity of Spent Nuclear Fuel during Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L; Flanagan, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading during road or rail shipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve the understanding of the impacts on SNF integrity due to vibration loading, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet the nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety and security of spent nuclear fuel storage and transport operations. The ORNL developed test system can perform reversible-bending fatigue testing to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The testing apparatus is also designed to meet the challenges of hot-cell operation, including remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, in-situ test specimen deformation measurement, and implementation of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. The system contains a U-frame set-up equipped with uniquely designed grip rigs, to protect SNF rod and to ensure valid test results, and use of 3 specially designed LVDTs to obtain the in-situ curvature measurement. A variety of surrogate test rods have been used to develop and calibrate the test system as well as in performing a series of systematic cyclic fatigue tests. The surrogate rods include stainless steel (SS) cladding, SS cladding with cast epoxy, and SS cladding with alumina pellets inserts simulating fuel pellets. Testing to date has shown that the interface bonding between the SS cladding and the alumina pellets has a significant impact on the bending response of the test rods as well as their fatigue strength. The failure behaviors observed from tested surrogate rods provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying failure mechanisms of the SNF surrogate rod under vibration which has not been achieved previously. The newly developed device is scheduled to be installed in the hot-cell in summer 2013 to test high burnup SNF.

  12. Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R.; Malaspina, D. C.

    2013-07-14

    The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

  13. In-Line Crack and Stress Detection in Silicon Solar Cells Using Resonance Ultrasonic Vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostapenko, Sergei

    2013-04-03

    Statement of Problem and Objectives. Wafer breakage in automated solar cell production lines is identified as a major technical problem and a barrier for further cost reduction of silicon solar module manufacturing. To the best of our knowledge, there are no commercial systems addressing critical needs for in-line inspection of the mechanical quality of solar wafers and cells. The principal objective of the SBIR program is to validate through experiments and computer modeling the applicability of the Resonance Ultrasonic Vibrations system, which ultimately can be used as a real-time in-line manufacturing quality control tool for fast detection of mechanically unstable silicon solar cells caused by cracks. The specific objective of Phase II is to move the technology of in-line crack detection from the laboratory level to commercial demonstration through development of a system prototype. The fragility of silicon wafers possessing low mechanical strength is attributed to peripheral and bulk millimeter-length cracks. The research program is based on feasibility results obtained during Phase I, which established that: (i) the Resonance Ultrasonic Vibrations method is applicable to as-cut, processed wafers and finished cells; (ii) the method sensitivity depends on the specific processing step; it is highest in as-cut wafers and lowest in wafers with metallization pattern and grid contacts; (iii) the system is capable of matching the 2.0 seconds per wafer throughput rate of state-of-art solar cell production lines; (iv) finite element modeling provides vibration mode analysis along with peak shift versus crack length and crack location dependence; (v) a high 91% crack rejection rate was confirmed through experimentation and statistical analysis. The Phase II project has the following specific tasks: (i) specify optimal configurations of the in-line system?¢????s component hardware and software; (ii) develop and justify a system prototype that meets major specifications for an in-line crack detection unit, such as high throughput rate, high level of stability, reproducibility of data acquisition and analysis, and high sensitivity with respect to crack length and crack location; (iii) design a system platform that allows easy integration within and adaptation to various solar cell belt-type production lines; (iv) develop a testing protocol providing quality certification of the production-grade system. Commercial Application of the proposed activity consists of bringing to the solar market a new high-tech product based on an innovative solution and patented methodology to contribute to cost reduction of silicon solar module production. The solar industry, with crystalline silicon as a dominant segment, shows outstanding performance, with approximately 25% yearly growth during the last years. Despite a slowdown with only 5.6 GW installations in 2009, solar module production for the 2010 and 2011 years was recovered. According to European Photonics Industry Consortium new solar PV installations grow by 56% compared to 2010 reached 64.7 GW in 2011. Revenues in the PV industry reached a record high of $93 billion in 2011, a 13.4 percent gain over 2010 â?? and 150 percent over 2009. This growth was forecasted to continue in 2013 with double digits growth. The solar industry is economically driven to make solar panels of the highest conversion efficiency and reliability at the lowest production cost. The Resonance Ultrasonic Vibration system addresses critical needs of the silicon-based solar industry by providing a quality control method and tool, which will improve productivity, increase reliability of products and reduce manufacturing cost of solar panels.

  14. Vibrational Feshbach resonances in near threshold HOCO{sup -} photodetachment: a theoretical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyabe, Shungo; Haxton, Dan; Lawler, Keith; Orel, Ann; McCurdy, Bill; Rescigno, Tom

    2011-03-02

    The results of a theoretical study of HOCO{sup ?} photodetachment are presented, with a view toward understanding the origin of two peaks observed by Lu and Continetti (Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 113005 (2007)) in the photoelectron kinetic energy spectrum very close to threshold. It is shown that the peaks can be attributed to vibrational Feshbach resonances of dipole-bound trans-HOCO{sup ?}, and not s- and p-wave shape resonances as previously assumed. Fixed-nuclei variational electron-HOCO scattering calculations are used to compute photodetachment cross sections and laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions. The calculations show a broad A??(#25;{pi}*)-shape resonance several eV above threshold.

  15. A vibrating razor blade machining tool for material removal on low- density foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillyer, D.F. Jr.

    1990-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed an accurate method of machining low-density foams into rectangular blank shapes by using a commercial oscillating razor blade machining tool concept marketed as a Vibratome. Since 1970, Vibratome has been used by medical laboratories to section fresh or fixed animal and plant tissues without freezing or embedding. By employing a vibrating razor blade principle, Vibratome sectioning avoids the alteration of morphology and the destruction of enzyme activities. The patented vibrating blade principle moves the sectioning razor blade in a reciprocating arcuate path as it penetrates the specimen. Sectioning takes place in a liquid bath using an ordinary injector-type razor blade. Although other commercial products may accomplish the same task, the Vibratome concept is currently being used at LLNL to obtain improved foam surface qualities from razor machining by combining state-of-the-art air bearing hardware with precise linear motion and an electrodynamic exciter that generates sinusoidal excitation. Razor cut foam surfaces of less than 25 {mu}m (0.001 in.) flatness are achieved over areas of 8.75 in.{sup 2} (2.5 {times} 3.5 in.). Razor machining of wide or narrow foam surfaces is generally characterized by a continuous curl chip for the full length of the material removed. This continuous chip facilitates flatness and prevents increased surface densities caused by material chip collection often left in the surface cells by conventional machine tools. This report covers the design evolution of razor machining of non-metallic soft materials. Hardware that maintains close dimensional tolerances and concurrently leaves the machined surface free of physical property changes is described. 20 figs.

  16. Nonequilibrium vibrational excitation of H{sub 2} in radiofrequency discharges: A theoretical approach based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassouni, K.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Capitelli, M.; Shakhatov, V.A.; De Pascale, O.

    2005-07-15

    Vibrational and rotational experimental temperatures of molecular hydrogen obtained by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in radiofrequency inductive plasmas have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of vibration, electron, dissociation-recombination, and attachment kinetics by using a sophisticated kinetic model recently developed. The analysis clarifies the role of atomic hydrogen in affecting the vibrational content of the molecules. Theoretical plasma composition and population and electron energy distributions are presented as a function of the recombination coefficient {gamma}{sub H} of atomic hydrogen on the surfaces. The agreement between theoretical and experimental results is achieved for recombination coefficients consistent with those found in the literature.

  17. INFRARED VIBRATIONAL PREDISSOCIATION SPECTROSCOPY OF WATER CLUSTERS BY THE CROSSED LASER MOLECULAR BEAM TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.; Krajnovich, D.J.; Kwok, H.S.; Lisy, J.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Lee, Y.T.

    1981-11-01

    Water clusters formed in a molecular beam are predissociated by tunable, pulsed, infrared radiation in the frequency range 2900~3750 cm{sup -1}. The recoiling fragments are detected off axis from the molecular beam using a rotatable mass spectrometer. Arguments are presented which show that the measured frequency dependent signal at a fixed detector angle is proportional to the absorption spectrum of the clusters. It is found that the spectra of clusters containing three or more water molecules are remarkably similar to the liquid phase spectrum. Dynamical information on the predissociation process is obtained from the velocity distribution of the fragments. An upper limit to the excited vibrational state lifetime of ~1 microsecond is observed for the results reported here. The most probable dissociation process concentrates the available excess energy into the internal motions of the fragment molecules. Both the time scale and translational energy distribution are consistent with the qualitative predictions of current theoretical models for cluster predissociation. From adiabatic dissociation trajectories and Monte Carlo simulations it is seen that the strong coupling present in the water polymers probably invalidates the simpler "diatomic" picture formulations of cluster predissociation. Instead, the energy can be extensively shared among the intermolecular motions in the polymer before dissociation. Comparison between current intermolecular potentials describing liquid water and the observed frequencies is made in the normal mode approximation. The inability of any potential to predict the gross spectral features (the number of bands and their observed frequency shift from the gas phase monomer) suggests that substantial improvement in the potential energy functions are possible, but that more accurate methods of solving the vibrational wave equation are necessary before a proper explanation of the spectral fine structure is possible. The observed differences between the dimer and larger polymers (trimer-hexamer) indicate a dramatic change in the hydrogen bonding, which is best explained as arising from the non-additive effects present when a water molecule is both donating and accepting a hydrogen bond. This difference between dimer and trimer also rationalizes the previous disagreement between potential functions based on condensed phase properties (where the water molecule is interacting with multiple neighbors) and those fit to imperfect gas or dimer properties which sample only the isolated pair potential. The data support an interpretation of the hydrogen bonded O-H stretching fundamental region as arising from a homogeneous broadening (not necessarily a result of the predissociation) whose width is characteristic of the hydrogen bond itself and not the sum of distinct bonding geometries. This is different from some previous theories of the water infrared absorption spectrum which assign each band to water molecules bound to different numbers of neighboring molecules.

  18. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  19. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimian, Majid [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Idris, M. H. [Dept. of Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Johor Bauru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

  20. NEW REACTOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF NON LINEAR VIBRATIONS OF DOUBLY CURVED SHALLOW SHELL UNDER A THERMAL GRADIENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanda, S.

    2004-10-06

    The present study concerns with the effects of material orthotropy,curvature, shear ratio and circumferential modulus under the influence of a temperature distribution throughout the shell structure. Here analysis is restricted to the study of nonlinear vibration of a doubly curved shell structure considering the periodic response of a simple bending mode due to curtailment of pages. Solutions of the problems with suitable illustrations are also presented.

  1. The interaction of organic adsorbate vibrations with substrate lattice waves in methyl-Si(111)-(1??1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Ryan D.; Hund, Zachary M.; Sibener, S. J.; Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M.; OLeary, Leslie E.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Benedek, G.

    2014-07-14

    A combined helium atom scattering and density functional perturbation theory study has been performed to elucidate the surface phonon dispersion relations for both the CH{sub 3}-Si(111)-(1??1) and CD{sub 3}-Si(111)-(1??1) surfaces. The combination of experimental and theoretical methods has allowed characterization of the interactions between the low energy vibrations of the adsorbate and the lattice waves of the underlying substrate, as well as characterization of the interactions between neighboring methyl groups, across the entire wavevector resolved vibrational energy spectrum of each system. The Rayleigh wave was found to hybridize with the surface rocking libration near the surface Brillouin zone edge at both the M{sup }-point and K{sup }-point. The calculations indicated that the range of possible energies for the potential barrier to the methyl rotation about the Si-C axis is sufficient to prevent the free rotation of the methyl groups at a room temperature interface. The density functional perturbation theory calculations revealed several other surface phonons that experienced mode-splitting arising from the mutual interaction of adjacent methyl groups. The theory identified a Lucas pair that exists just below the silicon optical bands. For both the CH{sub 3}- and CD{sub 3}-terminated Si(111) surfaces, the deformations of the methyl groups were examined and compared to previous experimental and theoretical work on the nature of the surface vibrations. The calculations indicated a splitting of the asymmetric deformation of the methyl group near the zone edges due to steric interactions of adjacent methyl groups. The observed shifts in vibrational energies of the -CD{sub 3} groups were consistent with the expected effect of isotopic substitution in this system.

  2. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-11-14

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  3. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1997-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  4. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1997-04-22

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  5. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in {approximately}240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a {approximately}350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  6. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore » FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  7. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-15

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  8. Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2013-04-15

    Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

  9. Sandwich beam model for free vibration analysis of bilayer graphene nanoribbons with interlayer shear effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazemnezhad, Reza E-mail: rnazemnezhad@du.ac.ir; Shokrollahi, Hassan; Hosseini-Hashemi, Shahrokh

    2014-05-07

    In this study, sandwich beam model (SM) is proposed for free vibration analysis of bilayer graphene nanoribbons (BLGNRs) with interlayer shear effect. This model also takes into account the intralayer (in-plane) stretch of graphene nanoribbons. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the software LAMMPS and Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO) potential are done to validate the accuracy of the sandwich model results. The MD simulation results include the two first frequencies of cantilever BLGNRs with different lengths and two interlayer shear moduli, i.e., 0.25 and 4.6?GPa. These two interlayer shear moduli, 0.25 and 4.6?GPa, can be obtained by sliding a small flake of graphene on a large graphene substrate when the parameter of E-LJ term in AIREBO potential, epsilon-CC, is set to be 2.84 and 45.44?meV, respectively. The SM results for a wide range of bending rigidity values show that the proposed model, i.e., the SM, predicts much better than the previous beam model in which the intralayer stretch is ignored. In addition, it is observed that the model can properly predict the natural frequencies of BLGNRs for various values of the bending rigidity and the interlayer shear modulus.

  10. Study of free vibrations of flexible shells with finite shear stiffness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krys`ko, V.A.; Pavlov, S.P.; Sytnik, I.F.

    1995-10-01

    This article presents a numerical algorithm for solving dynamic nonlinear problems of the theory of plates and shells that can be described by equations of the Timoshenko type. These are hyperbolic equations and account for inertial rotation and the so-called {open_quotes}fast{close_quotes} shear waves created in plates. The latter are in fact the reason that frequencies differing by an order of magnitude are seen in the natural frequency spectrum of a plate. It is known that the Cauchy problem will be stiff if the ratio of the natural frequencies {much_gt}1. In accordance with the definition given by Hall and Watt, the problem is considered stiff if this ratio is on the order of 0(10) or higher. We deal with such a problem in this article. The presence of shear waves with high natural frequencies is the determining factor in choosing the method of numerical integration. In explicit methods, it follows satisfy the condition {Delta}t {much_lt} T{sub n}/{pi}, where T{sub n} is the smallest period of natural vibration of the system, i.e. an excessively small value is chosen for {Delta}t in the solution of stiff problems. Thus, Newmark`s method, with an implicit integration scheme, is used to numerically integrate a stiff system of equations-such as the system being considered here.

  11. Results of flow and vibration testing of supercell target elements in support of the N Reactor Alternate Mission Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, R.D.; Samuel, T.J.

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of the Alternate Missions Program Design Tasks is to provide an alternate fuel/target design for producing tritium in the N Reactor. The planning for the program must be consistent with the following production requirements: (1) minimize changes to the reactor for implementation, (2) minimize implementation and production costs, and (3) maximize tritium production within these constraints. To evaluate the structural performance of the fuel/target and supercell target elements to be used in tritium production at the N Reactor, flow and vibration tests on the new supercell target design were conducted as described in WHC-IP-0552, (Crowe and Samuel 1989). Because the new fuel/target and supercell target elements weigh much less than fuel previously used in the N Reactor, testing was necessary to demonstrate that the elements would not vibrate when subjected to prototypical reactor flow conditions. This testing was essential to establish the new fuel and supercell target vibration and hydraulic behavior before actual use in the N Reactor. 5 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Gas-enabled resonance and rectified motion of a piston in a vibrated housing filled with a viscous liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Louis A.; Torczynski, John R.; Clausen, Jonathan R.; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2015-11-16

    Herein, we show how introducing a small amount of gas can completely change the motion of a solid object in a viscous liquid during vibration. We analyze an idealized system exhibiting this behavior: a piston moving in a liquid-filled housing, where the gaps between the piston and the housing are narrow and depend on the piston position. Recent experiments have shown that vibration causes some gas to move below the piston and the piston to subsequently move downward and compress its supporting spring. Herein, we analyze the analogous but simpler situation in which the gas regions are replaced by bellows with similar pressure-volume relationships. We show that these bellows form a spring (analogous to the pneumatic spring formed by the gas regions) which enables the piston and the liquid to oscillate in a mode that does not exist without this spring. This mode is referred to here as the Couette mode because the liquid in the gaps moves essentially in Couette flow (i.e., with almost no component of Poiseuille flow). Since Couette flow by itself produces extremely low damping, the Couette mode has a strong resonance. We show that, near this resonance, the dependence of the gap geometry on the piston position produces a large rectified (net) force on the piston during vibration. As a result, this force can be much larger than the piston weight and the strength of its supporting spring and is in the direction that decreases the flow resistance of the gap geometry.

  13. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations of vibrational spectrum of dideuteromethane CH{sub 2}D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2015-05-21

    We report a rigorous variational study of the infrared (IR) vibrational spectra of both CH{sub 2}D{sub 2} and {sup 13}CH{sub 2}D{sub 2} isotopomers using an exact molecular Hamiltonian. Calculations are carried out using a recently developed multi-layer Lanczos algorithm based on the accurate refined Wang and Carrington potential energy surface of methane and the low-order truncated ab initio dipole moment surface of Yurchenko et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 291, 69 (2013)]. All well converged 357 vibrational energy levels up to 6100 cm{sup ?1} of CH{sub 2}D{sub 2} are obtained, together with a comparison to previous calculations and 91 experimental bands available. The calculated frequencies are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and give a root-mean-square error of 0.67?cm{sup ?1}. In particular, we also compute the transition intensities from the vibrational ground state for both isotopomers. Based on the theoretical results, 20 experimental bands are suggested to be re-assigned. Surprisingly, an anomalous C isotopic effect is discovered in the n?{sub 5} modes of CH{sub 2}D{sub 2}. The predicted IR spectra provide useful information for understanding those unknown bands.

  14. Multi-layer Lanczos iteration approach to calculations of vibrational energies and dipole transition intensities for polyatomic molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2015-01-28

    We report a rigorous full dimensional quantum dynamics algorithm, the multi-layer Lanczos method, for computing vibrational energies and dipole transition intensities of polyatomic molecules without any dynamics approximation. The multi-layer Lanczos method is developed by using a few advanced techniques including the guided spectral transform Lanczos method, multi-layer Lanczos iteration approach, recursive residue generation method, and dipole-wavefunction contraction. The quantum molecular Hamiltonian at the total angular momentum J = 0 is represented in a set of orthogonal polyspherical coordinates so that the large amplitude motions of vibrations are naturally described. In particular, the algorithm is general and problem-independent. An applicationmore » is illustrated by calculating the infrared vibrational dipole transition spectrum of CH₄ based on the ab initio T8 potential energy surface of Schwenke and Partridge and the low-order truncated ab initio dipole moment surfaces of Yurchenko and co-workers. A comparison with experiments is made. The algorithm is also applicable for Raman polarizability active spectra.« less

  15. dynamo_double_vortex.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of triggering. * During a VDE, the gas jet is triggered when the vertical position of the plasma center drops by a set distance. * There is no straightforward way for a proper...

  16. Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Induced Fluorescence - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  17. Characterization of a genuin iron(V) - nitrido species by nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy coupled to density functional calculations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, T.; George, S. D.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Bill, E.; Mienert, B.; Xiao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Cramer, S.P.; Wieghardt, K.; Neese, F.; X-Ray Science Division; Institut of Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie; SSRL; Standford Univ.; Max-Planck Institut fur Bioanogranische Chemie; Univ. of California at Davis; LBNL

    2007-01-01

    The characterization of high-valent iron species is of interest due to their relevance to biological reaction mechanisms. Recently, we have synthesized and characterized an [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]{sup +} complex, which has been characterized by M{umlt o}ssbauer, magnetic susceptibility data, and XAS spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations . The results of this study indicated that the [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex is an unusual d{sup 3} system with a nearly orbitally degenerate S = 1/2 ground state. Although the calculations predicted fairly different Fe-N stretching frequencies for the S = 1/2 and the competing S = 3/2 ground states, a direct experimental determination of this important fingerprint quantity was missing. Here we apply synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational scattering (NRVS) to characterize the Fe-N stretching frequency of an Fe(V)-nitrido complex and its Fe(III)-azide precursor. The NRVS data show a new isolated band at 864 cm{sup -1} in the Fe(V)-nitrido complex that is absent in the precursor. The NRVS spectra are fit and simulated using a DFT approach, and the new feature is unambiguously assigned to a Fe(V)-N stretch. The calculated Fe-N stretching frequency is too high by {approx}75 cm{sup -1}. Anharmonic contributions to the Fe-N stretching frequency have been evaluated and have been found to be small (-5.5 cm{sup -1}). The NRVS data provided a unique opportunity to obtain this vibrational information, which had eluded characterization by more traditional vibrational spectroscopies.

  18. Characterization of a Genuine Lron(V)-Nitrido Species By Nuclear Resonant Vibrational Spectroscopy Coupled to Density Functional Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, T.; George, S.D.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Bill, E.; Mienert, B.; Xiao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Cramer, S.P.; Wieghardt, K.; Neese, F.; /Bonn U., LTC /SLAC, SSRL /Max Planck Inst., Mulheim /UC, Davis /Argonne /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-19

    The characterization of high-valent iron species is of interest due to their relevance to biological reaction mechanisms. Recently, we have synthesized and characterized an [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex, which has been characterized by M{umlt o}ssbauer, magnetic susceptibility data, and XAS spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations. The results of this study indicated that the [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex is an unusual d3 system with a nearly orbitally degenerate S = 1/2 ground state. Although the calculations predicted fairly different Fe-N stretching frequencies for the S = 1/2 and the competing S = 3/2 ground states, a direct experimental determination of this important fingerprint quantity was missing. Here we apply synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational scattering (NRVS) to characterize the Fe-N stretching frequency of an Fe(V)-nitrido complex and its Fe(III)-azide precursor. The NRVS data show a new isolated band at 864 cm-1 in the Fe(V)-nitrido complex that is absent in the precursor. The NRVS spectra are fit and simulated using a DFT approach, and the new feature is unambiguously assigned to a Fe(V)-N stretch. The calculated Fe-N stretching frequency is too high by {approx}75 cm-1. Anharmonic contributions to the Fe-N stretching frequency have been evaluated and have been found to be small (-5.5 cm-1). The NRVS data provided a unique opportunity to obtain this vibrational information, which had eluded characterization by more traditional vibrational spectroscopies.

  19. Gas-enabled resonance and rectified motion of a piston in a vibrated housing filled with a viscous liquid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Romero, Louis A.; Torczynski, John R.; Clausen, Jonathan R.; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2015-11-16

    Herein, we show how introducing a small amount of gas can completely change the motion of a solid object in a viscous liquid during vibration. We analyze an idealized system exhibiting this behavior: a piston moving in a liquid-filled housing, where the gaps between the piston and the housing are narrow and depend on the piston position. Recent experiments have shown that vibration causes some gas to move below the piston and the piston to subsequently move downward and compress its supporting spring. Herein, we analyze the analogous but simpler situation in which the gas regions are replaced by bellowsmore » with similar pressure-volume relationships. We show that these bellows form a spring (analogous to the pneumatic spring formed by the gas regions) which enables the piston and the liquid to oscillate in a mode that does not exist without this spring. This mode is referred to here as the Couette mode because the liquid in the gaps moves essentially in Couette flow (i.e., with almost no component of Poiseuille flow). Since Couette flow by itself produces extremely low damping, the Couette mode has a strong resonance. We show that, near this resonance, the dependence of the gap geometry on the piston position produces a large rectified (net) force on the piston during vibration. As a result, this force can be much larger than the piston weight and the strength of its supporting spring and is in the direction that decreases the flow resistance of the gap geometry.« less

  20. Search for the giant pairing vibration through (p,t) reactions around 50 and 60 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouginot, B.; Khan, E.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Ramus, A.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stefan, I.; Neveling, R.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Usman, I.; Mabiala, J.; Mira, J. P.; Swartz, J. A.; Papka, P.

    2011-03-15

    The existence of the giant pairing vibration (GPV) in {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb was investigated using the (p,t) reaction at incident proton energies of 50 MeV and 60 MeV for the scattering angles 0 deg. and 7 deg. No clear signature for the GPV was found, providing an upper limit for the cross section of {sigma}{sub max} = 0.2 mb. Theoretical interpretations for the low cross section of the GPV are discussed.

  1. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  2. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  3. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  4. Modeling of nonlinear vibrational relaxation of large molecules in shock waves with a nonlinear, temperature-varying master equation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M. J.; Kiefer, J. H.; Chemistry; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2002-05-08

    We model recent experiments on the vibrational relaxation of oxirane in a shock tube. A master equation is developed which includes self-collisions of the oxirane, leading to a nonlinear master equation. This master equation is also applied to a more limited study of vibrational relaxation for cyclopropane in a shock tube. The time variation of the temperature dependence of the bath is also included in the calculations. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments are obtained through a fit to the energy transfer parameters. These fits demonstrate that self-collisions are dominant in promoting the relaxation even for mixtures of Kr and oxirane where the oxirane is 2% and 4% dilute. This dominance comes from two sources: (1) much larger energy transfer per collision for oxirane-oxirane collisions and (2) resonant energy transfer effects. For cyclopropane, some of the good fits show smaller energy transfer characteristics for self-collisions than buffer gas collisions. Even in these cases self-collisions are an important part of the energy transfer process through resonant energy transfer effects.

  5. SBIR Grant: œNo-Vibration Agile Cryogenic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optical Refrigerator (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SBIR Grant: œNo-Vibration Agile Cryogenic Optical Refrigerator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SBIR Grant: œNo-Vibration Agile Cryogenic Optical Refrigerator Optical refrigeration is currently the only all-solid-state cryocooling technology that has been demonstrated. Optical cryocoolers are devices that use laser light to cool small crystal or glass cooling

  6. Evidence for photo-induced monoclinic metallic VO{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin Mao, Wendy L.; Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David A.; Andrea Artioli, Gianluca; Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-13

    We combine ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy with a diamond-anvil cell to decouple the insulator-metal electronic transition from the lattice symmetry changing structural transition in the archetypal strongly correlated material vanadium dioxide. Coherent phonon spectroscopy enables tracking of the photo-excited phonon vibrational frequencies of the low temperature, monoclinic (M{sub 1})-insulating phase that transforms into the metallic, tetragonal rutile structured phase at high temperature or via non-thermal photo-excitations. We find that in contrast with ambient pressure experiments where strong photo-excitation promptly induces the electronic transition along with changes in the lattice symmetry, at high pressure, the coherent phonons of the monoclinic (M{sub 1}) phase are still clearly observed upon the photo-driven phase transition to a metallic state. These results demonstrate the possibility of synthesizing and studying transient phases under extreme conditions.

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  8. Effects of spin doping and spin injection in the luminescence and vibrational spectrum of C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moorsom, Timothy; Wheeler, May; Taukeer Khan, Mohd; Al Ma'Mari, Fatma; Burnell, Gavin; Hickey, Bryan J.; Cespedes, Oscar; Lazarov, Vlado; Gilks, Daniel

    2014-07-14

    We have studied the Raman spectrum and photoemission of hybrid magneto-fullerene devices. For C{sub 60} layers on cobalt, the spin polarized electron transfer shifts the photoemission energy, reducing the zero phonon contribution. The total luminescence of hybrid devices can be controlled via spin injection from magnetic electrodes, with changes of the order of 10%20% at room temperature. Spin polarised currents alter as well the Raman spectrum of the molecules, enhancing some modes by a factor 5 while shifting others by several wavenumbers due to a spin-dependent hopping time and/or enhanced intermolecular interactions. These results can be used to measure spin polarisation in molecules or to fabricate magneto-optic and magneto-vibrational devices.

  9. Thermolysis of (1R,2R)-1,2-dideuteriocyclobutane. An application of vibrational circular dichroism to kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chickos, J.S.; Annamalai, A.; Keiderling, T.A.

    1986-07-23

    The relative rates of geometric isomerization to racemization have been studied for the title compound by using a combination of infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies, respectively. The results are interpreted with a kinetic and mechanistic scheme which parallels that used by Berson, Pedersen, and Carpenter on a similar study of chiral cyclopropane-d/sub 2/ thermolysis. Relative rates of isomerization to stereomutation of 1.5 +/- 0.4 were obtained which can be interpreted to be consistent with a mechanism best described by random methylene rotation in tetramethylene-d/sub 2/. This is the first application of VCD to kinetic analysis, and the advantages of IR techniques over the more usually employed UV spectroscopies to this type of basic mechanistic problem are illustrated.

  10. Observation of γ-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ¹⁵⁶Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, C. -H.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Almond, J. M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cooper, N.; Curien, D.; et al

    2015-03-26

    The exact nature of the lowest Kπ=2⁺ rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the γ degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such γ-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ¹⁵⁶Dy, using the ¹⁴⁸Nd(¹²C,4n)¹⁵⁶Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting γ-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the π=2⁺ γ-band are observed to 32⁺ and 31⁺ respectively.more » This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible γ-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28⁺ and 27⁺. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24⁺, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0₂⁺ state at 676 keV. As a result, the crossing of this band with the 0₂⁺ band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0₂⁺ band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.« less

  11. Decomposition and vibrational relaxation in CH{sub 3}I and self-reaction of CH{sub 3} radicals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X.; Goldsmith, C. F.; Tranter, R. S.

    2009-07-01

    Vibrational relaxation and dissociation of CH{sub 3}I, 2-20% in krypton, have been investigated behind incident shock waves in a diaphragmless shock tube at 20, 66, 148, and 280 Torr and 630-2200 K by laser schlieren densitometry. The effective collision energy obtained from the vibrational relaxation experiments has a small, positive temperature dependence, {Delta}E{sub down} = 63 x (T/298){sup 0.56} cm{sup -1}. First-order rate coefficients for dissociation of CH{sub 3}I show a strong pressure dependence and are close to the low-pressure limit. Restricted-rotor Gorin model RRKM calculations fit the experimental results very well with {Delta}E{sub down} = 378 x (T/298){sup 0.457} cm{sup -1}. The secondary chemistry of this reaction system is dominated by reactions of methyl radicals and the reaction of the H atom with CH{sub 3}I. The results of the decomposition experiments are very well simulated with a model that incorporates methyl recombination and reactions of methylene. Second-order rate coefficients for ethane dissociation to two methyl radicals were derived from the experiments and yield k = (4.50 {+-} 0.50) x 10{sup 17} exp(-32709/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, in good agreement with previous measurements. Rate coefficients for H + CH{sub 3}I were also obtained and give k = (7.50 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup 13} exp(-601/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, in reasonable agreement with a previous experimental value.

  12. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 The magnetic-recording industry deliberately...

  13. Microscopic Description of Induced Nuclear Fission (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopic Description of Induced Nuclear Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic Description of Induced Nuclear Fission You are accessing a document...

  14. On the use of the double floating probe method to infer the difference between the electron and the heavy particles temperatures in an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, L. Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.; Instituto de Fsica del Plasma , Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires

    2014-05-15

    Sweeping double probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current vortex-stabilized plasma jet are reported (plasma conditions: 100 A discharge current, N{sub 2} gas flow rate of 25 Nl/min, thoriated tungsten rod-type cathode, copper anode with 5 mm inner diameter). The interpretation of the double probe characteristic was based on a generalization of the standard double floating probe formulae for non-uniform plasmas coupled to a non-equilibrium plasma composition model. Perturbations caused by the current to the probe together with collisional and thermal processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Radial values of the average electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. The calculation of the temperature values did not require any specific assumption about a temperature relationship between different particle species. An electron temperature of 10?900 900 K, a heavy particle temperature of 9300 900 K, and an electron density of about 3.5 10{sup 22} m{sup ?3} were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found toward the outer border of the plasma jet. These results showed good agreement with those previously reported by the authors by using a single probe technique. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma torches operated at power levels of about 15 kW.

  15. Coherent orbital waves during an Ultrafast Photo-induced Isulator-metal Transition in a magnetoresistive manganite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ULTRAS-INFM-CNR Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Italy; Department of Physics - Cavalleri Group, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, U.K.; Correlated Electron Research Center, Tsukuba, Japan; Schoenlein, Robert William; Polli, D.; Rini, M.; Wall, S.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Cerullo, G.; Cavalleri, A.

    2007-06-01

    Photo-excitation can drive strongly correlated electron insulators into competing conducting phases1,2, resulting in giant and ultrafast changes of their electronic and magnetic properties. The underlying non-equilibrium dynamics involve many degrees of freedom at once, whereby sufficiently short optical pulses can trigger the corresponding collective modes of the solid along temporally coherent pathways. The characteristic frequencies of these modes range between the few GHz of acoustic vibrations3 to the tens or even hundreds of THz for purely electronic excitations. Virtually all experiments so far have used 100 fs or longer pulses, detecting only comparatively slow lattice dynamics4,5. Here, we use sub-10-fs optical pulses to study the photo-induced insulator-metal transition in the magneto-resistive manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3. At room temperature, we find that the time-dependent pathway towards the metallic phase is accompanied by coherent 31 THz oscillations of the optical reflectivity, significantly faster than all lattice vibrations. These high-frequency oscillations are suggestive of coherent orbital waves6,7, crystal-field excitations triggered here by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. Orbital waves are likely to be initially localized to the small polarons of this room-temperature manganite, coupling to other degrees of freedom at longer times, as photo-domains coalesce into a metallic phase.

  16. Rotovibrational collision-induced absorption by nonpolar gases and mixtures (H/sub 2/-He pairs): Symmetry of line profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moraldi, M.; Borysow, A.; Frommhold, L.

    1988-08-15

    Intermolecular-interaction potentials depend on the vibrational coordinates of the molecules involved. We study the effect of this v dependence (as we will call it for brevity) on the symmetry of line shapes of rotovibrational collision-induced-absorption (RVCIA) spectra of collisional complexes such as H/sub 2/-He or H/sub 2/-H/sub 2/. If the v dependence is ignored, individual line shapes GAMMA(..omega..) of CIA spectra satisfy the widely used ''detailed balance'' relationship GAMMA(-..omega..) = e/sup -//sup (h/2..pi..)//sup ..omega..//sup ///sup k//sup T/GAMMA(..omega..), where ..omega.. designates the frequency shift relative to the molecular transition frequency, and T the temperature. However, if one accounts for the v dependence, the symmetry of a computed profile is modified significantly, the more so the higher the temperature and the higher the vibrational overtones one considers. These differing symmetries are described in quantitative terms that are of interest in modeling or analyzing RVCIA spectra. This paper may be considered the second, concluding part of our theoretical study of the influence of the v dependence on RVCIA spectra; the previous part (Phys. Rev. A 36, 4700 (1987)) deals with the influence of the v dependence on the integrated intensities (spectral moments) of RVCIA spectra.

  17. Resonant Vibrations Resulting from the Re-Engineering of a Constant-Speed 2-Bladed Turbine to a Variable-Speed 3-Bladed Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Wright, A. D.; Finersh, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanced controls field-testing platform which has the more typical 3-bladed configuration. A result of this conversion was the emergence of several resonant vibrations, some of which initially prevented operation of the turbine until they could be explained and resolved. In this paper, the investigations into these vibrations are presented as 'lessons-learned'. Additionally, a frequency-domain technique called waterfall plotting is discussed and its usefulness in this research is illustrated.

  18. Aircraft gas-turbine engines: Noise reduction and vibration control. (Latest citations from Information Services in Mechanical Engineering data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and analysis of aircraft gas turbine engines with respect to noise and vibration control. Included are studies regarding the measurement and reduction of noise at its source, within the aircraft, and on the ground. Inlet, nozzle and core aerodynamic studies are cited. Propfan, turbofan, turboprop engines, and applications in short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft are included. (Contains a minimum of 202 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  20. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. [Spiropyrans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in [approximately]240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH[sub 2]I[sub 2] and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a [approximately]350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  2. Low-lying dipole excitations in vibrational nuclei: The Cd isotopic chain studied in photon scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohstall, C.; Belic, D.; Kneissl, U.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H.H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Yates, S.W.

    2005-09-01

    High-resolution nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) were performed on {sup 110,111,112,114,116}Cd at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3-MV Dynamitron accelerator in Stuttgart to study the low-lying dipole strength distributions in these vibrational nuclei. Numerous excited states, most of them previously unknown, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, spins, decay widths, decay branchings, and transition probabilities. For states in the even-even isotopes {sup 110,112,114,116}Cd, parities could be assigned from linear polarization measurements. Together with our previous results for {sup 108,112,113,114}Cd from NRF studies without polarization measurements, systematics was established for the dipole strength distributions of the stable nuclei within the Cd isotopic chain. The results are discussed with respect to the systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations and mixed-symmetry states in even-even nuclei near the Z=50 shell closure and the fragmentation of these excitation modes in the odd-mass Cd isotopes.

  3. Consistency in the Sum Frequency Generation Intensity and Phase Vibrational Spectra of the Air/Neat Water Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Ranran; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Rong; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2011-06-16

    Tremendous progresses have been made in quantitative understanding and interpretation of the hydrogen bonding and ordering structure at the air/water interface since the first sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) measurement on the neat air/water interface by Q. Du et al. in 1993 (PRL, 70, 2312-2316, 1993.). However, there are still disagreements and controversies on the consistency between the different experiment measurements and the theoretical computational results. One critical problem lies in the inconsistency between the SFG-VS intensity measurements and the recently developed SFG-VS phase spectra measurements of the neat air/water interface, which has inspired various theoretical efforts trying to understand them. In this report, the reliability of the SFG-VS intensity spectra of the neat air/water interface is to be quantitatively examined, and the sources of possible inaccuracies in the SFG-VS phase spectral measurement is to be discussed based on the non-resonant SHG phase measurement results. The conclusion is that the SFG-VS intensity spectra data from different laboratories are now quantitatively converging and in agreement with each other, and the possible inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the SFG-VS phase spectra measurements need to be carefully examined against the properly corrected phase standard.

  4. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S{sub 1}(?,?{sup *}) electronic state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Laane, Jaan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2014-01-21

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S{sub 1}(?,?{sup *}) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(?,?{sup *}) electronic states. In each case the decreased ? bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(?,?{sup *}) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S{sub 1}(?,?{sup *}) excited state.

  5. Matrix effect on vibrational frequencies: Experiments and simulations for HCl and HNgCl (Ng = Kr and Xe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Rsnen, Markku; Lignell, Antti; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Gerber, R. Benny; Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel and Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697

    2014-03-07

    We study the environmental effect on molecules embedded in noble-gas (Ng) matrices. The experimental data on HXeCl and HKrCl in Ng matrices is enriched. As a result, the H?Xe stretching bands of HXeCl are now known in four Ng matrices (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe), and HKrCl is now known in Ar and Kr matrices. The order of the H?Xe stretching frequencies of HXeCl in different matrices is ?(Ne) < ?(Xe) < ?(Kr) < ?(Ar), which is a non-monotonous function of the dielectric constant, in contrast to the classical order observed for HCl: ?(Xe) < ?(Kr) < ?(Ar) < ?(Ne). The order of the H?Kr stretching frequencies of HKrCl is consistently ?(Kr) < ?(Ar). These matrix effects are analyzed theoretically by using a number of quantum chemical methods. The calculations on these molecules (HCl, HXeCl, and HKrCl) embedded in single Ng{sup ?} layer cages lead to very satisfactory results with respect to the relative matrix shifts in the case of the MP4(SDQ) method whereas the B3LYP-D and MP2 methods fail to fully reproduce these experimental results. The obtained order of frequencies is discussed in terms of the size available for the Ng hydrides in the cages, probably leading to different stresses on the embedded molecule. Taking into account vibrational anharmonicity produces a good agreement of the MP4(SDQ) frequencies of HCl and HXeCl with the experimental values in different matrices. This work also highlights a number of open questions in the field.

  6. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kweskin, S.J.

    2006-05-19

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non-equilibrium states contribute to practical applications of acrylates, blends and hydrogels. Lastly, nanoparticle surfaces and the catalytic activity and selectivity of platinum cube nanoparticles are correlated to the surface intermediates in a high pressure flow reactor.

  7. Laser-induced incandescence (LII)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    induced incandescence (LII) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  8. Laser Induced Spectroscopy - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Induced Spectroscopy Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL's Laser Induced Spectroscopy technology detects and measures the composition of a material or the molecules in the material. It traces the constituents of the material by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The technology measures the decay emission values of the excited absorption state and compares it to decay

  9. 2D heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation study on the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of H{sub 2}O and HOD water at charged interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Ken-ichi; Singh, Prashant C.; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectroscopy is applied to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of water at positively charged aqueous interfaces, and 2D HD-VSFG spectra of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/water interfaces in the whole hydrogen-bonded OH stretch region (3000 cm{sup ?1} ? ?{sub pump} ? 3600 cm{sup ?1}) are measured. 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/isotopically diluted water (HOD-D{sub 2}O) interface exhibits a diagonally elongated bleaching lobe immediately after excitation, which becomes round with a time constant of ?0.3 ps due to spectral diffusion. In contrast, 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface at 0.0 ps clearly shows two diagonal peaks and their cross peaks in the bleaching region, corresponding to the double peaks observed at 3230 cm{sup ?1} and 3420 cm{sup ?1} in the steady-state HD-VSFG spectrum. Horizontal slices of the 2D spectrum show that the relative intensity of the two peaks of the bleaching at the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface gradually change with the change of the pump frequency. We simulate the pump-frequency dependence of the bleaching feature using a model that takes account of the Fermi resonance and inhomogeneity of the OH stretch vibration, and the simulated spectra reproduce the essential features of the 2D HD-VSFG spectra of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface. The present study demonstrates that heterodyne detection of the time-resolved VSFG is critically important for studying the ultrafast dynamics of water interfaces and for unveiling the underlying mechanism.

  10. AFIP-6 MKII First Cycle Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-03-01

    The first fuel plate frame assembly of the AFIP-6 MKII experiment was irradiated as planned from December, 2011 through February, 2012 in the center flux trap of the Advanced Test Reactor during cycle 151A. Following irradiation in this cycle and while reconfiguring the experiment in the ATR canal, a non-fueled component (the bottom plate) of the first fuel plate frame assembly became separated from the rail sides. There is no evidence that the fueled region of the fuel plate frame assembly was compromised by this incident or the irradiation conditions. The separation of this component was determined to have been caused by flow induced vibrations, where vortex shedding frequencies were resonant with a natural frequency of the bottom plate component. This gave way to amplification, fracture, and separation from the assembly. Although parallel flow induced vibrations were analyzed, vortex shedding flow induced vibrations was an unfamiliar failure mode that was difficult to identify. Both the once-irradiated first fuel plate and un-irradiated second fuel plate frame assemblies were planned for irradiation in the subsequent cycle 151B. The AFIP-6 MKII experiment was excluded from irradiation in cycle 151B because non-trivial design modifications would be needed to mitigate this type of incident during the second irradiation cycle. All items of the experiment hardware were accounted for and cycle 151B occurred with a non-fueled AFIP backup assembly in the center flux trap. Options for completion of the AFIP-6 MKII experiment campaign are presented and future preventative actions are recommended.

  11. Measurement of vibrational, gas, and rotational temperatures of H{sub 2} (X{sup 1} {sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) in radio frequency inductive discharge plasma by multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakhatov, V.A.; De Pascale, O.; Capitelli, M.; Hassouni, K.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.

    2005-02-01

    Translational, rotational, and vibrational temperatures of H{sub 2} in radio frequency inductive discharge plasmas at pressures and power release ranges, respectively, of 0.5-8 torr and 0.5-2 W/cm{sup 3} have been measured by using multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. Computational codes have been developed to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures and to analyze H{sub 2} CARS spectrum for nonequilibrium conditions. The results show a decrease of the vibrational temperature from 4250 to 2800 K by increasing the pressure from 0.5 to 8 torr and a corresponding increase of the rotational temperature from 525 to 750 K.

  12. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  13. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  14. Benchmark atomization energy of ethane : importance of accurate zero-point vibrational energies and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections for a 'simple' organic molecule.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karton, A.; Martin, J. M. L.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Weizmann Institute of Science

    2007-06-01

    A benchmark calculation of the atomization energy of the 'simple' organic molecule C2H6 (ethane) has been carried out by means of W4 theory. While the molecule is straightforward in terms of one-particle and n-particle basis set convergence, its large zero-point vibrational energy (and anharmonic correction thereto) and nontrivial diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC) represent interesting challenges. For the W4 set of molecules and C2H6, we show that DBOCs to the total atomization energy are systematically overestimated at the SCF level, and that the correlation correction converges very rapidly with the basis set. Thus, even at the CISD/cc-pVDZ level, useful correlation corrections to the DBOC are obtained. When applying such a correction, overall agreement with experiment was only marginally improved, but a more significant improvement is seen when hydrogen-containing systems are considered in isolation. We conclude that for closed-shell organic molecules, the greatest obstacles to highly accurate computational thermochemistry may not lie in the solution of the clamped-nuclei Schroedinger equation, but rather in the zero-point vibrational energy and the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction.

  15. Communication: Ro-vibrational control of chemical reactivity in H+CH{sub 4}→ H{sub 2}+CH{sub 3} : Full-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations and a sudden model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, Ralph Manthe, Uwe

    2014-08-07

    The mode-selective chemistry of the title reaction is studied by full-dimensional quantum dynamics simulation on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface for vanishing total angular momentum. Using a rigorous transition state based approach and multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree wave packet propagation, initial state-selected reaction probabilities for many ro-vibrational states of methane are calculated. The theoretical results are compared with experimental trends seen in reactions of methane. An intuitive interpretation of the ro-vibrational control of the chemical reactivity provided by a sudden model based on the quantum transition state concept is discussed.

  16. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scholl, and H.W. Zhao. Research conducted by J. Wu, D. Carlton, J.S. Park, J. Bokor, and Z.Q. Qiu (University of Califoria, Berkeley); Y. Meng (UC Berkeley and Institute of...

  17. Vortex lattices and crystalline geometries (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Accepted...

  18. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    central disc experience a magnetic field produced by the surrounding Fe film. This localized field has limited effect on photemitted electrons, enabling PEEM studies of the...

  19. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  20. Collision-induced infrared spectra of H2-He pairs at temperatures from 18 to 7000 K. II. Overtone and hot bands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, A.; Frommhold, L.; Texas Univ., Austin )

    1989-06-01

    The three lowest spectral moments of the collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of H2-He pairs have been computed from first principles for temperatures T from 18 to 7000 K for a number of hydrogen overtone and hot bands involving vibrational quantum numbers nu = 0, 1, 2, 3 yields nu-prime = 0, 1, 2, 3. The data are given in a form suitable for the computation of CIA spectra of H2-He as function of frequency and temperature, using simple computer codes and model line shapes. The work is of interest for the spectroscopy of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of stars that contain neutral molecular hydrogen and helium (late stars, white dwarfs, and Population II stars) in the infrared and visible region of the spectrum. 13 refs.

  1. Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Feedback Contact needs updating...

  2. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired...

  3. Photon Induced Positron Annihilation (PIPA) - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    define a non-destructive testing technology that uses photon induced positrons to measure volumetric changes in the lattice structure of metals, polymers, and ceramic components....

  4. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  5. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Teng, H. Henry PI, The George Washington University PI, The George...

  6. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Mica, biotite, muscovite, diopside, tremolite, ultramafic rock, hematite, Ca-Mg-carbonate, calcite, aragonite, dolomite, crystal nucleation,

  7. Solvent-induced forces in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Naim, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-08-23

    The solvent-induced forces between various groups on the protein are examined. It is found that the intramolecular hydrophilic forces are likely to be the strongest forces mediated through the solvent. It is argued that these are probably the most important solvent-induced driving forces in the process of protein folding.

  8. Structural, dynamic, electronic, and vibrational properties of flexible, intermediate, and stressed rigid As-Se glasses and liquids from first principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauchy, M.; Kachmar, A.; Micoulaut, M.

    2014-11-21

    The structural, vibrational, electronic, and dynamic properties of amorphous and liquid As{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} (0.10

  9. Spatially resolved penetration depth measurements and vortex manipulation in the ferromagnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulferding, Dirk; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Lee, Minkyung; Choi, Hee Cheul; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-07-31

    We present a local probe study of the magnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C, using magnetic force microscopy at sub-Kelvin temperatures. ErNi2B2C is an ideal system to explore the effects of concomitant superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At 500 mK, far below the transition to a weakly ferromagnetic state, we directly observe a structured magnetic background on the micrometer scale. We determine spatially resolved absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth ? and study its temperature dependence as the system undergoes magnetic phase transitions from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and to weak ferromagnetic, all within the superconducting regime. We estimate the absolute pinning force of Abrikosov vortices, which shows a position dependence and temperature dependence as well, and discuss the possibility of the purported spontaneous vortex formation.

  10. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  11. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represent ... F. Barone Wind Energy Technologies Department Sandia ... The three-dimensional flow induced by the blade tip vortex ...

  12. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... aims to bring the future of tropical forests into much clearer focus - 4115 A simulation of vortex induced motion shows how ocean currents affect offshore oil rigs. ...

  13. All News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... received 2014 Performance Excellence Recognition awards from Quality New Mexico - 32615 A simulation of vortex induced motion shows how ocean currents affect offshore oil rigs. ...

  14. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration We have approached the long-standing geochemical question why anhydrous high-Mg carbonate minerals (i.e., magnesite and dolomite) cannot be formed at

  15. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over

  16. Sandia Energy - BES Highlight: Stress-Induced NanoparticleCrystalliza...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlight: Stress-Induced Nanoparticle Crystallization Home Highlights - Energy Research BES Highlight: Stress-Induced Nanoparticle Crystallization Previous Next BES Highlight:...

  17. Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous power-distribution feeder Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fault-induced delayed voltage ...

  18. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems This...

  19. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  20. Behavior of tritium permeation induced by water corrosion of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    induced by water corrosion of alpha iron around room temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Behavior of tritium permeation induced by water corrosion of ...

  1. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene ...

  2. Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron ...

  3. Encapsulant-based Solution to Potential Induced Degradation of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulant-based Solution to Potential Induced Degradation of Photovoltaic Modules Encapsulant-based Solution to Potential Induced Degradation of Photovoltaic Modules Presented at ...

  4. Radiation-induced mechanical property changes in filled rubber...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation-induced mechanical property changes in filled rubber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiation-induced mechanical property changes in filled rubber Authors:...

  5. T invariance and T-odd asymmetries for the cold-polarized-neutron-induced fission of nonoriented nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Bunakov, V. E. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that the coefficients D{sup exp} for all T-odd asymmetries observed experimentally in the cross sections for the reactions of cold-polarized-neutron-induced fission of nonoriented target nuclei (which involves the emission of prescission and evaporated particles) comply in shape and scale with the coefficients D{sup theor} calculated for the analogous asymmetries on the basis of quantum-mechanical nuclear-fission theory for T-invariant Hamiltonians of fissile systems. It is also shown that the asymmetries in question arise upon taking into account the effect of (i) the interference between the fission amplitudes of s- and p-wave resonances of a polarized fissile compound nucleus formed in the aforementioned reactions; (ii) the collective rotation of the compound nucleus in question (this rotation entails a change in the angular distributions of fission fragments and third particles); and (iii) the wriggling vibrations of this compound nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point, which lead to the appearance of high aligned spins of fission fragments, with the result that the emission of neutrons and photons evaporated from these fragments becomes anisotropic. The possible contribution of T-noninvariant interactions to the formation of the T-odd asymmetries under analysis is estimated by using the results obtained in experimentally testing the detailed-balance principle, (P-A) theorem, and T invariance of cross sections for elastic proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering.

  6. Shape Transitional Nuclei: What can we learn from the Yrare States? or Hello the Double Vacuum; Goodbye {beta}-vibrations{exclamation_point}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Mullins, S. M.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Kau, J.; Komati, F.; Lawrie, J. J.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Maine, P.; Minkova, A.; Vymers, P.

    2008-05-12

    The results of our measurements on the yrare states up to spin 20({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) in {sup 152,154,155}Gd, using ({alpha},xn) reactions and the AFRODITE {gamma}-ray spectrometer, are presented. We find that in {sup 155}Gd the decay scheme is divided into levels feeding the [505]11/2{sup -} band, that is extruded by the prolate deformation from the h{sub 11/2} orbital, and levels feeding the i{sub 13/2}[651]3/2{sup +} intruder orbital and the h{sub 9/2}[521]3/2{sup -} orbital. The decay scheme of {sup 154}Gd is very complex. We find no evidence for the existence of {beta}-vibrational levels below 1.5 MeV. We discover that the level scheme can be best understood as a set of collective states built on the ground state configuration |0{sub 1}{sup +}> plus a 'congruent' set of collective states based on the |0{sub 2}{sup +}> state at 681 keV. The data suggest that this second vacuum has reduced pairing. Our data do not support IBA and phonon interpretations of these transitional nuclei.

  7. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-08-19

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  8. Hydrogenation of the alpha,beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde, and Prenal over Pt Single Crystals: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kliewer, C.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-11-26

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the surface reaction intermediates during the hydrogenation of three {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal, over Pt(111) at Torr pressures (1 Torr aldehyde, 100 Torr hydrogen) in the temperature range of 295K to 415K. SFG-VS data showed that acrolein has mixed adsorption species of {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-trans, {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-cis as well as highly coordinated {eta}{sub 3} or {eta}{sub 4} species. Crotonaldehyde adsorbed to Pt(111) as {eta}{sub 2} surface intermediates. SFG-VS during prenal hydrogenation also suggested the presence of the {eta}{sub 2} adsorption species, and became more highly coordinated as the temperature was raised to 415K, in agreement with its enhanced C=O hydrogenation. The effect of catalyst surface structure was clarified by carrying out the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over both Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals while acquiring the SFG-VS spectra in situ. Both the kinetics and SFG-VS showed little structure sensitivity. Pt(100) generated more decarbonylation 'cracking' product while Pt(111) had a higher selectivity for the formation of the desired unsaturated alcohol, crotylalcohol.

  9. Survey of the high resolution infrared spectrum of methane ({sup 12}CH{sub 4} and {sup 13}CH{sub 4}): Partial vibrational assignment extended towards 12000 cm{sup ?1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulenikov, O. N.; Bekhtereva, E. S.; Albert, S.; Bauerecker, S.; Niederer, H. M.; Quack, M.

    2014-12-21

    We have recorded the complete infrared spectrum of methane {sup 12}CH{sub 4} and its second most abundant isotopomer {sup 13}CH{sub 4} extending from the fundamental range starting at 1000 cm{sup ?1} up to the overtone region near 12000 cm{sup ?1} in the near infrared at the limit towards the visible range, at temperatures of about 80 K and also at 298 K with Doppler limited resolution in the gas phase by means of interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy using the Bruker IFS 125 HR prototype (ZP 2001) of the ETH Zrich laboratory. This provides the so far most complete data set on methane spectra in this range at high resolution. In the present work we report in particular those results, where the partial rovibrational analysis allows for the direct assignment of pure (J = 0) vibrational levels including high excitation. These results substantially extend the accurate knowledge of vibrational band centers to higher energies and provide a benchmark for both the comparison with theoretical results on the one hand and atmospheric spectroscopy on the other hand. We also present a simple effective Hamiltonian analysis, which is discussed in terms of vibrational level assignments and {sup 13}C isotope effects.

  10. SULFUR CHEMISTRY IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: THE EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION OF H{sub 2} IN THE REACTION S{sup +}+H{sub 2} →SH{sup +}+H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Herrero, Victor J.; Agúndez, Marcelino; Aguado, Alfredo; Roncero, Octavio

    2013-11-01

    Specific rate constants for the S{sup +}+H{sub 2} reaction are calculated using the ground quartet state potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectories method. The calculations are performed for H{sub 2} in different vibrational states v = 0-4 and thermal conditions for rotational and translational energies. The calculations lead to slow rate constants for the H{sub 2} vibrational levels v = 0, 1, but a significant enhancement of reactivity is observed when v > 1. The inverse reaction is also studied and rate constants for v = 0 are presented. For comparison, we also recompile previous results of state-to-state rate constants of the C{sup +}+H{sub 2} for H{sub 2} in rovibrational state v, j = (0,0), (1,0), (1,1), and (2,0). The calculated rate coefficients are fitted using an improved form of the standard three-parameter Arrhenius-like equation, which is found to be very accurate in fitting rate constants over a wide range of temperatures (10-4000 K). We investigate the impact of the calculated rate coefficients on the formation of SH{sup +} in the photon-dominated region Orion Bar and find an abundance enhancement of nearly three orders of magnitude when the reaction of S{sup +} with vibrationally excited H{sub 2} is taken into account. The title reaction is thus one of the principal mechanisms in forming SH{sup +} in interstellar clouds.

  11. Magnetomechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causado-Buelvas, Jesus D.; Gomez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Torres, Pedro

    2008-04-15

    In this work, we report a simple, flexible method to create long period fiber gratings mechanically by controlling the repulsion/attraction force between two magnets that pressing a plate with a periodic array of small glass cylinders to a short length of optical fiber. Via the photoelastic effect, the pressure points induce the required periodic refractive index modulation to create the LPFG. We found that the induced device exhibits spectral characteristics similar to those of other types of LPFG. As the optical properties of LPFGs are directly related to the nature of the applied perturbations, we show, to our knowledge for the frrst time, how is the evolution of birefringence effects in mechanically induced LPFGs.

  12. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  13. Impurity-induced moments in underdoped cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaliullin, G.; Kilian, R.; Krivenko, S.; Fulde, P.

    1997-11-01

    We examine the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity in a two-dimensional spin liquid in the spin-gap phase, employing a drone-fermion representation of spin-1/2 operators. The properties of the local moment induced in the vicinity of the impurity are investigated and an expression for the nuclear-magnetic-resonance Knight shift is derived, which we compare with experimental results. Introducing a second impurity into the spin liquid an antiferromagnetic interaction between the moments is found when the two impurities are located on different sublattices. The presence of many impurities leads to a screening of this interaction as is shown by means of a coherent-potential approximation. Further, the Kondo screening of an impurity-induced local spin by charge carriers is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown for combustion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotzagianni, M.; Couris, S.

    2012-06-25

    The focused beam of a 100 fs, 800 nm laser is used to induce a spark in some laminar premixed air-methane flames operating with variable fuel content (equivalence ratio). The analysis of the light escaping from the plasma revealed that the Balmer hydrogen lines, H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}}, and some molecular origin emissions were the most prominent spectral features, while the CN ({Beta}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-{Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) band intensity was found to depend linearly with methane content, suggesting that femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be a useful tool for the in-situ determination and local mapping of fuel content in hydrocarbon-air combustible mixtures.

  15. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alkali metals in high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    alkali metals in high-temperature gas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alkali metals in high-temperature gas Laser-induced ...

  17. Study Determines Wind-Induced Cycling Impacts are Minimal | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study Determines Wind-Induced Cycling Impacts are Minimal Study Determines Wind-Induced Cycling Impacts are Minimal January 10, 2013 - 2:34pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the ...

  18. electrochemical battery stress-induced degradation mechanisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrochemical battery stress-induced degradation mechanisms - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle

  19. Electrically induced mechanical precompression of ferroelectric plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, P.J.

    1987-03-02

    A method of electrically inducing mechanical precompression of ferroelectric plate covered with electrodes utilizes the change in strains of the plate as functions of applied electric field. A first field polarizes and laterally shrinks the entire plate. An outer portion of the electrodes are removed, and an opposite field partially depolarizes and expands the central portion of the plate against the shrunk outer portion. 2 figs.

  20. Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2006-09-26

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

  1. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  2. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  3. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  4. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  5. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  6. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-07

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ionmore » transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. As a result, the implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.« less

  7. Erratum: "Composition- and pressure-induced ferroelectric to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Erratum: "Composition- and pressure-induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase ... Show Author Affiliations Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania ...

  8. Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization

  9. Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Project objectives: To develop a combination of techniques to evaluate the relationship between EGS operations and the induced stress changes throughout the reservoir and the surrounding country rock. PDF icon seismicity_gritto_induced_seismicity.pdf More Documents & Publications Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

  10. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H+(H2O)n=2 28 Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-07-09

    In this Article, we review the role of gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H+(H2O)n, in the analysis of the microscopic mechanics responsible for the behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. We extend upon previous studies of the smaller, two-dimensional sheet-like structures to larger (n?10) assemblies with three-dimensional cage morphologies which better mimic the bulk environment. Indeed, clusters in which a complete second solvation shell forms around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield vibrational spectra where the signatures of the proton defect display strikingly similar positions and breadth to those observed in dilute acids. We investigate effects of the local structure and intermolecular interactions on the large red shifts observed in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth using various theoretical methods. We show that, in addition to sizeable anharmonic couplings, the position of the excess proton vibration can be traced to large increases in the electric field exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. MAJ acknowledges support from the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02- 06ER15800 as well as the facilities and staff of the Yale University Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Center, and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS 08-21132 that partially funded acquisition of the facilities. SMK and SSX acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  11. Franck-Condon transitions in a system with large-amplitude anharmonic vibrations coupled to a harmonic-oscillator bath: Application to the C 1s photoelectron spectrum of ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-samha, M.; Boerve, K. J.

    2006-10-15

    A vibrational adiabatic approach to Franck-Condon analysis is presented for systems with a few highly displaced oscillators coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The model reduces the many-coupled-oscillator problem to few-body problems, albeit with corrections due to coupling to harmonic modes. The theory is applied with very good results to the carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum of ethanol, which is strongly influenced by change in conformation from gauche to anti when ethanol is ionized at the methyl site.

  12. Direct non-Born-Oppenheimer variational calculations of all bound vibrational states corresponding to the first rotational excitation of D{sub 2} performed with explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-05-07

    Direct variational calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not assumed are done for all rovibrational states of the D{sub 2} molecule corresponding to first excited rotational level (the N = 1 states). All-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are used in the calculations. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized with the aid of analytically calculated energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results allow to determine the ortho-para spin isomerization energies as a function of the vibrational quantum number.

  13. First Principles Simulation of the Bonding, Vibrational, and Electronic Properties of the Hydration Shells of the High-Spin Fe3+ Ion in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogatko, Stuart A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, John H.

    2010-02-11

    Results of parameter-free first principles simulations of a spin up 3d5 Fe3+ ion hydrated in an aqueous solution (64 waters, 30 ps, 300 K) are reported. The first hydration shell associated with the first maximum of the radial distribution function, gFeO(r), at d(Fe?OI) = 2.11?2.15 , contains 6 waters with average d(OH) = 0.99 , in good agreement with observations. A second shell with average coordination number 13.3 can be identified with average shell radius of d(Fe?OII) = 4.21?4.32 . The waters in this hydration shell are coordinated to the first shell via a trigonal H-bond network with d(OI?OII) = 2.7?2.9 , also in agreement with experimental measurements. The first shell tilt angle average is 33.4 as compared to the reported value of 41. Wannier?Boys orbitals (WBO) show an interaction between the unoccupied 3d orbitals of the Fe3+ valence (spin up, 3d5) and the occupied spin down lone pair orbitals of first shell waters. The effect of the spin ordering of the Fe3+ ion on the WBO is not observed beyond the first shell. From this local bond analysis and consistent with other observations, the electronic structure of waters in the second shell is similar to that of a bulk water even in this strongly interacting system. H-bond decomposition shows significant bulk-like structure within the second shell for Fe3+. The vibrational density of states shows a first shell red shift of 230 cm?1 for the v1,2v2,v3 overtone, in reasonable agreement with experimental estimates for trivalent cations (300 cm?1). No exchanges between first and second shell were observed. Waters in the second shell exchanged with bulk waters via dissociative and associative mechanisms. Results are compared with an AIMD study of Al3+ and 64 waters. For Fe3+ the average first shell tilt angle is larger and the tilt angle distribution wider. H-bond decomposition shows that second shell to second shell H-bonding is enhanced in Fe3+ suggesting an earlier onset of bulk-like water structure.

  14. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a diagnostic tool. Broken Symmetry, Forbidden Transitions Philosopher of science Karl Popper once described science as "the art of systematic oversimplification." Indeed,...

  15. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forbidden Transitions Philosopher of science Karl Popper once described science as "the art of systematic oversimplification." Indeed, many valuable insights can be gained by...

  16. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn...

  17. Laser induced rovibrational cooling of the linear polyatomic ion C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb, Nabanita; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2014-04-28

    The laser-induced blackbody-assisted rotational cooling of a linear polyatomic ion, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +}, in its {sup 2}? ground electronic state in the presence of the blackbody radiation field at 300 K and 77 K is investigated theoretically using a rate-equations model. Although pure rotational transitions are forbidden in this non-polar species, the ?{sub 5} cis-bending mode is infrared active and the (1-0) band of this mode strongly overlaps the 300 K blackbody spectrum. Hence the lifetimes of state-selected rotational levels are found to be short compared to the typical timescale of ion trapping experiments. The ?{sub 5} (1-0) transition is split by the Renner-Teller coupling of vibrational and electronic angular momentum, and by the spin-orbit coupling, into six principal components and these effects are included in the calculations. In this paper, a rotational-cooling scheme is proposed that involves simultaneous pumping of a set of closely spaced Q-branch transitions on the {sup 2}?{sub 5/2} ? {sup 2}?{sub 3/2} band together with two Q-branch lines in the {sup 2}?{sup +} ? {sup 2}?{sub 1/2} band. It is shown that this should lead to >70% of total population in the lowest rotational level at 300 K and over 99% at 77 K. In principle, the multiple Q-branch lines could be pumped with just two broad-band (??? = 0.43 cm{sup ?1}) infrared lasers.

  18. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  19. Allostery through protein-induced DNA bubbles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Traverso, Joseph J.; Manoranjan, Valipuram S.; Bishop, A. R.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2015-03-12

    Allostery through DNA is increasingly recognized as an important modulator of DNA functions. Here, we show that the coalescence of protein-induced DNA bubbles can mediate allosteric interactions that drive protein aggregation. We propose that such allostery may regulate DNA's flexibility and the assembly of the transcription machinery. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a dual-function protein involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) packaging and transcription initiation, is an ideal candidate to test such a hypothesis owing to its ability to locally unwind the double helix. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the coalescence of TFAM-induced bubbles can explain experimentally observed TFAM oligomerization. The resultingmore » melted DNA segment, approximately 10 base pairs long, around the joints of the oligomers act as flexible hinges, which explains the efficiency of TFAM in compacting DNA. Since mitochondrial polymerase (mitoRNAP) is involved in melting the transcription bubble, TFAM may use the same allosteric interaction to both recruit mitoRNAP and initiate transcription.« less

  20. Neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayakawa, Takehito

    2012-11-12

    The neutrino-induced reactions in supernova explosions produce some rare odd-odd nuclides. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of the supernova production ratio of the long-lived isomeric state of {sup 180}Ta. This time-dependent solution is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this isotope. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta using the available nuclear data avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a {nu}-process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV. An unstable isotope {sup 92}Nb decays to {sup 92}Zr with a half-life of 3.47 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} years. We have proposed the {nu}-process origin for {sup 92}Nb. We calculate key neutrino-induced reactions and supernova {nu}-process. Our calculated result shows that the abundance of {sup 92}Nb can be explained by the {nu}-process.