Sample records for vortex induced vibrations

  1. Vortex-induced vibration of slender structures in unsteady flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Jung-Chi, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) results in fatigue damage of offshore oil exploration and production structures. In recent years, the offshore industry has begun to employ curved slender structures such as steel catenary ...

  2. Drag amplification and fatigue damage in vortex-induced vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage and drag force amplification due to Vortex-Induced-Vibrations (VIV) continue to cause significant problems in the design of structures which operate in ocean current environments. These problems are magnified ...

  3. Experimental Investigations of Vortex Induced Vibration of A Flat Plate in Pitch Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A bluff structure placed in a flowing fluid, may be subjected to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). For a flat plate with only rotational degree of freedom, the VIV is rotational oscillation. Based on the experimental investigation, vortex...

  4. Effect of traveling waves on Vortex-Induced Vibration of long flexible cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaiswal, Vivek, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore marine risers and pipelines, exposed to ocean currents, are susceptible to Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV). Accurate prediction of VIV is necessary for estimating the fatigue life as well as for taking corrective ...

  5. Vortex-induced vibration of marine risers : motion and force reconstruction from field and experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Harish

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of long flexible cylindrical structures enduring ocean currents is ubiquitous in the offshore industry. Though significant effort has gone into understanding this complicated fluid-structure ...

  6. Vortex-induced vibration of flexible cylinders in time-varying flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resvanis, Themistocles L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates two aspects of Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) on long flexible cylinders. The work is split into a minor and major part. The minor part addresses the effect of Reynolds number on flexible cylinder ...

  7. Vortex Induced Vibrations of cylinders : experiments in reducing drag force and amplitude of motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, David Emmanuel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing the deleterious effect of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) in marine risers is an important task for ocean engineers; and many competing factors exist in the design of VIV suppression devices. This thesis explores ...

  8. Vortex-induced vibrations of a long flexible cylinder in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    We investigate the in-line and cross-flow vortex-induced vibrations of a long cylindrical tensioned beam, with length to diameter ratio L/D = 200, placed within a linearly sheared oncoming flow, using three-dimensional ...

  9. Vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder with combined in-line and cross-flow motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Jason (Jason Michael)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep water, string-like, marine risers subject to strong ocean currents, suffer from vortex-induced vibrations (VIV), where vortex shedding interacts with the structural properties of the riser, resulting in large amplitude ...

  10. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M. (Saline, MI); Raghavan, Kamaldev (Houston, TX)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  11. Visualization of vibration experienced in offshore platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrikalakis, Alexander Marinos Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I design and evaluate methods to optimize the visualization of vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in marine risers. VIV is vibration experienced by marine risers in offshore drilling platforms due to ocean ...

  12. Influence of slip on vortex-induced motion of a superhydrophobic cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    Influence of slip on vortex-induced motion of a superhydrophobic cylinder Robert Daniello, Pranesh: Superhydrophobic Ultrahydrophobic Superhydrophobicity Slip Partial slip Drag reduction Vortex Cylinder a b s t r a c t The partial slip boundary condition produced by a superhydrophobic surface in the Cassie state

  13. MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCKInformationflow

  14. A Model of Compressor Blade Row Interaction with Shock Induced Vortex Shedding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    A Model of Compressor Blade Row Interaction with Shock Induced Vortex Shedding Mark G. Turner = circulation = trailing edge thickness = shock angle = density I. Introduction ransonic compressor stages AIAA. Research Scientist, Compressor Aerodynamic Research Laboratory, Associate Fellow AIAA

  15. Hydrodynamic loads on flexible marine structures due to vortex shedding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Every, M.J.; King, R.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper makes a comparison of experimental measurements and a recently developed methodology for the prediction of the increase in the steady drag of a cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibrations. The experimental results were obtained during the development of a means to reduce the flow-induced vibration of a cable-suspended pile of the COGNAC platform installation and agree well with the predictions made in this paper. Next, a brief consideration is made of some of the authors' experience of methods used to reduce vortex-induced vibrations, and hence stress levels. Finally, a reduction method which used an air-blowing manifold is described and results presented.

  16. Design and vibration testing of a flexible seal whisker model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Christopher D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harbor seal whiskers have a unique surface structure that dramatically reduces vortex induced vibrations as they move through the water. Concurrently with rigid whisker experiments, this project focuses on the design and ...

  17. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  18. Joule heating induced by vortex motion in a type-II superconductor Z. L. Xiao and E. Y. Andrei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei, Eva Y.

    Joule heating induced by vortex motion in a type-II superconductor Z. L. Xiao and E. Y. Andrei-II superconductor due to Joule heating induced by vortex motion. The effect of Joule heating is detected s duration, where the Joule heating is negligible and saturates, respectively. The thermometry is based

  19. Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation Chandra Prakash Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phani, A. Srikantha

    Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation by Chandra Prakash Sharma B. Tech., Sardar;Abstract Controlling friction at the wheel-rail interface is indispensable for extending track life implementation of friction modifier system consists of a stick-tube assembly, attached through a bracket which

  20. ANL-85-51 ANL-85-51 FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION OF CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    leakage signaled the beginning of a troublesome period for a series of 1-3 Table i.l U.S. Power Reactor Field Experience with Flow-induced Vibration Year Reactor Type Component...

  1. Effects of Induced Acoustic Vibrations on Droplet Shedding on Hybrid Micro-structured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Chen-Ling

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . In an effort to circumvent the pinning effect, a vibration-induced droplet shedding method has been explored to overcome contact angle hysteresis and facilitate droplet shedding at lower rolling angles. To understand the effects of hybrid surface morphology...

  2. Energy harvesting from wind-induced vibration of suspension bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Miao, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, an extensive amount of research has been focused on energy harvesting from structural vibration sources for wireless self-powered microsystem applications. One method of energy harvesting is using electromagnetic ...

  3. Thermally Induced Vibrations of a Solar Wing with Bowed STEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagler, Shawn 1983-

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    undergo thermal excitations due to a thermal gradient through the cross-section when entering and exiting solar eclipse. These vibrations can greatly reduce pointing accuracy and lead to mission failure. Boeing obtained a patent in 2006 for the High Power...

  4. Vortex-Induced Vibration of a slender horizontal cylinder in currents and waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitwood, James Scott

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structural members, e. g. tendons or mooring lines, that provide less lateral restraint as the water depth increases. These structures might encounter near-surface sheared currents, reversing currents, or deep subsea currents along with waves at the ocean...

  5. acoustically induced vibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preprints Summary: Sound can move particles. A good example of this phenomenon is the Chladni plate, in which an acoustic wave is induced in a metallic plate and particles migrate...

  6. Gravity waves from vortex dipoles and jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shuguang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation first investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model. Several initially balanced and localized jets induced by vortex dipoles are examined here...

  7. Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a vortex-pinning mechanism in high- temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llordes, Anna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Coll, M. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ye, S. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Rouco, V [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Magen Dominguez, Cesar [ORNL; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centers in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

  8. Dipole-Induced Vortex Ratchets in Superconducting Films with Arrays of Micromagnets C. C. de Souza Silva,1,2,* A. V. Silhanek,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    Dipole-Induced Vortex Ratchets in Superconducting Films with Arrays of Micromagnets C. C. de Souza. By carrying out transport measurements with ac drive, we observed experimentally a recently predicted ratchet on the phenomenon known as ratchet effect [8]. As recently proposed by Carneiro [9], a different way to create

  9. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Lu, R. [Hudson Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  10. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

  11. Rotational response of superconductors: magneto-rotational isomorphism and rotation-induced vortex lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egor Babaev; Boris Svistunov

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of nonclassical rotational response of superfluids and superconductors was performed by Onsager (in 1949) \\cite{Onsager} and London (in 1950) \\cite{London} and crucially advanced by Feynman (in 1955) \\cite{Feynman}. It was established that, in thermodynamic limit, neutral superfluids rotate by forming---without any threshold---a vortex lattice. In contrast, the rotation of superconductors at angular frequency ${\\bf \\Omega}$---supported by uniform magnetic field ${\\bf B}_L\\propto {\\bf \\Omega}$ due to surface currents---is of the rigid-body type (London Law). Here we show that, neglecting the centrifugal effects, the behavior of a rotating superconductor is identical to that of a superconductor placed in a uniform fictitious external magnetic filed $\\tilde{\\bf H}=- {\\bf B}_L$. In particular, the isomorphism immediately implies the existence of two critical rotational frequencies in type-2 superconductors.

  12. Infrared-induced conformational isomerization and vibrational relaxation dynamics in melatonin and 5-methoxy-N-acetyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwier, Timothy S.

    Infrared-induced conformational isomerization and vibrational relaxation dynamics in melatonin the infrared excitation early in a supersonic expansion, the excited molecules were re-cooled into their zero of the infrared excitation. In order to study the dependence of the isomerization on the cooling rate

  13. Direct dynamics study of energy transfer and collision-induced dissociation: Effects of impact energy, geometry, and reactant vibrational mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    in molecular ions,1­9 and also provides a convenient method to study the dynamics of collision transfer dynamics, and the effects of impact parameter and reactant vibrational excitation on CID. OneDirect dynamics study of energy transfer and collision-induced dissociation: Effects of impact

  14. Restoring Superhydrophobicity of Lotus Leaves with Vibration-Induced Dewetting Jonathan B. Boreyko and Chuan-Hua Chen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    Restoring Superhydrophobicity of Lotus Leaves with Vibration-Induced Dewetting Jonathan B. Boreyko to achieve antidew superhydrophobicity. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.174502 PACS numbers: 47.55.dr Antidew superhydrophobicity is a highly desired prop- erty for water-repellent materials [1]. When vapor con- denses

  15. Vortex methods and vortex statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorin, A.J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible, inviscid, isentropic flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus if the vorticity is known at time t = 0, one can deduce the flow at a later time by simply following it around. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that makes use of this observation. Even more generally, the analysis of vortex methods leads, to problems that are closely related to problems in quantum physics and field theory, as well as in harmonic analysis. A broad enough definition of vortex methods ends up by encompassing much of science. Even the purely computational aspects of vortex methods encompass a range of ideas for which vorticity may not be the best unifying theme. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (``blobs``) and those whose understanding contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Vortex methods for inviscid flow lead to systems of ordinary differential equations that can be readily clothed in Hamiltonian form, both in three and two space dimensions, and they can preserve exactly a number of invariants of the Euler equations, including topological invariants. Their viscous versions resemble Langevin equations. As a result, they provide a very useful cartoon of statistical hydrodynamics, i.e., of turbulence, one that can to some extent be analyzed analytically and more importantly, explored numerically, with important implications also for superfluids, superconductors, and even polymers. In the authors view, vortex ``blob`` methods provide the most promising path to the understanding of these phenomena.

  16. Effects of broad-banded higher harmonics on fatigue damage of risers due to vortex-induced vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Rachel Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent works have discussed "chaotic" or "Type-II" riser motion and suggested that it is a general feature of VIV riser response. Chaotic riser response contains broad-banded harmonics and a combination of standing and ...

  17. Vortex methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorin, A.J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  18. Local amplification of deep mining induced vibrations - Part.2: Simulation of the ground motion in a coal basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-François; Driad-Lebeau, L; Bonnet, Guy; 10.1016/j.soildyn.2010.04.006

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the impact of deep coal mining induced vibrations on surface constructions using numerical tools. An experimental study of the geological site amplification and of its influence on mining induced vibrations has already been published in a previous paper (Part 1: Experimental evidence for site effects in a coal basin). Measurements have shown the existence of an amplification area in the southern part of the basin where drilling data have shown the presence of particularly fractured and soft stratigraphic units. The present study, using the Boundary Element Method (BEM) in the frequency domain, first investigates canonical geological structures in order to get general results for various sites. The amplification level at the surface is given as a function of the shape of the basin and of the velocity contrast with the bedrock. Next, the particular coal basin previously studied experimentally (Driad-Lebeau et al., 2009) is modeled numerically by BEM. The amplification phenomena characteri...

  19. Vortex and structural dynamics of a flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Jessica K., E-mail: jshang@princeton.edu; Stone, Howard A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Smits, Alexander J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-density, flexible cantilevered cylinder was permitted to vibrate freely under the influence of vortex shedding in the laminar flow regime. We find that the vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible cantilever depart from those of a flexible cylinder that is fixed at both ends. In particular, we find discontinuous regions of VIV behavior – here called states – as a function of the reduced velocity U{sup *}. These states are demarcated by discrete changes in the dominant eigenmodes of the structural response as the cylinder vibrates in progressively higher structural modes with increasing U{sup *}. The contribution of structural modes can be identified readily by a modal projection of the cylinder oscillation onto known cantilever beam modes. Oscillation frequencies do not monotonically increase with U{sup *}. The wake response between different states is also found to have distinct characteristics; of particular note is the occurrence of a P+S wake over one of these regions, which is associated with a high-amplitude vibration of the cylinder that is due to the constructive interference of contributing eigenmodes.

  20. Flow induced vibration of a cantilever column jet: a spectral analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilling, Roy Bryant

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , both the pump and the test di scharge pipe were mounted on a carriage whiLh oscil]ated on the track above a water sump. They were connected from the suction end by two-inch I. D. gal- vanized pipe joined in the center by a 1. 5 inch orifice plate... SPECTRUM AT 3. 5 HZ, EMPTY PIPE . FORCED VIBRATION SPECTRUM AT 3. 5 HZ, 47 fps FLOW VELOCITY- FROCED VIBRATION SPECTRUM AT 4. 58 HZ EMPTY PIPE . FORCED VIBRATION SPECTRUM AT 4. 58 HZ 10 fps FLOW VELOCITY . MIDRANGE DYNAMICS . INTENSITY RESPONSE...

  1. Flow-induced tube vibration thresholds in heat exchangers from shellside water tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical industrial shell-and-tube heat exchanger configurations are investigated experimentally for the occurrence of potentially damaging tube vibration as a function of flowrate. The effort is part of a program to develop vibration avoidance criteria to be integrated and optimized with the advanced thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical design methods now available. The tests use a 0.6-m (2-ft)-diameter, 3.7-m (12-ft)-long shell containing a removable tube bundle whose components are readily rearranged or replaced. The 15 different full tube bundle configurations tested represent various combinations of parameters: triangular or square tube layout patterns with different orientations to the flow, number of crosspasses, sizes of nozzles, plain or finned tubes. All bundles have 19-mm (0.75-in.)-diameter tubes spaced with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25. The heat exchanger is tested with waterflow on the shellside to determine a critical threshold, above which a small increase in the flowrate initiates a fluidelastic instability resulting in large amplitude vibration. The test conditions, the critical flowrates, the vibration frequencies, and the locations of the tubes most susceptible to vibration are presented. The given data are used for a comparison with a presently recognized method of vibration prediction and will permit updated evaluations as more advanced methods become available in the future.

  2. Realization of Population Inversion under Nonadiabatic Conditions Induced by the Coupling between Vibrational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    of coupling between molecular vibrational modes attendant the excitation of Raman transitions. Raman active. Theoretical and experi- mental studies indicate that molecular dynamics can be guided and controlled by light of the widely studied topic is con- trolled excitations in atoms and molecules. In a simplistic pic- ture, any

  3. Vibration-Induced Kondo Tunneling through Metal-Organic Complexes with Even Electron Occupation Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - neling Hamiltonian H Hmol Hres Htun: (1) Here Hmol includes the 3d electron levels in a ligand field of the cage electrons, the molecular orbitals of these ligands, as well as interactions within the 3d shell with tunneling electrons (vibration assisted tunneling) [8­13] and modulation of the tunnel barriers (shuttling

  4. Vibrational excitation induced by electron beam and cosmic rays in normal and superconductive aluminum bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bassan; B. Buonomo; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; L. G. Foggetta; C. Ligi; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; G. Modestino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; F. Ronga; P. Valente; S. M. Vinko

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the acoustic excitation of an Al5056 superconductive bar when hit by an electron beam, in a previously unexplored temperature range, down to 0.35 K. These data, analyzed together with previous results of the RAP experiment obtained for T > 0.54 K, show a vibrational response enhanced by a factor 4.9 with respect to that measured in the normal state. This enhancement explains the anomalous large signals due to cosmic rays previously detected in the NAUTILUS gravitational wave detector.

  5. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in 2D electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the e...

  6. Dissipative dynamics of a vortex state in a trapped Bose-condensed gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. O. Fedichev; G. V. Shlyapnikov

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss dissipative dynamics of a vortex state in a trapped Bose-condensed gas at finite temperature and draw a scenario of decay of this state in a static trap. The interaction of the vortex with the thermal cloud transfers energy from the vortex to the cloud and induces the motion of the vortex core to the border of the condensate. Once the vortex reaches the border, it immediately decays through the creation of excitations. We calculate the characteristic life-time of a vortex state and address the question of how the dissipative dynamics of vortices can be studied experimentally.

  7. Geometrical statistics and vortex structures in helical and nonhelical turbulences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    , United Kingdom Received 4 August 2009; accepted 20 January 2010; published online 9 March 2010 explained in terms of the self-induced motions of local vortex structures, which tend to wind up the vortex­11,13­15 the effects of helicity on energy cascade,16 the interaction between helicity and energy dissipation,17

  8. Energy Spectrum of Vortex Tangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiko Araki; Makoto Tsubota; Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of superfluid turbulence in the absence of the normal fluid is studied numerically. In order to discuss the statistical properties, we calculated the energy spectra of the 3D velocity field induced by dilute and dense vortex tangles respectively, whose dynamics is calculated by the Biot-Savart law. In the case of a dense tangle, the slope of the energy spectrum is changed at $k=2\\pi/l$, where $l$ is the intervortex spacing. For $k>2\\pi/l$, the energy spectrum has $k^{-1}$ behavior in the same manner as the dilute vortex tangle, while otherwise the slope of the energy spectrum deviates from $k^{-1}$ behavior. We compare the behavior for $k<2\\pi/l$ with the Kolmogorov law.

  9. Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  11. Vortex diode jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  12. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  13. The Holographic Superconductor Vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Montull; Alex Pomarol; Pedro J. Silva

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gravity dual of a superconductor at finite temperature has been recently proposed. We present the vortex configuration of this model and study its properties. In particular, we calculate the free energy as a function of an external magnetic field, the magnetization and the superconducting density. We also find the two critical magnetic fields that define the region in which the vortex configurations are energetically favorable.

  14. Feasibility of a vortex transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental test is reported of the feasibility of developing a vortex transistor using tunnel junctions made from tin. (AIP)

  15. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 144511 (2011) Rectification of vortex motion in a circular ratchet channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plourde, Britton L. T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 144511 (2011) Rectification of vortex motion in a circular ratchet channel N and induces a net vortex flow without any unbiased external drive, i.e., the ratchet effect. We show containing a single weak-pinning circular ratchet channel in a Corbino geometry and observed a substantial

  17. Vortex-Based Aero- and Hydrodynamic Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemati, Maziar Sam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001. [Kra91] R. Krasny. “Vortex Sheet Computations: Roll-NK94] M. Nitsche and R. Krasny. “A Numerical Study of Vortex

  18. Vibrational dynamics of permanently densified GeO{sub 2} glasses: Densification-induced changes in the boson peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orsingher, L.; Fontana, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo Trento (Italy); Research center SOFT-INFM-CNR, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', I-00185 Roma (Italy); Gilioli, E. [IMEM-CNR, Area delle Scienze, 43010 Parma (Italy); Carini, G. Jr.; Carini, G.; Tripodo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone 31, 98166 S. Agata (Montenegro) (Italy); Unruh, T. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz-Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Buchenau, U. [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vitreous GeO{sub 2}, one of the main prototypes of strong glasses, was densified at several pressures up to 6 GPa, achieving more than 20% of densification. The density dependence of the vibrational density of states and of the low temperature properties of these glasses was investigated by means of inelastic neutron scattering and calorimetric measurements. With increasing density, both the boson peak and the bump in c{sub p}/T{sup 3} versus T plot exhibit variations which are stronger than the elastic medium expectation. If one reduces the measured spectra to a common master curve, one finds that this is only possible for the densified samples; the first densification step has an additional effect, similar to other cases in the literature. Nevertheless, the existence of a master curve for the three densified samples proves that the total number of excess modes remains constant on further densification. The experimental data are discussed in the framework of different theoretical models.

  19. VORTEX BREAKDOWN INCIPIENCE: THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    ­dimensional boundary layer (Hall 2;3 , Mager 4 ); (ii) vortex breakdown is a consequence of hydrodynamic instabilityVORTEX BREAKDOWN INCIPIENCE: THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS S. A. Berger Department of Mechanical in Science and Engineering NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA 23681­0001 ABSTRACT The sensitivity

  20. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  1. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

  2. All-optical discrete vortex switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Dennis, Mark R. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Ferrando, Albert [Interdisciplinary Modeling Group, InterTech and Departament d'Optica, Universitat de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce discrete vortex solitons and vortex breathers in circular arrays of nonlinear waveguides. The simplest vortex breather in a four-waveguide coupler is a nonlinear dynamic state changing its topological charge between +1 and -1 periodically during propagation. We find the stability domain for this solution and suggest an all-optical vortex switching scheme.

  3. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Argon-ion-induced formation of nanoporous GaSb layer: Microstructure, infrared luminescence, and vibrational properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, D. P.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751 005 (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 201 314 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Das, T. D. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Calcutta, APC Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature implantation of 60?keV Ar{sup +}-ions in GaSb to the fluences of 7?×?10{sup 16} to 3?×?10{sup 18} ions cm{sup ?2} is carried out at two incidence angles, viz 0° and 60°, leading to formation of a nanoporous layer. As the ion fluence increases, patches grow on the porous layer under normal ion implantation, whereas the porous layer gradually becomes embedded under a rough top surface for oblique incidence of ions. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies reveal the existence of nanocrystallites embedded in the ion-beam amorphized GaSb matrix up to the highest fluence used in our experiment. Oxidation of the nanoporous layers becomes obvious from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman mapping. The correlation of ion-beam induced structural modification with photoluminescence signals in the infrared region has further been studied, showing defect induced emission of additional peaks near the band edge of GaSb.

  5. 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion induced modification of microstructural, compositional, and vibrational properties of InSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, D. P.; Garg, S. K.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751005 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 203207 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature irradiation of InSb(111) by 60?keV Ar{sup +}-ions at normal (0°) and oblique (60°) angles of incidence led to the formation of nanoporous structure in the high fluence regime of 1?×?10{sup 17} to 3?×?10{sup 18} ions cm{sup ?2}. While a porous layer comprising of a network of interconnected nanofibers was generated by normal ion incidence, evolution of plate-like structures was observed for obliquely incident ions. Systematic studies of composition and structure using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman mapping, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a high degree of oxidation of the ion-induced microstructures with the presence of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases and presence of nanocrystallites within the nanoporous structures. The observed structural evolution was understood in terms of processes driven by ion-induced defect accumulation within InSb.

  6. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  7. aqueous solution vibrational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase liquids in porous media. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Acoustic wave stimulation, such as vibration-induced mobilization, is a promising enhancement...

  8. Wave–vortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yuan, E-mail: yuanguo@cims.nyu.edu; Bühler, Oliver [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a theoretical study of wave–vortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wave–vortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wave–vortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

  9. On the neutron noise diagnostics of pressurized water reactor control rod vibrations II. Stochastic vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazsit, I.; Glockler, O.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an earlier publication, using the theory of neutron fluctuations induced by a vibrating control rod, a complete formal solution of rod vibration diagnostics based on neutron noise measurements was given in terms of Fourier-transformed neutron detector time signals. The suggested procedure was checked in numerical simulation tests where only periodic vibrations could be considered. The procedure and its numerical testing are elaborated for stochastic two-dimensional vibrations. A simple stochastic theory of two-dimensional flow-induced vibrations is given; then the diagnostic method is formulated in the stochastic case, that is, in terms of neutron detector auto- and crosspower spectra. A previously suggested approximate rod localization technique is also formulated in the stochastic case. Applicability of the methods is then investigated in numerical simulation tests, using the proposed model of stochastic two-dimensional vibrations when generating neutron detector spectra that simulate measured data.

  10. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  11. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  12. Tripod vibration anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoecker, William V; Malters, Joseph M; Xu, Jin; Pikka, Jo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A, Liu JF. Vibration anesthesia: a noninvasive method ofTripod vibration anesthesia William V Stoecker MD 1 , Josephfor cutaneous injection anesthesia. Most pain associated

  13. Downhole vibration sensing by vibration energy harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, A. Zachary

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the design of a prototype electromagnetic induction vibration energy harvesting device for use in a downhole environment. First order models of the necessary components for a generic vibration energy ...

  14. VOLUME 83, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 23 AUGUST 1999 Flow Induced Organization and Memory of a Vortex Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei, Eva Y.

    , Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 M. J. Higgins NEC Research Institute, 4 Independence Way that the current enables the system to reorganize and access new configurations. During this process the system to history dependence and nonlinear behavior [4­14]. For example, a vortex array prepared by field cooling

  15. Vibration damping required for overhead lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, A.S. Jr. [Research Consulting Associates, Lexington, MA (United States)] [Research Consulting Associates, Lexington, MA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line engineers have sought an easy method for evaluating if external dampers are required on any new transmission line. In the past this question has been given to the damper manufacturer who has a vested interest in a affirmative answer. For single conductors (and for bundled conductors) the vibration level of a power line conductor is the result of a complicated aerodynamic process in which energy is taken into the motion from vortex action on the lee side of the conductor. The amount of energy taken in is a non-linear function of vibration amplitude, frequency, conductor diameter, and wind speed. The amount of energy taken out is a non-linear function of vibration amplitude, frequency, conductor mass, conductor tension, and a certain friction constant that varies from conductor to conductor. It is known that a small amount of vibration is allowed without endangering the conductor. This has been called the IEEE limit loop velocity, and is numerically equal to 200 mm/second. This paper explains a simple procedure, applicable to single conductors, which calculates a comparison of energy in vs. energy out. From this process it is shown how to select the initial tension in the conductor so that no external dampers are required.

  16. The Effect of Whole Body Horizontal Vibration in Position Sense and Dynamic Stability of the Spine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamis, Farhana

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    at the 5 Hz frequency. These results would suggest that horizontal vibration may be less of a factor in whole-body vibration induced injuries. This work was supported by University of Kansas Transportation Research Institute Grant Program....

  17. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  18. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  19. Computing Vortex Sheet Motion Robert Krasny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    Computing Vortex Sheet Motion Robert Krasny Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann;1574 Robert Krasny with respect to the time variable and obtained results consistent with Moore

  20. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificially prepared nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Yaniv Jacob

    K. Schuller, “Enhanced superconducting vortex pinning withat T/Tc = 0.99 of a superconducting Nb thin film on aof the triangles. The superconducting critical temperature

  1. aircraft vortex spacing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted. Inyong Cho; Youngone...

  2. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water...

  3. Light propagation around a relativistic vortex flow of dielectric medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Linet

    2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the path of the light around a dielectric vortex described by the relativistic vortex flow of a perfect fluid.

  4. advanced vortex element: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    method with mesh adaptivity for computing vortex states in fastrotating BoseEinstein condensates Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: ) vortices, vortex...

  5. accelerated vortex ring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rings and systems for controlled studies of vortex interactions in Bose-Einstein condensates HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We study controlled methods of preparing vortex...

  6. Vibrationally induced center reconfiguration in co-doped GaN:Eu, Mg epitaxial layers: Local hydrogen migration vs. activation of non-radiative channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, B.; Dierolf, V. [Lehigh University, 16 Memorial Dr. E, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)] [Lehigh University, 16 Memorial Dr. E, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Lee, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave L-413, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave L-413, California 94550 (United States); Lee, D.; Fujiwara, Y. [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium doped gallium nitride (GaN:Eu) is a promising candidate as a material for red light emitting diodes. When Mg was co-doped into GaN:Eu, additional incorporation environments were discovered that show high excitation efficiency at room temperature and have been attributed to the coupling of Mg-H complexes to the majority Eu site. Electron beam irradiation, indirect and resonant (direct) laser excitation were found to modify these complexes, indicating that vibrational energy alone can trigger the migration of the H while the presence of additional charges and excess energy controls the type of reconfiguration and the activation of non-radiative decay channels.

  7. Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth Citation: J. Math. Phys. 53, 013103 (2012); doi: 10 OF MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 53, 013103 (2012) Vortex dynamics in R4 Banavara N. Shashikantha) Mechanical and Aerospace dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in R4 is studied. Most of the paper focuses

  8. An investigation of the vortex method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, D.W. Jr.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  9. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the existence of a rebound of the core parallel to the formation of a secondary 47 vortex with opposite sign [14]. 48 More recently, attention has turned to the possibility of resuspension due to a vortex ring 49 impacting a bed of particles (e.g. [1], [15...

  10. Ergoregion instability: The hydrodynamic vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro A. Oliveira; Vitor Cardoso; Luís C. B. Crispino

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes with an ergoregion but no horizon have been shown to be linearly unstable against a superradiant-triggered mechanism. This result has wide implications in the search for astrophysically viable alternatives to black holes, but also in the understanding of black holes and Hawking evaporation. Here we investigate this instability in detail for a particular setup which can be realized in the laboratory: the {\\it hydrodynamic vortex}, an effective geometry for sound waves, with ergoregion and without an event horizon.

  11. The idea of vortex energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Shapiro

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This work formulates and gives grounds for general principles and theorems that question the energy function doctrine and its quantum version as a genuine law of nature without borders of adequacy. The emphasis is on the domain where the energy of systems is conserved -- I argue that only in its tiny part the energy is in the kinetic, potential and thermal forms describable by a generalized thermodynamic potential, whereas otherwise the conserved energy constitutes a whole linked to vortex forces, and can be a factor of things like persistent currents and dark matter.

  12. Vortex Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph Home Wzeng'sVortex Energy Jump to:

  13. 2094 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 21 / November 1, 2003 Fundamental and vortex solitons in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jianke

    2094 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 21 / November 1, 2003 Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optical lattice Jianke Yang Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington-dimensional optically induced waveguide array are reported. In the strong localization regime the fundamental soliton

  14. Sediment resuspension and erosion by vortex rings R. J. Munro,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    Sediment resuspension and erosion by vortex rings R. J. Munro,1,a N. Bethke,2 and S. B. Dalziel2 1; accepted 26 January 2009; published online 8 April 2009 Particle resuspension and erosion induced-ring propagation speed. The critical conditions for resuspension whereby particles are only just resuspended were

  15. Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jon

    Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors S.J. Chapman #3;y G. Richardson zx of a curvilinear vortex in an inhomogeneous type-II superconducting material in the limit as the vortex core radius of the superconducting electrons acts as a pinning potential for the vortex, so that vortices will be attracted

  16. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cericola, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Doggett, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Ernest, Terry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Priddy, Tommy G. (Rockville, MD)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  17. Spatiotemporal characterization of ultrashort optical vortex pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Miguel; Rudawski, Piotr; Guo, Chen; Harth, Anne; L'Huillier, Anne; Arnold, Cord L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of few-cycle optical vortex pulses is challenging due to the large spectral bandwidths, as most vortex generation techniques are designed for monochromatic light. In this work, we use a spiral phase plate to generate few-cycle optical vortices from an ultrafast titanium:sapphire oscillator, and characterize them in the spatiotemporal domain using a recently introduced technique based on spatially resolved Fourier transform spectrometry. The performance of this simple approach to the generation of optical vortices is analyzed from a wavelength dependent perspective, as well as in the spatiotemporal domain, allowing us to completely characterize ultrashort vortex pulses in space, frequency, and time.

  18. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  19. OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, O. M.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

  20. 2011 Vibrations -1 VIBRATION OF PLATES & BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    of plates of different shapes using Chladni patterns. APPARATUS: Function generator in FFTSCOPE, long and short flat bars, Chladni plates, salt, salt trays INTRODUCTION he equations of vibrational motion. The solutions become very complicated for the free boundary condition at the perimeter of the plate. The Chladni

  1. The Life of a Vortex Knot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that the knottedness (hydrodynamic Helicity) of a fluid flow is conserved has a long history in fluid mechanics. The quintessential example of a knotted flow is a knotted vortex filament, however, owing to experimental difficulties, it has not been possible until recently to directly generate knotted vortices in real fluids. Using 3D printed hydrofoils and high-speed laser scanning tomography, we generate vortex knots and links and measure their subsequent evolution. In both cases, we find that the vortices deform and stretch until a series of vortex reconnections occurs, eventually resulting several disjoint vortex rings. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion at the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  2. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, A. E., E-mail: koshelev@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division (United States); Dodgson, M. J. W. [Cavendish Laboratory, Theory of Condensed Matter Group (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, Theory of Condensed Matter Group (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  3. The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason Allen

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    cells and vortices are the respective source of PV production and building blocks for the meso-?-scale vortices. Finally, this thesis discusses issues related to the multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclone formation. For instance, the tracking...

  4. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H.W. Zhao, J. Bokor, and Z.Q. Qiu, "Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex states in CoOFeAg(001) discs," Nat. Phys. 7, 303 (2011). ALS Science Highlight 235...

  5. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Z.Q. Qiu, "Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex states in CoOFeAg(001) discs," Nat. Phys. 7, 303 (2011). ALS Science Highlight 235 ALSNews Vol. 324...

  6. Phases of Atom-Molecule Vortex Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, S. J.; Bigelow, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Park, Q-Han [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study ground state vortex configurations in a rotating atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. It is found that the coherent coupling between the atomic and molecular condensates can render a pairing of atomic and molecular vortices into a composite structure that resembles a carbon dioxide molecule. Structural phase transitions of vortex lattices are also explored through different physical parameters including the rotational frequency of the system.

  7. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  8. Heat transfer in a two-pass internally ribbed turbine blade coolant channel with cylindrical vortex generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, R.; Chen, Y.; Nikitopoulos, D. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of vortex generators on the mass (heat) transfer from the ribbed passage of a two pass turbine blade coolant channel is investigated with the intent of optimizing the vortex generator geometry so that significant enhancements in mass/heat transfer can be achieved. In the experimental configuration considered, ribs are mounted on two opposite walls; all four walls along each pass are active and have mass transfer from their surfaces but the ribs are non-participating. Mass transfer measurements, in the form of Sherwood number ratios, are made along the centerline and in selected inter-rib modules. Results are presented for Reynolds number in the range of 5,000 to 40,000, pitch to rib height ratios of 10.5 and 21, and vortex generator-rib spacing to rib height ratios of 0.55, and 1.5. Centerline and spanwise averaged Sherwood number ratios are presented along with contours of the Sherwood number ratios. Results indicate that the vortex generators induce substantial increases in the local mass transfer rates, particularly along the side walls, and modest increases in the average mass transfer rates. The vortex generators have the effect of making the inter-rib profiles along the ribbed walls more uniform. Along the side walls, horse-shoe vortices that characterize the vortex generator wake are associated with significant mass transfer enhancements. The wake effects and the levels of enhancement decrease somewhat with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing pitch.

  9. Heat transfer in a two-pass internally ribbed turbine blade coolant channel with cylindrical vortex generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, R.; Acharya, S.; Chen, Y. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of vortex generators on the mass (heat) transfer from the ribbed passage of a two pass turbine blade coolant channel is investigated with the intent of optimizing the vortex generator geometry so that significant enhancements in mass/heat transfer can be achieved. In the experimental configuration considered, ribs are mounted on two opposite walls; all four walls along each pass are active and have mass transfer from their surfaces but the ribs are non-participating. Mass transfer measurements, in the form of Sherwood number ratios, are made along the centerline and in selected inter-rib modules. Results are presented for Reynolds number in the range of 5,000 to 40,000, pitch to rib height ratios of 10.5 and 21, and vortex generator-rib spacing to rib height ratios of 0.55, and 1.5. Centerline and spanwise averaged Sherwood number ratios are presented along with contours of the Sherwood number ratios. Results indicate that the vortex generators induce substantial increases in the local mass transfer rates, particularly along the side walls, and modest increases in the average mass transfer rates. The vortex generators have the effect of making the inter-rib profiles along the ribbed walls more uniform. Along the side walls, horse-shoe vortices that characterize the vortex generator wake are associated with significant mass transfer enhancements. The wake effects and the levels of enhancement decrease somewhat with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing pitch.

  10. General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: rav@knights.ucf.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-1364 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In his study of superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Svistunov [“Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)] derived a Hamiltonian equation for the self-induced motion of a vortex filament. Under the local induction approximation (LIA), the Svistunov formulation is equivalent to a nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation. In this paper, we consider a family of rotating vortex filament solutions for the LIA reduction of the Svistunov formulation, which we refer to as the 2D LIA (since it permits a potential formulation in terms of two of the three Cartesian coordinates). This class of solutions holds the well-known Hasimoto-type planar vortex filament [H. Hasimoto, “Motion of a vortex filament and its relation to elastica,” J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 31, 293 (1971)] as one reduction and helical solutions as another. More generally, we obtain solutions which are periodic in the space variable. A systematic analytical study of the behavior of such solutions is carried out. In the case where vortex filaments have small deviations from the axis of rotation, closed analytical forms of the filament solutions are given. A variety of numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the wide range of rotating filament behaviors possible. Doing so, we are able to determine a number of vortex filament structures not previously studied. We find that the solution structure progresses from planar to helical, and then to more intricate and complex filament structures, possibly indicating the onset of superfluid turbulence.

  11. Self-ratcheting Stokes drops driven by oblique vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin John; Uwe Thiele

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop and analyze a minimal hydrodynamic model in the overdamped limit to understand why a drop climbs a smooth homogeneous incline that is harmonically vibrated at an angle different from the substrate normal [Brunet, Eggers and Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007)]. We find that the vibration component orthogonal to the substrate induces a nonlinear (anharmonic) response in the drop shape. This results in an asymmetric response of the drop to the parallel vibration and, in consequence, in the observed net motion. Beside establishing the basic mechanism, we identify scaling laws valid in a broad frequency range and a flow reversal at high frequencies.

  12. Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Integration of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Integration of Power Take-Off in VIVACE Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Integration of Power Take-Off in VIVACE...

  13. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  15. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ronald J. (Latham, NY)

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  16. Fractal powers in Serrin's swirling vortex solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel B?lík; Douglas P. Dokken; Kurt Scholz; Mikhail M. Shvartsman

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a modification of the fluid flow model for a tornado-like swirling vortex developed by J. Serrin, where velocity decreases as the reciprocal of the distance from the vortex axis. Recent studies, based on radar data of selected severe weather events, indicate that the angular momentum in a tornado may not be constant with the radius, and thus suggest a different scaling of the velocity/radial distance dependence. Motivated by this suggestion, we consider Serrin's approach with the assumption that the velocity decreases as the reciprocal of the distance from the vortex axis to the power $b$ with a general $b>0$. This leads to a boundary-value problem for a system of nonlinear differential equations. We analyze this problem for particular cases, both with nonzero and zero viscosity, discuss the question of existence of solutions, and use numerical techniques to describe those solutions that we cannot obtain analytically.

  17. Removing the concavity of the thick center vortex potentials by fluctuating the vortex profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedigheh Deldar; Shahnoosh Rafibakhsh

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The thick center vortex model reproduces important aspects of the potentials between static quark sources as seen in lattice Yang-Mills calculations: Both the intermediate distance behavior, governed by Casimir scaling, as well as the long distance behavior, governed by N-ality, are obtained. However, when a fixed vortex profile is used, these two distance regimes do not connect naturally to each other. The transition in general violates concavity constraints on the potential, especially for higher representations of the gauge group. We demonstrate how this issue can be alleviated when the vortex profile is allowed to fluctuate within this simple model.

  18. Journal of Sound and Vibration ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    the ocean surface to the sea floor. With the trend towards oil and gas exploration in deeper watersJOURNAL OF SOUND AND VIBRATION Journal of Sound and Vibration ] (

  19. Mode-selective vibrational control of charge transport in $?$-conjugated molecular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artem A. Bakulin; Robert Lovrin?i?; Yu Xi; Oleg Selig; Huib J. Bakker; Yves L. A. Rezus; Pabitra K. Nayak; Alexandr Fonari; Veaceslav Coropceanu; Jean-Luc Brédas; David Cahen

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to control charge transport in organic electronic devices by inducing molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such control has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be controlled by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1500-1700 cm$^{-1}$ region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. Vibrational control thus presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  20. Acoustics of finite-aperture vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld surface integral is provided, which makes it feasible to rigorously model, evaluate and compute the acoustic scattering and other mechanical effects of finite-aperture vortex beams such as the acoustic radiation force and torque on a viscoelastic sphere in various applications in acoustic tweezers and microfluidics, particle entrapment, manipulation and rotation. Partial-wave series expansions are derived for the incident field of acoustic spiraling (vortex) beams, comprising high-order Bessel and Bessel-Gauss beams.

  1. Invariants for Tendex and Vortex Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Tendex and vortex fields, defined by the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl curvature tensor, form the basis of a recently developed approach to visualizing spacetime curvature. In analogy to electric and magnetic fields, these fields are coordinate-dependent. However, in a further analogy, we can form invariants from the tendex and vortex fields that are invariant under coordinate transformations, just as certain combinations of the electric and magnetic fields are invariant under coordinate transformations. We derive these invariants, and provide a simple, analytical demonstration for non-spherically symmetric slices of a Schwarzschild spacetime.

  2. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  3. Review of Applied Physics Vol. 2 Iss. 4, December 2013 www.seipub.org/rap Frequency Selection in Heaving Airfoil Wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    is a Karman vortex street, and the wake produces drag; while at high reduced frequencies, the wake becomes a reversed Karman vortex street. During the transition from drag to thrust-producing wakes, a neutral mode), to vortex-induced-vibrations (VIV) (Williamson 2004), and flow-induced-vibrations (FIV) (Belvin 1977

  4. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  5. Convergenceof Vortex Methods for Weak Solutionsto the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian-Guo

    , Krasny applied such a method in his calculations of the evolution of vortex sheetseven past the time when numerical simulations;see Krasny, [16] and [17], and Baker and Shelley, [l]. It is thus important to analyze by Krasny (see [16] and [17]). Our analysis is closely related to that of [9], [lo], and [18], and based

  6. Quenching Processes in Flame-Vortex Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael

    for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes 1 , Chicago, IL 60637 y Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University-vortex interactions in order to understand quenching of thermonuclear ames. The key question is|can a ther- monuclear. If a ame encounters a 1) The Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes is supported by the Department

  7. Bifurcation to vortex solutions in superconducting lms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jon

    Bifurcation to vortex solutions in superconducting #12;lms T. Boeck #3; S.J. Chapman y Mathematical state to a superconducting state in a decreasing magnetic #12;eld is studied for a slab geometry of these behaviours will occur in practice. 1 Introduction If a superconducting body is placed in a suÃ?ciently strong

  8. Interaction of a monopole vortex with an isolated topographic feature in a three-layer geophysical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny A. Ryzhov; K. V. Koshel

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the frame of a three-layer quasi-geostrophic analytical model of a $f$-plane geophysical flow, Lagrangian advection being induced by the interaction of a monopole vortex with an isolated topographic feature is addressed. Two different cases when the monopole locates either within the upper or the middle layer are of our interest. In the bottom layer, there is a delta function topographic feature, which generates a closed recirculation region in its vicinity due to the background flow. This recirculation region extends to the middle and upper layers, and it plays the role of a topographic vortex. The interaction between the monopole and the topographic vortex causes complex, including chaotic, advection of fluid particles. We show that the model's parameters, namely, the monopole and topographic vortices' strengths and initial positions, the layers' depths and densities are responsible for the diverse advection patterns. While the patterns are rather complicated, however, one can single out two major processes, which mostly govern fluid particle advection. The first one is the variation in time of the system's phase space structure, so that within the closed region of the topographic vortex, there appear periodically unclosed particle pathways by which the particles leave the topographic vortex. The second one is chaotic advection that arises from the nonstationarity of the monopole-topography interaction.

  9. Active vibration control of a fluid/plate system using a pole placement controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Active vibration control of a fluid/plate system using a pole placement controller Bogdan Robu reduction of the structural vibrations induced by the sloshing of large masses of fuel inside a partly full, published in "International Journal of Control 85, 6 (2012) 684-694" #12;Keywords Flexible system, fluid

  10. Large amplitude spin torque vortex oscillations at zero external field using a perpendicular spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dussaux, A.; Rache Salles, B.; Jenkins, A. S.; Bortolotti, P.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Grimaldi, E., E-mail: eva.grimaldi@thalesgroup.com [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); CNES, 1 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Khvalkovskiy, A. V. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilova Str. 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Yuasa, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the microwave response of a spin transfer vortex based oscillator in a magnetic tunnel junction with an in-plane reference layer combined with a spin valve with an out-of-plane magnetization spin polarizing layer. The main advantage of this perpendicular spin polarizer is to induce a large spin transfer force even at zero magnetic field, thus leading to a record emitted power (up to 0.6??W) associated to a very narrow spectral linewidth of a few hundreds of kHz. The characteristics of this hybrid vortex based spin transfer nano-oscillator obtained at zero field and room temperature are of great importance for applications based on rf spintronic devices as integrated and tunable microwave source and/or microwave detector.

  11. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  12. Strings, vortex rings, and modes of instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Nayar, Revant; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We treat string propagation and interaction in the presence of a background Neveu–Schwarz three-form field strength, suitable for describing vortex rings in a superfluid or low-viscosity normal fluid. A circular vortex ring exhibits instabilities which have been recognized for many years, but whose precise boundaries we determine for the first time analytically in the small core limit. Two circular vortices colliding head-on exhibit stronger instabilities which cause splitting into many small vortices at late times. We provide an approximate analytic treatment of these instabilities and show that the most unstable wavelength is parametrically larger than a dynamically generated length scalemore »which in many hydrodynamic systems is close to the cutoff. We also summarize how the string construction we discuss can be derived from the Gross–Pitaevskii Lagrangian, and also how it compares to the action for giant gravitons.« less

  13. Deterministic Josephson Vortex Ratchet with a load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Knufinke; K. Ilin; M. Siegel; D. Koelle; R. Kleiner; E. Goldobin

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate experimentally a deterministic underdamped Josephson vortex ratchet -- a fluxon-particle moving along a Josephson junction in an asymmetric periodic potential. By applying a sinusoidal driving current one can compel the vortex to move in a certain direction, producing average dc voltage across the junction. Being in such a rectification regime we also load the ratchet, i.e., apply an additional dc bias current I_dc (counterforce) which tilts the potential so that the fluxon climbs uphill due to the ratchet effect. The value of the bias current at which the fluxon stops climbing up defines the strength of the ratchet effect and is determined experimentally. This allows us to estimate the loading capability of the ratchet, the output power and efficiency. For the quasi-static regime we present a simple model which delivers simple analytic expressions for the above mentioned figures of merit.

  14. Vortex state in a doped Mott insulator M. Franz and Z. Tesanovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesanovic, Zlatko

    predicts two types of singly quantized vortices: an insulating ``holon'' vortex in the underdoped and a metallic ``spinon'' vortex in the overdoped region of the phase diagram. We argue that the holon vortex

  15. Ab Initio Study of Vibrational Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab Initio Study of Vibrational Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in Semiconducting Carbon Engineering, UniVersity of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan Received May 7, 2007; Revised Manuscript Received August 1, 2007 ABSTRACT Phonon-induced dephasing of electronic transitions

  16. Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine diagnostics G of a normally aspirated diesel engine contain valu­ able information on the health of the combustion chamber induced in a 4­stroke diesel engine and the ensuing vi­ bration signals recorded. Three different feature

  17. Multiple precision, multiple processor vortex sheet roll-up computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.H. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Krasny, R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelz, R. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A vortex sheet in incompressible flow is a surface across which the tangential fluid velocity has a jump discontinuity. A basic idea in fluid dynamics going back to Prandtl is that the vortex sheet can be obtained as the zero viscosity limit of a sequence of smooth solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Thus, the investigation of vortex sheet motion may yield insight into the structure of high Reynolds number flow.

  18. Optical vortex interaction and generation via nonlinear wave mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenzini, F. [INLN, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U. [INLN, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Arecchi, F. T. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical vortex beams are made to interact via degenerate two-wave mixing in a Kerr-like nonlinear medium. Vortex mixing is shown to occur inside the medium, leading to exchange of topological charge and cascaded generation of vortex beams. A mean-field model is developed and is shown to account for the selection rules of the topological charges observed after the wave-mixing process. Fractional charges are demonstrated to follow the same rules as for integer charges.

  19. Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whilden, Kerri Ann

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the secondary structures into the vortex system are shown as well as variations in characteristics such as trajectory, size, vorticity, and circulation for the vortices as they move downstream. iv To the loved ones who have encouraged me along the way. v.... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 30 13 Non-Dimensional Vorticity at the Swirl Strength Peak for the Pri- mary Vortex Within the Vortex System Versus Non-Dimensional Horizontal Location of the Centroid. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 14 Non-Dimensional Circulation...

  20. Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

  1. active vortex generators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    how an initial dusturbing cyclonic vortex is created by collision between two linear wind jets under certain conditions, which under favorable conditions, may mature into a...

  2. All-optical switching in optically induced nonlinear waveguide couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebel, Falko, E-mail: falko.diebel@uni-muenster.de; Boguslawski, Martin; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia [Institut für Angewandte Physik and Center for Nonlinear Science (CeNoS), Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate all-optical vortex switching in nonlinear coupled waveguide arrays optically induced in photorefractive media. Our technique is based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams to induce various types of waveguide configurations. Using double- and quadruple-well potentials, we demonstrate precise control over the coupling strength between waveguides, the linear and nonlinear dynamics and symmetry-breaking bifurcations of guided light, and a power-controlled optical vortex switch.

  3. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Charles C. (San Diego, CA); Pytanowski, Gregory P. (San Diego, CA); Vendituoli, Jonathan S. (San Diego, CA)

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  4. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  5. Instability of Non-vortex State toward a Quantized Vortex in Bose-Einstein Condensate under External Rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya Isoshima; Kazushige Machida

    1999-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The instability condition of the non-vortex state toward vortex formation is exa mined within the Bogoliubov theory when a Bose-Einstein condensate is under exte rnally forced rotation. The obtained critical angular velocity combined with the previous stability cond itions for a votex yields a detailed phase diagram in the critical velocity vs t he system parameter. This facilitates vortex formation experiments for alkali atom gases confined in a harmonic potential.

  6. Topological superconductivity, topological confinement, and the vortex quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Perugia, via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); SwissScientific, chemin Diodati 10, CH-1223 Cologny (Switzerland)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological matter is characterized by the presence of a topological BF term in its long-distance effective action. Topological defects due to the compactness of the U(1) gauge fields induce quantum phase transitions between topological insulators, topological superconductors, and topological confinement. In conventional superconductivity, because of spontaneous symmetry breaking, the photon acquires a mass due to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. In this paper we derive the corresponding effective actions for the electromagnetic field in topological superconductors and topological confinement phases. In topological superconductors magnetic flux is confined and the photon acquires a topological mass through the BF mechanism: no symmetry breaking is involved, the ground state has topological order, and the transition is induced by quantum fluctuations. In topological confinement, instead, electric charge is linearly confined and the photon becomes a massive antisymmetric tensor via the Stueckelberg mechanism. Oblique confinement phases arise when the string condensate carries both magnetic and electric flux (dyonic strings). Such phases are characterized by a vortex quantum Hall effect potentially relevant for the dissipationless transport of information stored on vortices.

  7. The vibrational Raman spectrum of CS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Harold Noble

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CSp A Thesis By HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD Approved as to style and content by Chairman o| Committee THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CS2 HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD A Thesis Suhmitted to the Graduate School... in the procurement of necessary equipment. SECTION I: INTRODUCTION. SECTION II: CLASSICAL THEORY OF RAHAM SCATTERING . SECTION III: THEORY OF NORMAL VIBRATIONS AND VIBRATIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS. A, Morsel Vibrations B. Vibrational Wave Eqnation and lhergy Levels...

  8. Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy This customized SFG-VS spectrometer incorporates unique...

  9. Center Manifold Analysis of a PointVortex Model of Vortex Shedding with Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protas, Bartosz

    of the point vortex F¨oppl system with linear feedback control. The F¨oppl system was used in an earlier system. Key words: point vortices, flow control, dynamical systems, wake flows PACS: 47.15.Hg, 47.27.Rc, 47.27.Vf 1 Introduction Integration of rigorous methods of Modern Control Theory with Computational

  10. Center Vortex vs. Abelian models of the QCD vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Höllwieser, Roman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the center vortex model of confinement is more consistent with lattice results than other currently available models. In particular we show that Abelian field distributions predicted by monopole plasma, caloron gas or dual superconductor models cannot reproduce the area-law falloff of double winding Wilson loops in full $SU(2)$ and center vortex only gauge fields.

  11. Vortex Lattice Modelling of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vortex Lattice Modelling of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades Mads Døssing Risø-R-1621(EN) Risø Title: Vortex Lattice Modelling of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades Departments: Wind Energy Department turbines can be increased by the use of winglets without increasing the swept area. This makes them

  12. Electron vortex beams in a magnetic field and spin filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashree Chowdhury; Banasri Basu; Pratul Bandyopadhyay

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation of electron vortex beams in a magnetic field. It is pointed out that when electron vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum propagate in a magnetic field, the Berry curvature associated with the scalar electron moving in a cyclic path around the vortex line is modified from that in free space. This alters the spin-orbit interaction, which affects the propagation of nonparaxial beams. The electron vortex beams with tilted vortex lead to spin Hall effect in free space. In presence of a magnetic field in time space we have spin filtering such that either positive or negative spin states emerge in spin Hall currents with clustering of spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ states.

  13. Vortex and Droplet Engineering in Holographic Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tameem Albash; Clifford V. Johnson

    2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a detailed account of the construction of non--trivial localized solutions in a 2+1 dimensional model of superconductors using a 3+1 dimensional gravitational dual theory of a black hole coupled to a scalar field. The solutions are found in the presence of a background magnetic field. We use numerical and analytic techniques to solve the full Maxwell--scalar equations of motion in the background geometry, finding condensate droplet solutions, and vortex solutions possessing a conserved winding number. These solutions and their properties, which we uncover, help shed light on key features of the (B,T) phase diagram.

  14. Vortex lattice for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengo Maeda; Makoto Natsuume; Takashi Okamura

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the vortex lattice solution in a (2+1)-dimensional holographic model of superconductors constructed from a charged scalar condensate. The solution is obtained perturbatively near the second-order phase transition and is a holographic realization of the Abrikosov lattice. Below a critical value of magnetic field, the solution has a lower free energy than the normal state. Both the free energy density and the superconducting current are expressed by nonlocal functions, but they reduce to the expressions in the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory at long wavelength. As a result, a triangular lattice becomes the most favorable solution thermodynamically as in the GL theory of type II superconductors.

  15. Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah: Energydba Vision MotorVolusiaVortex

  16. Vortex Hydro Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility RateVirginia/WindCounty, California |Vortex Hydro

  17. ccsd00002004, Di usivity induced by vortex-like coherent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Reversed Field Pinch plasmas M. Spolaore x, V. Antoni, E. Spada, R. Cavazzana, E. Martines, G. Regnoli z, G Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, SE10044, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract. Coherent structures emerging of two Reversed Field Pinch experiments, RFX (Padua) and Extrap-T2R (Stockholm). Measurements have been

  18. Scaling of convective velocity in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya M. Yamada; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection which is a possible mechanism of the regolith migration on the surface of small asteroids. In order to evaluate the contribution of granular convection to the regolith migration, the velocity of granular convection under the microgravity condition has to be revealed. Although it is hard to control the gravitational acceleration in laboratory experiments, scaling relations involving the gravitational effect can be evaluated by systematic experiments. Therefore, we perform such a systematic experiment of the vibration-induced granular convection. From the experimental data, a scaling form for the granular convective velocity is obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be decomposed into two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity $v$ depends on the gravitational acceleration $g$ as $v \\propto g^{0.97}$ when the normalized vibrational acceleration is fixed.

  19. Degassing of molten alloys with the assistance of ultrasonic vibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou (Knoxville, TN); Xu, Hanbing (Knoxville, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed in which ultrasonic vibration is used to assist the degassing of molten metals or metal alloys thereby reducing gas content in the molten metals or alloys. High-intensity ultrasonic vibration is applied to a radiator that creates cavitation bubbles, induces acoustic streaming in the melt, and breaks up purge gas (e.g., argon or nitrogen) which is intentionally introduced in a small amount into the melt in order to collect the cavitation bubbles and to make the cavitation bubbles survive in the melt. The molten metal or alloy in one version of the invention is an aluminum alloy. The ultrasonic vibrations create cavitation bubbles and break up the large purge gas bubbles into small bubbles and disperse the bubbles in the molten metal or alloy more uniformly, resulting in a fast and clean degassing.

  20. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Investigation of the Evolution of Vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Axel

    and 1000 diameters, alternate vortex shedding begins, and a von Karman vortex street develops in the wake of Vortex Instability in a 2-D Compressible Flow over a Cylinder Axel Rohde Department of Aerospace start and reveals the evolution of vortex instability. After the cylinder has traveled between 100

  1. Non-Riemannian geometry of vortex acoustics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, Maracana, 20550, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of acoustic torsion is introduced by making use of the scalar wave equation in Riemann-Cartan spacetime. Acoustic torsion extends the acoustic metric previously given by Unruh (PRL-1981). The wave equation describes irrotational perturbations in rotational nonrelativistic fluids. This physical motivation allows us to show that the acoustic line element can be conformally mapped to the line element of a stationary torsion loop in non-Riemannian gravity. Two examples of such sonic analogues are given. The first is the stationary torsion loop in teleparallel gravity. In the far from the vortex approximation, the Cartan torsion vector is shown to be proportional to the quantum vortex number of the superfluid. The torsion vector is also shown to be proportional to the superfluid vorticity in the presence of vortices. The formation of superfluid vortices is shown not to be favored by torsion loops in Riemann-Cartan spacetime, as long as this model is concerned. It is suggested that the teleparallel model may help to find a model for superfluid neutron stars vortices based on non-Riemannian gravity.

  2. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  3. Vibrations of circular steel plates with damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Prafulchandra Naginlal

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed. Usually, the prime objection to vibrations produced by machines is their effect on humans. These are high frequency vibrations that produce troublesome noise. Low frequency vibrations are often trans- mitted and these may damage nearby... materials used with fans, motors, engines, presses, turbines and similar machines. Byars (1)* studied vibrations of a circular plate on three supports for node patterns, amplitudes and frequencies. Ballentine (2) investigated the vibrations of circular...

  4. Ferroelectric nanostructure having switchable multi-stable vortex states

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naumov, Ivan I. (Fayetteville, AR); Bellaiche, Laurent M. (Fayetteville, AR); Prosandeev, Sergey A. (Fayetteville, AR); Ponomareva, Inna V. (Fayetteville, AR); Kornev, Igor A. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A ferroelectric nanostructure formed as a low dimensional nano-scale ferroelectric material having at least one vortex ring of polarization generating an ordered toroid moment switchable between multi-stable states. A stress-free ferroelectric nanodot under open-circuit-like electrical boundary conditions maintains such a vortex structure for their local dipoles when subject to a transverse inhomogeneous static electric field controlling the direction of the macroscopic toroidal moment. Stress is also capable of controlling the vortex's chirality, because of the electromechanical coupling that exists in ferroelectric nanodots.

  5. Sound Wave in Vortex with Sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soumen Basak

    2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Komar's definition, we give expressions for the mass and angular momentum of a rotating acoustic black hole. We show that the mass and angular momentum so defined, obey the equilibrium version of the first law of Black Hole thermodynamics. We also show that when a phonon passes by a vortex with a sink, its trajectory is bent. The angle of bending of the sound wave to leading order is quadratic in $A/cb$ and $B/cb$, where $b$ is the impact parameter and $A$ and $B$ are the parameters in the velocity of the fluid flow. The time delay in the propagation of sound wave which to first order depends only on $B/c^2$ and is independent of $A$.

  6. Fuel injection of coal slurry using vortex nozzles and valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holmes, Allen B. (Rockville, MD)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of atomized coal slurry fuel into an engine combustion chamber is achieved at relatively low pressures by means of a vortex swirl nozzle. The outlet opening of the vortex nozzle is considerably larger than conventional nozzle outlets, thereby eliminating major sources of failure due to clogging by contaminants in the fuel. Control fluid, such as air, may be used to impart vorticity to the slurry and/or purge the nozzle of contaminants during the times between measured slurry charges. The measured slurry charges may be produced by a diaphragm pump or by vortex valves controlled by a separate control fluid. Fluidic circuitry, employing vortex valves to alternatively block and pass cool slurry fuel flow, is disclosed.

  7. Zero-Energy Flows and Vortex Patterns in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiro Kobayashi

    2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that zero-energy flows appear in many particle systems as same as in single particle cases in 2-dimensions. Vortex patterns constructed from the zero-energy flows can be investigated in terms of the eigenstates in conjugate spaces of Gel'fand triplets. Stable patterns are written by the superposition of zero-energy eigenstates. On the other hand vortex creations and annihilations are described by the insertions of unstable eigenstates with complex-energy eigenvalues into the stable patterns. Some concrete examples are presented in the 2-dimensional parabolic potential barrier case. %, i.e., $-m \\gamma^2 (x^2+y^2)/2$. We point out three interesting properties of the zero-energy flows; (i) the absolute economy as for the energy consumption, (ii) the infinite variety of the vortex patterns, and (iii) the absolute stability of the vortex patterns .

  8. axisymmetric vortex breakdown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluid Motion at the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics. Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T M 2013-01-01 325 The Taylor-vortex dynamo Christophe Gissinger...

  9. Desingularization of periodic vortex sheet roll-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasny, R.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations governing periodic vortex sheet roll-up from analytic initial data are desingularized. Linear stability analysis shows that this diminishes the vortex sheet model's short wavelength instability, yielding a numerically more tractable set of equations. Computational evidence is presented which indicates that this approximation converges, beyond the critical time of singularity formation in the vortex sheet, if the mesh is refined and the smoothing parameter is reduced in the proper order. The results suggest that the vortex sheet rolls up into a double branched spiral past the critical time. It is demonstrated that either higher machine precision or a spectra filter can be used to maintain computational accuracy as the smoothing parameter is decreased. Some conjectures on the model's long time asymptotic state are given.

  10. Vortex hair on AdS black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Ruth; Kubiznak, David; Mann, Robert B; Wills, Danielle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse vortex hair for charged rotating asymptotically AdS black holes in the abelian Higgs model. We give analytical and numerical arguments to show how the vortex interacts with the horizon of the black hole, and how the solution extends to the boundary. The solution is very close to the corresponding asymptotically flat vortex, once one transforms to a frame that is non-rotating at the boundary. We show that there is a Meissner effect for extremal black holes, with the vortex flux being expelled from sufficiently small black holes. The phase transition is shown to be first order in the presence of rotation, but second order without rotation. We comment on applications to holography.

  11. Nonclassicality of vortex Airy beams in the Wigner representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Ruipin [School of Sciences, Zhejiang A and F University, Lin'an, Zhejiang Province 311300 (China); Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ooi, C. H. Raymond [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) of a vortex Airy beam is calculated analytically. The WDF provides intuitive pictures of the intriguing features of vorticity in phase space. The nonclassical property of the vortex Airy beam and the Airy beam is analyzed through the negative parts of the WDF. The study shows that destructive interference of certain classical waves can mimic nonclassical lights such as those due to quantum effects.

  12. Quantum correlation dynamics in photosynthetic processes assisted by molecular vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Giorgi; M. Roncaglia; F. A. Raffa; M. Genovese

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the long course of evolution, nature has learnt how to exploit quantum effects. In fact, recent experiments reveal the existence of quantum processes whose coherence extends over unexpectedly long time and space ranges. In particular, photosynthetic processes in light-harvesting complexes display a typical oscillatory dynamics ascribed to quantum coherence. Here, we consider the simple model where a dimer made of two chromophores is strongly coupled with a quasi-resonant vibrational mode. We observe the occurrence of wide oscillations of genuine quantum correlations, between electronic excitations and the environment, represented by vibrational bosonic modes. Such a quantum dynamics has been unveiled through the calculation of the negativity of entanglement and the discord, indicators widely used in quantum information for quantifying the resources needed to realize quantum technologies. We also discuss the possibility of approximating additional weakly-coupled off-resonant vibrational modes, simulating the disturbances induced by the rest of the environment, by a single vibrational mode. Within this approximation, one can show that the off-resonant bath behaves like a classical source of noise.

  13. Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Joseph W. (East Aurora, NY); Homicz, Gregory F. (Getzville, NY); Bergman, Richard C. (Corfu, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

  14. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the system measures Rayleigh scattering whose phase is modulated by vibrations. In order to obtain a large sensing area, an external cavity ring laser is used as the light source for a high degree of coherence. The linewidth of this laser light can...

  15. A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: raettig@mpia.de, E-mail: klahr@mpia.de, E-mail: Wladimir.Lyra@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

  16. Ultra-Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, R.G. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Steele, R.C. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Williams, J.T. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar (California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  17. ULTRA-LOW NOX ADVANCED VORTEX COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan G. Edmonds; Robert C. Steele; Joseph T. Williams; Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Avtar Bining

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  18. Visualization of Intricate Flow Structures for Vortex Breakdown Analysis Xavier Tricoche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Visualization of Intricate Flow Structures for Vortex Breakdown Analysis Xavier Tricoche University, synthetic depictions that permit new insight into the structural properties of vortex breakdowns. CR And Modeling-- Simulation Output Analysis J.2 [Physical Sciences and Engineer- ing]: Engineering--. Keywords

  19. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

  20. Vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid and Nambu Goto dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    1999-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    By a weak deformation of the cylindrical symmetry of the potential vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid, we study the possible dynamics of the central line of this vortex. In "stiff" material the Nanbu-Goto equations are obtained

  1. Vortex Shedding from Superhydrophobic Cylinders Nangelie Ferrer, Robert Daniello and Jonathan Rothstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Vortex Shedding from Superhydrophobic Cylinders Nangelie Ferrer, Robert Daniello and Jonathan Rothstein University of Massachusetts Amherst Abstract Superhydrophobic surfaces are ideal for applications to characterize the vortex shedding phenomenon observed within the wake region of the superhydrophobic cylinder

  2. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN, UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A. [CNR-SPIN, UOS Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Wang, X.; Paparo, D. [CNR-SPIN, UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N?=?1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2??1000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  3. Vortex Interactions and Barotropic Aspects of Concentric Eyewall Formation HUNG-CHI KUO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    of a tropical cyclone core with nearby weaker vorticity of various spatial scales. This paper considers, separation distance, companion vortex size, and core vortex skirt parameter. A vorticity skirt on the core­6 times as strong as the larger companion vortex. An additional requirement is that the separation

  4. Nonexistence of Lyapunov Functions and the Instability of the von Karman Vortex Streets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Chjan C.

    Nonexistence of Lyapunov Functions and the Instability of the von Karman Vortex Streets Chjan Lim of the von Karman vortex streets and the existence of a global Lyapunov function at the special aspect ratio the equilibrium Karman streets are unlikely theoretical candidates for observed vortex trails. On the other hand

  5. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on the Asymmetric Wake Vortex Structures around an Oscillating Airfoil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    of the reverse von Karman vortex street behind the flapping wing. However, it is challenging to fully understandExperimental and Numerical Investigations on the Asymmetric Wake Vortex Structures around of the vortex pair becomes more apparent, which is considered to be a vital element to form the asymmetric wake

  6. The effect of surface tension on the Moore singularity of vortex sheet dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontelos, Marco

    The effect of surface tension on the Moore singularity of vortex sheet dynamics F. de la Hoz , M's singularities by surface tension in the evolution of vortex sheets and its dependence on Weber number (which is inversely proportional to surface tension coefficient). The curvature of the vortex sheet, instead

  7. Traveling Waves from the Arclength Parameterization: Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, J. Douglas

    Traveling Waves from the Arclength Parameterization: Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension Benjamin for the vortex sheet with surface tension. We use the angle- arclength description of the interface rather than prove that there exist traveling vortex sheets with surface tension bifurcating from equilibrium. We

  8. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  9. Eur. .I. Mech. B/Fluids, 17, no 4, 5499560, 1998 Experimental evidencefor a new type of stretched vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    , concentrated vorticity can appear as a result of instabilities such as the BCnard-Von Karman vortex street vortex P. PETITJEANS `*, J. H. ROBRES a, J. E. WESFREID a, N. KEVLAHAN b ABSTRACT. - Experimental vortex (which is a non-confined stretched vortex model) are observed and analyzed, 0 Elsevier, Paris 1

  10. Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: II. Vortex Formation, Evolution and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental investigations of inhomogeneities of gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma obtained by using the nonperturbing experimental methods [N.A. Kervalishvili, arXiv:1502.02516 [physics.plasm-ph] (2015)] have been presented. Inhomogeneities are the dense solitary vortex structures stretched along the magnetic field, the lifetime of which is much greater than the time of electron-neutral collisions. The processes of formation, evolution and dynamics of vortex structures were studied. The periodic sequence of these processes is described for different geometries of discharge device.

  11. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  12. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  13. Vortex phase-jitter in acoustically excited bluff body flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    Vortex phase-jitter in acoustically excited bluff body flames Santosh J. Shanbhogue, Michael disturbances. Phase locked particle image velocimetry was carried out over a range of conditions", manifested as cycle-to-cycle variation in flame and vorticity field at the same excitation phase. Phase

  14. Onset of superradiant instabilities in the hydrodynamic vortex model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahar Hod

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic vortex, an effective spacetime geometry for propagating sound waves, is studied analytically. In contrast with the familiar Kerr black-hole spacetime, the hydrodynamic vortex model is described by an effective acoustic geometry which has no horizons. However, this acoustic spacetime possesses an ergoregion, a property which it shares with the rotating Kerr spacetime. It has recently been shown numerically that this physical system is linearly unstable due to the superradiant scattering of sound waves in the ergoregion of the effective spacetime. In the present study we use analytical tools in order to explore the onset of these superradiant instabilities which characterize the effective spacetime geometry. In particular, we derive a simple analytical formula which describes the physical properties of the hydrodynamic vortex system in its critical (marginally-stable) state, the state which marks the boundary between stable and unstable fluid configurations. The analytically derived formula is shown to agree with the recently published numerical data for the hydrodynamic vortex system.

  15. AXISYMMETRIC VORTEX BREAKDOWN IN AN ENCLOSED CYLINDER FLOW.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    into the interior flow from the Ekman boundary layer on the rotating endwall is observed, as is the formation,. The boundary conditions are also defined precisely since the flow is confined in a fixed volume. As Re and and the flow remains oscillatory. This oscillatory behavior is mostly confined to the central vortex region. 2

  16. Modified Black Hole with Polar Jet and Vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Tmmalm

    2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many models relating an accretion disk of Black Hole to jet outflow. The herein heuristic model describes the continuation of an external accretion disk to an internal accretion disk for less than Black Hole horizon, and subsequent polar jet outflow along polar axis out of polar vortex wherein the event horizon is no longer descriptive.

  17. Creation and pinning of vortex-antivortex pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sangbum; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, Malcolm J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer modeling is reported about the creation and pinning of a magnetic vortex-antivortex (V-AV) pair in a superconducting thin film, due to the magnetic field of a vertical magnetic dipole above the film, and two antidot pins inside the film...

  18. -STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirn, Daniel

    -STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS MATTHIAS KURZKE AND DANIEL SPIRN Abstract. 1. Introduction 1.1. Physical background. The evolution of a superconducting material is usu- ally of the magnetic field and the electric field potential for a superconducting sample R2 . The parameter

  19. LINEAR DISPERSIVE DECAY ESTIMATES FOR VORTEX SHEETS WITH SURFACE TENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirn, Daniel

    governing irrotational vortex sheets and water waves with surface tension. Using oscillatory integral order, well- posedness theory poses difficulties; however, local-in-time existence for water waves by the kinematic condition in that the interface does not break. This implies the component of the velocity field

  20. Vortex Shedding on Hydrofoils Its dark and lonely down there...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vortex Shedding on Hydrofoils Its dark and lonely down there... Improving marine vehicle an underwater vehicle moves, it displaces water, genera6ng a unique velocity that it can u6lize rather than fight those flows, saving energy and improving

  1. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  2. Inhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correggi, Michele

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a 2D rotating Bose gas described by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) theory and investigate the properties of the ground state of the theory for rotational speeds close to the critical speed for vortex nucleation. While one could expect that the vortex distribution should be homogeneous within the condensate we prove by means of an asymptotic analysis in the strongly interacting (Thomas-Fermi) regime that it is not. More precisely we rigorously derive a formula due to Sheehy and Radzihovsky [Phys. Rev. A 70, 063620(R) (2004)] for the vortex distribution, a consequence of which is that the vortex distribution is strongly inhomogeneous close to the critical speed and gradually homogeneizes when the rotation speed is increased. From the mathematical point of view, a novelty of our approach is that we do not use any compactness argument in the proof, but instead provide explicit estimates on the difference between the vorticity measure of the GP ground state and the minimizer of a certain renormalized energy...

  3. Inhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be homogeneous within the condensate we prove by means of an asymptotic analysis in the strongly interactingInhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates M. Correggia , N. Rougerieb, France. May 10, 2012 Abstract We consider a 2D rotating Bose gas described by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP

  4. Inhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    should be homogeneous within the condensate we prove by means of an asymptotic analysis in the stronglyInhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates M. Correggia , N. Rougerieb, France. September 19, 2012 Abstract We consider a 2D rotating Bose gas described by the Gross

  5. Spacetime Defects: von Kármán vortex street like configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricio S. Letelier

    2001-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A special arrangement of spinning strings with dislocations similar to a von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street is studied. We numerically solve the geodesic equations for the special case of a test particle moving along twoinfinite rows of pure dislocations and also discuss the case of pure spinning defects.

  6. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  7. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  8. Roland Kruse, Tiedo Meyer: Vibration platform for the calibration of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    Roland Kruse, Tiedo Meyer: Vibration platform for the calibration of optical sensors #12;Roland Kruse, Tiedo Meyer (Oldenburg University): Vibration platform for the calibration of optical sensors Meyer (Oldenburg University): Vibration platform for the calibration of optical sensors The project

  9. Phonon spectrum of QCD vacuum in magnetic-field-induced superconducting phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. N. Chernodub; Jos Van Doorsselaere; Henri Verschelde

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the background of a sufficiently strong magnetic field the vacuum was suggested to become an ideal electric conductor (highly anisotropic superconductor) due to an interplay between the strong and electromagnetic forces. The superconducting ground state resembles an Abrikosov lattice state in an ordinary type--II superconductor: it is an inhomogeneous structure made of a (charged vector) quark-antiquark condensate pierced by vortices. In this paper the acoustic (phonon) vibrational modes of the vortex lattice are studied at zero temperature. Using an effective model based on a vector meson dominance, we show that in the infrared limit the longitudinal (transverse) acoustic vibrations of the vortex lattice possess a linear (quadratic) dispersion relation corresponding to type I (type II) Nambu--Goldstone modes.

  10. The effect of disorder on the critical points in the vortex phase diagram of YBCO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Olsson, R. J.; Karapetrov, G.; Tobos, V.; Moulton, W. G.

    2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of line disorder induced by heavy ion irradiation and of point disorder induced by proton and electron irradiation on the upper and lower critical points in the vortex phase diagram of YBCO is presented. The authors find that dilute line disorder induces a Bose glass transition at low fields which is replaced at the lower critical point by first order melting at higher fields. Strong pinning point defects raise the lower critical point, while weak pinning point defects have little or no effect on the lower critical point. The upper critical point is lowered by point disorder, but raised by line disorder. First order melting is suppressed by point disorder in two ways, by lowering of the upper critical point only for weak point pins, or by merging of the upper and lower critical points for strong point pins. The differing responses of the upper and lower critical points to line and point disorder can be understood in a picture of transverse and longitudinal spatial fluctuations.

  11. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the last report. Most of the components have been received and assembly has begun. Testing is expected to resume in August. In April, a paper was presented at the American Association of Drilling Engineers National Technical Conference in Houston. The paper was well received, and several oilfield service and supply companies sent inquiries regarding commercial distribution of the system. These are currently being pursued, but none have yet been finalized.

  12. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the previous quarter. Efforts this quarter have focused on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The delivery date for five critical parts from one supplier has slipped to late November, which will preclude deployment for a field test before late December or early January. We are exploring whether we can take the partially made parts and complete them earlier in our own shop.

  13. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair) [Conference Chair; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE�s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE�s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  14. RESEARCH LETTERS Vibrating insoles and balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    , and such changes have been associated with diminished motor performance. Input noise can enhance sensory and motor be substantially reduced through the application of mechanical noise to the feet via vibrating insoles. We usedRESEARCH LETTERS Vibrating insoles and balance control in elderly people Attila A Priplata, James B

  15. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectrosco...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectroscopy: A Comparison with the AirDMSO Liquid Interface. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear...

  16. active dynamic vibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Active Vibration Control on A 3-DOF Parallel Platform Based on Kane's Dynamics Method Engineering Websites Summary: - 2783 - Active Vibration Control on A 3-DOF...

  17. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough...

  18. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure...

  19. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  20. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galchev, Tzeno (University of Michigan); Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil (University of Michigan)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The fabricated device currently generates a peak power of 25.9{micro}W and an average power of 1.21{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup -} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 23Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 1.2cm{sup 3}.

  1. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  2. Vibrations in elemental amorphous semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Peter Ernest

    1977-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ~lationG 0re pl'c.3cnted for four-fold coordinated contirluou:, random net',/orK (CR~'i J mocels of a-Ge I for a three-fold c08rdinated CRN n10dol of a-As and fOe isolated- and interacting-chain models of a-Se. In order to obtain a more realistic descripti... are summarised in the final part of this cha pter and n plan of the thesis is outlined. 5 1. 2 VI BRATIONAL CALCULATIONS To calculate the normal modes of vibration of an infinite cr ystal of ric;id !toms in the harmonic approximation, the interatomic force...

  3. Vortex energy and 360 Neel walls in thinfilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel walls in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

  4. Vortex topology and the continuum limit of lattice gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Burgio

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the stability of Z_2 topological vortex excitations in d+1 dimensional SU(2) Yang-Mills theory on the lattice at T=0. This is found to depend on d and on the coupling considered. We discuss the connection with lattice artifacts causing bulk transitions in the beta_A-beta_F plane and draw some conclusions regarding the continuum limit of the theory.

  5. Reduction of the planar 4-vortex system at zero momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, George

    in the plane the nth vortex has location zn = xn + iyn Ppl (C2 )N . The Hamiltonian and symplectic form- nally on each factor C of Ppl by (ei , a) · z ei z + a. A momentum mapping is Jpl - N n=1 n 1 2 |zn|2]. To calculate the quotient µe : (Jpl )-1 (µe) (Ppl )µe (Jpl )-1 (µe)/SE(2), one may first translate

  6. Vortex energy and 360 Neel wall in thinfilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat, Radu

    .Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel wall in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

  7. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006. The month of January was devoted to the final preparations for, and conducting of testing of the DVMCS at TerraTek laboratories in Salt Lake City. This testing was concluded on January 27, 2006. Much of the effort in this period was then devoted to the analysis of the data and the preparation of the Phase II final report. The report was issued after the close of the period. Work on Phase III of the project began during this quarter. It has consisted of making some modifications in the prototype design to make it more suitable for field testing an more practical for commercial use. This work is continuing. The redesign effort, coupled with the current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The precommercial prototypes are being developed in parallel, so the project should be completed per the current schedule.

  8. Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the Phase II final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006. Efforts the current quarter have continued to focus on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The continued extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components significantly delayed the deployment of the prototype and precommercial units. All parts have now been received for two units, and all but one for the third. Mechanical assembly of the first two systems is complete and the electronics installation and laboratory testing will be finished in April. We have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with a major US oilfield equipment supplier, which calls for their assisting with our field tests, in cash and in kind. We are close to signing a definitive agreement which includes the purchase of the three precommercial units. We had also signed a CRADA with the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC), and scheduled a test at their site, The RMOTC drilling schedule continues to slip, and the test cannot begin until the first week of May. Based on these factors, we have requested a no-cost extension to July 31, 2007.

  9. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign was complete and new parts were on order. The project is approximately three months behind schedule at this time.

  10. Energy-dependent characteristics of collisinal vibration-energy exchange in vapors of polyatomic molcules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalesskaya, G.A.; Yakovlev, D.L. [Institute of Molecular and Atomic Physics, Minsk (Belarus)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} laser-induced delayed fluorescence was used to study the collisional vibration-energy exchange between the polyatomic molecules in gases. The efficiency of collisional exchange, the mean amount of energy transfer in one collision, as well as their correlation with the vibration energy and with the size of excited molecule were determined for diacetyl, acetophenone, benzophenone, and anthraquinone molecules form the experimentally observed pressure dependences of the decay rates and fluorescence intensities. It was shown that the mean amount of energy transfer per collision decreases with the molecular size and increases as E{sup m}, with m>2, with increasing the vibration energy. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. High-precision calculations of vortex sheet motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, J.S. (Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR (United States)); Baker, G.R. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a vortex sheet undergoing Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is known to be ill-posed, causing deterioration in numerical calculations from the rapid growth of round-off errors. In particular, it is the smallest scales (introduced by round-off) that grow the fastest. Krasny introduced a spectral filter to suppress the growth of round-off errors of the smallest scales. He was then able to detect evidence supporting asymptotic studies that indicate the formation of a curvature singularity in finite time. We use high precision interval arithmetic, coded in C + +, to re-examine the evolution of a vortex sheet from initial conditions used previously by several researchers. Most importantly, our results are free from the influence of round-off errors. We show excellent agreement between results obtained through high precision interval arithmetic and through the use of Krasny's spectral filter. In particular, our results support the formation of a curvature singularity in finite time. After the time of singularity formation, the markers move in peculiar patterns. We rule out any possibility of this motion resulting from round-off errors, but it does depend on the level of resolution. We find no consistent behavior in the motion of the markers as we improve the resolution of the vortex sheet. Also, we find some disagreement between the results obtained through high precision interval arithmetic and through the use of the spectral filter. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The Assistance of Molecular Vibrations on Coherent Energy Transfer in Photosynthesis from the View of Quantum Heat Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhedong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the quantum nature in the energy transport in solar cell and light-harvesting complexes have attracted much attention, as being triggered by the experimental observations. We model the light-harvesting complex (i.e., PEB50 dimer) as a quantum heat engine (QHE) and study the effect of the undamped intra-molecule vibrational modes on the coherent energy transfer process and quantum transport. We find that the exciton-vibration interaction has non-trivial contribution to the promotion of quantum yield as well as transport properties of the quantum heat engine at steady state, by enhancing the quantum coherence quantified by entanglement entropy. The perfect quantum yield over 90% has been obtained, with theexciton-vibration coupling. We attribute these improvements to the renormalization of the electronic couplings effectively induced by exciton-vibration interaction and the subsequent delocalization of excitons. Finally we demonstrate that the thermal relaxation and dephasing can help the excitation en...

  13. Low cost subpixel method for vibration measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrer, Belen [Department of Civil Engineering, Univ. Alicante P.O. Box, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Espinosa, Julian; Perez, Jorge; Acevedo, Pablo; Mas, David [Inst. of Physics Applied to the Sciences and Technologies, Univ. Alicante P.O. Box, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Roig, Ana B. [Department of Optics, Univ. Alicante P.O. Box, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional vibration measurement methods are based on devices that acquire local data by direct contact (accelerometers, GPS) or by laser beams (Doppler vibrometers). Our proposal uses video processing to obtain the vibration frequency directly from the scene, without the need of auxiliary targets or devices. Our video-vibrometer can obtain the vibration frequency at any point in the scene and can be implemented with low-cost devices, such as commercial cameras. Here we present the underlying theory and some experiments that support our technique.

  14. Surface Vibrations in a Model Hcp Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; DEWITTE, FW.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and F. W. de Wette, Phys. Rev. B4, 1661 (1971). PHYSICA L RE VIE W 8 VOLUME 6, NUMBE R 2 15 JULY 1972 Surface Vibrations in a Model hcp Crystal R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A @ M University, College Station, Texas 77843 and G. P.... Alldredge and F. %. de bette Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 16 February 1972) The surface relaxation, vibrational modes, mean-square amplitudes of vibration, etc. , have been calculated for the (0001) surface...

  15. On the neutron noise diagnostics of pressurized water reactor control rod vibrations. 1. periodic vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazsit, I.; Glockler, O.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the theory of neutron noise arising from the vibration of a localized absorber, the possibility of rod vibration diagnostics is investigated. It is found that noise source characteristics, namely rod position and vibration trajectory and spectra, can be unfolded from measured neutron noise signals. For the localization process, the first and more difficult part of the diagnostics, a procedure is suggested whose novelty is that it is applicable in case of arbitrary vibration trajectories. Applicability of the method is investigated in numerical experiments where effects of background noise are also accounted for.

  16. Electrostatic vibration-to-electric energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mur Miranda, José Oscar, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-Low-Power electronics can perform useful functions with power levels as low as 170 nW. This makes them amenable to powering from ambient sources such as vibration. In this case, they can become autonomous. Motivated ...

  17. Drops bouncing on a vibrating bath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of millimetric droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrating fluid bath. We first characterize the system experimentally, deducing the dependence ...

  18. Simulations of Vibrational Frequencies of Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    analytical model ­ Euler-Bernoulli theory Frequencies of the modes of the lateral vibration 8 fn ~ 1/L2 fn close to global or local buckling instabilities. 19 · The results of this study are relevant fo

  19. Multi-frequency cable vibration experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Andrew (Andrew Dale)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of Multi-Frequency cable vibration experiments at Reynolds number 7600 were carried out at the MIT Tow Tank using the Virtual Cable Towing Apparatus (VCTA). Motions observed in a Direct Numerical Simulation of a ...

  20. Harvesting energy from non-ideal vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Samuel C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy harvesting has drawn significant interest for its potential to power autonomous low-power applications. Vibration energy harvesting is particularly well suited to industrial condition sensing, environmental monitoring ...

  1. Using piezo-electric material to simulate a vibration environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jepsen, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Davie, Neil T. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vangoethem, Douglas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Edward F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A target object can be vibrated using actuation that exploits the piezo-electric ("PE") property. Under combined conditions of vibration and centrifugal acceleration, a centrifugal load of the target object on PE vibration actuators can be reduced by using a counterweight that offsets the centrifugal loading. Target objects are also subjected to combinations of: spin, vibration, and acceleration; spin and vibration; and spin and acceleration.

  2. Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

  3. Collective Motion of Vibrated Polar Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Deseigne; Olivier Dauchot; Hugues Chatè

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study a monolayer of vibrated disks with a built-in polar asymmetry which enables them to move quasi-balistically on a large persistence length. Alignment occurs during collisions as a result of self-propulsion and hard core repulsion. Varying the amplitude of the vibration, we observe the onset of large-scale collective motion and the existence of giant number fluctuations with a scaling exponent in agreement with the predicted theoretical value.

  4. Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; WETTE, FWD.

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOB ER, 1970 Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures* B. E. Allen, G. P. Alldredge, and F. W. de bette DePartment of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 18... May 1970) In order to estimate the influence of both surface and interface effects on phonon frequencies and superconducting transition temperatures in layered structures, we have calculated the vibrational modes of structures composed...

  5. Active vibration control using piezoceramic transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stjernstrom, Scott Christopher

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL ESIVG PIEZOCERAVIIC TRAiVSDI. CERS A Thesis bv SCOTT CHRISTOPHER STJERNSTRO'vl Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Ak?~I L niversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of i...XIASTER OF SCIEVCE December 198i Xlajor Subject: iXIechanical Engineering ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL USING PIEZOCERAkIIC TRANSDUCERS A Thesis by SCOTT CHRISTOPHER STJERNSTROM Approved as to style and content by: /j': ~R. M. Alexander (Chairman of Committee...

  6. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program is to develop the Drilling Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) to both record and reduce drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drill string. It is composed of two main elements. The first is a multi-axis active vibration damper to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations, and thereby increase both rate of penetration (ROP) and bit life, as well that the life of other drillstring components. The hydraulic impedance (hardness) of this damper will be continuously adjusted using unique technology that is robust, fast-acting and reliable. The second component is a real-time system to monitor 3-axis drillstring vibration, and related parameters including weight- and torque-on-bit (TOB) and temperature. This monitor will determine the current vibration environment and adjust the damper accordingly. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. Phase I of this program addresses an evaluation of the environment in which the DVMCS will operate; modeling of a drillstring response including the active damper; a top-level design of the mechanical and electronic systems; analyzing the anticipated performance of the damper by modeling and laboratory testing of small prototypes; and doing preliminary economic, market, environmental and financing analyses. This phase is scheduled to last fourteen months, until November 30, 2003. During this first quarter, significant progress was achieved on the first two objectives, and work was begun on several others. Initial designs of the DVMCS are underway.

  7. VIBRATIONS INDUCED BY THE FLOW OF MAGNET COOLING WATER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    response in the range 10-500 Hz are given. From measurements made on the beam tube (A3' H), it can be observed that the total rms acceleration response increased by a...

  8. Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    operations, cloud services and market trading. Owners such as Amazon EC2, Facebook, Google and stock and maintain runtime performance, datacenters have high-powered HVAC systems in the buildings and fan

  9. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  10. A model for universal time scale of vortex ring formation Kamran Mohseni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    and Applied Science, 104-44, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Morteza Gharib Graduate Aeronautical Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Received of the fluid out of the cylinder and the approximation of the vortex at the pinch off moment by a vortex

  11. Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Vigor

    1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A) #12;2 COMBUSTION IN MESO-SCALE VORTEX CHAMBERS Ming-hsun Wu, Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A with the chemical energy varying from 25 to 174W. For the largest combustion volume, hydrogen and hydrocarbons

  12. The geometric phase and the geometrodynamics of relativistic electron vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratul Bandyopadhyay; Banasri Basu; Debashree Chowdhury

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied here the geometrodynamics of relativistic electron vortex beams from the perspective of the geometric phase associated with the scalar electron encircling the vortex line. It is pointed out that the electron vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum is a natural consequence of the skyrmion model of a fermion. This follows from the quantization procedure of a fermion in the framework of Nelson's stochastic mechanics when a direction vector (vortex line) is introduced to depict the spin degrees of freedom. In this formalism a fermion is depicted as a scalar particle encircling a vortex line. It is here shown that when the Berry phase acquired by the scalar electron encircling the vortex line involves quantized Dirac monopole we have paraxial (non-paraxial) beam when the vortex line is parallel (orthogonal) to the wavefront propagation direction. Non-paraxial beams incorporate spin-orbit interaction. When the vortex line is tilted with respect to the propagation direction the Berry phase involves non-quantized monopole. The temporal variation of the direction of the tilted vortices is studied here taking into account the renormalization group flow of the monopole charge and it is predicted that this gives rise to spin Hall effect.

  13. Determination of magnetic vortex chirality using lateral spin-valve and Y. Otani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    Determination of magnetic vortex chirality using lateral spin-valve geometry T. Kimuraa and Y October 2005 We demonstrate the determination of the vortex chirality using a nonlocal spin-valve measurement technique in a lateral spin valve consisting of a Permalloy Py disk 1 m in diameter and a Py wire

  14. Generalized London free energy for high-Tc vortex lattices Ian Affleck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Marcel

    Generalized London free energy for high-Tc vortex lattices Ian Affleck Department of Physics-1829 97 50402-4 The London free energy provides a very simple way of studying the vortex lattice that this effect can arise from additional quartic derivative terms in the Ginzburg-Landau GL free energy4­7 or

  15. FABRICATION ET TUDE D'UN MONOCRISTAL DE VORTEX DANS LE NIOBIUM SUPRACONDUCTEUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    447 FABRICATION ET ÉTUDE D'UN MONOCRISTAL DE VORTEX DANS LE NIOBIUM SUPRACONDUCTEUR P. THOREL. 2014 Nous étudions expérimentalement par diffraction de neutrons le réseau de vortex dans le niobium ce V-cristal est liée à celle des axes cristallins du niobium, étant donné la forte anisotropie des

  16. GPU accelerated simulations of bluff body flows using vortex particle methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottet, Georges-Henri

    GPU accelerated simulations of bluff body flows using vortex particle methods Diego Rossinelli in press as: D. Rossinelli et al., GPU accelerated simulations of bluff body flows using vortex particle Penalization Bluff body flows a b s t r a c t We present a GPU accelerated solver for simulations of bluff body

  17. Lateral imaging of the superconducting vortex lattice using Doppler-modulated scanning tunneling microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, John Y.T.

    Lateral imaging of the superconducting vortex lattice using Doppler-modulated scanning tunneling on the quasiparticle tunneling spectrum, we have laterally imaged the vortex lattice in superconducting 2H-NbSe2 that circulates along the sample edge. Above the lower critical field, field can penetrate into the superconductor

  18. Zero modes in vortex-fermion system with compact extra space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Nakamula; K. Shiraishi

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of fermionic zero modes is shown in the presence of vortex configuration of pure $SU(2)$ gauge field on the manifold $M_4 \\times S^2$. From the perspective of four-dimensional effective theory, these zero modes are almost the same as the Jackiw-Rossi type zero modes of the vortex-fermion system.

  19. Efficiently computing vortex lattices in fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensates Yanzhi Zhang1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Weizhu

    Efficiently computing vortex lattices in fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensates Yanzhi Zhang1-Einstein condensates (BECs) with strongly repulsive interactions. The key ingredients of the method is to discretize method in time. Different vortex lattice structures of condensate ground state in two-dimensional (2D

  20. Progress in year 2001 1. Observation of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Progress in year 2001 1. Observation of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates Quantized in rotating gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) [2, 3]. We have observed the formation of highly-ordered vortex lattices in a rotating Bose- condensed gas [4]. They were produced by rotating the condensate

  1. Elliptical-inertial instability of rotating Karman vortex streets A. Stegnera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegner Alexandre

    Elliptical-inertial instability of rotating Karman vortex streets A. Stegnera Laboratoire de. Unlike the classical bidimensional Karman street, these observed vortex streets are affected by the earth Karman streets. A series of experiments were performed to study the wake of a cylinder in a rotating deep

  2. Vortex ratchet effects in films with a periodic array of antidots Clcio C. de Souza Silva,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    Vortex ratchet effects in films with a periodic array of antidots Clécio C. de Souza Silva,1, * J The vortex ratchet effect has been studied in Al films patterned with square arrays of submicron antidots. We. In addition, the experiments reveal interesting collective phenomena in the vortex ratchet effect. At fields

  3. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics A Numerical Study of Vortex-Dominated Flow around an Oscillating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    flapping motion is due to the reverse von Karman vortex street. Recently, Bohl and Koochesfahani1 haveAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 A Numerical Study of Vortex-Dominated Flow at the Reynolds (Re) number of 12600. The effects of the reduced frequency and Strouhal number on the wake vortex

  4. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  5. Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, L.F.

    1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

  6. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU .Magnetic Vortex Core

  7. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU .Magnetic Vortex CoreMagnetic

  8. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU .Magnetic Vortex

  9. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU .Magnetic VortexMagnetic

  10. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU .MagneticMagnetic Vortex Core

  11. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'll Love YouTokamak| NationalMagnetic Vortex

  12. The Relation Between Dry Vortex Merger and Tropical Cyclone Genesis over the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chin

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong, convective African tropical disturbance has a greater chance to develop into a Tropical 23 Depression (TD) if it merges with a shallow, dry vortex (D-vortex) from the north of the African 24 easterly jet (AEJ) after leaving the western coast. Using 11-year reanalysis data we found that the 25 western tip of a vortex strip at northwestern Africa can serve as dry vortices for the D-vortex 26 merger if it shifts southward. Another source of D-vortices is the westward propagating lows 27 along the southern edge of the Saharan air. The D-vortex merger process occurred for 63.5% of 28 tropical cyclones (TCs) or developing systems over the main development region of the Atlantic 29 Ocean, while it occurred for 54% of non-developing systems. TC genesis could be largely 30 controlled by the large-scale environment, but the differences in characteristics of vortices 31 associated with the D-vortex merger between developing and non-developing systems could 32 potentially help determine their destinies; in general, developing systems were dominated by a 33 more intense and moist south vortex, while non-developing systems were dominated by a north 34 vortex which was more intense, drier, and larger in size. Analysis also shows that 74% of intense 35 developing systems were involved with the D-vortex merger process. More attention needs to be 36 paid to the D-vortex merger and the characteristics of those vortices as they can play significant 37 roles or have a strong indication in Atlantic TC genesis.

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 54, NO. 3, JUNE 2007 1375 Singular Perturbation Control for Vibration Rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    Control for Vibration Rejection in HDDs Using the PZT Active Suspension as Fast Subsystem Observer Chee sensors other than the read/write head are not embedded into current hard disk drives (HDDs) due to signal-to-noise is applied to decompose the voice coil motor's (VCM's) and induced PZT active suspension's dynamics into fast

  14. Experimental flight test vibration measurements and nondestructive inspection on a USCG HC-130H aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.G.; Jones, C.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). FAA Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center; Mihelic, J.E.; Barnes, J.D. [Coast Guard Aircraft Repair and Supply Center, Elizabeth City, NC (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of experimental flight test vibration measurements and structural inspections performed by the Federal Aviation Administration`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories and the US Coast Guard Aircraft Repair and Supply Center (ARSC). Structural and aerodynamic changes induced by mounting a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) system on a USCG HC-130H aircraft are described. The FLIR adversely affected the air flow characteristics and structural vibration on the external skin of the aircraft`s right main wheel well fairing. Upon initial discovery of skin cracking and visual observation of skin vibration in flight by the FLIR, a baseline flight without the FLIR was conducted and compared to other measurements with the FLIR installed. Nondestructive inspection procedures were developed to detect cracks in the skin and supporting structural elements and document the initial structural condition of the aircraft. Inspection results and flight test vibration data revealed that the FLIR created higher than expected flight loading and was the possible source of the skin cracking. The Coast Guard performed significant structural repair and enhancement on this aircraft, and additional in-flight vibration measurements were collected on the strengthened area both with and without the FLIR installed. After three months of further operational FLIR usage, the new aircraft skin with the enhanced structural modification was reinspected and found to be free of flaws. Additional US Coast Guard HC-130H aircraft are now being similarly modified to accommodate this FLIR system. Measurements of in-flight vibration levels with and without the FLIR installed, and both before and after the structural enhancement and repair were conducted on the skin and supporting structure in the aircraft`s right main wheel fairing. Inspection results and techniques developed to verify the aircraft`s structural integrity are discussed.

  15. The time evolution of a vortex-flame interaction observed via planar imaging of CH and OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Paul, P.H.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging diagnostics of OH and CH are used to examine a premixed laminar flame subjected to a strong line-vortex pair. Results are reported for a fuel-rcih lamiar CH{sub 4}-air-N{sub 2} rod-stabilized flame. The flow studied was highly reproducible, which enabled the use of phase-sampled imaging to provide time-resolved image sequences. Image sequences are shown for a condition sufficient to produce localized extinction of the primary flame. Results indicate that a breakage in the CH front is not preceded by any distinct change in the OH front. The structure of the CH and OH profiles during the transient leading up to, and through the breakage of the CH front do not appear to be consistent with the concept of a strained laminar flame.

  16. Vibration monitoring system for drill string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wassell, M.E.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration monitoring system is described for use in monitoring lateral and torsional vibrations in a drill string comprising: a drill string component having an outer surface; first accelerometer means A[sub 1] for measuring tangential acceleration; second accelerometer means A[sub 2] for measuring tangential acceleration; third accelerometer means A[sub 3] for measuring tangential acceleration; said first, second and third accelerometer means A[sub 1], A[sub 2] and A[sub 3] being mounted in said drill string component and being spaced from one another to measure acceleration forces on said drill string component tangentially with respect to the outer surface of said component wherein said first, second and third accelerometer means are adapted to measure and distinguish between lateral and torsional vibrations exerted on said drill string component.

  17. Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

  18. MONITORING OF VIBRATIONS FOR THE PROTECTION OF ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MONITORING OF VIBRATIONS FOR THE PROTECTION OF ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE Andrea E. Del Grosso1 , Paolo the integrity and conservation of architectural heritage buildings. The paper reviews the main issues : Structural Health Monitoring, vibration measurements, interpretation models, historical buildings

  19. CX-011457: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011456: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-011454: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-011455: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. Traveling waves in mode superposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheshadri, Aditi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore marine risers are subject to Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) because of ocean currents. Response prediction techniques which accurately estimate the strain due to VIV are of help in deciding how to mitigate VIV, ...

  4. The influence of high harmonic force on fatigue life and its prediction via coupled inline-crossflow VIV modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Haining

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) of a flexibly mounted rigid cylinder placed in a flow is a canonical problem of fluid-structure interactions and the study of VIV and the resulting material fatigue is particularly important ...

  5. DNS of flow past a stationary and oscillating cylinder at Re ¼ 10 000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: Flow structure interaction; Vortex induced vibration; Cylinder flow; High ... methods, and low-order upwind schemes are observed to fail to predict several .... overhead and enables the applications to scale to a large number of ...

  6. Structure and vibrations of different charge Ge impurity in ?-quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kislov, A. N., E-mail: a.n.kislov@urfu.ru; Mikhailovich, A. P., E-mail: a.n.kislov@urfu.ru; Zatsepin, A. F., E-mail: a.n.kislov@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira St., Yekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic structure and localized vibrations of ??SiO{sub 2}:Ge are studied using computer modeling techniques. The simulation was carried out by the lattice dynamics calculation of the local density of vibrational states. Local structures parameters are calculated, localized symmetrized vibrations frequency caused by Ge impurity in different charge states are defined. The movements of atoms located near Ge impurity are analyzed and their contribution into localized vibrations of different type is evaluated.

  7. Magnetic response of holographic Lifshitz superconductors:Vortex and Droplet solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arindam Lala

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a holographic model of $s$-wave superconductor with anisotropic Lifshitz scaling has been considered. In the presence of an external magnetic field our holographic model exhibits both vortex and droplet solutions. Based on analytic methods we have shown that the anisotropy has no effect on the vortex and droplet solutions whereas it may affect the condensation. Our vortex solution closely resembles the Ginzburg-Landau theory and a relation between the upper critical magnetic field and superconducting coherence length has been speculated from this comparison. Using Sturm-Liouville method, the effect of anisotropy on the critical parameters in insulator/superconductor phase transitions has been analyzed.

  8. Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Flowserve Vibration Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Flowserve Vibration Energy Harvesting of these vibrations, Flowseve is looking at using vibration absorbers coupled with energy harvesting technology a steady state DC output The prototype was created using water jet cutting and milling to create the parts

  9. DOE/ANL/HTRI heat exchanger tube vibration data bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This addendum to the DOE/ANL/HTRI Heat Exchanger Tube Vibration Data Bank includes 16 new case histories of field experiences. The cases include several exchangers that did not experience vibration problems and several for which acoustic vibration was reported.

  10. Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1 Page 1 of 26 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Distribution authorized to all. Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report at the University of Southern California #12;Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1

  11. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: rav@knights.ucf.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-1364 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite value. These decaying Kelvin waves correspond to wave number below the critical value for the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, and hence our results on the Schwarz quantum LIA correspond exactly to what one would expect from prior work on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability.

  12. HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

  13. SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS: METHOD AND VALIDATION Clotaire Michel, France cmichel@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic vulnerability in wide areas is usually assessed like USA or Italy. France is a country with moderate seismicity so that it requires lower-cost methods

  14. Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

  15. Spectral Techniques for Solving PDE Stability Model of Vortex Rope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bistrian, Diana Alina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper spectral methods are applied to investigate the hydrodynamic instability of swirling flow with application to Francis hydraulic turbine. Spectral methods imply representing the problem solution as truncated series of smooth global functions. An L2 - projection and the collocation methods are developed assessing both analytically methodology and computational techniques using symbolic and numerical conversions. Remarks concerning the efficiency and the accuracy of each method in this case are presented. The model of the trailing vortex is used to validate the numerical algorithms with existing results in the literature. All the results are compared to existing ones and they prove to agree quite well. The advantages of using this methods in flow control problems are pointed out.

  16. Vortex flow in the technology of radiation wave cracking (RWC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Tsoy; V. N. Kolushov; A. G. Komarov; A. N. Tsoy

    2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the theory of vortex flows in relation to the processes occurring in the radiation-wave cracking of crude oil, when the crude oil is sprayed into the gas stream in the form of a mist and then is fed into the reactor, where it is treated by the accelerated electrons and the UHF radiation. The output of this process are the products with the specified parameters (high-octane petroleum products). This process operates at the ambient pressure and temperature, which makes the process safer for industrial purposes. Besides the process itself, the authors described the equipment used in this process, as well as the parameters of the optimal process.

  17. Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krusch, S. [School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NF (United Kingdom); Speight, J. M. [Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as {sigma}{sub n,m}, are spaces of C{sub n}-invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of {sigma}{sub n,m} are investigated, and it is found that {sigma}{sub n,n-1} is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3{pi}n){sup -1}. The geodesic flow on {sigma}{sub n,m} and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

  18. Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

  19. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE funding.

  20. Methods of performing downhole operations using orbital vibrator energy sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Jack H.; Weinberg, David M.; Wilson, Dennis R.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of performing down hole operations in a wellbore. A vibrational source is positioned within a tubular member such that an annulus is formed between the vibrational source and an interior surface of the tubular member. A fluid medium, such as high bulk modulus drilling mud, is disposed within the annulus. The vibrational source forms a fluid coupling with the tubular member through the fluid medium to transfer vibrational energy to the tubular member. The vibrational energy may be used, for example, to free a stuck tubular, consolidate a cement slurry and/or detect voids within a cement slurry prior to the curing thereof.

  1. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  2. Vortex life cycles in two-and three-layer quasi-geostrophic models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Amanda Katherine

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent vortices and their properties were studied in two- and three-layer quasi-geostrophic beta-plane turbulence. Much research has discussed vortex characteristics in a number of applications, but no significant study of vortices in turbulent...

  3. On the vortex parameter estimation using wide band signals in active acoustic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is an important operation in a large number of applications such as turbine monitoring, de- tection of a vortex in a closed hydraulic test loop. The objective of the work is to emphasize the effect

  4. Falling, flapping, flying, swimming,... : high-Re fluid-solid interactions with vortex shedding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelin, Sébastien Honoré Roland

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meckh. , 1, 79–86. Krasny, R. , 1986a: Desingularisation ofJ. Comp. Phys. , 65, 292–313. Krasny, R. , 1986b: A study ofvortex sheet equation (Krasny, 1986a,b). The vortex sheet

  5. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Mixing in a vortex breakdown flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    & Kohlman 1971; Hall 1972; Lowson & Riley 1995) where it creates a sudden drop of the lift and an increase the core of the vortex. Artificial tornadoes within a chimney have been proposed as a way of converting

  6. The vortex merger rate in freely decaying, two-dimensional turbulence J. H. LaCascea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    vortex models in which energy-conserving mergers were allowed. Trizac19 used a molecular dynamics in laboratory experiments in which vortices were generated by electromagnetic excitation in an electrolyte.10

  7. Hierarchical Colloidal Vortex Rings in a Constant Electric Field Yilong Han and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    15 1050 15 (b) (c) (d) (e) packed close- core vortex ring (d) (e)(b) (c) (a) (f) corona t [sec] Rg) tracking its radius of gyration Rg over time. spheres is surrounded by a diffuse circulating corona

  8. Hierarchical Colloidal Vortex Rings in a Constant Electric Field Yilong Han and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    15 10 5 0 15 (b) (c) (d) (e) packed close- core vortex ring (d) (e) (b) (c) (a) (f) corona t [sec] Rg corona that extends outward for tens of micrometers. Although these clusters somewhat resemble

  9. Steady-state and equilibrium vortex configurations, transitions, and evolution in a mesoscopic superconducting cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, MJ.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the system passes through nearly metastable intermediate configurations while seeking the final minimum-energy steady state consistent with the square symmetry of the sample. An efficient scheme to determine the equilibrium vortex configuration in a...

  10. Interaction between magnetic vortex cores in a pair of nonidentical nanodisks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinnecker, J. P.; Vigo-Cotrina, H.; Garcia, F.; Novais, E. R. P.; Guimarães, A. P., E-mail: apguima@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling of two nonidentical magnetic nanodisks, i.e., with different vortex gyrotropic frequencies, is studied. From the analytical approach, the interactions between the nanodisks along x and y directions (the coupling integrals) were obtained as a function of distance. From the numerical solution of Thiele's equation, we derived the eigenfrequencies of the vortex cores as a function of distance. The motion of the two vortex cores and, consequently, the time dependence of the total magnetization M(t) were derived both using Thiele's equation and by micromagnetic simulation. From M(t), a recently developed method, the magnetic vortex echoes, analogous to the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spin echoes, was used to compute the distance dependence of the magnetic coupling strength. The results of the two approaches differ by approximately 10%; using one single term, a dependence with distance found is broadly in agreement with studies employing other techniques.

  11. Interacting vortex pairs in inviscid and viscous planar flows Thierry Gallay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallay, Thierry

    Interacting vortex pairs in inviscid and viscous planar flows Thierry Gallay Universitâ??e de Grenoble I Institut Fourier, UMR CNRS 5582 B.P. 74 F­38402 Saint­Martin­d'Hâ??eres, France Thierry.Gallay

  12. Interacting vortex pairs in inviscid and viscous planar flows Thierry Gallay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallay, Thierry

    Interacting vortex pairs in inviscid and viscous planar flows Thierry Gallay Universit´e de Grenoble I Institut Fourier, UMR CNRS 5582 B.P. 74 F-38402 Saint-Martin-d'H`eres, France Thierry.Gallay

  13. Vortex in a weakly relativistic Bose gas at zero temperature and relativistic fluid approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bogoliubov procedure in quantum field theory is used to describe a relativistic almost ideal Bose gas at zero temperature. Special attention is given to the study of a vortex. The radius of the vortex in the field description is compared to that obtained in the relativistic fluid approximation. The Kelvin waves are studied and, for long wavelengths, the dispersion relation is obtained by an asymptotic matching method and compared with the non relativistic result.

  14. Adjustable Nonlinear Springs to Improve Efficiency of Vibration Energy Harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Boisseau; G. Despesse; B. Ahmed Seddik

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration Energy Harvesting is an emerging technology aimed at turning mechanical energy from vibrations into electricity to power microsystems of the future. Most of present vibration energy harvesters are based on a mass spring structure introducing a resonance phenomenon that allows to increase the output power compared to non-resonant systems, but limits the working frequency bandwidth. Therefore, they are not able to harvest energy when ambient vibrations' frequencies shift. To follow shifts of ambient vibration frequencies and to increase the frequency band where energy can be harvested, one solution consists in using nonlinear springs. We present in this paper a model of adjustable nonlinear springs (H-shaped springs) and their benefits to improve velocity-damped vibration energy harvesters' (VEH) output powers. A simulation on a real vibration source proves that the output power can be higher in nonlinear devices compared to linear systems (up to +48%).

  15. CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE FISSION REACTORS CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZI�RE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology for Publication October 12, 2005 The subject of this paper is the calculation of the in-core neutron noise induced

  16. Couplings between dipole and quadrupole vibrations in tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Simenel; Philippe Chomaz

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the couplings between collective vibrations such as the isovector giant dipole and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in tin isotopes in the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a Skyrme energy density functional. These couplings are a source of anharmonicity in the multiphonon spectrum. In particular, the residual interaction is known to couple the isovector giant dipole resonance with the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance built on top of it, inducing a nonlinear evolution of the quadrupole moment after a dipole boost. This coupling also affects the dipole motion in a nucleus with a static or dynamical deformation induced by a quadrupole constraint or boost respectively. Three methods associated with these different manifestations of the coupling are proposed to extract the corresponding matrix elements of the residual interaction. Numerical applications of the different methods to 132Sn are in good agreement with each other. Finally, several tin isotopes are considered to investigate the role of isospin and mass number on this coupling. A simple 1/A dependence of the residual matrix elements is found with no noticeable contribution from the isospin. This result is interpreted within the Goldhaber-Teller model.

  17. The universal criterion for switching a magnetic vortex core in soft magnetic nanodots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.-S.; Kim, S.-K.; Yu, Y.-S.; Choi, Y.-S.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Jung, H.; Fischer, P.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The universal criterion for ultrafast vortex core switching between core-up and -down vortex bi-states in soft magnetic nanodots was empirically investigated by micromagnetic simulations and combined with an analytical approach. Vortex-core switching occurs whenever the velocity of vortex core motion reaches a critical value, which is {nu}{sub c} = 330 {+-} 37 m/s for Permalloy, as estimated from numerical simulations. This critical velocity was found to be {nu}{sub c} = {eta}{sub c}{gamma} {radical}A{sub ex} with A{sub ex} the exchange stiffness, {gamma} the gyromagnetic ratio, and an estimated proportional constant {eta}{sub c} = 1.66 {+-} 0.18. This criterion does neither depend on driving force parameters nor on the dimension or geometry of the magnetic specimen. The phase diagrams for the vortex core switching criterion and its switching time with respect to both the strength and angular frequency of circular rotating magnetic fields were derived, which offer practical guidance for implementing vortex core switching into future solid state information storage devices.

  18. Nightmare from which you will never awake: Electronic to vibrational spectra!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Silva, Nuwon

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical background of ab initio methods and density functional theory is provided. The anharmonicity associated with weakly bound metal cation dihydrogen complexes is examined using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method and the interaction between a hydrogen molecule and a metal cation is characterized. A study of molecular hydrogen clustering around the lithium cation and their accompanied vibrational anharmonicity employing VSCF is illustrated. A qualitative interpretation is provided of solvent-induced shifts of amides and simulated electronic absorption spectra using the combined time-dependent density functional theory/effective fragment potential method (TDDFT/EFP). An excited-state solvent assisted quadruple hydrogen atom transfer reaction of a coumarin derivative is elucidated using micro solvated quantum mechanical (QM) water and macro solvated EFP water. A dispersion correction to the QM-EFP1 interaction energy is presented.

  19. Entanglement spectrum: Identification of the transition from vortex-liquid to vortex-lattice state in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Zhao; Guo Hongli; Fan Heng [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Vedral, Vlatko [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use entanglement to investigate the transition from vortex-liquid phase to vortex-lattice phase in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. For the torus geometry, the ground-state entanglement spectrum is analyzed to distinguish these two phases. The low-lying part of the ground-state entanglement spectrum, as well as the behavior of its lowest level, changes clearly when the transition occurs. For the sphere geometry, the entanglement gap in the conformal limit is also studied. We also show that the decrease in entanglement between particles can be regarded as a signal of the transition.

  20. Dynamic Response of a Rotor-air Bearing System Due to Base Induced Periodic Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Yaying

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment such as turbochargers and micro gas turbine engines. For example, air flow fluctuations and landing sudden maneuver can introduce random excitations or shock to auxiliary power units for aircrafts. Diesel engine induced vibrations and road...

  1. The internal structure of a vortex in a two-dimensional superfluid with long healing length and its implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Avraham [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Aleiner, Igor L., E-mail: aleiner@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Agam, Oded [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the motion of quantum vortices in a two-dimensional spinless superfluid within Popov’s hydrodynamic description. In the long healing length limit (where a large number of particles are inside the vortex core) the superfluid dynamics is determined by saddle points of Popov’s action, which, in particular, allows for weak solutions of the Gross–Pitaevskii equation. We solve the resulting equations of motion for a vortex moving with respect to the superfluid and find the reconstruction of the vortex core to be a non-analytic function of the force applied on the vortex. This response produces an anomalously large dipole moment of the vortex and, as a result, the spectrum associated with the vortex motion exhibits narrow resonances lying within the phonon part of the spectrum, contrary to traditional view.

  2. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  3. Localized Surface Plasmons in Vibrating Graphene Nanodisks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Weihua; Mortensen, N Asger; Christensen, Johan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized surface plasmons are confined collective oscillations of electrons in metallic nanoparticles. When driven by light, the optical response is dictated by geometrical parameters and the dielectric environment and plasmons are therefore extremely important for sensing applications. Plasmons in graphene disks have the additional benefit to be highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters, such as molecules, for future nanophotonic devices.

  4. Hole interactions with molecular vibrations on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Omerzu; M. Licer; T. Mertelj; V. V. Kabanov; D. Mihailovic

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the interactions between holes and molecular vibrations on dry DNA using photoinduced infrared absorption spectroscopy. Laser photoexcited (PE) holes are found to have a room-temperature lifetime in excess of 1 ms, clearly indicating the presence of localization. However, from a quantitative model analysis of the frequency shifts of vibrational modes caused by the PE holes, we find the holevibrational coupling constant to be relatively small, 0.2. This interaction leads to a change in the conformational energy of 0.015 eV, which is too small to cause selftrapping at room temperature. We conclude that, at least in the dry (A) form, DNA is best understood in terms of a double chain of coupled quantum dots arising from the pseudo-random chain sequence of base pairs, in which Anderson localization prevents the formation of a metallic state.

  5. Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

  6. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  7. Dynamics of a relativistic Rankine vortex for a two-constituent superfluid in a weak perturbation of cylindrical symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    From a recent study of a stationary cylindrical solution for a relativistic two-constituent superfluid at low temperature limit, we propose to specify this solution under the form of a relativistic generalisation of a Rankine vortex (Potential vortex whose the core has a solid body rotation).Then we establish the dynamics of the central line of this vortex by supposing that the deviation from the cylindrical configuration is weak in the neighbourhood of the core of the vortex. In "stiff" material the Nambu-Goto equations are obtained.

  8. The London theory of the crossing-vortex lattice in highly anisotropic layered superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. E. Savel'ev; J. Mirkovic; K. Kadowaki

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel description of Josephson vortices (JVs) crossed by the pancake vortices (PVs) is proposed on the basis of the anisotropic London theory. The field distribution of a JV and its energy have been calculated for both dense ($a\\lambda_J$) PV lattices with distance $a$ between PVs, and the nonlinear JV core size $\\lambda_J$. It is shown that the ``shifted'' PV lattice (PVs displaced mainly along JVs in the crossing vortex lattice structure), formed in high out-of-plane magnetic fields transforms into the PV lattice ``trapped'' by the JV sublattice at a certain field, lower than $\\Phi_0/\\gamma^2s^2$, where $\\Phi_0$ is the flux quantum, $\\gamma$ is the anisotropy parameter and $s$ is the distance between CuO$_2$ planes. With further decreasing $B_z$, the free energy of the crossing vortex lattice structure (PV and JV sublattices coexist separately) can exceed the free energy of the tilted lattice (common PV-JV vortex structure) in the case of $\\gamma s<\\lambda_{ab}$ with the in-plane penetration depth $\\lambda_{ab}$ if the low ($B_x<\\gamma\\Phi_0/\\lambda_{ab}^2$) or high ($B_x\\gtrsim \\Phi_0/\\gamma s^2$) in-plane magnetic field is applied. It means that the crossing vortex structure is realized in the intermediate field orientations, while the tilted vortex lattice can exist if the magnetic field is aligned near the $c$-axis and the $ab$-plane as well. In the intermediate in-plane fields $\\gamma\\Phi_0/\\lambda_{ab}^2\\lesssim B_x \\lesssim \\Phi_0/\\gamma s^2$, the crossing vortex structure with the ``trapped'' PV sublattice seems to settle in until the lock-in transition occurs since this structure has the lower energy with respect to the tilted vortex structure in the magnetic field ${\\vec H}$ oriented near the $ab$-plane.

  9. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins at Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holinga, George J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy2.1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational SpectroscopyIntroduction Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational

  10. Vortex generation in protoplanetary disks with an embedded giant planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. de Val-Borro; P. Artymowicz; G. D'Angelo; A. Peplinski

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortices in protoplanetary disks can capture solid particles and form planetary cores within shorter timescales than those involved in the standard core-accretion model. We investigate vortex generation in thin unmagnetized protoplanetary disks with an embedded giant planet with planet to star mass ratio $10^{-4}$ and $10^{-3}$. Two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of a protoplanetary disk with a planet are performed using two different numerical methods. The results of the non-linear simulations are compared with a time-resolved modal analysis of the azimuthally averaged surface density profiles using linear perturbation theory. Finite-difference methods implemented in polar coordinates generate vortices moving along the gap created by Neptune-mass to Jupiter-mass planets. The modal analysis shows that unstable modes are generated with growth rate of order $0.3 \\Omega_K$ for azimuthal numbers m=4,5,6, where $\\Omega_K$ is the local Keplerian frequency. Shock-capturing Cartesian-grid codes do not generate very much vorticity around a giant planet in a standard protoplanetary disk. Modal calculations confirm that the obtained radial profiles of density are less susceptible to the growth of linear modes on timescales of several hundreds of orbital periods. Navier-Stokes viscosity of the order $\

  11. Diagnosing subsynchronous vibrations in turbomachinery - stable or unstable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopalan, Vinayaka Narayanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    friction whip defies the general rules of thumb for diagnosing a true instability and at the same time is a very violent one as well. The last phenomenon to be studied is coupled lateral-torsional vibrations. A special test rig was built to study... this effect, and clear indicators have been identified to distinguish the response as resulting from torsional vibrations and also classify it as a benign source of subsynchronous vibration. The test rig is also mathematically modeled to predict its...

  12. APS Protocol for Reporting Construction Vibration Issues for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that shown in the online version. Advanced Photon Source APS Protocol for Reporting Construction Vibration Issues for Beamlines Section where used: This procedure describes the...

  13. VIBRATION CHARACTERISTICS OF AN APS LAB FACILITY IN BUILDING...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VIBRATION CHARACTERISTICS OF AN APS LAB FACILITY IN BUILDING 401 by T. J. Royston, Summer Faculty Participant Experimental Facilities Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne...

  14. Explicit Correlated Exciton-Vibrational Dynamics of the FMO Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Jan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled exciton-vibrational dynamics of a 3-site FMO model is investigated using the numerically exact multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree approach. Thereby the vibrational mode specific coupling to local electronic transitions is adapted from a discretized experimental spectral density. The solution of the resulting time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation including three electronic and 450 vibrational degrees of freedom is analyzed in terms of excitonic populations and coherences. Emphasis is put onto the role of specific ranges of vibrational frequencies. It is observed that modes between 160 and 300 cm$^{-1}$ are responsible for the subpicosecond population and coherence decay.

  15. Vibrational energy transfer in ultracold molecule - molecule collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulven Quéméner; Naduvalath Balakrishnan; Roman V. Krems

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a rigorous study of vibrational relaxation in p-H2 + p-H2 collisions at cold and ultracold temperatures and identify an efficient mechanism of ro-vibrational energy transfer. If the colliding molecules are in different rotational and vibrational levels, the internal energy may be transferred between the molecules through an extremely state-selective process involving simultaneous conservation of internal energy and total rotational angular momentum. The same transition in collisions of distinguishable molecules corresponds to the rotational energy transfer from one vibrational state of the colliding molecules to another.

  16. active vibration isolation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ultra-precision instruments such as the MITCaltech Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory ... Zuo, Lei, 1974- 2005-01-01 5 Active vibration isolation of a...

  17. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  18. Adaptive vibration control using synchronous demodulation with machine tool controller motor commutation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, David James (Livermore, CA)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system and method for actively reducing vibration in a spindle housing caused by unbalance forces on a rotating spindle, by measuring the force-induced spindle-housing motion, determining control signals based on synchronous demodulation, and provide compensation for the measured displacement to cancel or otherwise reduce or attenuate the vibration. In particular, the synchronous demodulation technique is performed to recover a measured spindle housing displacement signal related only to the rotation of a machine tool spindle, and consequently rejects measured displacement not related to spindle motion or synchronous to a cycle of revolution. Furthermore, the controller actuates at least one voice-coil (VC) motor, to cancel the original force-induced motion, and adapts the magnitude of voice coil signal until this measured displacement signal is brought to a null. In order to adjust the signal to a null, it must have the correct phase relative to the spindle angle. The feedback phase signal is used to adjust a common (to both outputs) commutation offset register (offset relative to spindle encoder angle) to force the feedback phase signal output to a null. Once both of these feedback signals are null, the system is compensating properly for the spindle-induced motion.

  19. A Robust Numerical Method for Integration of Point-Vortex Trajectories in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer A. Smith; Bruce M. Boghosian

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The venerable 2D point-vortex model plays an important role as a simplified version of many disparate physical systems, including superfluids, Bose-Einstein condensates, certain plasma configurations, and inviscid turbulence. This system is also a veritable mathematical playground, touching upon many different disciplines from topology to dynamic systems theory. Point-vortex dynamics are described by a relatively simple system of nonlinear ODEs which can easily be integrated numerically using an appropriate adaptive time stepping method. As the separation between a pair of vortices relative to all other inter-vortex length scales decreases, however, the computational time required diverges. Accuracy is usually the most discouraging casualty when trying to account for such vortex motion, though the varying energy of this ostensibly Hamiltonian system is a potentially more serious problem. We solve these problems by a series of coordinate transformations: We first transform to action-angle coordinates, which, to lowest order, treat the close pair as a single vortex amongst all others with an internal degree of freedom. We next, and most importantly, apply Lie transform perturbation theory to remove the higher-order correction terms in succession. The overall transformation drastically increases the numerical efficiency and ensures that the total energy remains constant to high accuracy.

  20. Numerical study of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability by the point vortex method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasny, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosenhead's classical point vortex numerical method for studying the evolution of a vortex sheet from analytic initial data (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) is examined using the discrete Fourier analysis techniques of Sulem, Sulem and Frisch. One cause for the chaotic motion previously observed in computations using a large number of vortices is that short wavelength perturbations are introduced spuriously by finite precision arithmetic and become amplified by the model's dynamics. Methods for controlling this source of error are given, and the results confirm the formation of a singularity in a finite time which was previously found by Moore and Meiron, Baker and Orszag using different techniques of analysis. A cusp forms in the vortex sheet strength at the critical time, explaining the onset of erratic particle motion in applications of the numerical methods of Van de Vooren and Fink and Soh to this problem. Unlike those methods, the point vortex approximation remains consistent at the critical time and results of a long time calculation are presented. The singularity is interpreted physically as a discontinuity in the strain rate along the vortex sheet and also as the start of roll up on a small scale. The author numerically studies some aspects of the dependence of the solution on the initial condition and finds agreement with Moore's asymptotic relation between the initial amplitude and the critial time.

  1. A parametric study of the circulation and updwelling induced by an axially-symmetric atmospheric vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, C. Ernest

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Inflow Angle, Model VI 6. Strength of Storm, Model VII IV. SUMMARY REFERENCES APPENDIX: Half-Width of Upwelled Area FIGURES 1-30 1 1 2 4 4 6 8 11 12 15 16 16 18 22 25 28 30 33 36 38 39-67 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Geometry..., and tangential, v, fluid velocities as a func- tion of t 44 Models IV-3, V-l, and V-Z, maximum values of radial, u, and tangential, v, fluid ve- locities as a function of t 45 Models IV-3, VI-1, and VI-2, maximum values of radial, u, and tangential, v, fluid...

  2. Non-linear modulation of a boundary layer induced by vortex generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    the efficiency of static mixers.6 Nevertheless, the question of the choice and design of the proper VG

  3. Wake Tracking and the Detection of Vortex Rings by the Canal Lateral Line of Fish Jan-Moritz P. Franosch,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    that pass a fish later- ally [19] as well as vortex rings that are part of a von Ka´rma´n vortex street [20 by the lateral-line sensors so as to enable fish to follow a vortex street. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103Wake Tracking and the Detection of Vortex Rings by the Canal Lateral Line of Fish Jan-Moritz P

  4. Femtosecond laser fabrication of micro and nano-disks in single layer graphene using vortex Bessel beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Femtosecond laser fabrication of micro and nano-disks in single layer graphene using vortex Bessel deposition graphene on glass substrate using femtosecond laser ablation with vortex Bessel beams. The fabricated graphene disks with diameters ranging from 650 nm to 4 µm were characterized by spatially resolved

  5. Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open the obstacle, two main flow structures are observed: i a hydraulic jump in the near-surface region and ii turbulent regime , the detachment length of the hydraulic jump exceeds the one of the horseshoe vortex

  6. Vortex dipoles by PIV method Click here to see the images and the short movies from this lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Introduction A vortex dipole is a jet flow with a system of two vortices of opposite sign at its front. Vortex of density stratification. The simplest case of stratification is a two-layer system. A Plexiglas tank a two-layer system without mixing the fluids, one can float a sheet of paper on top of the salt water

  7. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head-to-head domain walls using off-axis electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    transformations.7 Recent experimental reports confirm these predictions of domain wall movement8Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head-to-head domain walls using off-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based

  8. Vibration Power Harvesting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report | DepartmentTRU PassiveNovember 1,Vibration Power

  9. Role of the Vortex-Core Energy on the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition in Thin Films of NbN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    Role of the Vortex-Core Energy on the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition in Thin Films-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition in thin films of NbN at various film thickness, by probing the effect of vortex played by the vortex-core energy in determining the characteristic signatures of the BKT physics, and we

  10. A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    field around a fish's body in the presence of a Karman vortex street. Karman and reverse Karman streets LLTC model could explain how a fish identifies the characteristics of a Karman vortex street shed that the main characteristics of a vortex street including the magnitude of vortices, their translational speed

  11. Experimental Vibrational Zero-Point Energies: Diatomic Molecules Karl K. Irikuraa...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Experimental Vibrational Zero-Point Energies: Diatomic Molecules Karl K. Irikuraa... Physical online 18 April 2007 Vibrational zero-point energies ZPEs , as determined from published spectroscopic: molecular energetics; uncertainty; vibrational spectroscopy; zero-point energy. CONTENTS 1. Introduction

  12. A multi-frequency induction heating system for a thermally triggered gel polymer dynamic vibration absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, John Israel, 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its invention in the early part of the twentieth century, the dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) has played an important role in vibration suppression. In its simplest form, a dynamic vibration absorber is a mechanical ...

  13. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  14. Random Vortex-Street Model for a Self-Similar Plane Turbulent Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor L'vov; Anna Pomyalov; Itamar Procaccia; Rama Govindarajan

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We ask what determines the (small) angle of turbulent jets. To answer this question we first construct a deterministic vortex-street model representing the large scale structure in a self-similar plane turbulent jet. Without adjustable parameters the model reproduces the mean velocity profiles and the transverse positions of the large scale structures, including their mean sweeping velocities, in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Nevertheless the exact self similar arrangement of the vortices (or any other deterministic model) necessarily leads to a collapse of the jet angle. The observed (small) angle results from a competition between vortex sweeping tending to strongly collapse the jet and randomness in the vortex structure, with the latter resulting in a weak spreading of the jet.

  15. Shear Banding and Spatiotemporal Oscillations in Vortex Matter in Nanostructured Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Reichhardt; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple nanostructured pinning array geometry where a rich variety of complex vortex shear banding phenomena can be realized. A single row of pinning sites is removed from a square pinning array. Shear banding effects arise when vortex motion in the pin-free channel nucleates motion of vortices in the surrounding pinned regions, creating discrete steps in the vortex velocity profile away from the channel. Near the global depinning transition, the width of the band of moving vortices undergoes oscillations or fluctuations that can span the entire system. We use simulations to show that these effects should be observable in the transport properties of the system. Similar large oscillations and shear banding effects are known to occur for sheared complex fluids in which different dynamical phases coexist.

  16. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  17. Estimating dispersion from a tornado vortex and mesocyclone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, A.H.; Hunter, C.H.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling is required to ensure that a postulated breach in radionuclide storage containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from a tornado strike of Fujita-scale intensity F2 or higher will not result in an unacceptable dose to individuals. Fujita-scale tornado descriptions are included in Appendix A of this report. Dispersion models previously used at SRS for estimating dispersion following a tornado strike were developed by D.W. Pepper in 1975 (DP-1387, Dispersion of Small Particles) and H.R. Haynes and D.W. Taylor in 1983 (DPST-82-982, Estimating Doses from Tornado Winds). Research conducted in 1983 on the formation and evolution of tornadic thunderstorms has lead to a more complete understanding of the tornado vortex and associated persistent updraft and downdraft regions within the parent thunderstorm. To ensure that appropriate, contemporary methods are used for safety analysis, the Pepper model and the Haynes and Taylor model were evaluated with respect to current knowledge of circulations within tornadic thunderstorms. Pepper`s model is complex numerically but contains most of the desired physical parameterizations. Haynes and Taylor`s model is used with the Puff-Plume model (an emergency response model on the Weather INformation and Display System at SRS) and has provisions for radionuclide deposition and rainout. Haynes and Taylor assumed heavy rain following the tornado for a period of ten minutes, followed by a lighter rain for another ten minutes, then no rain for the period when the material is transported to 100 km downwind. However, neither model incorporates the effects of a nearby thunderstorm downdraft.

  18. Formation of multi-solitons and vortex bright solitons in Bose-condensed alkali-metal atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Salasnich

    2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of multi-solitons and vortex bright solitons in Bose-condensed alkali-metal atoms is analyzed by using the nonpolynomial Schordinger equation. A train of bright solitons is obtained from an axially homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate by a sudden change of the scattering length from repulsive to attractive. We derive an analytical expression for the number of bright solitons generated by using this mechanism. The formula generalizes a previous formula obtained with the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii equation. In the second part we consider vortex bright solitons, namely cigar-shaped bright solitons with a nonzero angular quantum number $k$ along the axial direction. By using a variational approach we determine the shape of vortex bright solitons, showing that the critical number of atoms for the collapse of the vortex soliton increases with a larger $k$. Finally we calculate monopole and quadrupole collective oscillations of these vortex bright solitons.

  19. Numerical study of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability by the point vortex method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasny, R.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosenhead's classical point vortex numerical method for studying the evolution of a vortex sheet from analytic initial data (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) is examined using the discrete Fourier analysis techniques of Sulem, Sulem and Frisch. One cause for the chaotic motion previously observed in computations using a large number of vortices is that short wavelength perturbations are introduced spuriously by finite precision arithmetic and become amplified by the model's dynamics. Methods for controlling this source of error are given and the results confirm the formation of a singularity in a finite time which was previously found by Moore and Meiron, Baker and Orszag using different techniques of analysis. A cusp forms in the vortex sheet strength at the critical time, explaining the onset of erratic particle motion in applications of the numerical methods of Van de Vooren and Fink and Soh to this problem. Unlike those methods, the point vortex approximation remains consistent at the critical time and we present the results of a long time calculation. The singularity is interpreted physically as a discontinuity in the strain rate along the vortex sheet and also as the start of roll up on a small scale. We numerically study some aspects of the dependence of the solution on the initial condition and find agreement with Moore's asymptotic relation between the initial amplitude and the critical time. For large initial amplitudes, two cusps form in the sheet strength, corresponding to double roll up. We explain why the Poincare recurrenc theorem does not imply that the sheet will eventually unroll. Our results suggest that beyond the critical time, the vortex sheet becomes a spiral with infinite arclength although we have doubts about the approximation's accuracy in that regime. 36 references, 30 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  1. The effects of a jet on vortex breakdown over a sharp leading-edge delta wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, Ian Kenneth

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF A JET ON VORTEX BREAKDOWN OVER A SHARP LEADING-EDGE DELTA WING A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering THE EFFECTS OF A JET ON VORTEX BREAKDOWN OVER A SHARP LEADING-EDGE DELTA WING A Thesis by IAN KENNETH MAYNARD Approved as to style and content by: Cyrus Ostowar (Chairman of Committee) Stan J Miley (M er...

  2. Streamline topology and dilute particle dynamics in a Karman vortex street flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z B

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three types of streamline topology in a Karman vortex street flow are shown under the variation of spatial parameters. For the motion of dilute particles in the K\\'arm\\'an vortex street flow, there exist a route of bifurcation to a chaotic orbit and more attractors in a bifurcation diagram for the proportion of particle density to fluid density. Along with the increase of spatial parameters in the flow filed, the bifurcation process is suspended, as well as more and more attractors emerge. In the motion of dilute particles, a drag term and gravity term dominate and result in the bifurcation phenomenon.

  3. anharmonic vibrational dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anharmonic vibrational dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Anharmonic Vibrational...

  4. ambient vibration test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vibration test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ambient Vibration Tests and Modal...

  5. Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium P. M. Scheifele Department significant levels of background noise due to pumps and motors. This noise, together with pool architecture to quantify the ambient noise levels in the water from machine vibration and from in-air performance speaker

  6. VIBRATION CONTROL IN A SMART BEAM Daniel R. Fay*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Mayuresh

    activity and nearby motorized equipment. In this case, disturbance is produced using a white noise signal for vibration suppression, stability augmentation, and noise reduction in beam-like aerodynamic surfacesVIBRATION CONTROL IN A SMART BEAM Daniel R. Fay* Widener University, Chester, Pennsylvania Abstract

  7. Electromagnetic actuator to reduce vibration sources Thibaut Chailloux*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in an FE- Tuned Magnetic Equivalent Circuit of an Electromagnetic Relay, Sixdenier F., Raulet M.-A., MarionElectromagnetic actuator to reduce vibration sources Thibaut Chailloux* , L. Morel* , F. Sixdenier In order to improve passenger comfort, a reduction of vibration sources in vehicles is being considered

  8. Electromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    an equivalent circuit by application of network theory. The Mason equivalent circuit, shown in Fig. 1 for a oneElectromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency Timothy Ritter the electromechanical properties of high frequency 20 MHz piezoelectric strip vibrators. A nonlinear regression

  9. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hale, Thomas C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  10. ME 355K Engineering Vibrations ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    of contemporary issues in engineering practice, including economic, social, political, and environmental issues. Apply principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics (including multivariate calculusME 355K ­ Engineering Vibrations Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 355K ­ Engineering Vibrations

  11. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational...

  12. THE EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION ON THE DYNAMICS OF ION-MOLECULE REACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, S.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Research Division THE/EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION ON THE DYNAMICSmolecular charge transfer. 'J i THE EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION ON THE DYNAMICS

  13. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string using a magnetorheological damper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Houston, TX); Burgess, Daniel E. (Portland, CT); Barbely, Jason R. (East Islip, NY)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a magnetorheological fluid valve assembly having a supply of a magnetorheological fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil for inducing a magnetic field that alters the resistance of the magnetorheological fluid to flow between the first and second chambers, thereby increasing the damping provided by the valve. A remnant magnetic field is induced in one or more components of the magnetorheological fluid valve during operation that can be used to provide the magnetic field for operating the valve so as to eliminate the need to energize the coils during operation except temporarily when changing the amount of damping required, thereby eliminating the need for a turbine alternator power the magnetorheological fluid valve. A demagnetization cycle can be used to reduce the remnant magnetic field when necessary.

  14. Reusable vibration resistant integrated circuit mounting socket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Craig N. (Irwin, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention discloses a novel form of socket for integrated circuits to be mounted on printed circuit boards. The socket uses a novel contact which is fabricated out of a bimetallic strip with a shape which makes the end of the strip move laterally as temperature changes. The end of the strip forms a barb which digs into an integrated circuit lead at normal temperatures and holds it firmly in the contact, preventing loosening and open circuits from vibration. By cooling the contact containing the bimetallic strip the barb end can be made to release so that the integrated circuit lead can be removed from the socket without damage either to the lead or to the socket components.

  15. A vibration model for centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, R.A.; Wasserman, M.O.; Wygmans, D.G.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the transfer matrix method, we created the Excel worksheet ``Beam`` for analyzing vibrations in centrifugal contactors. With this worksheet, a user can calculate the first natural frequency of the motor/rotor system for a centrifugal contactor. We determined a typical value for the bearing stiffness (k{sub B}) of a motor after measuring the k{sub B} value for three different motors. The k{sub B} value is an important parameter in this model, but it is not normally available for motors. The assumptions that we made in creating the Beam worksheet were verified by comparing the calculated results with those from a VAX computer program, BEAM IV. The Beam worksheet was applied to several contactor designs for which we have experimental data and found to work well.

  16. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure.

  17. Effect of asymmetric axial strain on the behavior of the juncture vortex system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trosper, Jeffrey Randall

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to investigate the behavior of the vortex formed in a wing-body juncture in a water tunnel flow. The wing-body juncture was created by mounting a symmetrical airfoil with an elliptical leading edge normal to a flat...

  18. A Lagrangian approach to identifying vortex pinch-off Clara O'Farrell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    A Lagrangian approach to identifying vortex pinch-off Clara O'Farrell1 and John O. Dabiri2 1 Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA 2 Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories and Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

  19. Crown copyright Met Office Hurricane dynamics: on the role of Vortex Rossby Waves (VRWs).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Crown copyright Met Office Hurricane dynamics: on the role of Vortex Rossby Waves (VRWs). Gilbert of numerical weather prediction: hurricanes, typhoons and tropical cyclones · Hurricane intensity · Conclusion #12;© Crown copyright Met Office Hurricane Juan, 28 September 2003, Halifax 75°N 110°W 10°E5°N

  20. Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 2315 #12;Combustion noise in gas turbines consists of direct noise related to the unsteady combustion process itself and indirect noise. As known, indirect noise is produced when entropy

  1. Observations of wave-generated vortex ripples on the North Carolina continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    October 2002. [1] Sand ripples with wavelengths between 0.5 and 3 m were observed on the bottom across, 1882; Forel, 1883; Dingler, 1974; Vincent and Osborne, 1993; Gallagher et al., 1998; Traykovski et al ripples'' by Bagnold [1946], exert a much larger drag on the flow than friction on sand grains. Vortex

  2. Simulation of vortex sheet roll-up: chaos, azimuthal waves, ring merger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    Simulation of vortex sheet roll-up: chaos, azimuthal waves, ring merger Robert KRASNY1 , Keith-1109 USA krasny@umich.edu National Center for Atmospheric Research, Climate andGlobal Dynamics Boulder, axisymmetric, and three- dimensional flow Krasny &Nitsche 2001; Lindsay & Krasny 2001. Vor- tex sheet

  3. On the bifurcation structure of axisyrnmetric vortex breakdown in a constricted pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    On the bifurcation structure of axisyrnmetric vortex breakdown in a constricted pipe J. M. Lopez Department of Mathematics and Earth SystemScienceCenter;The PennsylvaniaState University, Universiv Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (Received 5 April 1994; accepted 20 July 1994) The bifurcation structure is presented

  4. Complex Langevin simulation of quantum vortex nucleation in the Bose-Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya Hayata; Arata Yamamoto

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The ab-initio simulation of quantum vortex nucleation in the Bose-Einstein condensate is performed by adopting the complex Langevin techniques. We simulate the two-component boson field theory at a finite chemical potential under rotation. In the superfluid phase, vortices are generated above a critical angular velocity and the circulation is clearly quantized even in the presence of quantum fluctuations.

  5. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Vortex Suppress Device Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used in an investigation into the suppression of a surface vortex that forms and the south-most spilling bay at The Dalles Project. The CFD work complemented work at the prototype and the reduced-scale physical models. The CFD model was based on a model developed for other work in the forebay but had additional resolution added near the spillway. Vortex suppression devices (VSDs) were to placed between pier noses and/or in the bulkhead slot of the spillway bays. The simulations in this study showed that placing VSD structures or a combination of structures to suppress the vortex would still result in near-surface flows to be entrained in a vortex near the downstream spillwall. These results were supported by physical model and prototype studies. However, there was a consensus of the fish biologists at the physical model that the fish would most likely move north and if the fish went under the VSD it would immediately exit the forebay through the tainter gate and not get trapped between VSDs or the VSDs and the tainter gate if the VSDs were deep enough.

  6. Wavelet analysis of vortex breakdown Jori E. Ruppert-Felsot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    École Normale Supérieure

    Wavelet analysis of vortex breakdown Jori E. Ruppert-Felsot1 , Marie Farge1 , and Philippe the experimentally mea- sured flow field using orthogonal wavelets to observe the time evolution of the bursting. The discrete wavelet transform is used to separate the flow field into a coherent component, capturing

  7. Vortex Ring Interaction with a Particle Layer: Implications for Sediment Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    resuspension has been studied much less. This is an important mechanism, however, as it represents an integral conducted to study particle resuspension by vortex rings colliding with a particle bed. The dynamics at the resuspension onset are investigated, showing that the deformable particle bed resembles a free slip boundary

  8. Reduced gravity rankine cycle design and optimization with passive vortex phase separation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supak, Kevin Robert

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Interphase Transport Phenomena kW(e) Kilowatts-Electric MVS Microgravity Vortex Separator ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory SNAP Systems For Nuclear Auxiliary Power MPRE Medium Power Reactor Experiment RFMD Rotary Fluid Management Device RPM...............................................................................................3 History of Space Rankine Cycle Development .....................................6 ORNL Rankine Cycle Design..............................................................10 Space Rankine Cycle Components...

  9. Reduced gravity Rankine cycle system design and optimization study with passive vortex phase separation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supak, Kevin Robert

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interphase Transport Phenomena kW(e) Kilowatts-Electric MVS Microgravity Vortex Separator ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory SNAP Systems For Nuclear Auxiliary Power MPRE Medium Power Reactor Experiment RFMD Rotary Fluid Management Device RPM...............................................................................................3 History of Space Rankine Cycle Development .....................................6 ORNL Rankine Cycle Design..............................................................10 Space Rankine Cycle Components...

  10. Vortex Liquid Crystals in Anisotropic Type II Superconductors E.W. Carlson,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Erica

    Vortex Liquid Crystals in Anisotropic Type II Superconductors E.W. Carlson,1,2 A. H. Castro Neto,1 September 2002; published 25 February 2003) In an isotropic type II superconductor in a moderate magnetic been much interest in high tem- perature superconductors in a magnetic field. Various ex- periments

  11. Two regimes of vortex penetration into platelet-shaped type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, E. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung (Germany); Mikitik, G. P., E-mail: mikitik@ilt.kharkov.ua [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering (Ukraine); Zeldov, E. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Condensed Matter Physics (Israel)] [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Condensed Matter Physics (Israel)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex penetration into a thin superconducting strip of a rectangular cross section is considered at an increasing applied magnetic field H{sub a}, taking an interplay between the Bean-Livingston and the geometric barriers in the sample into account. We calculate the magnetic field H{sub p} at which the penetration begins and show that two regimes of vortex penetration are possible. In the first regime, vortices appearing at the corners of the strip at H{sub a} = H{sub p} immediately move to its center, where a vortex dome starts to develop. In the second regime, the penetration occurs in two stages. In the first stage, at H{sub a} < H{sub p}, tilted vortices penetrate into the edge regions of the strip, where novel domes are shown to be formed at the top, bottom, and lateral surfaces. In the second stage, at H{sub a} = H{sub p}, the vortex propagation to the center becomes possible. The difference between the regimes manifests itself in slightly different dependences of the magnetic moment of the strip on H{sub a}.

  12. Origin of Reversed Vortex Ratchet Motion W. Gillijns, A. V. Silhanek, and V. V. Moshchalkov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    Origin of Reversed Vortex Ratchet Motion W. Gillijns, A. V. Silhanek, and V. V. Moshchalkov INPAC. This rectified motion of particles, known as a rocked ratchet, is basically the result of the broken spatial that the particles (flux lines) cannot be regarded as independent entities leads to a far richer ratchet motion

  13. Evolution of an initially columnar vortex terminating normal to a no-slip wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    Èdewadt-type spatially oscillatory boundary layer within the core region and a potential-like vortex boundary layer at large radii. The toroidal structure results from the interaction between these two boundary layers's theo- retical study only applied to the boundary layer formed away from the core, as have most other

  14. BAROCLINIC VORTICITY PRODUCTION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. VORTEX GROWTH AND LONGEVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Keith

    BAROCLINIC VORTICITY PRODUCTION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. VORTEX GROWTH AND LONGEVITY Mark R -- instabilities -- methods: numerical -- solar system: formation -- turbulence Online material: color figures 1 the surface. Thus, the potential energy of the tilted isopycnals is converted into the kinetic energy

  15. Vortex avalanches with robust statistics observed in superconducting niobium E. Altshuler,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeldov, Eli

    Vortex avalanches with robust statistics observed in superconducting niobium E. Altshuler,1,2 T. H topography of superconducting niobium samples as the external field is slowly increased. The avalanche size in Ref. 11, was quite limited, being based on only a few hundred events. Nowak et al.12 studied niobium

  16. Vortex-Pair Dynamics in Anisotropic Bistable Media: A Kinematic Approach Aric Hagberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagberg, Aric

    Vortex-Pair Dynamics in Anisotropic Bistable Media: A Kinematic Approach Aric Hagberg1 and Ehud typically evolves into rotating spiral waves. In an anisotropic system, instead of spiral waves, the vortices can form wave fragments that propagate with a constant speed in a given direction determined

  17. Particle resuspension by an impacting vortex ring RICK J. MUNRO & STUART B. DALZIEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    Particle resuspension by an impacting vortex ring RICK J. MUNRO & STUART B. DALZIEL Department results from a set of visualization experiments conducted to analyse the hydrodynamic resuspension of particles from a thick horizontal sediment layer. The mechanism employed to produce the resuspension

  18. Resuspension onset and crater erosion by a vortex ring interacting with a particle layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    Resuspension onset and crater erosion by a vortex ring interacting with a particle layer N. Bethke://pof.aip.org/features/most_downloaded Information for Authors: http://pof.aip.org/authors #12;PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 063301 (2012) Resuspension onset layer. The flow dynamics during the onset of particle resuspension are analysed using particle image

  19. Fluid Dynamics Research 33 (2003) 333356 Leapfrogging vortex rings: Hamiltonian structure, geometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid Dynamics Research 33 (2003) 333­356 Leapfrogging vortex rings: Hamiltonian structure that if the rings are modeled as coaxial circular ÿlaments, their dynamics and Hamil- tonian structure is derivable of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA b Control and Dynamical

  20. Vortex-peak interaction and lattice shape in rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun-cheng

    Vortex-peak interaction and lattice shape in rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates: November 28, 2011) When a two component Bose-Einstein condensate is placed into rotation, a lattice component condensate is set into rotation, topological defects of both order parameters are created, which

  1. Formation and Decay of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates at Finite Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formation and Decay of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates at Finite Temperatures Gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) are a testbed for many-body theory. Recently, rotating condensates was observed non-destructively by monitoring the centrifugal distortions of the rotating condensate

  2. ccsd00003161, Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Furthermore we restrict our analysis to the case of a two-dimensional gas in the xy plane, assumingccsd­00003161, version 1 ­ 26 Oct 2004 Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate, France (Dated: October 26, 2004) For a fast rotating condensate in a harmonic trap, we investigate

  3. Spacetime Defects von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street like configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letelier, P S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A special arrangement of spinning strings with dislocations similar to a von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street is studied. We numerically solve the geodesic equations for the special case of a test particle moving along twoinfinite rows of pure dislocations and also discuss the case of pure spinning defects.

  4. Theory of vortex crystal formation in two-dimensional turbulence* Dezhe Z. Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Theory of vortex crystal formation in two-dimensional turbulence* Dezhe Z. Jin and Daniel H. E are symmetric arrays of strong vortices within a background of weaker vorticity. This paper presents a theory, a theory is advanced that allows us to predict from the initial conditions the approximate number

  5. Size separation in vibrated granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kudrolli

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent developments in size separation in vibrated granular materials. Motivated by a need in industry to efficiently handle granular materials and a desire to make fundamental advances in non-equilibrium physics, experimental and theoretical investigations have shown size separation to be a complex phenomena. Large particles in a vibrated granular system invariably rise to the top. However, they may also sink to the bottom, or show other patterns depending on subtle variations in physical conditions. While size ratio is a dominant factor, particle specific properties such as density, inelasticity and friction can play an important role. The nature of the energy input, boundary conditions and interstitial air have been also shown to be significant factors in determining spatial distributions. The presence of convection can enhance mixing or lead to size separation. Experimental techniques including direct visualization and magnetic resonance imaging are being used to investigate these properties. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation techniques have been developed to probe size separation. Analytical methods such as kinetic theory are being used to study the interplay between particle size and density in the vibro-fluidized regime, and geometric models have been proposed to describe size separation for deep beds. Besides discussing these studies, we will also review the impact of inelastic collision and friction on the density and velocity distributions to gain a deeper appreciation of the non-equilibrium nature of the system. While a substantial number of studies have been accomplished, considerable work is still required to achieve a firm description of the phenomena.

  6. Analysis of wind turbine vibrations based on SCADA data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Kusiak; Zijun Zhang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrations of a wind turbine have a negative impact on its performance. Mitigating this undesirable impact requires knowledge of the relationship between the vibrations and other wind turbine parameters that could be potentially modified. Three approaches for ranking the impact importance of measurable turbine parameters on the vibrations of the drive train and the tower are discussed. They include the predictor importance analysis, the global sensitivity analysis, and the correlation coefficient analysis versed in data mining and statistics. To decouple the impact of wind speed on the vibrations of the drive train and the tower, the analysis is performed on data sets with narrow speed ranges. Wavelet analysis is applied to filter noisy accelerometer data. To exclude the impact malfunctions on the vibration analysis, the data are analyzed in a frequency domain. Data-mining algorithms are used to build models with turbine parameters of interest as inputs, and the vibrations of drive train and tower as outputs. The performance of each model is thoroughly evaluated based on metrics widely used in the wind industry. The neural network algorithm outperforms other classifiers and is considered to be the most promising approach to study wind turbine vibrations. ?DOI: 10.1115/1.4001461?

  7. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases and phase transitions in condensed matter systems with random pinning. The broader impact of the program includes the training of future generation of neutron scientists, and further development of neutron scattering and complementary techniques for studies of superconducting materials. The graduate and undergraduate students participating in this project will learn the state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques, acquire a wide range of materials research experiences, and participate in the frontier research of superconductivity. This should best prepare the students for future careers in academia, industry, or government.

  8. The vibration by analogy of certain trusses, beams and plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lee Price

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the positive sense of rotation. In this paper, the torsional vibration equation was replaced by a finite difference equation for the nth node in the form n which was regarded as a statement of Kirchhoff's current law and led to the following equivalent...THE VIBRATION BY ANALOGY OF CERTAIN TRUSSES, THEVI EBR AOENHI A Dissertation By LEE PRICE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: Ciiairman of Committee 6 . . 7 T . Head of Department May 1953 THE VIBRATION BY ANALOGY OF CERTAIN...

  9. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  10. An experimental study of the vibration of modified cantilever plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, James McPherson

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wings and larger sweep angles. For complete vibration and flutter anal- ysis of these components it is necessary that the modes and frequencies of natural vibration be closely established. Flat cantilever plates (I). serve as a good analogy... of the wings for vibration study. The wings, however, are not usually true cantilevers but are fastened along two lines. One of these lines is along the skin of the fuselage and the other is along the center line of the craft. JL moment is applied...

  11. Airbus Toulouse Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    Airbus Toulouse ­ Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data. The trainee will work within flight test vibration analysis team.The main missions and activities on flight test vibration data; - Implement and test in LMS Test.Lab (vibration data processing software

  12. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA); Mauger, Joseph (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Eric H. (Mountain View, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  13. Experimental evidence of flutter and divergence instabilities induced by dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigoni, Davide

    Experimental evidence of flutter and divergence instabilities induced by dry friction Davide Bigoni structures with Coulomb friction, but no direct experimental evidence has ever been provided. Moreover Coulomb friction and how this, in full agreement with the theory, can induce a blowing-up vibrational

  14. Nonlinear Optimal Control Techniques for Vibration Attenuation Using Magnetostrictive Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of vibrations in aeronautic, aerospace, automotive, and industrial systems constitutes a fundamental component compounds, and shape memory alloys (SMA) -- have emerged as viable alternatives for both passive and active

  15. Orientational relaxation and vibrational excitation transfer in methanolcarbon tetrachloride solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Orientational relaxation and vibrational excitation transfer in methanol­carbon tetrachloride spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of methanol in carbon tetrachloride solutions to study orientational excitation transfer. For concentrated methanol in carbon tetrachloride solu- tions, like those used

  16. Active vibration cancellation of tonal disturbance using orthogonal eigenstructure control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastgaar Aagaah, Mohammad

    Orthogonal Eigenstructure Control (OEC) is a novel control method that can be used for active vibration cancellation. OEC is an output feedback control method applicable to multiple-input, multiple-output linear systems. ...

  17. Vibration Isolation of a Locomotive Mounted Energy Storage Flywheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaohua

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing flywheels to store and reuse energy from regenerative braking on locomotives is a new technology being developed in the Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab at Texas A&M. This thesis focuses on the motion analysis of a locomotive...

  18. A preferential vibration dissociation coupling model for nonequilibrium hypersonic flowfields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGough, David Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preferential vibration-dissociation coupling model is incorporated into a radiatively coupled viscous shock layer code that also includes chemical, radiative, and thermal nonequilibrium. Stagnation point flow profiles are obtained for several...

  19. Modeling and design of a MEMS piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du Toit, Noël Eduard

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling and design of MEMS-scale piezoelectric-based vibration energy harvesters (MPVEH) are presented. The work is motivated by the need for pervasive and limitless power for wireless sensor nodes that have application ...

  20. attached vibrational probe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the site energy of the acceptor chromophore is lower than that of the donor. Jason D. Biggs; Jeffrey A. Cina 2009-10-12 34 Model-Based Vibration Suppression in Piezoelectric Tube...

  1. Order preserving vibrating strings and applications to Electrodynamics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenier, Yann

    time. It has been advertised as a possible model for dark energy [GKMP]. From a mathematical point specifically to its shallow water version. Then, each vibrating string can be interpreted as a magnetic line

  2. Good vibrations give electrons excitations that rock an insulator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    online issue of Nature. "We proved that phonons-the vibrations of the atoms-provide the driving force that stabilizes the metal phase when the material is heated," said John...

  3. Vibration Isolation of a Locomotive Mounted Energy Storage Flywheel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaohua

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing flywheels to store and reuse energy from regenerative braking on locomotives is a new technology being developed in the Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab at Texas A&M. This thesis focuses on the motion ...

  4. Element and system design for active and passive vibration isolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lei, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focusses on broadband vibration isolation, with an emphasis on control of absolute payload motion for ultra-precision instruments such as the MIT/Caltech Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory ...

  5. Magnetic induction systems to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonnalagadda, Aparna S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the design process for magnetic induction systems to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations. Two styles of magnetic induction systems - magnet-through-coil and magnet-across-coils - were analyzed. ...

  6. An experimental study of torsional vibration measurement / b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Robert Sheldon

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF TORSIONAL VIBRATION MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ROBERT SHELDON FRENCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uniuersity in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981... biajor Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF TORSIONAL VIBRATION MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ROBERT SHELDON FRENCH Approved as to style and content by: , ' (Chairman of Committee) (Mem ) ( er) (Member) (H d of Department) August...

  7. Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Fabrice

    Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in ...

  8. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  9. Vibration monitoring of EDF rotating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Hamon, L.; Lefevre, F. (Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration monitoring of components in nuclear power plants has been used for a number of years. This technique involves the analysis of vibration data coming from vital components of the plant to detect features which reflect the operational state of machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. Earlydetection is important because it can decrease the probability of catastrophic failures, reduce forced outgage, maximize utilization of available assets, increase the life of the plant, and reduce maintenance costs. This paper documents our work on the design of a vibration monitoring methodology based on neural network technology. This technology provides an attractive complement to traditional vibration analysis because of the potential of neural networks to operate in real-time mode and to handle data which may be distorted or noisy. Our efforts have been concentrated on the analysis and classification of vibration signatures collected by Electricite de France (EDF). Two neural networks algorithms were used in our project: the Recirculation algorithm and the Backpropagation algorithm. Although this project is in the early stages of development it indicates that neural networks may provide a viable methodology for monitoring and diagnostics of vibrating components. Our results are very encouraging.

  10. Vibration monitoring of EDF rotating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Hamon, L.; Lefevre, F. [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration monitoring of components in nuclear power plants has been used for a number of years. This technique involves the analysis of vibration data coming from vital components of the plant to detect features which reflect the operational state of machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. Earlydetection is important because it can decrease the probability of catastrophic failures, reduce forced outgage, maximize utilization of available assets, increase the life of the plant, and reduce maintenance costs. This paper documents our work on the design of a vibration monitoring methodology based on neural network technology. This technology provides an attractive complement to traditional vibration analysis because of the potential of neural networks to operate in real-time mode and to handle data which may be distorted or noisy. Our efforts have been concentrated on the analysis and classification of vibration signatures collected by Electricite de France (EDF). Two neural networks algorithms were used in our project: the Recirculation algorithm and the Backpropagation algorithm. Although this project is in the early stages of development it indicates that neural networks may provide a viable methodology for monitoring and diagnostics of vibrating components. Our results are very encouraging.

  11. Direct observation of the topological charge of a terahertz vortex beam generated by a Tsurupica spiral phase plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, K., E-mail: k-miyamoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Suizu, K.; Akiba, T. [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Omatsu, T. [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); CREST Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A terahertz (THz) spiral phase plate with high transmission (>90% after Fresnel correction) and low dispersion has been developed based on the Tsurupica olefin polymer. Direct observations of the topological charge (both magnitude and sign) of a THz vortex beam are performed by using a THz camera with tilted lens focusing and radial defect introduction. The vortex outputs with a topological charge of ±1 (or ±2) are obtained at a frequency of 2 (or 4) THz.

  12. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruce, Jesse R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erwin, Jenny R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remick, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornwell, Phillip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menegini, R. Michael [INDIANA UNIV.; Racanelli, Joe [STRYKER ORTHOPARDICS

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  13. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruce, Jesse R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erwin, Jenny R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remick, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornwell, Phillip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menegini, R. Michael [INDIANA UNIV.; Racanelli, Joe [STRYKER ORTHOPAEDICS

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer or force response data from an instrument stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing will be conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem will be instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs will be compared: a monolithic impactor with an integrated load cell and accelerometer and a two piece impactor. Acceleration and force measurements will be taken in the direction of impaction. Signal processing techniques will be applied to the acceleration time histories to determine features that can be used to assess device seating and potential fracture. A consistent energy input will be applied using a drop tower. The effect of introducing compliance under the bone support vise will also be investigated. The ultimate goal of this study is to design an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental set-up, the signal processing techniques used and the subsequent results.

  14. Heat transfer in a two-pass internally ribbed turbine blade coolant channel with cylindrical vortex generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, R.G.; Acharya, S.; Chen, Y.; Nikitopoulos, D.E.; Myrum, T.A. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of vortex generators on the mass (heat) transfer from the ribbed passage of a two-pass turbine blade coolant channel is investigated with the intent of optimizing the vortex generator geometry so that significant enhancements in mass/heat transfer can be achieved. In the experimental configuration considered, ribs are mounted on two opposite walls; all four walls along each pass are active and have mass transfer from their surfaces but the ribs are nonparticipating. Mass transfer measurements, in the form of Sherwood number ratios, are made along the centerline and in selected interrib modules. Results are presented for Reynolds number in the range of 5000 to 40,000 pitch to rib height ratios of 10.5 and 21, and vortex generator-rib spacing to rib height ratios of 0.55 and 1.5. Centerline and spanwise-averaged Sherwood number ratios are presented along with contours of the Sherwood number ratios. Results indicate that the vortex generators lead to substantial increases in the local mass transfer rates, particularly along the side walls, and modest increases in the average mass transfer rates. The vortex generators have the effect of making the interrib profiles along the ribbed walls more uniform. Along the side walls, vortices that characterize the vortex generator wake are associated with significant mass transfer enhancements. The wake effects and the levels of enhancement decrease somewhat with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing pitch.

  15. Von K\\'arm\\'an Vortex Street within an Impacting Drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Etoh, Takeharu Goji; Popinet, Stephane; Ray, Pascal; Josserand, Christophe; Zaleski, Stephane; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The splashing of a drop impacting onto a liquid pool produces a range of different sized micro-droplets. At high impact velocities, the most significant source of these droplets is a thin liquid jet emerging at the start of the impact from the neck that connects the drop to the pool. We use ultra-high-speed video imaging in combination with high-resolution numerical simulations to show how the ejecta gives way to irregular splashing. At higher Reynolds number, its base becomes unstable, shedding vortex rings into the liquid from the free surface in an axisymmetric von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street, thus breaking the ejecta sheet as it forms.

  16. Analytical Tendex and Vortex Fields for Perturbative Black Hole Initial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tendex and vortex fields, defined by the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl curvature tensor, form the basis of a recently developed approach to visualizing spacetime curvature. In particular, this method has been proposed as a tool for interpreting results from numerical binary black hole simulations, providing a deeper insight into the physical processes governing the merger of black holes and the emission of gravitational radiation. Here we apply this approach to approximate but analytical initial data for both single boosted and binary black holes. These perturbative data become exact in the limit of small boost or large binary separation. We hope that these calculations will provide additional insight into the properties of tendex and vortex fields, and will form a useful test for future numerical calculations.

  17. Tripolar vortex formation in dense quantum plasma with ion-temperature-gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qamar, Anisa; Ata-ur-Rahman [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived system of nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency electrostatic toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode for dense quantum magnetoplasma. For some specific profiles of the equilibrium density, temperature, and ion velocity gradients, the nonlinear equations admit a stationary solution in the form of a tripolar vortex. These results are relevant to understand nonlinear structure formation in dense quantum plasmas in the presence of equilibrium ion-temperature and density gradients.

  18. Hierarchical Colloidal Vortex Rings in a Constant Electric Field Yilong Han and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    often, the dense ring of 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 15 (b) (c) (d) (e) packed close- core vortex ring (d) (e) (b) (c) (a) (f) corona t [sec] Rg (t) [µm] +V h H 20 µm glass slide cluster electrode R g 20 µm FIG. 1 is surrounded by a di#11;use circulating corona that extends outward for tens of micrometers. Although

  19. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Three-dimensional vortex dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    , the boundary layer can become centrifugally unstable (Honji 1981), leading to well-developed G¨ortler vortices dissipation and boundary layer dynamics. It is widely accepted that vortex shedding is a dominant pr in oscillatory flow separation M I G U E L C A N A L S AND G E N O P A W L A K Department of Ocean and Resources

  20. Vortex free energy and deconfinement in center-blind discretizations of Yang-Mills theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgio, G; Kerler, W; Müller-Preussker, M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximal 't Hooft loops are studied in SO(3) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature T. Tunneling barriers among twist sectors causing loss of ergodicity for local update algorithms are overcome through parallel tempering, enabling us to measure the vortex free energy F and to identify a deconfinement transition at some $\\beta_A^{crit}$. The behavior of F below $\\beta_A^{crit}$ shows however striking differences with what is expected from discretizations in the fundamental representation.

  1. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCluskey, M D [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  2. Measurement of rabbit eardrum vibration through stroboscopic digital holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Greef, Daniël; Dirckx, Joris J. J. [University of Antwerp, Laboratory of BioMedical Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a setup for high-power single shot stroboscopic digital holography and demonstrate it in an application on rabbit eardrum vibration measurement. The setup is able to make full-field time-resolved measurements of vibrating surfaces with a precision in the nanometer range in a broad frequency range. The height displacement of the measured object is visualized over the entire surface as a function of time. Vibration magnitude and phase maps can be extracted from these data, the latter proving to be very useful to reveal phase delays across the surface. Such deviations from modal motion indicate energy losses due to internal damping, in contrast to purely elastic mechanics. This is of great interest in middle ear mechanics and finite element modelling. In our setup, short laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the surface vibration period and are recorded by a CCD camera. The timing of the pulses and the exposure of the camera are synchronized to the vibration phase by a microprocessor. The high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser produces pulses containing up to 5 mJ of energy, which is amply sufficient to record single-shot holograms. As the laser pulse length is 8 ns and the smallest time step of the trigger electronics is 1 ?s, vibration measurements of frequencies up to 250 kHz are achievable through this method, provided that the maximum vibration amplitude exceeds a few nanometers. In our application, middle ear mechanics, measuring frequencies extend from 5 Hz to 20 kHz. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as results of measurements on a stretched circular rubber membrane and a rabbit's eardrum. Two of the challenges when measuring biological tissues, such as the eardrum, are low reflectivity and fast dehydration. To increase reflectivity, a coating is applied and to counteract the undesirable effects of tissue dehydration, the measurement setup and software have been optimized for speed without compromising on the quality. Results of a repeatability test will be presented as well. Since the method measures the membrane motion as a function of time in small time steps, we do not only measure vibration amplitude like in time-average holography, but we can also measure non-linear elastic and transient behaviour. In conclusion, the combination of good spatial, depth and time resolution with the fast data acquisition and very wide frequency range make our technique applicable in a number of fields, including biological tissue vibrations.

  3. Coherent exciton dynamics in the presence of underdamped vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arend G. Dijkstra; Chen Wang; Jianshu Cao; Graham R. Fleming

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent ultrafast optical experiments show that excitons in large biological light-harvesting complexes are coupled to molecular vibration modes. These high-frequency vibrations will not only affect the optical response, but also drive the exciton transport. Here, using a model dimer system, the frequency of the underdamped vibration is shown to have a strong effect on the exciton dynamics such that quantum coherent oscillations in the system can be present even in the case of strong noise. Two mechanisms are identified to be responsible for the enhanced transport efficiency: critical damping due to the tunable effective strength of the coupling to the bath, and resonance coupling where the vibrational frequency coincides with the energy gap in the system. The interplay of these two mechanisms determines parameters responsible for the most efficient transport, and these optimal control parameters are comparable to those in realistic light-harvesting complexes. Interestingly, oscillations in the excitonic coherence at resonance are suppressed in comparison to the case of an off-resonant vibration.

  4. Energy harvesting of random wide-band vibrations with applications to an electro-magnetic rotational energy harvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, A. Zachary

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, vibration energy harvesting is the scavenging of ambient vibration by transduction of mechanical kinetic energy into electrical energy. Many mechanical or electro-mechanical systems produce mechanical vibrations. ...

  5. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  6. Proposal of thermal neutron flux monitors based on vibrating wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arutunian, S G; Chung, M; Harutyunyan, G S; Lazareva, E G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of neutron monitors with fine spatial resolution are proposed based on vibrating wire. In the first type, neutrons interact with the vibrating wire, heat it, and lead to the change of natural frequency, which can be precisely measured. To increase the heat deposition during the neutron scattering, use of gadolinium layer which has the highest thermal neutron capture cross section among all elements is proposed. The second type of the monitor uses vibrating wire as a resonant target. Besides the measurement of beam profile according to the average signal, the differential signal synchronized with the wire oscillations defines the gradient of beam profile. Spatial resolution of the monitor is defined by the diameter of the wire.

  7. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E; Perry, Carl Allison

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  8. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingwood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  9. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingswood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  10. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingwood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  11. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingwood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  12. MATLAB implementation of an operational modal analysis technique for vibration-based structural health monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojeda, Alejandro P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration-based structural health monitoring (SHM) has become an attractive solution for the global monitoring and evaluation of damage in structures. Numerous damage detection schemes used in vibration-based SHM require ...

  13. Vibration damping using low-wave-speed media with applications to precision machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varanasi, Kripa K. (Kripa Kiran), 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration and noise are an ever-present problem in the majority of mechanical systems, from consumer products to precision manufacturing systems. But most approaches for vibration suppression are expensive and invasive, ...

  14. Non-intrusive vibration monitoring in US Naval and US Coast Guard ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerhard, Katherine Leigh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011, the Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems proposed a new type of vibration monitoring system, entitled vibration assessment monitoring point with integrated recovery of energy or VAMPRIE, in their ...

  15. Modeling and Vibration Control with a Nanopositioning Magnetic-Levitation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young Ha

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation demonstrates that a magnetic-levitation (maglev) stage has the capabilities to control movements and reject vibration simultaneously. The mathematical model and vibration control scheme with a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) maglev...

  16. Vibration control in plates by uniformly distributed PZT actuators interconnected via electric networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    improve the performances of piezoelectric actuation. internal resonance / equivalent circuits 1Vibration control in plates by uniformly distributed PZT actuators interconnected via electric vibrations of plates by means of a set of electrically-interconnected piezoelectric actuators is described

  17. Optimization of Passive Constrained Layer Damping Treatments for Vibration Control of Cylindrical Shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, H.

    This paper presents the layout optimization of passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatment for vibration control of cylindrical shells under a broadband force excitation. The equations governing the vibration responses ...

  18. Characterization of a synthetic peroxodiiron(III) protein model complex by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Loi Hung

    The vibrational spectrum of an ?[superscript 1],?[superscript 1]-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex was measured by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and fit using an empirical force field analysis. Isotopic 18O2 ...

  19. Vibration and crack detection in gas turbine engine compressor blades using Eddy current sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Matthew, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) in the ECS signal, no definitive method for sensing blade vibration using an ECS has yet been developed.

  20. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems Brandon Brown, Tarunraj Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    motion of transmission line towers [3]. Since the vibration absorber was introduced in 1909 by Frahm [4

  1. Surface Science Letters Surface vibrations of a highly ordered low-density alkanethiol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    ; Surface structure, morphology, roughness, and topography; Vibrations of adsorbed molecules; Gold; LowSurface Science Letters Surface vibrations of a highly ordered low-density alkanethiol monolayer-energy surface vibrational structure of the 11:5 Â p 3 striped phase of 1-decanethiol (C10H21SH) chemi- sorbed

  2. Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

  3. Temperature-dependent vibrational relaxation in polyatomic liquids: Picosecond infrared pump-probe experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    , California 94305 (Received 24 November 1993; accepted 10 March 1994) Vibrational lifetimes of metal carbonyl those in CHCls. A decrease in the vibrational lifetime with temperature is seen for both metal carbonyls a detailed study of the temperature-dependent relax- ation of a vibrational mode of two molecules, tungsten

  4. Long-Range Electronic-to-Vibrational Energy Transfer from Nanocrystals to Their Surrounding Matrix Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabani, Eran

    for the analysis, control, and optimization of energy storage and disposal in chemistry, physics, material sci radiationless electronic-to-vibrational energy conversion and vibrational energy exchange, which are centralLong-Range Electronic-to-Vibrational Energy Transfer from Nanocrystals to Their Surrounding Matrix

  5. Vibration Isolation with High Strain Shape Memory Alloy Actuators: Case of the impulse disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    disturbance, while an active stage is used to aug- ment low frequency damping and provide attenuationVibration Isolation with High Strain Shape Memory Alloy Actuators: Case of the impulse disturbance disturbance on a mass to be isolated from vibrations. The vibration isolation testbed consists of a `strong

  6. Controlled propagation of locally excited vortex dynamics in linear nanomagnet arrays This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    Controlled propagation of locally excited vortex dynamics in linear nanomagnet arrays This article. Here, we present a controlled propagation of locally excited magnetic vortex dynamics through a linear. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43 (2010) 335001 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/43/33/335001 Controlled propagation

  7. Vortex Dynamics Models in Flow Control Problems Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protas, Bartosz

    . Following a comprehensive review of earlier approaches, we discuss how methods of modern control and optimization theory can be employed to solve control problems for vortex system. In addition, we also address vortex systems, in the second part of the paper we also introduce a novel approach to the control

  8. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Aluminum Nitride Laurie E. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Raman and Brillouin scattering, infrared absorption, neutron scattering, and ultrasonics can be used to probe the vibrational spectrum. Although Raman and Brillouin scattering probe only long-wavelength modes, they have the advantage that much smaller crystals are required than for neutron or ultra- sonic studies

  9. Grinding media oscillation: effect on torsional vibrations in tumble mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toram, Kiran Kumar

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of oscillation of grinding media on torsional vibrations of the mill. A theoretical model was developed to determine the oscillating frequency of the grinding media. A 12" (0.3 m) diameter tumble mill test rig was built with a 0.5 hp DC motor. The rig is tested...

  10. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloucek, Petr (Houston, TX); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Oakland, CA)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  11. Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy of High-temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy of High-temperature Superconductors C. Thomsen and G. Kaczmarczyk-temperature Superconductors C. Thomsen and G. Kaczmarczyk Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany 1 INTRODUCTION Raman after the discovery of high- critical-temperature Tc superconductors:2 while reports on Raman scattering

  12. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  13. absorption va vibrational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption va vibrational First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 LE JOURNAL DE .PHYSIQUE...

  14. Vibrational properties of double-walled carbon J. Maultzsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    , University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia Abstract. We study the vibrational properties, the change in phonon frequencies due to the wall interaction is larger for the high-energy optical phonon. Total energy per carbon atom after relaxation of the atomic positions. Etot eV/atom radius Å Etot e

  15. Ultrasound scattering and the study of vortex correlations in disordered flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Boyer; Fernando Lund

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In an idealized way, some turbulent flows can be pictured by assemblies of many vortices characterized by a set of particle distribution functions. Ultrasound provide an useful, nonintrusive, tool to study the spatial structure of vorticity in flows. This is analogous to the use of elastic neutron scattering to determine liquid structure. We express the dispersion relation, as well as the scattering cross section, of sound waves propagating in a ``liquid'' of identical vortices as a function of vortex pair correlation functions. In two dimensions, formal analogies with ionic liquids are pointed out.

  16. Geometry and scaling of tangled vortex lines in three-dimensional random wave fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander J. Taylor; Mark R. Dennis

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The short- and long-scale behaviour of tangled wave vortices (nodal lines) in random three-dimensional wave fields is studied via computer experiment. The zero lines are tracked in numerical simulations of periodic superpositions of three-dimensional complex plane waves. The probability distribution of local geometric quantities such as curvature and torsion are compared to previous analytical and new Monte Carlo results from the isotropic Gaussian random wave model. We further examine the scaling and self-similarity of tangled wave vortex lines individually and in the bulk, drawing comparisons with other physical systems of tangled filaments.

  17. Extraordinary optical transmission and vortex excitation by periodic arrays of Fresnel zone plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roszkiewicz, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraordinary optical transmission and good focusing properties of a two-dimensional scattering structure is presented. The structure is made of Fresnel zone plates periodically arranged along two orthogonal directions. Each plate consists of two ring-shaped waveguides supporting modes that match the symmetry of a circularly polarized incident plane wave. High field concentration at the focal plane is obtained with short transverse and long longitudinal foci diameters. Optical vortex excitation in a paraxial region of the transmitted field is also observed and analysed in terms of cross-polarisation coupling. The structure presented may appear useful in visualization, trapping and precise manipulations of nanoparticles.

  18. SEMIACTIVE DAMPING OF CABLES WITH SAG E.A. Johnson,1 R.E. Christenson,2 and B.F. Spencer, Jr.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Erik A.

    damping, cable galloping, rain-wind induced vibration, cable sag, structural control INTRODUCTION Cables by vortex shedding, wake-induced oscillation, and iced and ice-free galloping. Fatigue of the transmission lines near clamps or masses (such as aircraft warning spheres) is the principal effect of conductor

  19. Critical current density and mechanism of vortex pinning in KxFe2-ySe? doped with S

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the critical current density Jc in KxFe2-ySe2-zSz crystals. The Jc can be enhanced significantly with optimal S doping (z=0.99). For K0.70(7)Fe1.55(7)Se1.01(2)S0.99(2), the weak fishtail effect is found for H II c. The normalized vortex pinning forces follow the scaling law with a maximum position at 0.41 of the reduced magnetic field. These results demonstrate that the small size normal point defects dominate the vortex pinning mechanism.

  20. Spin-spin interaction in general relativity and induced geometries with nontrivial topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Krechet; D. V. Sadovnikov

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the dynamics of a self-gravitating spinor field and a self-gravitating rotating perfect fluid. It is shown that both these matter distributions can induce a vortex field described by the curl 4-vector of a tetrad: $\\omega^i = \\frac12\\eps^{iklm}e_{(a)k}e^{(a)}_{l;m}$, where $e^{(a)}_k$ are components of the tetrad. The energy-momentum tensor $T_{ik}(\\omega)$ of this field has been found and shown to violate the strong and weak energy conditions which leads to possible formation of geometries with nontrivial topology like wormholes. The corresponding exact solutions to the equations of general relativity have been found. It is also shown that other vortex fields, e.g., the magnetic field, can also possess such properties.

  1. MAP, MAC, and Vortex-rings Configurations in the Weinberg-Salam Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosy Teh; Ban-Loong Ng; Khai-Ming Wong

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the presence of new axially symmetric monopoles, antimonopoles and vortex-rings solutions of the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) Weinberg-Salam model of electromagnetic and weak interactions. When the $\\phi$-winding number $n=1$, and 2, the configurations are monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and monopole-antimonopole chain (MAC) with poles of alternating sign magnetic charge arranged along the $z$-axis. Vortex-rings start to appear from the MAP and MAC configurations when the winding number $n=3$. The MAP configurations possess zero net magnetic charge whereas the MAC configurations possess net magnetic charge of $4\\pi n/e$. In the MAP configurations, the monopole-antimonopole pair is bounded by the ${\\cal Z}^0$ field flux string and there is an electromagnetic current loop encircling it. The monopole and antimonopole possess magnetic charges $\\pm\\frac{4\\pi n}{e}\\sin^2\\theta_W$ respectively. In the MAC configurations there is no string connecting the monopole and the adjacent antimonopole and they possess magnetic charges $\\pm\\frac{4\\pi n}{e}$ respectively. The MAC configurations possess infinite total energy and zero magnetic dipole moment whereas the MAP configurations which are actually sphalerons possess finite total energy and magnetic dipole moment. The configurations were investigated for varying values of Higgs self-coupling constant $0\\leq \\lambda\\leq 40$ at Weinberg angle $\\theta_W=\\frac{\\pi}{4}$.

  2. Filamentary structures in dense plasma focus: Current filaments or vortex filaments?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Castillo, Fermin [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, México (Mexico); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Auluck, S. K. H. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations of an azimuthally distributed array of sub-millimeter size sources of fusion protons and correlation between extreme ultraviolet (XUV) images of filaments with neutron yield in PF-1000 plasma focus have re-kindled interest in their significance. These filaments have been described variously in literature as current filaments and vortex filaments, with very little experimental evidence in support of either nomenclature. This paper provides, for the first time, experimental observations of filaments on a table-top plasma focus device using three techniques: framing photography of visible self-luminosity from the plasma, schlieren photography, and interferometry. Quantitative evaluation of density profile of filaments from interferometry reveals that their radius closely agrees with the collision-less ion skin depth. This is a signature of relaxed state of a Hall fluid, which has significant mass flow with equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy, supporting the “vortex filament” description. This interpretation is consistent with empirical evidence of an efficient energy concentration mechanism inferred from nuclear reaction yields.

  3. Vibrational relaxation of matrix-isolated CH/sub 3/F and HCl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on CH/sub 3/F and HCl as a function of host matrix and temperature. Temporally and spectrally resolved infrared fluorescence was used to monitor the populations of both the initially excited state and the lower lying levels which participate in the relaxation process. For CH/sub 3/F, relaxation from any of the levels near 3.5 ..mu.., i.e. the CH stretching fundamentals or bend overtones, occurs via rapid (< 5 ns) V ..-->.. V transfer to 2..nu../sub 3/ with subsequent relaxation of the ..nu../sub 3/ (CF stretch) manifold. Lifetimes of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ were determined through overtone, ..delta..V = 2, and fundamental fluorescence. These lifetimes show a dramatic dependence on host lattice, an increase of two orders of magnitude in going from Xe and Ar matrices. Lifetimes depend only weakly on temperature. The relaxation of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ is consistent with a model in which production of a highly rotationally excited guest via collisions with the repulsive wall of the host is the rate limiting step. For HCl, lifetimes of v = 1,2,3 have been determined. In all hosts, the relaxation is non-radiative. For a given vibrational state, v, the relaxation rate increases in the series k(Ar) < k(Kr) < k(Xe). The dependence of the relaxation rate; on v is superlinear in all matrices, the deviation from linearity increasng in the order Ar < Kr < Xe. The relaxation rates become more strongly temperature dependent with increasing vibrational excitation. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which complex formation introduces the anisotropy necessary to induce a near resonant V ..-->.. R transition in the rate limiting step.

  4. Effect of time-dependent piston velocity program on vortex ring formation in a piston/cylinder arrangement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories and Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena velocity fixed. It turned out that the pinch-off was always observed to occur at a stroke ratio L time scale for the pinch-off process formation number was tested by generating vortex rings

  5. http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Optimization of a Vortex Finder in a Cyclone Separator using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Optimization of a Vortex Finder in a Cyclone Separator using Particle of fluidized bed power plants is the cyclone separator. The cyclone separator is used to remove smaller particles, those not large enough for heat transfer, and retain large particles. The cyclone separator

  6. Zero-energy states bound to a magnetic pi-flux vortex in a two-dimensional topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrej Mesaros; Robert-Jan Slager; Jan Zaanen; Vladimir Juricic

    2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the existence of a pair of zero-energy modes bound to a vortex carrying a pi-flux is a generic feature of the topologically non-trivial phase of the M-B model, which was introduced to describe the topological band insulator in HgTe quantum wells. We explicitly find the form of the zero-energy states of the corresponding Dirac equation, which contains a novel momentum-dependent mass term and describes a generic topological transition in a band insulator. The obtained modes are exponentially localized in the vortex-core, with the dependence of characteristic length on the parameters of the model matching the dependence extracted from a lattice version of the model. We consider in full generality the short-distance regularization of the vector potential of the vortex, and show that a particular choice yields the modes localized and simultaneously regular at the origin. Finally, we also discuss a realization of two-dimensional spin-charge separation through the vortex zero-modes.

  7. Direct observation of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a periodic array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    Direct observation of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a periodic array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures T. Shapoval,1,* V. Metlushko,2 M. Wolf,1 B. Holzapfel,1 V. Neu,1, Illinois 60612, USA Received 13 November 2009; published 11 March 2010 Strong pinning of superconducting

  8. A finite element method with mesh adaptivity for computing vortex states in fast-rotating Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Einstein condensates Ionut Danaila,a,b , Fr´ed´eric Hechta,b aUPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques Abstract Numerical computations of stationary states of fast-rotating Bose-Einstein condensates require-Einstein condensate, vortex, Sobolev gradient, descent method. 1. Introduction Recent research efforts in the field

  9. A finite element method with mesh adaptivity for computing vortex states in fastrotating BoseEinstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    ­Einstein condensates Ionut Danaila #,a,b , Frâ??edâ??eric Hecht a,b a UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques Abstract Numerical computations of stationary states of fast­rotating Bose­Einstein condensates require­Einstein condensate, vortex, Sobolev gradient, descent method. 1. Introduction Recent research e#orts in the field

  10. ccsd-00003161,version1-26Oct2004 Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the rotating gas increases and tends to infinity, and the number of vortices in the condensate diverges [5, 6. Furthermore we restrict our analysis to the case of a two- dimensional gas in the xy plane, assumingccsd-00003161,version1-26Oct2004 Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

  11. A model for the symmetry breaking of the reverse Benard-von Karman vortex street produced by a flapping foil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Aider, Jean-Luc; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vortex streets produced by a flapping foil of span-to-chord aspect ratio of 4:1 are studied in a hydrodynamic tunnel experiment. In particular, the mechanisms giving rise to the symmetry breaking of the reverse B\\'enard-von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street that characterizes fish-like swimming and forward flapping flight are examined. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements in the mid-plane perpendicular to the span axis of the foil are used to characterize the different flow regimes. The deflection angle of the mean jet flow with respect to the horizontal observed in the average velocity field is used as a measure of the asymmetry of the vortex street. Time series of the vorticity field are used to calculate the advection velocity of the vortices with respect to the free-stream, defined as the phase velocity $U_{phase}$, as well as the circulation $\\Gamma$ of each vortex and the spacing $\\xi$ between consecutive vortices in the near wake. The observation that the symmetry breaking results from th...

  12. First-Order Transition in the Magnetic Vortex Matter in Superconducting MgB2 Tuned by Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    First-Order Transition in the Magnetic Vortex Matter in Superconducting MgB2 Tuned by Disorder T such as Wigner crystals, charge density waves, magnetic bubble arrays, or vortices in type-II superconductors posi- tional correlations. Vortices in superconductors rapidly became the system of choice

  13. A co-ordinate transformation technique for studying ux perturbations induced by strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    A co-ordinate transformation technique for studying ¯ux perturbations induced by strong vibrating of the problem. The essence of the method is a variable transformation by which the moving boundary is transformed into a static one without Tay- lor expansion. The corresponding equations are solved in a linear

  14. Ab Initio Study of Phonon-Induced Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab Initio Study of Phonon-Induced Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in Narrow Graphene Vibrational dephasing of the lowest energy electronic excitations in the perfect (16,16) graphene nanoribbon discovery came in 2004 with the isolation of single sheets of graphite, or graphene, by mechanical

  15. Nonlinear behavior of vibrating molecules on suspended graphene waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Amrita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspended graphene waveguides were deposited on micron-scale periodic metal (plasmonic) structures. Raman scattering of test molecules (B. Megaterium), deposited on the waveguides' surface, exhibited azimuthal cycles upon rotation: at these micron scales, spontaneous Raman ought to be independent of phase matching conditions. In addition, we observed angular-selective quadratic intensity dependence contrary to the typical linear behavior of spontaneous Raman. The effects were observed at very modest pump laser intensities (<10 MW/cm2 at the sample surface, oftenly used in Raman experiments). We attributed these observations to nonlinear coupling between the vibrating molecules and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the molecular vibration frequency. It was assessed that the polariton mode propagates through fairly long distances (over 100 microns).

  16. Resonant vibrational excitation of CO by low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poparic, G. B.; Belic, D. S.; Vicic, M. D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, P.O. Box 368, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110-1093 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron impact vibrational excitation of the CO molecule, via the {sup 2}{pi} resonance, in the 0-4 eV energy region has been investigated. The energy dependence of the resonant excitation of the first ten vibrational levels, v=1 to v=10, has been measured by use of a crossed-beams double trochoidal electron spectrometer. Obtained relative differential cross sections are normalized to the absolute values. Integral cross sections are determined by using our recent results on scattered electrons angular distributions, which demonstrate clear p-partial wave character of this resonance. Substructures appear in the {sup 2}{pi} resonant excitation of the CO molecule which have not been previously observed.

  17. Optical properties of C{sub 60} vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsch, G.F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States); Smith, A. [Department of Chemistry, BG-10, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, BG-10, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States); Yabana, K. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-21 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-21 (Japan)

    1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The tight-binding and local-density approximation (LDA) models of the electronic structure for C{sub 60} are applied to calculate the transition strength of the four infrared-active vibrations. The tight-binding results are of the correct order of magntiude, but not accurate enough to have predictive power. The LDA results give a much better description of the relative and absolute strengths of the four modes.

  18. A vacuum microgripping tool with integrated vibration releasing capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Weibin; Fan, Zenghua, E-mail: zenghua-fan@163.com; Wang, Lefeng; Xie, Hui; Sun, Lining [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pick-and-place of micro-objects is a basic task in various micromanipulation demands. Reliable releasing of micro-objects is usually disturbed due to strong scale effects. This paper focuses on a vacuum micro-gripper with vibration releasing functionality, which was designed and assembled for reliable micromanipulation tasks. Accordingly, a vibration releasing strategy of implementing a piezoelectric actuator on the vacuum microgripping tool is presented to address the releasing problem. The releasing mechanism was illustrated using a dynamic micro contact model. This model was developed via theoretical analysis, simulations and pull-off force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Micromanipulation experiments were conducted to verify the performance of the vacuum micro-gripper. The results show that, with the assistance of the vibration releasing, the vacuum microgripping tool can achieve reliable release of micro-objects. A releasing location accuracy of 4.5±0.5 ?m and a successful releasing rate of around 100% (which is based on 110 trials) were achieved for manipulating polystyrene microspheres with radius of 35–100 ?m.

  19. Magnetically induced splitting of a giant vortex state in a mesoscopic superconducting disk D. S. Golubovi,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    , whose dimensions are comparable to the supercon- ducting coherence length T and the penetration depth.4 and 1 nm, respectively. The triangle is separated from the supercon- ducting disk by a 2-nm Si spacer

  20. Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn? with H?c

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Petrovic, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn? with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, ?=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition, an increased disordering of the VL is observed.