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1

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Wednesday, 28 March 2007 00:00 In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

2

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

3

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

4

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

5

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong...

6

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

7

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

8

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

9

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

10

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

11

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

12

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

13

Geostrophic Vortex Merger and Streamer Development in the Ocean with Special Reference to the Merger of Kuroshio Warm Core Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple, quasigeostrophic, two-layer model was used to study the interactions of two like-signed vortices and streamer development in the ocean. In particular, models corresponding to the observed merger of two Kuroshio warm core rings were ...

Ichiro Yasuda

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Interactions between a Submesoscale Anticyclonic Vortex and a Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of a submesoscale anticyclonic vortex was observed by high-frequency Doppler radio current meters and satellite radiometers. The vortex formed between two large cyclones to the southwest of Oahu, Hawaii. The radius of the core was ...

Cédric Chavanne; Pierre Flament; Klaus-Werner Gurgel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Vortex methods and vortex statistics  

SciTech Connect

Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible, inviscid, isentropic flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus if the vorticity is known at time t = 0, one can deduce the flow at a later time by simply following it around. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that makes use of this observation. Even more generally, the analysis of vortex methods leads, to problems that are closely related to problems in quantum physics and field theory, as well as in harmonic analysis. A broad enough definition of vortex methods ends up by encompassing much of science. Even the purely computational aspects of vortex methods encompass a range of ideas for which vorticity may not be the best unifying theme. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (``blobs``) and those whose understanding contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Vortex methods for inviscid flow lead to systems of ordinary differential equations that can be readily clothed in Hamiltonian form, both in three and two space dimensions, and they can preserve exactly a number of invariants of the Euler equations, including topological invariants. Their viscous versions resemble Langevin equations. As a result, they provide a very useful cartoon of statistical hydrodynamics, i.e., of turbulence, one that can to some extent be analyzed analytically and more importantly, explored numerically, with important implications also for superfluids, superconductors, and even polymers. In the authors view, vortex ``blob`` methods provide the most promising path to the understanding of these phenomena.

Chorin, A.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Analytical examples of reversal current, zero core current, and surface current, toroidal magnetostatic equilibria with nested flux surfaces  

SciTech Connect

We present exact analytical examples of three types of axisymmetric toroidal magnetostatic equilibria with nested flux surfaces: (1) current reversal equilibria, for which the net toroidal current switches from a negative to a positive value when moving away from the magnetic axis; these equilibria have a non-monotonic pressure profile, in accordance with Hammett et al.'s theorem stating that the pressure on the current reversal surface has to exceed the volume-averaged pressure within that surface; (2) zero core current equilibria, in which the toroidal current density vanishes inside some flux surface; and (3) surface current equilibria, constituted of an arbitrary number of nested layers inside which the plasma pressure is constant and the magnetic field force-free, with two adjacent layers being separated by a current sheet. All these configurations are obtained by shaping in an adequate way the arbitrary function which intervenes in the class of generalized isodynamic equilibria first constructed by Palumbo and recovered later on by Bishop and Taylor. A derivation of these equilibria by a method slightly different from Palumbo's is given in an Appendix.

Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA - UP7 - CNRS, UMR no. 7158, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reply to "Comment on 'Vortex-assisted photon counts and their magnetic field dependence in single-photon superconducting detectors'"  

SciTech Connect

The vortex crossing rate in thin current-biased superconducting strips, calculated within the London approach employing the concept of a vortex as a particle, is very sensitive to the cutoff at the vortex core size. To account properly for the vortex core, one needs to use microscopic theory.

Bulaevskii, L.N.; Graf, Matthias; Kogan, Vladimir G.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

Vortex Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by expanding it. Vortex Energy is a company located in Germany . References "Vortex Energy" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVortexEnergy&oldid352892...

19

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a magnetic vortex are not actually swirling around the core. What they can do is flip in place, and the core-defined as the area where spins point out of the plane-can be...

20

Observation of coupled vortex gyrations by 70-ps-time and 20-nm-space- resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We employed time-and space-resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to observe vortex-core gyrations in a pair of dipolar-coupled vortex-state Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) disks. The 70 ps temporal and 20 nm spatial resolution of the microscope enabled us to simultaneously measure vortex gyrations in both disks and to resolve the phases and amplitudes of both vortex-core positions. We observed their correlation for a specific vortex-state configuration. This work provides a robust and direct method of studying vortex gyrations in dipolar-coupled vortex oscillators.

Jung, Hyunsung; Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Bocklage, Lars; Vogel, Andreas; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Tornadic Vortex Signature: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tornadic vortex signature (TVS) is a degraded Doppler velocity signature of a tornado that occurs when the core region of a tornado is smaller than the half-power beamwidth of the sampling Doppler radar. Soon after the TVS was discovered in the ...

Rodger A. Brown; Vincent T. Wood

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Twisted vortex state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a twisted vortex bundle where quantized vortices form helices circling around the axis of the bundle in a "force-free" configuration. Such a state is created by injecting vortices into rotating vortex-free superfluid. Using continuum theory we determine the structure and the relaxation of the twisted state. This is confirmed by numerical calculations. We also present experimental evidence of the twisted vortex state in superfluid 3He-B.

V. B. Eltsov; A. P. Finne; R. Hanninen; J. Kopu; M. Krusius; M. Tsubota; E. V. Thuneberg

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

VORTEX.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vortex generator. Figure 5. The fan in its plenum-a two-speed stove fan mounted in a plywood box. It provides a vacuum at the top of the generator. The ruler is six inches long....

25

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Analytic Vortex Initialization Technique for Idealized Tropical Cyclone Studies in AGCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses the design of idealized tropical cyclone experiments in atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). The evolution of an initially weak, warm-core vortex is investigated over a 10-day period with varying initial conditions ...

Kevin A. Reed; Christiane Jablonowski

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Depinning of a superfluid vortex line by Kelvin waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the interaction of a single superfluid vortex with surface irregularities. While vortex pinning in superconductors usually becomes weaker at higher temperatures, we find the opposite behavior. The pinning steadily increases throughout our measurement range, from 0.15Tc to over 0.5Tc. We also find that moving the other end of the vortex decreases the pinning, so we propose Kelvin waves along the vortex as a depinning mechanism. PACS numbers: 67.40.Vs, 74.60.Ge Pinning sites can trap vortices in a variety of systems. In superconductors, where vortex motion leads to nonzero resistance, a vast amount of work has been devoted to preventing such motion by introducing defects. Experimental work has shown that defects comparable in size to the vortex core make effective pin centers, and that straight [1] or splayed [2] line defects can increase the pin strength. Yet the mechanisms by which vortices interact with pin sites remain unresolved. Experimentally, pinning in superconductors becomes weaker as

L. A. K. Donev; L. Hough; R. J. Zieve

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Impact of a vortex ring on a density interface using a regularized inviscid vortex sheet method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, fully three-dimensional, vortex-in-cell method designed to follow the unsteady motion of inviscid vortex sheets with or without small (Boussinesq) density discontinuities is presented. As is common in front-tracking methods, the vortex sheet is ... Keywords: Density discontinuity, Stratified flow, Vortex methods, Vortex sheet dynamics, Vortex-in-cell

Mark J. Stock; Werner J. A. Dahm; Grétar Tryggvason

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Vortex lattices in layered superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear.

Prokic, V. (Department of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Davidovic, D. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States) Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L. (Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Variable residence time vortex combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nielsen-Olesen vortex in varying-alpha theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider soliton solutions to Bekenstein's theory, for which the fine structure constant $\\alpha=e^2/(4\\pi\\hbar c)$ is allowed to vary due to the presence of a dielectric field pervading the vacuum. More specifically we investigate the effects of a varying $\\alpha$ upon a complex scalar field with a U(1) electromagnetic gauge symmetry subject to spontaneous symmetry breaking. We find vortex solutions to this theory, similar to the Nielsen-Olesen vortex. Near the vortex core the electric charge is typically much larger than far away from the string, lending these strings a superconducting flavour. In general the dielectric field coats the usual local string with a global string envelope. We discuss the cosmological implications of networks of such strings, with particular emphasis on their ability to generate inhomogeneous recombination scenarios. We also consider the possibility of the dielectric being a charged free field. Even though the vacuum of such a field is trivial, we find that the dielectric arranges itself in the shape of a local string, with a quantized magnetic flux at the core -- presumably borrowing these topological features from the underlying Nielsen-Olesen vortex.

J. Magueijo; H. Sandvik; T. W. B. Kibble

2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Vortex–Vortex Interactions in the Winter Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the interaction of oppositely signed vortices in the compressible (non-Boussinesq) quasigeostrophic system, with a view to understanding vortex interactions in the polar winter stratosphere. A series of simplifying ...

R. K. Scott; D. G. Dritschel

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Gravity waves from vortex dipoles and jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation first investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model. Several initially balanced and localized jets induced by vortex dipoles are examined here. Within these dipoles, inertia-gravity waves with intrinsic frequencies 1-2 times the Coriolis parameter are simulated in the jet exit region. The ray tracing analysis reveals strong variation of wave characteristics along ray paths. The dependence of wave amplitude on the Rossby number is examined through experiments in which the two vortices are initially separated by a large distance but subsequently approach each other and form a vortex dipole with an associated amplifying localized jet. The amplitude of stationary gravity waves in the simulations with a 90-km grid spacing increases nearly linearly with the square of the Rossby number but significantly more rapidly when smaller grid spacing is used. To further address the source mechanism of the gravity waves within the vortex dipole, a linear numerical framework is developed based on the framework proposed by Plougonven and Zhang (2007). Using the nonlinearly balanced fields as the basic state and driven by three types of large scale forcing, the vorticity, divergence and thermodynamic forcing, this linear model is utilized to obtain linear wave responses. The wave packets in the linear responses compare reasonably well with the MM5 simulated gravity waves. It is suggested that the vorticity forcing is the leading contribution to both gravity waves in the jet exit region and the ascent/descent feature in the jet core. This linear model is also adopted to study inertia-gravity waves in the vicinity of a baroclinic jet during the life cycle of an idealized baroclinic wave. It is found that the thermodynamic forcing and the vorticity forcing are equally important to the gravity waves in the low stratosphere, but the divergence forcing is again playing a lesser role. Two groups of wave packets are present in the linear responses; their sources appear to locate either near the surface front or near the middle/upper tropospheric jet.

Wang, Shuguang

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental results show similar trends as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results presented in this report; however, some differences exist that will need to be assessed in future studies. The results of this testing will be used to improve the diode design to be tested in the liquid salt loop system.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic...

36

Observable Vortex Properties in Finite Temperature Bose Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of vortices in finite temperature atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, focussing on decay rates, precession frequencies and core brightness, motivated by a recent experiment (Freilich et al. Science 329, 1182 (2010)) in which real-time dynamics of a single vortex was observed. Using the ZNG formalism based on a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate coupled to a semi-classical Boltzmann equation for the thermal cloud, we find a rapid nonlinear increase of both the decay rate and precession frequency with increasing temperatures. The increase, which is dominated by the dynamical condensate-thermal coupling is also dependent on the intrinsic thermal cloud collisional dynamics; the precession frequency also varies with the initial radial coordinate. The integrated thermal cloud density in the vortex core is for the most part independent of the position of the vortex (except when it is near the condensate edge) with its value increasing with temperature. This could potentially be used as a variant to the method of Coddington et al. (Phys. Rev. A 70, 063607 (2004)) for experimentally determining the temperature.

A. J. Allen; E. Zaremba; C. F. Barenghi; N. P. Proukakis

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Transformed Eliassen Balanced Vortex Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the axisymmetric balanced flow occurring in a thermally forced vortex in which the frictional inflow is confined to a thin boundary layer. Above the boundary layer the absolute angular momentum ½fR2=rv+½fr2 is conserved. We refer to R ...

Wayne H. Schubert; James J. Hack

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Simulations of Dual-Vortex Interaction within Environmental Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For over a century it has been known that each vortex in a multiple vortex configuration will move in response to the other vortices. However, despite advances since that time, the complexities of multiple vortex scenarios when sheared ...

Robert E. Hart; Jenni L. Evans

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Probing the spin polarization of current by soft x-ray imaging of current-induced magnetic vortex dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Time-resolved soft X-ray transmission microscopy is applied to image the current-induced resonant dynamics of the magnetic vortex core realized in a micron-sized Permalloy disk. The high spatial resolution better than 25 nm enables us to observe the resonant motion of the vortex core. The result also provides the spin polarization of the current to be 0.67 {+-} 0.16 for Permalloy by fitting the experimental results with an analytical model in the framework of the spin-transfer torque.

Kasai, Shinya; Fischer, Peter; Im, Mi-Young; Yamada, Keisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kohno, Hiroshi; Ono, Teruo

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NEUTRONIC REACTOR OPERATIONAL METHOD AND CORE SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous neutronic reactor systems are described wherein an aqueous fuel solution is continuously circulated through a spherical core tank. The pumped fuel solution-is injected tangentially into the hollow spherical interior, thereby maintaining vigorous rotation of the solution within the tank in the form of a vortex; gaseous radiolytic decomposition products concentrate within the axial vortex cavity. The evolved gas is continuously discharged through a gas- outlet port registering with an extremity of the vortex cavity. and the solution stream is discharged through an annular liquid outlet port concentrically encircling the gas outlet by virtue of which the vortex and its cavity are maintained precisely axially aligned with the gas outlet. A primary heat exchanger extracts useful heat from the hot effluent fuel solution before its recirculation into the core tank. Hollow cylinders and other alternative core- tank configurations defining geometric volumes of revolution about a principal axis are also covered. AEC's Homogeneous Reactor Experiment No. 1 is a preferred embodiment.

Winters, C.E.; Graham, C.B.; Culver, J.S.; Wilson, R.H.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

ANALYTICAL STUDY OF SOME ASPECTS OF VORTEX TUBES FOR GAS-PHASE FISSION HEATING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several problems connected with vortex cavity reactors were studied analytically. They include, the generation of high-strength vortices by utilization of bleed through a porous tube wall to stabilize the shear layer on the wall; the nuclear criticality problem; the suitability of various compounds of plutonium as gaseous fissionable materials; and the problem of retaining the fission fragments within the vortex tube. It is concluded that the shear layer on the vortex tube wall can be stabilized if a mass flow greater than or equal to the vortex through flow is bled through the porous wall, and that the tangential Mach numbers which can be obtained are then slightly more than one-half the inviscid values. Beryllium oxide or graphite-moderated reactors of reasonable size and weight can attain criticality if the product of the hydrogen pressure in the vortex core and the maximum value of the ratio of fissionable gas density to hydrogen density in the tube is greater than about 100 atm. The reactor weights are then in the order of 10,000 lb or less. Of the several compounds of plutonium considered as gaseous fuel carriers, plutonium trifluoride and plutonium tribromide appear to be the most promising. It is probable that they can be held in gaseous form in hydrogen, under the desired concentrations. The rate of loss of fission fragments from the vortex tube can be reduced to a small fraction of the rate of their generation by making the vortex tubes about twice the minimum size that is allowable for satisfactory retention of the fissionable material. (auth)

Kerrebrock, J.L.; Lafyatis, P.G.

1958-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

The idea of vortex energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work formulates and gives grounds for general principles and theorems that question the energy function doctrine and its quantum version as a genuine law of nature without borders of adequacy. The emphasis is on the domain where the energy of systems is conserved -- I argue that only in its tiny part the energy is in the kinetic, potential and thermal forms describable by a generalized thermodynamic potential, whereas otherwise the conserved energy constitutes a whole linked to vortex forces, and can be a factor of things like persistent currents and dark matter.

V. E. Shapiro

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Increase of pinning with temperature for a single vortex line in superfluid helium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While vortex pinning in superconductors usually becomes weaker at higher temperatures, we find the opposite behavior for a single vortex line in superfluid 4 He. The pinning steadily increases over our entire measurement range, from 0.15Tc to over 0.5Tc. We propose Kelvin waves along the vortex as a depinning mechanism with the observed temperature behavior. PACS numbers: 67.40.Vs, 74.60.Ge Pinning sites can trap vortices in a variety of systems. In superconductors, where vortex motion leads to non-zero resistance, a vast amount of work has been devoted to preventing such motion by introducing defects. Experimental work has shown that defects comparable in size to the vortex core make effective pin centers, and that straight [1] or splayed [2] line defects can increase the pin strength. Yet the mechanisms by which vortices interact with pin sites remain unresolved. Experimentally, pinning becomes weaker as temperature increases, in accord with the general assumption that depinning

L. A. K. Donev; L. Hough; R. J. Zieve

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Characterization of The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 Vortex Using Surface Entrained Sensor Fish Device: Preliminary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the pilot study to characterize The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 vortex using a surface entrained Sensor Fish device. It was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on April 13 and 14, 2006. The total spill was controlled at approximately 110 kcfs, the forebay elevation was 157.89 ft, and the discharge of Bay 6 at the tested gate opening of 14 ft was approximately 18 kcfs. The objectives of the full study are to (1) develop baseline conditions for the detailed analysis of Sensor Fish measurements by deploying Sensor Fish in different surface locations in the vortex periphery; (2) observe the entrainment pattern and extract hydraulic data of interest such as acceleration, rotation, pressure, and estimated velocity of Sensor Fish or drogues; (3) integrate the experimental results with companion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and inertial particle tracking studies. A total of 12 Sensor Fish were released in the surface at upstream edge, left edge, downstream edge, and the core of the vortex at Bay 6. Because of the high discharge, the vortex patterns at the test condition were less consistent than the patterns observed at lower discharges. Compared with the Sensor Fish released at mid-bay at Bay 6, Sensor Fish released from the surface at the vortex experienced higher pressure fluctuations, a larger percentage of severe events, and much more rapid angular velocities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Stable optical vortex solitons in pair plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the pair plasmas with small temperature asymmetry can support existence of localized as well as delocalized optical vortex solitons. Coexistence of such solitons is possible due to peculiar form of saturating nonlinearity which has a focusing-defocusing nature--for weak amplitudes being focusing becoming defocusing for higher amplitudes. It is shown that delocalized vortex soliton is stable in entire region of its existence while single- and multicharged localized vortex solitons are unstable for low amplitudes and become stable for relativistic amplitudes.

Berezhiani, V. I.; Shatashvili, N. L. [Plasma Physics Department, Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 0177 (Georgia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia); Mahajan, S. M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Vortex Rossby Waves in a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone. Part II: The Role in Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the author analyzed the asymmetric structure in the inner core of a numerically simulated tropical cyclone and found that the asymmetry near the eyewall in the mid–lower troposphere is dominated by wavenumber-1 and -2 vortex Rossby ...

Yuqing Wang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Vortex Breakdown in Atmospheric Columnar Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex breakdown occurs in tornadoes and waterspouts. This phenomenon may give information on the state and future behavior of those whirlwinds. Because of the rarity of recorded events, archival sources are consulted for qualitative descriptions ...

H. J. Lugt

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Bubble Behavior in a Taylor Vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an experimental study on the behavior of bubbles captured in a Taylor vortex. The gap between a rotating inner cylinder and a stationary outer cylinder is filled with a Newtonian mineral oil. Beyond a critical ...

Deng, Rensheng

50

Barotropic Vortex Evolution on a Beta Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A barotropic, primitive equation (shallow water) model is used on the beta plane to investigate the influence of divergence, total relative angular momentum (RAM) and advective nonlinearities on the evolution of a hurricane-like vortex. The ...

Lloyd J. Shapiro; Katsuyuki V. Ooyama

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Vortex Hydro Energy - National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

Vortex Hydro Energy, LLC Michael M. Bernitsas Ph.D., CEO and CTO Gus Simiao MSE, MBA, Dir. of Business Development NREL’s 20th Annual, Industry Growth Forum

52

Vortex-Driven Sensitivity in Deformation Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity mechanism for the interaction of two vortices in a two-dimensional deformation background flow is explored. A nonlinear model describing the vortex interaction up to a critical merging distance is developed. This model shows that in ...

Zhiyuan Liu; Paul J. Roebber

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic disk structures using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) at ALS Beamlines 4.0.2 and 11.0.1 , respectively. The experiments observed two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analogue in FM vortices.

56

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic disk structures using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) at ALS Beamlines 4.0.2 and 11.0.1 , respectively. The experiments observed two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analogue in FM vortices.

57

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic disk structures using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) at ALS Beamlines 4.0.2 and 11.0.1 , respectively. The experiments observed two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analogue in FM vortices.

58

Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor  

SciTech Connect

A lean-premixed advanced vortex combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, WV. All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx /CO/unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions corrected to 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated marked acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions, which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean-premixed combustion approaches. In addition, the measured 1.75% pressure drop is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors, which could translate into an overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvement. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drop achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

Edmonds, R.G. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Williams, J.T. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Steele, R.C. (EPRI); Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar (California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Core Specialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization (CS) is a feature of the Cray operating system that allows the user to reserve one or more cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring more nodes to run an application. The specialized cores may also be used in conjunction with Cray's MPI asynchronous progress engine [1] to improve the overlap of communication and computation for applications that use non-blocking MPI functions. In the absence of CS, the compute cores must service their own non-blocking calls. Hyper-Threading complicates questions abouty the most effective use of processor resources. HT doubles the number of compute stream (i.e.

60

Core Specialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization (CS) is a feature of the Cray operating system that allows the user to reserve one or more cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring more nodes to run an application. The specialized cores may also be used in conjunction with Cray's MPI asynchronous progress engine [1] to improve the overlap of communication and computation for applications that use non-blocking MPI functions. In the absence of CS, the compute cores must service their own non-blocking calls. Hyper-Threading complicates questions abouty the most effective use of processor resources. HT doubles the number of compute stream (i.e.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DIODE STEERED MANGETIC-CORE MEMORY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A word-arranged magnetic-core memory is designed for use in a digital computer utilizing the reverse or back current property of the semi-conductor diodes to restore the information in the memory after read-out. In order to ob tain a read-out signal from a magnetic core storage unit, it is necessary to change the states of some of the magnetic cores. In order to retain the information in the memory after read-out it is then necessary to provide a means to return the switched cores to their states before read-out. A rewrite driver passes a pulse back through each row of cores in which some switching has taken place. This pulse combines with the reverse current pulses of diodes for each column in which a core is switched during read-out to cause the particular cores to be switched back into their states prior to read-out. (AEC)

Melmed, A.S.; Shevlin, R.T.; Laupheimer, R.

1962-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nonlinear Motion of a Shallow Water Barotropic Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear motions of a shallow water barotropic vortex on a ? plane differ substantially from the analogous linear motions. The nonlinear model described here, in which wavenumber 1–3 asymmetries interact with each other and the mean vortex, ...

H. E. Willoughby

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Highly Configurable Vortex Initialization Method for Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly configurable vortex initialization methodology has been constructed in order to permit manipulation of the initial vortex structure in numerical models of tropical cyclones. By using distinct specifications of the flow in the boundary ...

Eric D. Rappin; David S. Nolan; Sharanya J. Majumdar

64

Case Study of an Orographically Induced Mesoscale Vortex (Denver Cyclone)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations taken during the Convection Initiation and Downburst Experiment (CINDE) are used to describe the formation and structure of an orographically induced mesoscale vortex that frequently occurs in northeastern Colorado. This vortex, ...

J. M. Wilczak; T. W. Christian

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Highly Configurable Vortex Initialization Method for Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly configurable vortex initialization methodology has been constructed in order to permit manipulation of the initial vortex structure in numerical models of tropical cyclones. By using distinct specifications of the flow in the boundary ...

Eric D. Rappin; David S. Nolan; Sharanya J. Majumdar

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Stabilization of vortex solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of vortex solitons in optical media with a nonlocal nonlinear response. We employ a modulation theory for the vortex parameters based on an averaged Lagrangian, and analyze the azimuthal evolution of both the vortex width and diffractive radiation. We describe analytically the physical mechanism for vortex stabilization due to the long-range nonlocal nonlinear response, the effect observed earlier in numerical simulations only.

Minzoni, Antonmaria A. [Fenomenos Nonlineales y Mecanica (FENOMEC), Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Instituto de Investigacion en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Smyth, Noel F. [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Worthy, Annette L. [School of Mathematics and Applied Statistics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522 (Australia); Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Vortex Hydro Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Energy LLC Hydro Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Address 4870 West Clark Rd Suite 108 Place Ypsilanti Zip 48197 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 734.971.4020 Website http://www.vortexhydroenergy.c Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Vortex_Hydro_Energy_LLC&oldid=678497

68

A Study of Premixed Propagating Flame Vortex Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental data is presented for the interaction between a propagating flame and a simple vortex flow field structure generated in the wake of solid obstacles. The interaction between gas movement and obstacles creates vortex shedding forming a simple ... Keywords: Combustion, Flame/Vortex, PIV, Visualization

G. K. Hargrave; S. Jarvis

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Thermodynamic and Microscopic Reversibility Abstract. Theof the University of California. On Thermodynamic andMicroscopic Reversibility Thermodynamic reversibility The

Crooks, Gavin E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Entanglement of a Quantum Optical Elliptic Vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the entanglement of a generalized elliptical vortex formed by quantized radiation field, using Wigner quasiprobability distribution function for such states. We find a critical squeezing parameter above which the entanglement is less for higher vorticity, which is counter intuitive.

Abir Bandyopadhyay; Shashi Prabhakar; Ravindra Pratap Singh

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

71

Entanglement of Quantum Optical Elliptic Vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the entanglement of a generalized elliptical vortex formed by quantized radiation field, using Wigner quasiprobability distribution function for such states. We find a critical squeezing parameter above which the entanglement is less for higher vorticity, which is counter intuitive.

Bandyopadhyay, Abir; Singh, Ravindra Pratap

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Controlled Vortex Breakdown on Modified Delta Wings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the effect of perturbation to the breakdown of the leading-edge vortices over delta wings. The passive perturbation in the normal direction is achieved by installing the hemisphere-like bulges on the delta wing along the projection ... Keywords: Bulge perturbation, Delta wing, Vortex breakdown

S. Srigrarom; N. Lewpiriyawong

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Vortex operators in gauge field theories  

SciTech Connect

Several related aspects of the 't Hooft vortex operator are studied. The current picture of the vacuum of quantum chromodynamics, the idea of dual field theories, and the idea of the vortex operator are reviewed first. The Abelian vortex operator written in terms of elementary fields and the calculation of its Green's functions are considered. A two-dimensional solvable model of a Dirac string is presented. The expression of the Green's functions more neatly in terms of Wu and Yang's geometrical idea of sections is addressed. The renormalization of the Green's functions of two kinds of Abelian looplike operators, the Wilson loop and the vortex operator, is studied; for both operators only an overall multiplicative renormalization is needed. In the case of the vortex this involves a surprising cancellation. Next, the dependence of the Green's functions of the Wilson and 't Hooft operators on the nature of the vacuum is discussed. The cluster properties of the Green's functions are emphasized. It is seen that the vortex operator in a massive Abelian theory always has surface-like clustering. The form of Green's functions in terms of Feynman graphs is the same in Higgs and symmetric phases; the difference appears in the sum over all tadpole trees. Finally, systems having fields in the fundamental representation are considered. When these fields enter only weakly into the dynamics, a vortex-like operator is anticipated. Any such operator can no longer be local looplike, but must have commutators at long range. A U(1) lattice gauge theory with two matter fields, one singly charged (fundamental) and one doubly charged (adjoint), is examined. When the fundamental field is weakly coupled, the expected phase transitions are found. When it is strongly coupled, the operator still appears to be a good order parameter, a discontinuous change in its behavior leads to a new phase transition. 18 figures.

Polchinski, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The dependence of chemistry on the inlet equivalence ratio in vortex-flame interactions [Printed LBNL report with title: The effect of stoichiometry on vortex flame interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of stoichiometry on vortex flame interactions [31] Pember,Rosalik, M . E . , Combust. Flame, 112(3):342-358 (1998).of stoichiometry on vortex flame interactions [15] Mueller,

Tonse, Shaheen R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The dependence of chemistry on the inlet equivalence ratio in vortex-flame interactions [Printed LBNL report with title: The effect of stoichiometry on vortex flame interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of stoichiometry on vortex flame interactions [31] Pember,Rosalik, M . E . , Combust. Flame, 112(3):342-358 (1998).of stoichiometry on vortex flame interactions [15] Mueller,

Bell, John B.; Brown, Nancy J.; Day, Marcus S.; Frenklach, Michael; Grcar, Joseph F.; Tonse, Shaheen R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Persistence of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2 in the Presence of Vortex Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

Rastovski, Catherine [University of Notre Dame, IN; Schlesinger, Kimberly [University of Notre Dame, IN; Gannon, William J [Northwestern University, Evanston; Dewhurst, Charles [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M [ORNL; Zhigadlo, Nikolai [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Karpinski, Janusz [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Eskildsen, Morten [University of Notre Dame, IN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a vortex-pinning mechanism in high- temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centers in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

Llordes, Anna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Coll, M. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ye, S. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Rouco, V [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Magen Dominguez, Cesar [ORNL; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Kevin T. Raterman (ratekt@inel.gov; 208-526-5444) Michael McKellar (mgq@inel.gov; 208-526-1346) Anna Podgorney (poloak@inel.gov; 208-526-0064) Douglas Stacey (stacde@inel.gov; 208-526-3938) Terry Turner (tdt@inel.gov; 208-526-8623) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2110 Brian Stokes (bxs9@pge.com; 415-972-5591) John Vranicar (jjv2@pge.com; 415-972-5591) Pacific Gas & Electric Company 123 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94105 Introduction Many analysts 1,2,3 identify carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA)

79

Vortex Dynamics in NanoScale Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Micron and nanosized magnets are of great interest for their potential applications in new electronic devices, such as magnetic random access memories. As the size of magnets is reduced to a 1-micron scale and below, the boundaries (surfaces, perimeters, etc) of the objects begin to profoundly influence both the static and dynamic behavior of the materials. Researchers from Argonne's Materials Science Division (MSD), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), and Advanced Photon Source (APS) have recently examined the dynamics of 3- to 7-micron-diameter NiFe alloy disks with a combination of theoretical calculations and a new time-resolved magnetic imaging technique using synchrotron-based x-ray photoemission electron

80

Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

Motley, R.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vortex flow visualization using tetrahedral cell subdivision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposes an effective technique for searching for critical points, which are points at which the velocity vector is zero. The previous method, using tetrahedral-cell subdivision, often generates multiple critical points in a hexahedral cell, and this ... Keywords: Newton's method, critical point searching technique, hexahedral cell, linear interpolation function, multiple critical points, numerical integration scheme, precise position calculation, tetrahedral cell subdivision, trilinear interpolation function, velocity vector, vortex flow visualization, vortices

A. Doi; S. Suzuki; K. Koyamada; S. Sannakanishi

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

QCD String as Vortex String in Seiberg-Dual Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a classical vortex string solution in a Seiberg-dual theory of N=1 supersymmetric SO(N_c) QCD which flows to a confining phase. We claim that this vortex string is a QCD string, as previouly argued by M.Strassler. In SO(N_c) QCD, it is known that stable QCD strings exist even in the presence of dynamical quarks. We show that our vortex strings are stable in the Seiberg-dual theory.

Eto, Minoru; Terashima, Seiji

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Spontaneous Symmetry-Breaking and the Vortex Lattice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The magnetic vortex lattice of Type-II superconductors, as a quasi ... morphology in single-crystals of pure niobium, a 'conventional' superconductor. ...

84

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Crooks, Gavin E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Gavin E. Crooks

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

Synthesis and magnetic reversal of bi-conical Ni nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Template synthesis in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes has been used to grow hour glass shaped nickel nanowires with a constriction in the range of tens of nanometers at the center. Anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements have been performed on a single nanowire to follow magnetization reversal of the structure. The results are explained via 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the appearance of a complex vortex state close to the constriction whose propagation depends on the angle between the cone axis and the applied field. The interest of this original growth process for spintronics is discussed.

Biziere, N. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, CEA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Lassalle Ballier, R.; Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condense, DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC, CEA Saclay URA CNRS 2464, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Clochard, M. C.; Wade, T. L.; Wegrowe, J. E. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, CEA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Balanzat, E. [CIMAP, Unite Mixte CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN, F-14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Structure of quantum vortex tangle in He-4 counterflow turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to present a comprehensive characterization of well developed vortex tangles in a turbulent counterflow in quantum fluids (with a laminar normal fluid component). We analyze extensive numerical simulations using the vortex filament method, solving the full Biot-Savart equations for the vortex dynamics in a wide range of temperatures and counter-flow velocities. In addition to a detailed analysis of traditional characteristics such as vortex line density, anisotropic and curvature parameters of the vortex tangle, we stress other dynamical and statistical characteristics which are either much less studied or even unstudied. The latter include reconnection rates, mean mutual friction forces, drift velocities and the probability distribution functions of various tangle parameters: the loop length, the line curvature, the mean curvature of loops with a given length, etc. During these studies we compare the three main reconnection procedures which are widely used in the literature, and identify which properties are strongly affected by the choice of the reconnection criteria and which of them are practically insensitive to the reconnection procedure. The conclusion is that the vortex filament method in the framework of the Biot-Savart equation sufficiently robust and well suited for the description of the steady state vortex tangle in a quantum counterflow. The Local-Induction Approximation to this equation may be successfully used to analytically establish relationships between mean characteristics of the stochastic vortex tangle.

Luiza Kondaurova; Victor L'vov; Anna Pomyalov; Itamar Procaccia

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Helicoidal vortex model for wind turbine aeroelastic simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vortex method has been extended to account for blade flexibility, which is a potential source of unsteadiness in the flow past a wind turbine rotor. The code has been validated previously under the assumption of rigid blades. The aerodynamics method ... Keywords: Blade flexibility, Steady and unsteady flows, Tower interference, Vortex model

Jean-Jacques Chattot

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

Sohal, Monohar S. (Idaho Falls, ID); O' Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

Sohal, Manohar S. (Idaho Falls, ID); O' Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

An Investigation of a Three-Dimensional Asymmetric Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional numerical simulation is presented for the asymmetric vortex motion which occurs in a Ward-type vortex chamber. The initial state is taken to be one of axisymmetric irrotational flow where the flow enters through the sides at ...

Richard Rotunno

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Stability of an optical vortex in a circular nematic cell  

SciTech Connect

The stability of an optical vortex in a cell with a circular cross section containing a nematic liquid crystal is studied. A modulation theory based on an averaged Lagrangian formulation is developed to study this stability. It is found that the vortex is stable unless the radius of the cell is very small, nearly the width of the vortex itself. Based on the analysis of a stationary vortex, the stability of a low-amplitude vortex in a large cell under the influence of its orbital angular momentum and the repelling effect of the cell boundary are studied. The predictions of this modulation theory are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

Minzoni, Antonmaria A. [Fenomenos Nonlineales y Mecanica (FENOMEC), Departamento de Matematicas y Mecanica, Instituto de Investigacion en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Smyth, Noel F. [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Xu Zhiyong [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy) device is based on the extensively studied phenomenon of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed five-hundred years ago by Leonardo DaVinci in the form of 'Aeolian Tones.' VIV results from vortices forming and shedding on the downstream side of a bluff body in a current. Vortex shedding alternates from one side to the other, thereby creating a vibration or oscillation. The VIV phenomenon is non-linear, which means it can produce useful energy at high efficiency over a wide range of current speeds and directions.This converter is unlike any existing technology, as it does not use turbines, propellers, or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power generators.

94

Ferroelectric nanostructure having switchable multi-stable vortex states  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferroelectric nanostructure formed as a low dimensional nano-scale ferroelectric material having at least one vortex ring of polarization generating an ordered toroid moment switchable between multi-stable states. A stress-free ferroelectric nanodot under open-circuit-like electrical boundary conditions maintains such a vortex structure for their local dipoles when subject to a transverse inhomogeneous static electric field controlling the direction of the macroscopic toroidal moment. Stress is also capable of controlling the vortex's chirality, because of the electromechanical coupling that exists in ferroelectric nanodots.

Naumov, Ivan I. (Fayetteville, AR); Bellaiche, Laurent M. (Fayetteville, AR); Prosandeev, Sergey A. (Fayetteville, AR); Ponomareva, Inna V. (Fayetteville, AR); Kornev, Igor A. (Fayetteville, AR)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Vortex flow around the bases of obstacles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 The horseshoe . vortex formed by a separating turbulent boundary layer 5.3 Scour around obstacles in an erodible bed 114 116 117 . ·4 References Uf'l() I:!~oLtlecl F,'obL.efl):' Llr:cl ~u.g5el:dto/J~ fer ju.iLt(t' wc"..,I" 11 2 119 Figures (vi... , are shmm in figUre 2.3.4. It can be seen that there is a rather high le,el of turbulence in the tunnel free stream. This is poss:l.bly due to the extra screens placed upstream of the \\'lorking section. At the higher speeds used this turbulence...

Baker, Christopher James

1979-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contains an observational analysis of the genesis of Tropical Storm Allison (2001). Using a paradigm of tropical cyclone formation as the superposition of potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, the importance of different scales of PV merger to various aspects of Allison?s formation is discussed. While only the case of Allison is discussed in great detail, other studies have also documented PV superposition on various scales, and superposition could be important for most tropical cyclones. Preceding Allison?s genesis, PV superposition on the large scale destabilized the atmosphere and increased low-level cyclonic vorticity. This presented a more favorable environment for the formation of MCV-type PV anomalies and smaller, surface-based, meso-?-scale vortices. Although these vortices eventually merged to form a more concentrated vortex with stronger surface pressure gradients, the merger happened well after landfall of Allison and no strengthening ensued. The unstable, vorticity-rich environment was also favorable for the development of even smaller, meso-?-scale vortices that accompanied deep convective cells within one of Allison?s meso-?-scale vortices. The observations herein suggest that the meso-?- scale convective cells and vortices are the respective source of PV production and building blocks for the meso-?-scale vortices. Finally, this thesis discusses issues related to the multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclone formation. For instance, the tracking of developing tropical cyclones is greatly complicated by the presence of multiple vortices. For these cases, the paradigm of a single cyclone center is inappropriate and alternative tracking methods are introduced.

Sippel, Jason Allen

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reverse hoare logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel Hoare-style logic, called Reverse Hoare Logic, which can be used to reason about state reachability of imperative programs. This enables us to give natural specifications to randomized (deterministic or nondeterministic) algorithms. ...

Edsko de Vries; Vasileios Koutavas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Reversible and Irreversible Finestructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various statistics of temperature profiles are examined in an attempt to distinguish irreversible structures due to mixing from reversible distortions induced by internal wave straining. Even if all the low gradient regions were the result of ...

Yves Desaubies; M. C. Gregg

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Argonne CNM Highlight: Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction Magnetic microdisks Reflection optical microscope image of a dried suspension of the discs prepared via magnetron sputtering and optical lithography. Magnetic spin vortex Model of magnetic-vortex spin distribution in a disc. Users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine, working collaboratively on a user science project with CNM's Nanobio Interfaces Group, have discovered that nanostructured magnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics, activating mechanosensitive ion channels, and advancing potential cancer therapies. Their new report describes an approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs (1-micron

100

Linear Dynamics of the Multiple-Vortex Phenomenon in Tornadoes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reason for existence of two separate unstable modes, previously described by Gall for flows in vortex simulators, is explored. When the energy equation for an unstable disturbance is considered, it is clear that the most unstable wave must be ...

Robert L. Gall

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Baroclinic Transition of a Long-Lived Mesoscale Convective Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The period 5–15 June 2003, during the field phase of the Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) Experiment (BAMEX), was noteworthy for the wide variety of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that occurred. Of particular interest was a ...

Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.; Lance F. Bosart; Christopher A. Davis; Ron McTaggart-Cowan

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reexamining the Vertical Development of Tornadic Vortex Signatures in Supercells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from a hybrid phased-array Doppler radar, the Mobile Weather Radar, 2005 X-band, Phased-Array (MWR-05XP), were used to investigate the vertical development of tornadic vortex signatures (TVSs) during supercell tornadogenesis. Data ...

Michael M. French; Howard B. Bluestein; Ivan PopStefanija; Chad A. Baldi; Robert T. Bluth

103

Inertia–Gravity Waves Generated within a Dipole Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex dipoles provide a simple representation of localized atmospheric jets. Numerical simulations of a synoptic-scale dipole in surface potential temperature are considered in a rotating, stratified fluid with approximately uniform potential ...

Chris Snyder; David J. Muraki; Riwal Plougonven; Fuqing Zhang

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ozone Chemistry during the 2002 Antarctic Vortex Split  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2002, the Antarctic polar vortex was disturbed, and it split into two parts caused by an unusually early stratospheric major warming. This study discusses the chemical consequences of this event using the Chemical Lagrangian Model of ...

Jens-Uwe Grooß; Paul Konopka; Rolf Müller

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Assimilating Vortex Position with an Ensemble Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of hurricane position, which in practice might be available from satellite or radar imagery, can be easily assimilated with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) given an operator that computes the position of the vortex in the background ...

Yongsheng Chen; Chris Snyder

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Spontaneous Imbalance and Hybrid Vortex–Gravity Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After reviewing the background, this article discusses the recently discovered examples of hybrid propagating structures consisting of vortex dipoles and comoving gravity waves undergoing wave capture. It is shown how these examples fall outside ...

Michael E. McIntyre

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Some Aspects of Vortex Structure Related to Tropical Cyclone Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some effect of tropical cyclone structure on the vortex motion are examined in a nondivergent, barotropic numerical model with no basic current. As suggested earlier by DeMaria, the initial maximum wind speed has little effect on the track. ...

Michael Fiorino; Russell L. Elsberry

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MHK Technologies/SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Elemental Energy Technologies Limited ABN 46 128 491 903 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A revolutionary vortex reaction turbine branded the SeaUrchin an advanced third generation marine turbine technology capable of delivering inexpensive small to large scale baseload or predictable electricity by harnessing the kinetic energy of free flowing ocean currents tides and rivers Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 55:15.2

109

On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility  

SciTech Connect

The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

Crooks, Gavin E.

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Closed cycle steam turbine system with liquid vortex pump  

SciTech Connect

A closed cycle steam generating system is described comprising a steam boiler, and a steam turbine includes a vacuum pump of the liquid vortex type for condensing the exhaust steam from the turbine, a feedwater pump being employed for returning the condensate to the boiler. The tank of the vortex pump is maintained filled with water and the pressure in the tank is regulated automatically to maintain a predetermined value thereof.

Brown, K.D.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nonclassicality of vortex Airy beams in the Wigner representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wigner distribution function (WDF) of a vortex Airy beam is calculated analytically. The WDF provides intuitive pictures of the intriguing features of vorticity in phase space. The nonclassical property of the vortex Airy beam and the Airy beam is analyzed through the negative parts of the WDF. The study shows that destructive interference of certain classical waves can mimic nonclassical lights such as those due to quantum effects.

Chen Ruipin [School of Sciences, Zhejiang A and F University, Lin'an, Zhejiang Province 311300 (China); Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ooi, C. H. Raymond [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a source of vortex pinning in high-temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centres in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

Llordes, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A numerical study of steady-state vortex configurations and vortex pinning in type-II superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In part I, a numerical study of the mixed states in a mesoscopic type-II superconducting cylinder is described. Steady-state configurations and transient behavior of the magnetic vortices for various values of the applied magnetic field H are presented. Transitions between different multi-vortex states as H is changed is demonstrated by abrupt changes in vortex configurations and jumps in the B vs H plot. An efficient scheme to determine the equilibrium vortex configuration in a mesoscopic system at any given applied field, not limited to the symmetry of the system, is devised and demonstrated. In part II, a superconducting thin film is subject to a non-uniform magnetic field from a vertical magnetic dipole, consisting of two magnetic monopoles of opposite charges. For a film with constant thickness and with no pins, it has been found that the film carries two pairs of vortex-antivortex in the steady state in the imposed flux range of 2.15 < (Phi)+ < 2.90 (in units of flux quantum) and no vortex at all for (Phi)+ <= 2.15. Transitions from a superconducting state with 3 pairs of vortex-antivortex to one with 2 pairs, where a pair of vortex-antivortex annihilates, have been observed in the pseudo-time sequence. With a perturbation with antidots (holes), vortexantivortex pair has been created for lower magnetic fluxes down to (Phi)+ = 1.3. In the sample of size 16(Xi) x 16(Xi), the attraction force between the vortex and antivortex always dominates over the pinning force, so that they eventually come out of pins, move toward each other, and annihilate each other. The annihilation rate, measured with time taken for the annihilation, is reduced noticeably by the increase of the distance between pins, or the increase in the pin size. A simulation of the magnetic vortex pinning in the sample of size 32(Xi) x 32(Xi) suggests we are likely to achieve pinning of the vortex-antivortex pair with the sample size around this and vortex-antivortex separation of 22(Xi). Using this sample as a template, the maximum density of pinned vortices achievable is calculates to be about 7.6 x 10^14 vortices/m2 for (Xi) =~ 1.6A°.

Kim, Sangbum

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Barotropic Simulation of Large-Scale Mixing in the Antarctic Polar Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theory and observations suggest that the Antarctic polar vortex is relatively isolated from midlatitudes, although others have interpreted the observations to indicate that there is substantial mixing from the interior of the vortex into middle ...

Kenneth P. Bowman

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Stratospheric Sudden Warmings as Self-Tuning Resonances. Part I: Vortex Splitting Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fundamental dynamics of “vortex splitting” stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs), which are known to be predominantly barotropic in nature, are reexamined using an idealized single-layer f-plane model of the polar vortex. The aim is to ...

N. Joss Matthewman; J. G. Esler

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Theory for Mixed Vortex Rossby–Gravity Waves in Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex–Rossby waves (VRWs) and inertial gravity waves (IGWs) have been proposed to explain the propagation of spiral rainbands and the development of dynamical instability in tropical cyclones (TCs). In this study, a theory for mixed vortex–...

Wei Zhong; Da-Lin Zhang; Han-Cheng Lu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Generation and Propagation of Inertia–Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model. Two types of initially balanced and localized jets induced by vortex dipoles are examined here. ...

Shuguang Wang; Fuqing Zhang; Chris Snyder

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Influence of a Strong Bottom Slope on the Evolution of a Surface-Intensified Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the influence of steep bottom topography on the propagation of a vortex in a two-layer quasigeostrophic model. The vortex is intensified in the upper layer and the planetary beta effect is taken into account.

Virginie Thierry; Yves Morel

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Vortex dynamics : a window into the properties of type-II superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIEGO Vortex Dynamics: A Window Into the Properties of Type-DISSERTATION Vortex Dynamics: A Window Into the Propertiesa ?lm deposits on the window through which the laser beam

Taylor, Benjamin Jeremy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Combining the vortex-in-cell and parallel fast multipole methods for efficient domain decomposition simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new combination of vortex-in-cell and parallel fast multipole methods is presented which allows to efficiently simulate, in parallel, unbounded and half-unbounded vortical flows (flows with one flat wall). In the classical vortex-in-cell (VIC) method, ... Keywords: Incompressible flows, Lagrangian methods, Parallel fast multipole method, Particle methods, Unbounded flows, Unsteady flows, Vortex methods, Vortex-in-cell method, Wall-bounded flows

Roger Cocle; Grégoire Winckelmans; Goéric Daeninck

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Data Vortex, an All Optical Path Multicomputer Interconnection Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All optical path interconnection networks employing dense wavelength division multiplexing can provide vast improvements in supercomputer performance. However, the lack of efficient optical buffering requires investigation of new topologies and routing techniques. This paper introduces and evaluates the Data Vortex optical switching architecture which uses cylindrical routing paths as a packet buffering alternative. In addition, the impact of the number of angles on the overall network performance is studied through simulation. Using optimal topology configurations, the Data Vortex is compared to two existing switching architectures—butterfly and omega networks. The three networks are compared in terms of throughput, accepted traffic ratio, and average packet latency. The Data Vortex is shown to exhibit comparable latency and a higher acceptance rate (2x at 50 percent load) than the butterfly and omega topologies.

Cory Hawkins; Benjamin A. Small; D. Scott Wills; Keren Bergman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Identification of vortexes obstructing the dynamo mechanism in laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The magnetohydrodynamic dynamo effect explains the generation of self-sustained magnetic fields in electrically conducting flows, especially in geo- and astrophysical environments. Yet the details of this mechanism are still unknown, e.g., how and to which extent the geometry, the fluid topology, the forcing mechanism and the turbulence can have a negative effect on this process. We report on numerical simulations carried out in spherical geometry, analyzing the predicted velocity flow with the so-called Singular Value Decomposition, a powerful technique that allows us to precisely identify vortexes in the flow which would be difficult to characterize with conventional spectral methods. We then quantify the contribution of these vortexes to the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the system. We identify an axisymmetric vortex, whose rotational direction changes periodically in time, and whose dynamics are decoupled from those of the large scale background flow, is detrimental for the dynamo effect. A compar...

Limone, Angelo; Forest, Cary B; Jenko, Frank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Shock-compressible-vortex interactions: Computing approximate post-shock fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock-compressible-vortex interactions: Computing approximate post-shock fields G.K. O'Reilly and D of the passage of a planar shock through a steady compressible vortex is developed. To compute the approximate post-shock fields, the steady pre-shock vortex is decomposed into a sum of frozen sinusoidal modes

Barr, Al

125

Non-Contact Haptic Feedback Using Air Vortex Rings Sidhant Gupta1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regions of the human body. Author Keywords Non-contact haptic feedback; air vortex rings ACM1 AirWave: Non-Contact Haptic Feedback Using Air Vortex Rings Sidhant Gupta1,2 , Dan Morris1 feedback into such interaction. In this work, we explore the use of air vortex rings for this purpose

Rajamani, Sriram K.

126

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new materials with new switching mechanisms. Uncovered by basic research into the fundamentals of magnetism, one such candidate consists of miniscule magnetic vortices like...

127

Wigner function and entanglement of generalized quantum optical vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the Wigner quasiprobability distribution function of the quantum elliptical vortex (QEV), produced by coupling squeezed coherent states of two modes . The coupling between the two modes is performed by using beam splitter (BS) or a dual channel directional coupler (DCDC). The quantum interference due to the coupling between the two modes promises the generation of controlled entanglement for quantum computation and quantum tomography. We calculate the entanglement of such generalized elliptical vortex formed by quantized radiation field (QEV), using Wigner quasiprobability distribution function for such states. We find a critical squeezing parameter above which the entanglement is less for higher vorticity, which is counter intuitive.

Bandyopadhyay, Abir; Singh, R P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Field reversed ion rings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A. [Laboratory of Plasma Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-reversal symmetry breaking superconductors are exotic phases of matter with fascinating properties, which are, however, encountered rather sparsely. Here we identify the possibility of realizing such a superconducting state that exhibits an $f+is$ pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, we argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. We show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed here in the framework of an $\\epsilon$-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which topologically nontrivial quantum spin Hall insulator. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions.

Bitan Roy; Vladimir Juricic

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

of 1 ) United States Patent 5,158,704 Fulton ,   et al. October 27, 1992 Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Integrated framework for reverse logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although reverse logistics has been disregarded for many years, pressures from both environmental awareness and business sustainability have risen. Reverse logistical activities include return, repair and recycle products. Traditionally, since the information ... Keywords: gent-based system, information transparency, reverse logistics

Heng-Li Yang; Chen-Shu Wang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

On the Onset Vortex of the Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the evolution of the low-level flow over the Arabian Sea during the onset of the summer monsoon. A detailed examination of the onset vortex that forms over the Arabian Sea just prior to the commencement of heavy rains ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; Philip Ardanuy; Y. Ramanathan; Richard Pasch

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Blade-Vortex Interactions in High Pressure Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental and numerical investigation of the transport of streamwise (passage) vortices in high-pressure axial turbines and their interaction with the downstream blade rows was performed. The results indicate large variations in the downstream flow field, notably the development of the secondary flows. The mechanism of passage vortex transport was studied in two differently configured high-pressure turbine stages. In the first configuration, the blades are radially stacked while the second configuration features three-dimensionally stacked high-pressure steam turbine blading. The stator hub passage vortex is chopped by the downstream blade row in a similar way to the wake. The bowed vortex tube near the inlet to the rotor appeared to develop two counter-rotating legs extending back to the leading edges of the adjacent blades. These were termed the suction side leg and the pressure side leg. The two legs of the incoming passage vortex then convect with the respective velocities on the blade surfaces. The results are discussed for the radially stacked turbine and the 3-D turbine separately.

Venkata Siva Prasad Chaluvadi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reversible brazing process  

SciTech Connect

A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

Pierce, Jim D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geomagnetic Reversals: Rates, Timescales, Preferred Paths,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic Reversals: Rates, Timescales, Preferred Paths, Statistical Models and Simulations: Geomagnetic reversals, Reversal rates, Paleointensity, Statistics of Geodynamo September 30, 2001 #12;Abstract Paleomagnetic data on geomagnetic reversals are divided into two general categories: times of occurrence

Constable, Catherine G.

136

Reverse Osmosis Optimization  

SciTech Connect

This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Some conservation issues for the dynamical cores of NWP and climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rationale for designing atmospheric numerical model dynamical cores with certain conservation properties is reviewed. The conceptual difficulties associated with the multiscale nature of realistic atmospheric flow, and its lack of time-reversibility, ... Keywords: Climate simulation, Conservation, Weather prediction

J. Thuburn

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hairpin vortex formation, a case study for unsteady visualization.  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the vortex dynamics of coherent structures in turbulent and transitional boundary layers, we consider direct numerical simulation of the interaction between a flat-plateboundary-layer flow and an isolated hemispherical roughness element. Of principal interest is the evolution of hairpin vortices that form an interlacing pattern in the wake of the hemisphere, lift away from the wall, and are stretched by the shearing action of the boundary layer. Using animations of unsteady three-dimensional representations of this flow, produced by the vtk toolkit and enhanced to operate in a CAVE virtual environment, we identify and study several key features in the evolution of this complex vortex topology not previously observed in other visualization formats.

Fischer, P. F.; Papka, M. E.; Szymanski, M.; Tufo, H. M.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

MHK Technologies/Vortex Oscillation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscillation Oscillation < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Oscillation.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description If cylinder or another body is fixed on a moving bonding this force can set the body or its separate parts into oscillation e g elastic slat If the system of mechanical energy output is organized correctly this device can be considered as generator Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 08:12.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from

140

Compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unique confinement properties of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) are exploited to examine physics and technical issues related to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor. This resistive-coil, steady-state, toroidal device would use a dual-media power cycle driven by a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, and coils) with a power density and mass approaching values characteristic of pressurized-water fission rectors. A 1000-MWe(net) base case is selected from a comprehensive trade-off study to examine technological issues related to operating a high-power-density FPC. After describing the main physics and technology issues for this base-case reactor, directions for future study are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Hagenson, R.L.; Copenhaver, C.; Werley, K.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Annihilation of vortex dipole in an Oblate Bose-Einstein Condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the annihilation of vortex dipole, generated when an obstacle moves through a condensate, in an oblate Bose-Einstein Condensate and the possible reasons for the annihilation. We show that the grey soliton, which results from vortex dipole annihilation, is lower in energy than the vortex dipole. We also investigate the annihilation events numerically and observe annihilation occurs only when the vortex dipole overtake the obstacle. Further more, we find that the adding noise reduces the probability of annihilation events. This may explain the lack of annihilation events in experimental realizations.

Prabhakar, Shashi; Gautam, S; Angom, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vortex formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating deep optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of vortex nucleation and lattice formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating square optical lattice by numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Different dynamical regimes of vortex nucleation are found, depending on the depth and period of the optical lattice. We make an extensive comparison with the experiments by R. A. Williams et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 050404 (2010)], especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotation frequency for the first vortex nucleation and the vortex number as a function of rotation frequency.

Kato, Akira; Nakano, Yuki; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Matsui, Tetsuo [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Numerical Simulation of Flame-Vortex Interactions in Natural and Synthetic Gas Mixtures .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The interactions between laminar premixed flames and counter-rotating vortex pairs in natural and synthetic gas mixtures have been computationally investigated through the use of Direct… (more)

Weiler, Justin D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sea bottom coring apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A marine bottom coring apparatus for drilling into and obtaining core samples from subsea formations is described. It is particularly useful for obtaining core samples from hard rock formations. The apparatus includes a frame having buoyancy, which has sufficient capacity to float the apparatus in the unballast condition. Ballasting means are also connected to the frame and having ballast capacity sufficient to overcome a buoyancy of the buoyancy means. Release means are provided for releasing the ballast at a predetermined time. The frame has the core drilling means attached to it and is supported on the sea bottom, whereby the apparatus may be sunk to the sea bottom by the ballast, a core sample drilled from the subsea formation, and the apparatus floated to the surface upon release of the ballast. (11 claims)

Williamson, T.N.

1969-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Reversibility and Non-reversibility in Stochastic Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical problems with mean field and local type interaction related to stochastic chemical kinetics,are considered. Our main concern various definitions of reversibility, their corollaries (Boltzmann type equations, fluctuations, Onsager relations, etc.) and emergence of irreversibility.

Malyshev, V A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Description of Selected Algorithms and Implementation Details of a Concept-Demonstration Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based system has been developed to demonstrate the feasibility of automating the process of collecting relevant weather data, predicting wake vortex behavior from a data base of aircraft, prescribing safe wake vortex spacing criteria, estimating ...

Hinton David A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cloud-Resolving Simulations of Mesoscale Vortex Intensification and Its Effect on a Serial Mesoscale Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors performed numerical simulations of the 27–28 May 1998 mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) and mesoscale convective system (MCS) to understand how the MCV modulated the convection, and how the convection intensified the vortex. The fifth-...

Christopher A. Davis; Stanley B. Trier

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Information Management for Reverse Logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction In this chapter, we examine how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are being used to support reverse logistics. In this respet, this chapter does not follow a quantitative approach as the rest of the book. Nonetheless, the topics covered in this section outline how ICT systems enable and support the quantitative approaches presented in other chapters of this book. Furthermore, this chapter provides a roadmap to the reader about what aspects of reverse logistics are implemented and what remains to be addressed in the future. Most ICT systems for reverse logistics have been developed to address needs in a specific sector (i.e. decision making on di#erent recovery options of returns, designing a product for optimal end of use recovery, etc.) or to cover the reverse logistics requirements of a particular company. Thus, in our attempt to present this area systematically we need to develop a framework of reference first. For that reason, we go back to the essent

Angelika Kokkinaki; Rob Zuidwijk

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solution of linear problems of the uniform motion of a vortex source in a multilayer fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of solving linear problems of the uniform motion of a vortex source in a multilayer fluid having an arbitrary finite number of layers is proposed. As an example, the problem of the motion of a vortex source of given intensity in a three-layer fluid is solved. Formulas for the complex velocities and hydrodynamic reactions are obtained.

Gorlov, S.I.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Generalized London free energy for high-Tc vortex lattices Ian Affleck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized London free energy for high-Tc vortex lattices Ian Affleck Department of Physics-1829 97 50402-4 The London free energy provides a very simple way of studying the vortex lattice that this effect can arise from additional quartic derivative terms in the Ginzburg-Landau GL free energy4­7 or

Franz, Marcel

151

Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A) #12;2 COMBUSTION IN MESO-SCALE VORTEX CHAMBERS Ming-hsun Wu, Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A with the chemical energy varying from 25 to 174W. For the largest combustion volume, hydrogen and hydrocarbons

Yang, Vigor

152

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

On a Graphics Hardware-Based Vortex Detection and Visualization System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a graphics hardware-based system for interactive denoising, vortex detection, and visualization of vector data. No intermediate results need to be read back by the application once the vector field has been loaded onto the graphics adapter. ... Keywords: Flow visualization, Graphics hardware, Vortex detection

S. Stegmaier; T. Ertl

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Are all reversible computations tidy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has long been known that to minimise the heat emitted by a deterministic computer during it's operation it is necessary to make the computation act in a logically reversible manner\\cite{Lan61}. Such logically reversible operations require a number of auxiliary bits to be stored, maintaining a history of the computation, and which allows the initial state to be reconstructed by running the computation in reverse. These auxiliary bits are wasteful of resources and may require a dissipation of energy for them to be reused. A simple procedure due to Bennett\\cite{Ben73} allows these auxiliary bits to be "tidied", without dissipating energy, on a classical computer. All reversible classical computations can be made tidy in this way. However, this procedure depends upon a classical operation ("cloning") that cannot be generalised to quantum computers\\cite{WZ82}. Quantum computations must be logically reversible, and therefore produce auxiliary qbits during their operation. We show that there are classes of quantum computation for which Bennett's procedure cannot be implemented. For some of these computations there may exist another method for which the computation may be "tidied". However, we also show there are quantum computations for which there is no possible method for tidying the auxiliary qbits. Not all reversible quantum computations can be made "tidy". This represents a fundamental additional energy burden to quantum computations. This paper extends results in \\cite{Mar01}.

O. J. E. Maroney

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Polarization radiation of vortex electrons with large orbital angular momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex electrons, - freely propagating electrons whose wavefunction has helical wavefronts, - could become a novel tool in the physics of electromagnetic radiation. They carry a non-zero intrinsic orbital angular momentum (OAM) $\\ell$ with respect to the propagation axis and, for \\ell \\gg 1, a large OAM-induced magnetic moment, \\mu ~ \\ell \\mu_B (\\mu_B is the Bohr magneton), which influences the radiation of electromagnetic waves. Here, we consider in detail the OAM-induced effects by such electrons in two forms of polarization radiation, namely in Cherenkov radiation and transition radiation. Thanks to the large \\ell, we can neglect quantum or spin-induced effects, which are of the order of \\hbar \\omega/E_e \\ll 1, but retain the magnetic moment contribution \\ell \\hbar \\omega/E_e \\lesssim 1, which makes the quasiclassical approach to polarization radiation applicable. We discuss the magnetic moment contribution to polarization radiation, which has never been experimentally observed, and study how its visibility depends on the kinematical parameters and the medium permittivity. In particular, it is shown that this contribution can, in principle, be detected in azimuthally non-symmetrical problems, for example when vortex electrons obliquely cross a metallic screen (transition radiation) or move nearby it (diffraction radiation). We predict a left-right angular asymmetry of the transition radiation (in the plane where the charge radiation distributions would stay symmetric), which appears due to an effective interference between the charge radiation field and the magnetic moment one. Numerical values of this asymmetry for vortex electrons with E_e = 300keV and \\ell = O(100-1000) are O(0.1-1%), and we argue that this effect could be detected with existing technology. The finite conductivity of the target and frequency dispersion play the crucial roles in these predictions.

Igor P. Ivanov; Dmitry V. Karlovets

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Wigner distribution function and entanglement of generalized quantum optical vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the Wigner (quasi)probability distribution function of the quantum optical elliptical vortex (QEV), generated by coupling squeezed vacuum states of two modes. The coupling between the two modes is performed by using beam splitter (BS) or a dual channel directional coupler (DCDC). The quantum interference due to the coupling between the two modes promises the generation of controlled entanglement for quantum computation and quantum tomography. We compute the entanglement of such QEV formed by non-classical radiation field, using Wigner function. We report a critical squeezing parameter above which the entanglement is less for higher vorticity, which is counter intuitive.

Abir Bandyopadhyay; Shashi Prabhakar; R. P. Singh

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Oxygen to the core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-01 1-01 For immediate release: 01/10/2013 | NR-13-01-01 Oxygen to the core Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly An artist's conception of Earth's inner and outer core. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- An international collaboration including researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has discovered that the Earth's core formed under more oxidizing conditions than previously proposed. Through a series of laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at high pressure (350,000 to 700,000 atmospheres of pressure) and temperatures (5,120 to 7,460 degrees Fahrenheit), the team demonstrated that the depletion of siderophile (also known as "iron loving") elements can be produced by core formation under more oxidizing conditions than earlier

158

Curing of Compacted Cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...dry for 1 min. Add water and mull for 1 min. Add oil and mull for 4 min. These materials are mixed in a muller as follows: Sand (by weight), 95.80% Cereal flour, 1.01% Core oil, 1.17% Water, 1.86% Bentonite, 0.16% Oil-sand mixtures are used for cores in sand molds, and by varying their

159

Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

Bieg, L.F.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations which utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

Bieg, L.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MCNP LWR Core Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Emergency core cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Heat Transfer Enhancement in Separated and Vortex Flows  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the research performance done at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the University of Minnesota on heat transfer and energy separation in separated and vortex flow supported by DOE in the period September 1, 1998--August 31, 2003. Unsteady and complicated flow structures in separated or vortex flows are the main reason for a poor understanding of heat transfer under such conditions. The research from the University of Minnesota focused on the following important aspects of understanding such flows: (1) Heat/mass transfer from a circular cylinder; (2) study of energy separation and heat transfer in free jet flows and shear layers; and (3) study of energy separation on the surface and in the wake of a cylinder in crossflow. The current study used three different experimental setups to accomplish these goals. A wind tunnel and a liquid tunnel using water and mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, is used for the study of prandtl number effect with uniform heat flux from the circular cylinder. A high velocity air jet is used to study energy separation in free jets. A high speed wind tunnel, same as used for the first part, is utilized for energy separation effects on the surface and in the wake of the circular cylinder. The final outcome of this study is a substantial advancement in this research area.

Richard J. Goldstein

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Recent developments in pressure coring  

SciTech Connect

The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

McFall, A. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Dissipative dynamics of vortex arrays in trapped Bose-condensed gases: neutron stars physics on $?$K scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theory of dissipative dynamics of large vortex arrays in trapped Bose-condensed gases. We show that in a static trap the interaction of the vortex array with thermal excitations leads to a non-exponential decay of the vortex structure, and the characteristic lifetime depends on the initial density of vortices. Drawing an analogy with physics of pulsar glitches, we propose an experiment which employs the heating of the thermal cloud in the course of the decay of the vortex array as a tool for a non-destructive study of the vortex dynamics.

P. O. Fedichev; A. E. Muryshev

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reverse skyline search in uncertain databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reverse skyline queries over uncertain databases have many important applications such as sensor data monitoring and business planning. Due to the wide existence of uncertainty in many real-world data, answering reverse skyline queries accurately and ... Keywords: Uncertain database, bichromatic reverse skyline, monochromatic reverse skyline

Xiang Lian; Lei Chen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

2000 BTS Core Databook  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 BTS CORE DATABOOK 0 BTS CORE DATABOOK 2000 BTS CORE DATABOOK OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY * U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This version is dated: August 7, 2000 DISCLAIMER This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy. This document was also designed to be occasionally updated and, therefore, this copy may not reflect the most current version. This document was prepared as account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that

168

AO Core Competency Worksheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AO Core Competency Worksheet AO Core Competency Worksheet 1 DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Key Cyber Security Role: Authorizing Official (AO) Role Definition: The AO is the Senior DOE Management Federal official with the authority to formally assume responsibility and be held fully accountable for operating an information system at an acceptable level of risk. Competency Area: Incident Management Functional Requirement: Manage Competency Definition: Refers to the knowledge and understanding of the processes and procedures required to prevent, detect, investigate, contain, eradicate, and recover from incidents that impact the organizational mission as directed by the DOE Cyber Incident Response Capability (CIRC). Behavioral Outcome: Individuals fulfilling the role of AO will have a working knowledge of policies

169

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

170

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of Blade Vortex Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of parallel ics. Blade Vortex Interaction (BV1) with an active Trailing Edge Flap (TEF) is presented. The two-dimensional 1111-steady problem is solved by a higher order upwind Euler method for an unstructured mesh. A local mesh adaptation technique is employed to maintain vortex strength by capturing the details of the convecting vortex. The computational technique does not require any assumption on the vortex structure, and, therefore is suitable for close interaction of the vortex and the blade. The adaptive method is based on cell subdivisions and allows for frequent mesh adaptation due to its fast speed. To demonstrate the reduction of numerical dissipation of a vortex via mesh adaptation, we first consider a simple case with a convecting vortex in freestream. Finally, we apply tile techniques to examine the effectiveness of an active TEF on BVI in reducing the pressure perturbations at the airfoil leading edge. For the boundary motion due to TEF deployment, a local recessing procedure is utilized to maintain mesh quality by avoiding distorted mesh elements near the flap.

Kim, Kyu-Sup

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

Spinrad, R.J.

1961-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hopper Multi-Core FAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Q. How is Hopper Different than Franklin? A. The new Hopper Phase-II system will have 24 cores per node. Franklin had only four. Q. What else is different? A. There is less memory per core. Hopper has 1.3 GB / core rather than 2.0 GB / core on Franklin. A code using MPI on Hopper may be more likely to exhaust available memory, causing an error. Additionally, Hopper's memory hierarchy is "deeper" and more non-uniform than Franklin's and this can have a big impact on performance in certain cases. Hopper's 24 cores per node are implemented on two sockets, each containing two six-core dies (see the image below). Each of the six-core dies has direct access to one-quarter of the node's total memory. Thus,

173

Combination pipe rupture mitigator and in-vessel core catcher  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device which mitigates against the effects of a failed coolant loop in a nuclear reactor by restricting the outflow of coolant from the reactor through the failed loop and by retaining any particulated debris from a molten core which may result from coolant loss or other cause. The device reduces the reverse pressure drop through the failed loop by limiting the access of coolant in the reactor to the inlet of the failed loop. The device also spreads any particulated core debris over a large area to promote cooling.

Tilbrook, Roger W. (Monroeville, PA); Markowski, Franz J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

SECA Core Technology Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 27 - January 27 - 28, 2005 Workshop Peer Review Rating Results Summary Donald Collins SECA Core January 2005 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,3-10-05 2 of 21 Review Process Summary * Core Technology Project Presentations - Project Objectives & Results - Non-proprietary Information - Industry, National Lab & University Participation * Verbal & Written Constructive Comments - Written Comments on Peer Review Forms - Industry Verbal Feedback at Workshop * Core Participant Review & Reply to Comments - Reply to Comment Issues * DOE NETL Redirect Projects as Needed M a t e r i a l s C o n t r o l s & D i a g n o s t i c s P o w e r E le c t r o n ic s F u e l P r o c e s s i n g Manufacturing M o d e li n g & S im u la ti o n SECA Core January 2005 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,3-10-05 3 of 21 Peer Review Questions

175

SECA Core Technology Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 12 - May 12 - 13, 2004 Workshop Peer Review Rating Results Summary Donald Collins SECA Core May 2004 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,5-21-04 2 of 16 Review Process Summary * Core Technology Project Presentations - Project Objectives & Results - Non-proprietary Information - Industry, National Lab & University Participation * Verbal & Written Constructive Comments - Written Comments on Peer Review Forms - Industry Verbal Feedback at Workshop * Core Participant Review & Reply to Comments - Reply to Comment Issues * DOE NETL Redirect Projects as Needed M a t e r i a l s C o n t r o l s & D i a g n o s t i c s P o w e r E le c t r o n ic s F u e l P r o c e s s i n g Manufacturing M o d e li n g & S im u la ti o n SECA Core May 2004 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,5-21-04 3 of 16 Peer Review Questions

176

Reversible Simulations of Elastic Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consider a system of N identical hard spherical particles moving in a d-dimensional box and undergoing elastic, possibly multi-particle, collisions. We develop a new algorithm that recovers the pre-collision state from the post-collision state of the system, across a series of consecutive collisions, \\textit{with essentially no memory overhead}. The challenge in achieving reversibility for an n-particle collision (where, in general, nN) arises from the presence of nd-d-1 degrees of freedom (arbitrary angles) during each collision, as well as from the complex geometrical constraints placed on the colliding particles. To reverse the collisions in a traditional simulation setting, all of the particular realizations of these degrees of freedom (angles) during the forward simulation must be tracked. This requires memory proportional to the number of collisions, which grows very fast with N and d, thereby severely limiting the \\textit{de facto} applicability of the scheme. This limitation is addressed here by first performing a pseudo-randomization of angles, which ensures determinism in the reverse path for any values of n and d. To address the more difficult problem of geometrical and dynamic constraints, a new approach is developed which correctly samples the constrained phase space. Upon combining the pseudo-randomization with correct phase space sampling, perfect reversibility of collisions is achieved, as illustrated for nn=2, d=3. This result enables, for the first time, reversible simulations of elastic collisions with essentially zero memory accumulation. In principle, the approach presented here could be generalized to larger values of n, which would be of definite interest for molecular dynamics simulations at high densities.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Protopopescu, Vladimir A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Axial dipolar dynamo action in the Taylor-Green vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a numerical study of the magnetic field generated by the Taylor-Green vortex. We show that periodic boundary conditions can be used to mimic realistic boundary conditions by prescribing the symmetries of the velocity and magnetic fields. This gives insight in some problems of central interest for dynamos: the possible effect of velocity fluctuations on the dynamo threshold, the role of boundary conditions on the threshold and on the geometry of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action. In particular, we show that an axial dipolar dynamo similar to the one observed in a recent experiment can be obtained with an appropriate choice of the symmetries of the magnetic field. The nonlinear saturation is studied and a simple model explaining the magnetic Prandtl number dependence of the super/sub critical nature of the dynamo transition is given.

Giorgio Krstulovic; Gentien Thorner; Julien-Piera Vest; Stephan Fauve; Marc Brachet

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Vortex flow in the technology of radiation wave cracking (RWC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article examines the theory of vortex flows in relation to the processes occurring in the radiation-wave cracking of crude oil, when the crude oil is sprayed into the gas stream in the form of a mist and then is fed into the reactor, where it is treated by the accelerated electrons and the UHF radiation. The output of this process are the products with the specified parameters (high-octane petroleum products). This process operates at the ambient pressure and temperature, which makes the process safer for industrial purposes. Besides the process itself, the authors described the equipment used in this process, as well as the parameters of the optimal process.

L. A. Tsoy; V. N. Kolushov; A. G. Komarov; A. N. Tsoy

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Vortex flow in the technology of radiation wave cracking (RWC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article examines the theory of vortex flows in relation to the processes occurring in the radiation-wave cracking of crude oil, when the crude oil is sprayed into the gas stream in the form of a mist and then is fed into the reactor, where it is treated by the accelerated electrons and the UHF radiation. The output of this process are the products with the specified parameters (high-octane petroleum products). This process operates at the ambient pressure and temperature, which makes the process safer for industrial purposes. Besides the process itself, the authors described the equipment used in this process, as well as the parameters of the optimal process.

Tsoy, L A; Komarov, A G; Tsoy, A N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy harvesting using vortex-induced vibrations of tensioned cables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of energy harvesting systems based on fluid/structure interactions is part of the global search for innovative tools to produce renewable energy. In this paper, the possibility to harvest energy from a flow using vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a tensioned flexible cable is analyzed. The fluid loading on the vibrating solid and resulting dynamics are computed using an appropriate wake-oscillator model, allowing one to perform a systematic parametric study of the efficiency. The generic case of an elastically-mounted rigid cylinder is first investigated, before considering an infinite cable with two different types of energy harvesting : a uniformly spanwise distributed harvesting and then a periodic distribution of discrete harvesting devices. The maximum harvesting efficiency is of the same order for each configuration and is always reached when the solid body and its wake are in a frequency lock-in state.

Grouthier, Clement; de Langre, Emmanuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Kinematics of a Midlatitude, Continental Mesoscale Convective System and Its Mesoscale Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a unique, scale-discriminating study of the environment-relative circulations within a mesoscale convective system (MCS) and mesoscale convective vortex (MCV). The MCS, a leading convective line and trailing stratiform region ...

Jason C. Knievel; Richard H. Johnson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Wave–Current Interaction: A Comparison of Radiation-Stress and Vortex-Force Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vortex-force representation of the wave-averaged effects on currents is compared to the radiation-stress representation in a scaling regime appropriate to coastal and shelf waters. Three-dimensional and vertically integrated expressions for ...

E. M. Lane; J. M. Restrepo; J. C. McWilliams

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evidence against an Antarctic Stratospheric Vortex Split during the Periods of Pre-IGY Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historic upper-air observations from Antarctica are inspected to investigate the uniqueness of the vortex split in the Antarctic spring of 2002. No comprehensive meteorological observations are available prior to the International Geophysical ...

Barbara Naujokat; Howard K. Roscoe

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Midtropospheric Anticyclonic Vortex Street Associated with a Cloud Band near a Cold Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics and formation mechanism of an anticyclonic vortex street of meso-? scale, which appeared near a cold front around the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, on 11 April 1995, were examined by an analysis of observational data, a numerical ...

Eizi Toyoda; Hiroshi Niino; Kazuhisa Tsuboki; Ryuji Kimura; Masanori Yoshizaki

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Vortex Ring Dyons of the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an axially symmetric vortex ring dyons solutions of the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. These vortex rings carry electric charges that are determined by a parameter, -1{<=}{eta}{<=}1. They possess vanishing magnetic charge and are located at a ring centered around the z-axis where the Higgs field vanishes. These stationary vortex ring dyon solutions possess finite energy but they do not satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations. In the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) limit where the Higgs field potential is zero, the time component of the gauge field is parallel to the Higgs field in isospace. The total energy, net electric charge and diameter of the vortex ring increase exponentially to infinity when {eta} approaches {+-}1. On the contrary, when {lambda} = 1, all these three values reach their critical value as {eta} approaches {+-}1.

Lim, Kok-Geng; Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia 11800 USM Penang (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Splitting of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex in the Southern Hemisphere, September 2002: Dynamical Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polar vortex of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) split dramatically during September 2002. The large-scale dynamical effects were manifest throughout the stratosphere and upper troposphere, corresponding to two distinct cyclonic centers in the ...

Andrew J. Charlton; Alan O’Neill; William A. Lahoz; Paul Berrisford

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ensemble Forecasting of Tropical Cyclone Motion Using a Barotropic Model. Part II: Perturbations of the Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, the technique of ensemble forecasting is applied to the problem of tropical cyclone motion prediction by perturbing the environmental flow. In this part, the focus is shifted to perturbation of the vortex structure. The ...

Kevin K. W. Cheung; Johnny C. L. Chan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Jovian Dynamics. Part II: The Genesis and Equilibration of Vortex Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To extend studies of the dynamics of thin atmospheric layers, the generation and equilibration of multiple anticyclonic vortex sets associated with long solitary baroclinic Rossby waves are examined numerically using a primitive equation model ...

G. P. Williams

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Structure of a Midtropospheric Vortex Induced by a Mesoscale Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 9 June 1988 a mesoscale (200-km diameter) convectively generated vortex (MCV) passed through the Colorado wind-profiling network. The generating convective system, which was too small to meet Maddox’s mesoscale convective complex criteria, ...

Diana L. Bartels; John M. Brown; Edward I. Tollerud

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Vortex-Based Perspective of Eastern Pacific Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone formation over the eastern Pacific during 2005 and 2006 was examined using primarily global operational analyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. This paper represents a “vortex view” of genesis, adding to ...

Christopher Davis; Chris Snyder; Anthony C. Didlake Jr.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Observations of a Storm Containing Misocyclones, Downbursts, and Horizontal Vortex Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 30 June 1982, a multicellular storm in Colorado produced four downbursts, three misocyclones, a miso-anticyclone, and horizontal vortex circulations within a relatively small area of the storm. Weather events associated with this storm ...

Cathy J. Kessinger; David B. Parsons; James W. Wilson

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Role of Vortex and Environment Errors in Genesis Forecasts of Hurricanes Danielle and Karl (2010)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble of Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) forecasts initialized from a cycling ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) system is used to evaluate the sensitivity of Hurricanes Danielle and Karl’s (2010) genesis forecasts to vortex and ...

Ryan D. Torn; David Cook

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Garden City, Kansas, Storm during VORTEX 95. Part II: The Wall Cloud and Tornado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 16 May 1995, a supercell storm produced an F1 tornado near Garden City, Kansas, during VORTEX (Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment). This event provided the first opportunity to synthesize data collected by a new ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; Chinghwang Liu

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Effect of Tropospheric Jet Latitude on Coupling between the Stratospheric Polar Vortex and the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dry general circulation model is used to investigate how coupling between the stratospheric polar vortex and the extratropical tropospheric circulation depends on the latitude of the tropospheric jet. The tropospheric response to an identical ...

Chaim I. Garfinkel; Darryn W. Waugh; Edwin P. Gerber

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Role of Multiple Vortex Tornado Structure in Causing Storm Researcher Fatalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large and violent tornado/multiple vortex mesocyclone (MVMC) / tornado tracked east and northeastward near El Reno, Oklahoma on 31-May-2013, causing eight fatalities, including storm-chasers/researchers attempting to deploy in-situ instrumentation. Sub-...

Joshua Wurman; Karen Kosiba; Paul Robinson; Tim Marshall

196

A Concentrated Outbreak of Tornadoes, Downbursts and Microbursts, and Implications Regarding Vortex Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remarkable case of severe weather occurred near Springfield, Illinois on 6 August 1977. Aerial and ground surveys revealed that 17 cyclonic vortices an anticyclonic vortex, 10 downbursts and 19 microbursts occurred in a limited (20 km × 40 km) ...

Gregory S. Forbes; Roger M. Wakimoto

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mesoscale Convective Vortex Formation in a Weakly Sheared Moist Neutral Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idealized simulations of a diabatic Rossby vortex (DRV) in an initially moist neutral baroclinic environment are performed using the fifth-generation National Center for Atmospheric Research–Pennsylvania State University (NCAR–PSU) Mesoscale ...

Robert J. Conzemius; Richard W. Moore; Michael T. Montgomery; Christopher A. Davis

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Intense Vortex Motion on the Beta Plane: Development of the Beta Gyres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical theory is presented for the self-induced translation of an intense vortex relative to a uniform background flow on the ? plane. The equivalent barotropic approximation is used to formulate the initial value problem within a polar ...

Georgi G. Sutyrin; Glenn R. Flierl

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Interaction of a Baroclinic Vortex with Background Shear: Application to Hurricane Movement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most extant studies of tropical cyclone movement consider a barotropic vortex on a ? plane. However, observations have shown that real tropical cyclones are strongly baroclinic, with broad anticyclones aloft. Also, the distribution of the large-...

Chun-Chieh Wu; Kerry A. Emanuel

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Uses and Limitations of Contour Advection as a Technique for Examining Arctic Vortex Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A contour advection technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), is applied to the Northern Hemisphere Arctic vortex during several dynamically active periods in midwinter and at several different levels in the stratosphere. The ability of ...

Michael N. Baker; Derek M. Cunnold

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Verification of RUC 0–1-h Forecasts and SPC Mesoscale Analyses Using VORTEX2 Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses radiosonde observations obtained during the second phase of the Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2) to verify base-state variables and severe-weather-related parameters calculated from Rapid ...

Michael C. Coniglio

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Gradient Genesis of Stratospheric Trace Species in the Subtropics and around the Polar Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms that control the formation and decay of meridional gradients in stratospheric trace species in the subtropics and around the polar vortex are investigated using a gradient genesis equation that uses mass-weighted isentropic zonal ...

Kazuyuki Miyazaki; Toshiki Iwasaki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Mesoscale Vortex Couplet Observed in the Trailing Anvil of a Multicellular Convective Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations collected during the Oklahoma–Kansas PRE-STORM experiment are used to document the evolution and structure of a mesoscale vortex couplet that developed in the mesoscale convective system that occurred on 16–17 June 1985. The ...

Johannes Verlinde; William R. Cotton

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Parametric Representation of the Primary Hurricane Vortex. Part II: A New Family of Sectionally Continuous Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For applications such as windstorm underwriting or storm-surge forecasting, hurricane wind profiles are often approximated by continuous functions that are zero at the vortex center, increase to a maximum in the eyewall, and then decrease ...

H. E. Willoughby; R. W. R. Darling; M. E. Rahn

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Influence of Balanced Motions on Heavy Precipitation within a Long-Lived Convectively Generated Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forcing of heavy precipitation within a long-lived convectively generated mesoscale vortex (MCV) is investigated with the aid of diagnoses from Rapid Update Cycle gridded analyses. Organized convection within the MCV followed a distinct ...

Stanley B. Trier; Christopher A. Davis

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Source of Gravity Waves within a Vortex-Dipole Jet Revealed by a Linear Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops a linear numerical model to address the source mechanism of the gravity waves generated within a vortex dipole simulated in a fully nonlinear nonhydrostatic mesoscale model. The background flow for this linear model is ...

Shuguang Wang; Fuqing Zhang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Submonthly Polar Vortex Variability and Stratosphere–Troposphere Coupling in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal component analysis is performed to characterize intraseasonal variability in the boreal stratospheric polar vortex. In contrast to previous studies, the current analysis examines daily zonal-mean variability within a limited spatial ...

Robert X. Black; Brent A. McDaniel

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A New Parametric Model of Vortex Tangential-Wind Profiles: Development, Testing, and Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new parametric model of vortex tangential-wind profiles is presented that is primarily designed to depict realistic-looking tangential wind profiles such as those in intense atmospheric vortices arising in dust devils, waterspouts, tornadoes, ...

Vincent T. Wood; Luther W. White

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Maximum Likelihood Estimates of Vortex Parameters from Simulated Coherent Doppler Lidar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of pulsed coherent Doppler lidar in estimating aircraft trailing wake vortices by scanning across the aircraft flight track is evaluated using Monte Carlo lidar simulations of a simple vortex pair in both a nonturbulent and ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An Observational Study of the Final Breakdown of the Southern Hemisphere Stratospheric Vortex in 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Southern Hemisphere final warming occurred early, following an unusually active winter and the first recorded major warming in the Antarctic. The breakdown of the stratospheric polar vortex in October and November 2002 is examined using ...

Yvan J. Orsolini; Cora E. Randall; Gloria L. Manney; Douglas R. Allen

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Subtropical Oceanic Mesoscale Convective Vortex Observed during SoWMEX/TiMREX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines a subtropical oceanic mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) that occurred from 1800 UTC 4 June to 1200 UTC 6 June 2008 during intensive observing period (IOP) 6 of the Southwest Monsoon Experiment (SoWMEX) and the Terrain-...

Hsiao-Wei Lai; Christopher A. Davis; Ben Jong-Dao Jou

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control  

SciTech Connect

Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

Bernitsas, Michael M. (Saline, MI); Raghavan, Kamaldev (Houston, TX)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Core Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Holes Core Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Core Holes Details Activities (8) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core holes are drilled to identify lithology and mineralization Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify fracture networks or faults Hydrological: Thermal: Thermal conductivity measurements can be done on retrieved samples. Dictionary.png Core Holes: A core hole is a well that is drilled using a hallow drill bit coated with synthetic diamonds for the purposes of extracting whole rock samples from

214

Vortex Lattice Structures of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a Rotating Lattice Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study vortex lattice structures of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating lattice potential by numerically solving the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. By rotating the lattice potential, we observe the transition from the Abrikosov vortex lattice to the pinned lattice. We investigate the transition of the vortex lattice structure by changing conditions such as angular velocity, intensity, and lattice constant of the rotating lattice potential. PACS numbers: 03.75.Lm, 03.75.Kk Quantized vortices are one of the most characteristic manifestations of superfluidity associated with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in atomic gases. By rotating anisotropic trap potentials, several experimental groups observed formation of triangular Abrikosov lattices of vortices in rotating BECs 1,2,3. Microscopic mechanism of the vortex lattice formation has been extensively studied both analytically and numerically using the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation for the condensate wavefunction 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11. More recently, the vortex phase diagrams of a BEC in rotating lattice potentials have attracted theoretical attention, since one expects vortex pinning and structural phase transition of vortex lattice structures 12,13,14. Recently, a rotating lattice has been experimentally realized at JILA, makinig use of a laser beam passing through a rotating mask 12. Stimulated by the recent JILA experiment, in this paper, we study vortex lattice structures of a BEC in a rotating triangular lattice potential created by blue-detuned laser beams. We numerically solve the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equa-T. Sato, T. Ishiyama and T. Nikuni Fig. 1. Density profile (a) and Structure factor profile (b) of BEC in the lattice potential. The lattice potential geometry is triangular lattice at a/aho = 2.2 and ?/aho = 0.65. tion in a frame rotationg with anguler velocity ?: (i ? ?)¯h ??(r,t)

Toshihiro Sato; Tomohiko Ishiyama; Tetsuro Nikuni

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Core Measure Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Core Measure Core Measure Results FY 07 Results FY 08 Results FY 09 Results FY 10 Target FY 10 Customer Perspective: Customer Satisfaction: -Timeliness NM 81 NM NM NM -Quality NM 90 NM NM NM Effective Service Partnership: -Extent of Customer Satisfaction with the responsiveness, etc. NM 87 NM NM NM Internal Business Perspective: Acquisition Excellence: -Extent to which internal quality control systems are effective 86 87 84 87 88 Most Effective Use of Contracting Approaches to Maximize Efficiency and Cost Effectiveness: Use of Electronic Commerce: - % of delivery & purchase orders issued electronically as a % of total simplified actions 70 72 89 99 100 - % of new competitive transactions > $100K conducted through EC 70 72 91 100 95 Performance Based Service Contracts: - PBSCs awarded as a % of eligible new

216

Critical CRBR core pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

Ju, F.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Smoke sheets for graph-structured vortex filaments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke is one of the core phenomena which fluid simulation techniques in computer graphics have attempted to capture. It is both well understood mathematically and important in lending realism to computer generated effects. In an attempt to overcome the ...

Alfred Barnat; Nancy S. Pollard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Toroidal core winder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

Potthoff, Clifford M. (Livermore, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Reverse engineering of integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

Chisholm, Gregory H. (Shorewood, IL); Eckmann, Steven T. (Colorado Springs, CO); Lain, Christopher M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Veroff, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

222

Near-Surface Vortex Structure in a Tornado and in a Sub-Tornado-Strength, Convective-Storm Vortex Observed by a Mobile, W-Band Radar During VORTEX2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the VORTEX2 field campaign, a very high-resolution, mobile, W-band Doppler radar collected near-surface (?200 m AGL) observations in an EF-0 tornado near Tribune, Kansas on 25 May 2010 and in sub-tornado-strength vortices near Prospect ...

Robin L. Tanamachi; Howard B. Bluestein; Ming Xue; Wen-Chau Lee; Krzysztof A. Orzel; Stephen J. Frasier; Roger M. Wakimoto

223

Core Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis Core Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Core Analysis Details Activities (41) Areas (28) Regions (2) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core analysis is done to define lithology. Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Hydrological: Thermal: Thermal conductivity can be measured from core samples. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 2,000.00200,000 centUSD 2 kUSD 0.002 MUSD 2.0e-6 TUSD / 30 foot core Median Estimate (USD): 10,000.001,000,000 centUSD

224

Optimization Online - Recruiting Suppliers for Reverse Production ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2007 ... Recruiting Suppliers for Reverse Production Systems: an MDP Heuristics Approach. Wuthichai Wongthatsanekorn(wwongtha ***at*** ...

225

2001 BTS Core Databook  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 BTS CORE 1 BTS CORE DATABOOK OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This version is dated: November 30, 2001 REVISED data tables on the web site that have been changed since November 30, 2001 include tables: 5.6.7 5.6.8 5.6.9 5.10.8 5.10.9 5.10.10 5.10.11 5.10.12 5.10.13 5.10.14 5.10.15 5.10.16 5.10.17 5.10.18 NEW data tables on the web site that have been added since July 13, 2001 include tables: 5.6.14 5.9.7 5.9.8 5.9.9 REVISED data tables on the web site that have been changed since July 13, 2001 include tables: 4.1.1 4.1.2 4.1.4 4.1.5 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.9 4.3.1 4.3.2 4.3.3 4.3.4 4.5.1 4.5.2 4.5.3 5.1.2 5.3.1 5.8.1 5.10.1 6.2.4 7.1.8 7.3.3 These tables are not included in this version of the 2001 BTS Core Databook. DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER

226

Partial core pulse transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light-weight partial-core pule transformer is provided for generating high voltage output pulses with low distortion. The transformer includes sets of ferrite bars arranged so as to extend longitudinally along the inside and outside surfaces of a high frequency cylindrical coil winding-pair. The ferrite bars are arranged in pairs with the bars of each pair being located on opposite sides of winding-pair. The bars are preferably disposed in a radially symmetric arrangement around the winding-pair, and each has a length at least equal to the width of the winding-pair.

Lawson, R.N.; Rohwein, G.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Core-tube data logger  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

NETL: Carbon Storage - Core R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core R&D Carbon Storage Core R&D The Core Research and Development (Core R&D) focuses on developing new carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to a pre-commercial...

229

OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

Griffin, O. M.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

230

HTTF Core Stress Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Structure and Evolution of the Large-Scale Flow and an Embedded Upper-Tropospheric Cyclonic Vortex over Northeast Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal structure and evolution of large-scale flow and an embedded synoptic-scale cyclonic vortex over northeast Brazil as separate systems and dynamical interaction between them are studied at 200 hPa. A quasi-stationary cyclonic vortex with ...

S. K. Mishra; V. B. Rao; M. A. Gan

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Evidence of small-scale magnetic concentrations dragged by vortex motion of solar photospheric plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex-type motions have been measured by tracking bright points in high-resolution observations of the solar photosphere. These small-scale motions are thought to be determinant in the evolution of magnetic footpoints and their interaction with plasma and therefore likely to play a role in heating the upper solar atmosphere by twisting magnetic flux tubes. We report the observation of magnetic concentrations being dragged towards the center of a convective vortex motion in the solar photosphere from high-resolution ground-based and space-borne data. We describe this event by analyzing a series of images at different solar atmospheric layers. By computing horizontal proper motions, we detect a vortex whose center appears to be the draining point for the magnetic concentrations detected in magnetograms and well-correlated with the locations of bright points seen in G-band and CN images.

Balmaceda, L; Palacios, J; Cabello, I; Domingo, V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Mitigation of Wind Turbine/Vortex Interaction Using Disturbance Accommodating Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines, a competitive source of emission-free electricity, are being designed with diameters and hub heights approaching 100 m, to further reduce the cost of the energy they produce. At this height above the ground, the wind turbine is exposed to atmospheric phenomena such as low-level jets, gravity waves, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which are not currently modeled in wind turbine design codes. These atmospheric phenomena can generate coherent turbulence that causes high cyclic loads on wind turbine blades. These fluctuating loads lead to fatigue damage accumulation and blade lifetime reduction. Advanced control was used to mitigate vortex-induced blade cyclic loading. A full-state feedback controller that incorporates more detailed vortex inputs achieved significantly greater blade load reduction. Blade loads attributed to vortex passage, then, can be reduced through advanced control, and further reductions appear feasible.

Hand, M. M.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

Dickinson, Robert J. (Shaler Township, Allegheny County, PA); Wetherill, Todd M. (Lower Burrell, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electron trapping by a current vortex F. Bentosela, a;b P. Exner, c;d and V.A. Zagrebnov a;b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the magnetic field due to an electric current forming a localized rotationally symmetric vortex. We show simpler example involves a Pauli electron interacting with a flux tube modelling a vortex magnetic field field Ansatz. To illustrate this point we analyze in this letter the situation where the vortex current

239

TIME REVERSAL ACOUSTIC NONCONTACT SOURCE - Energy Innovation ...  

The present invention provides a flexible noncontact source of wave energy through the use of time reversal. In the preferred embodiment a ...

240

Spatial diversity in passive time reversal communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Song et al. : Spatial diversity in passive time reversaland J. Ritcey, “Spatial diversity equalization applied toSpatial diversity in passive time reversal communications H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reverse Computation for Rollback-based Fault Tolerance in Large Parallel Systems  

SciTech Connect

Reverse computation is presented here as an important future direction in addressing the challenge of fault tolerant execution on very large cluster platforms for parallel computing. As the scale of parallel jobs increases, traditional checkpointing approaches suffer scalability problems ranging from computational slowdowns to high congestion at the persistent stores for checkpoints. Reverse computation can overcome such problems and is also better suited for parallel computing on newer architectures with smaller, cheaper or energy-efficient memories and file systems. Initial evidence for the feasibility of reverse computation in large systems is presented with detailed performance data from a particle simulation scaling to 65,536 processor cores and 950 accelerators (GPUs). Reverse computation is observed to deliver very large gains relative to checkpointing schemes when nodes rely on their host processors/memory to tolerate faults at their accelerators. A comparison between reverse computation and checkpointing with measurements such as cache miss ratios, TLB misses and memory usage indicates that reverse computation is hard to ignore as a future alternative to be pursued in emerging architectures.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Park, Alfred J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SNAP II REACTOR CORE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

A survey was made to select the construction materials for the SDR-1 reactor core vessel and grid plates. Hastelloy C was selected for the reactor vessel, top grid plate, and bottom grid plate. Inconel X was selected for the core hold-down springs. (C.J.G.)

Facha, J.V.

1960-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

Microsoft Word - IronCore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November/December 2013 November/December 2013 Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but

244

Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in core-level photoemission from ferromagnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this thesis we present a theoretical investigation of angle- and spin-resolved core-level photoemission from ferromagnetic Fe and Ni. We also consider magneto-dichroic effects due to reversal of the photon helicity or reversal of the sample magnetization direction. In chapter 1, we provide a brief outline of the history of photoemission, and show how it has played an important role in the development of modern physics. We then review the basic elements of the theory of core-level photoemission, and discuss the validity of the some of the commonly-used approximations. In chapter 2, we present a one-electron theory to calculate spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra for an arbitrary photon polarization. The Hamiltonian includes both spin-orbit and exchange interactions. As test cases for the theory, we calculate the spin polarization and magnetic dichroism for the Fe 2p core level, and find that agreement with experiment is very good.

Menchero, J.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Iterative Time Reversal with Tunable Convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and test an iterative technique for improving the temporal focusing of a time reversal mirror. A single amplification parameter is introduced to tune the convergence of the iteration. The tunable iterative technique is validated by tests on an experimental electromagnetic time reversal mirror, as well as on a novel numerical model.

Biniyam Tesfaye Taddese; Thomas M. Antonsen; Edward Ott; Steven M. Anlage

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fuel cell system with coolant flow reversal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for cooling electrochemical fuel cell system components. Periodic reversal of the direction of flow of cooling fluid through a fuel cell stack provides greater uniformity and cell operational temperatures. Flow direction through a recirculating coolant fluid circuit is reversed through a two position valve, without requiring modulation of the pumping component.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Linear and Nonlinear Vortex Motion in an Asymmetric Balance Shallow Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work extends asymmetric balance (AB) theory to the beta plane (?-AB). The physical problem examined is the motion of a coherent vortex on a beta plane in a finite depth fluid in the absence of an environmental steering flow. A useful ...

Michael T. Montgomery; J. Dominique Möller; Christopher T. Nicklas

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Effect of Vorticity-Profile Shape on the Instability of a Two-Dimensional Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple linear numerical model is used to study the effect of the shape of the vertical vorticity profile on the stability characteristics of a two-dimensional vortex. In all cases, the basic-state vorticity is confined to an annulus. It is ...

Jerry L. Steffens

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Original articles: Vortex states in axially symmetric superconductors in applied magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We solve analytically the linearized Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation in the presence of an uniform magnetic field with cylindrical boundary conditions. The solution of the non-linear GL equation is provided as an expansion in the basis of linearized solutions. ... Keywords: Axial magnetic field, Mesoscopic superconductivity, Nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equation, Vortex

Andrei Ludu; Milorad V. Miloševi?; Francois M. Peeters

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Stability of a Two-Layer Quasigeostrophic Vortex over Axisymmetric Localized Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of a quasigeostrophic vortex over a radially symmetric topographic feature (elevation or depression) in a two-layer ocean on the f plane is examined. This article’s concern is with compensated vortices, that is, those in which the ...

E. S. Benilov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 2315 #12;Combustion noise in gas turbines consists of direct noise related to the unsteady combustion process itself and indirect noise. As known, indirect noise is produced when entropy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

252

Longitudinally Dependent Ozone Increase in the Antarctic Polar Vortex Revealed by Balloon and Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal structure of processes causing increases in ozone in the Antarctic polar vortex was examined using data measured in 2003 from an ozonesonde observation campaign at Syowa Station (39.6°E, 69.0°S) and from the Improved Limb ...

K. Sato; Y. Tomikawa; G. Hashida; T. Yamanouchi; H. Nakajima; T. Sugita

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Aging memory and glassiness of a driven vortex , Guohong Li1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Aging memory and glassiness of a driven vortex system. Xu Du1 , Guohong Li1 , Eva Y. Andrei1 , M memory, aging and nonlinear-dynamics. Glasses[1-11], interfaces[12] and fractures are some examples[13 the deviation from equilibrium. After removing the force, the system ages with time and its subsequent response

Andrei, Eva Y.

254

3D-vortex labyrinths in the near field of solid-state microchip laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatiotemporal vortex lattices generated in high Fresnel number solid-state microchip lasers are studied in connection with Talbot phenomenon generic to spatially periodic electromagnetic fields. The spatial layout of light field is obtained via dynamical model based on Maxwell-Bloch equations for class-B laser, discrete Fox-Lee map with relaxation of inversion and static model based on superposition of copropagating Gaussian beams. The spatial patterns observed experimentally and obtained numerically are interpreted as nonlinear superposition of vortices with helicoidal phase dislocations. The usage of vortex labyrinths and Talbot lattices as optical dipole traps for neutral atoms is considered for the wavelength of trapping radiation in the range 0.98 $\\div$ 2.79 $\\mu m$. The separable optical trapping potential is mounted as a sum of array of vortex lines and additional parabolic subtrap. The factorization of macroscopic wavefunction have led to analytical solution of Gross-Pitaevski equation for ground state of ensemble of quantum particles trapped in vortex labyrinth and in spatially - periodic array of Gaussian beams.

A. Yu. Okulov

2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ozone Forecasts of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex–Splitting Event in September 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Hemisphere major warming event in September 2002 has led to a breakup of the vortex in the middle and higher stratosphere and to a corresponding splitting of the ozone hole. Daily 3D ozone forecasts, produced at the Royal Netherlands ...

Henk Eskes; Arjo Segers; Peter van Velthoven

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Genesis of the Goshen County, Wyoming, Tornado on 5 June 2009 during VORTEX2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genesis of a strong and long-lived tornado observed during the second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2) in Goshen County, Wyoming, on 5 June 2009 is studied. Mobile radar, mobile mesonet, rawinsonde, and ...

Karen Kosiba; Joshua Wurman; Yvette Richardson; Paul Markowski; Paul Robinson; James Marquis

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Generation and Stability of a Quasi-Permanent Vortex in the Lofoten Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Nordic seas the Lofoten Basin is a region of high mesoscale activity. The generation mechanism and the conditions for the stability of a quasi-permanent vortex in the center of the Lofoten Basin are studied with a high-resolution ocean ...

Armin Köhl

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Asymptotic and numerical analysis of an inviscid bounded vortex flow at low Mach number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inviscid low Mach number compressible flow developing from a plane incompressible vortex with constant density in a bounded domain is studied. A reference solution for this model flow is obtained by two-time scale asymptotic development in the zero ... Keywords: Asymptotic development, Compressible low Mach number flow, Explicit Roe scheme, Implicit scheme, WENO and high-order-compact schemes

Anne Cadiou; Lionel Le Penven; Marc Buffat

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Study of a Heavy Rain Vortex Formed over the Eastern Flank of the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case of the heavy rain vortex which occurred during the period 14–15 July 1979 is studied using a limited-area mesoscale numerical model. This is a representative example of a group of warm southwest vortices that often form over the eastern ...

Bin Wang; Isidoro Orlanski

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Final Warming Date of the Antarctic Polar Vortex and Influences on its Interannual Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 40 years of radiosonde data from two Antarctic stations are examined for changes in the date of the final stratospheric warming that occurs each year as the vortex breaks up in spring/summer. A new measure of this date is derived that ...

Joanna D. Haigh; Howard K. Roscoe

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment: VORTEX2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2), which had its field phases in May and June of 2009 and 2010, was designed to explore i) the physical processes of tornadogenesis, maintenance, and demise; ii) the ...

Joshua Wurman; David Dowell; Yvette Richardson; Paul Markowski; Erik Rasmussen; Donald Burgess; Louis Wicker; Howard B. Bluestein

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA); Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Consani, Keith A. (Richland, WA)

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Field-Reversed Configuration Power Plant Critical-Issue Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed an engineering scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis for deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core. For the engineering conceptual design of the fusion core, the project team focused on intermediate-term technology. For example, one decision was to use steele structure. The FRC systems analysis led to a fusion power plant with attractive features including modest size, cylindrical symmetry, good thermal efficiency (52%), relatively easy maintenance, and a high ratio of electric power to fusion core mass, indicating that it would have favorable economics.

Santarius, J. F.; Mogahed, E. A.; Emmert, G. A.; Khater, H. Y.; Nguyen, C. N.; Ryzhkov, S. V.; Stubna, M. D.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Switching a magnetic vortex by interlayer coupling in epitaxially grown Co/Cu/Py/Cu(001) trilayer disks  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxial Py/Cu/Co/Cu(001) trilayers were patterned into micron sized disks and imaged using element-specific photoemission electron microscopy. By varying the Cu spacer layer thickness, we study how the coupling between the two magnetic layers influences the formation of magnetic vortex states. We find that while the Py and Co disks form magnetic vortex domains when the interlayer coupling is ferromagnetic, the magnetic vortex domains of the Py and Co disks break into anti-parallel aligned multidomains when the interlayer coupling is antiferromagnetic. We explain this result in terms of magnetic flux closure between the Py and Co layers for the antiferromagnetic coupling case.

Wu, J.; Carlton, D.; Oelker, E.; Park, J. S.; Jin, E.; Arenholz, E.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, C.; Bokor, J.; Qiu, Z Q

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Are all Quasi-static Processes Reversible?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A process, carried out in a stepwise manner, becomes quasi-static when the number of intermediate steps tends to infinity. Usually, the net entropy production approaches zero under this limiting condition. Hence, such cases are termed reversible. A favorite example is the introduction of an infinite number of intermediate-temperature reservoirs in between the source and the sink for a non-isothermal heat transfer process. We analyze the situation and conclude that such quasi-static processes are not reversible. Indeed, no non-isothermal heat transfer process can ever be made reversible due to an extraneous work term.

Mukhopadhyay, Debasis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optimization of Core Point Detection in Fingerprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares and documents the work of an optimized fingerprint core point determination algorithm. This work focuses to present an efficient and precise way for the extraction of core point. Core Point is detected using least mean square algorithm. ...

Nabeel Younus Khan; M. Younus Javed; Naveed Khattak; Umer Munir Yongjun Chang

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Audit of Departmental Integrated Standardized Core Accounting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit of Departmental Integrated Standardized Core Accounting System (DISCAS) Operations at Selected Field Sites, AP-FS-97-02 Audit of Departmental Integrated Standardized Core...

268

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Annular Core...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annular Core Research Reactor facility Nuclear science photo At the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) facility, Sandia researchers can subject various test objects to a mixed...

269

Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Energy drift in reversible time integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy drift is commonly observed in reversible integrations of systems of molecular dynamics. We show that this drift can be modelled as a diffusion and that the typical energy error after time T is O(?T).

R I McLachlan; M Perlmutter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the ALS to directly image the magnetic structure of an exchange-biased film, a team from the University of Washington and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory has identified separate magnetic-reversal mechanisms in the two branches of a hysteresis loop. This advance in fundamental understanding will provide new insights for developing the next generation of information storage and sensing devices where exchange bias is expected to play a critical role.

272

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversing the Circulation of Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Wednesday, 31 July 2013 00:00 In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can be oriented clockwise or counterclockwise. Previous studies have shown that the polarity can be flipped on command. Now, using time-resolved magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at the ALS, researchers have shown for the first time how to use pulsed magnetic fields to reverse the circulation.

273

Low Cost Reversible fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes a 3-phase program performed from March 2000 through September 2003 with a particular focus on Phase III. The overall program studied TMI's reversible solid oxide stack, system concepts, and potential applications. The TMI reversible (fuel cell-electrolyzer) system employs a stack of high temperature solid-oxide electrochemical cells to produce either electricity (from a fuel and air or oxygen) or hydrogen (from water and supplied electricity). An atmospheric pressure fuel cell system operates on natural gas (or other carbon-containing fuel) and air. A high-pressure reversible electrolyzer system is used to make high-pressure hydrogen and oxygen from water and when desired, operates in reverse to generate electricity from these gases.

Technology Management Inc.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

MODIFIED BOROHYDRIDES FOR REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the results in the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. A number of metals, metal hydrides, metal chlorides and complex hydrides were selected and evaluated as the destabilization agents for reducing dehydriding temperature and generating dehydriding-rehydriding reversibility. It is found that some additives are effective. The Raman spectroscopic analysis shows the change of B-H binding nature.

Au, Ming

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

Tropical Cyclone Initialization with a Spherical High-Order Filter and an Idealized Three-Dimensional Bogus Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tropical cyclone initialization method with an idealized three-dimensional bogus vortex of an analytic empirical formula is presented for the track and intensity prediction. The procedure in the new method consists of four steps: the separation ...

In-Hyuk Kwon; Hyeong-Bin Cheong

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Observations of a Terrain-Forced Mesoscale Vortex and Canyon Drainage Flows along the Front Range of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations taken during the February 1991 Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Winter Validation Study are used to describe the wind field associated with a terrain-forced mesoscale vortex and thermally forced canyon drainage flows ...

David H. Levinson; Robert M. Banta

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Convection-Allowing and Convection-Parameterizing Ensemble Forecasts of a Mesoscale Convective Vortex and Associated Severe Weather Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of a regional severe weather outbreak that was related to a mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) is performed. The MCV-spawning mesoscale convection system (MCS) formed in northwest Kansas along the southern periphery of a large cutoff ...

Adam J. Clark; William A. Gallus Jr.; Ming Xue; Fanyou Kong

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Spatial Filter Approach to Evaluating the Role of Convection on the Evolution of a Mesoscale Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new spatial filter is proposed that exploits a spectral gap in power between the convective scale and the system (“vortex”) scale during tropical cyclone (TC) genesis simulations. Using this spatial separation, this study analyzes idealized ...

Glenn A. Creighton; Robert E. Hart; Philip Cunningham

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Probabilistic Evaluation of the Dynamics and Predictability of the Mesoscale Convective Vortex of 10–13 June 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the dynamics and predictability of the mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) of 10–13 June 2003 through ensemble forecasting. The MCV of interest developed from a preexisting upper-level disturbance over the southwest United ...

Daniel P. Hawblitzel; Fuqing Zhang; Zhiyong Meng; Christopher A. Davis

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Turbulence process domination under the combined forcings of wind stress, the Langmuir vortex force, and surface cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulence in the ocean surface layer is generated by time-varying combinations of destabilizing surface buoyancy flux, wind stress forcing, and wave forcing through a vortex force associated with the surface wave field. Observations of time- and ...

A. E. Gargett; C. E. Grosch

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Observations of a Squall Line and Its Near Environment Using High-Frequency Rawinsonde Launches during VORTEX2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rawinsonde data were collected before and during passage of a squall line in Oklahoma on 15 May 2009 during the Second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2). Nine soundings were released within 3 h, allowing ...

George H. Bryan; Matthew D. Parker

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in ...

Schlegel, Fabrice

283

Variation in the Stratospheric Aerosol Associated with the North Cyclonic Polar Vortex as Measured by the SAM II Satellite Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol extinction data obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) satellite instrument during the 1979/80 Northern Hemisphere winter season have been analyzed in relation to the cyclonic polar vortex. A synoptic approach has ...

G. S. Kent; C. R. Trepte; U. O. Farrukh; M. P. McCormick

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Fuel Cells Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

285

GEOMAGNETIC REVERSALS DRIVEN BY ABRUPT SEA LEVEL CHANGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sea-level changes and geomagnetic reversals, then we have athe dynamo theory of the geomagnetic field is incorrect.preprint LBL-20131 Geomagnetic Reversals Driven by Abrupt

Muller, R.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Heat transfer in a two-pass internally ribbed turbine blade coolant channel with cylindrical vortex generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of vortex generators on the mass (heat) transfer from the ribbed passage of a two pass turbine blade coolant channel is investigated with the intent of optimizing the vortex generator geometry so that significant enhancements in mass/heat transfer can be achieved. In the experimental configuration considered, ribs are mounted on two opposite walls; all four walls along each pass are active and have mass transfer from their surfaces but the ribs are non-participating. Mass transfer measurements, in the form of Sherwood number ratios, are made along the centerline and in selected inter-rib modules. Results are presented for Reynolds number in the range of 5,000 to 40,000, pitch to rib height ratios of 10.5 and 21, and vortex generator-rib spacing to rib height ratios of 0.55, and 1.5. Centerline and spanwise averaged Sherwood number ratios are presented along with contours of the Sherwood number ratios. Results indicate that the vortex generators induce substantial increases in the local mass transfer rates, particularly along the side walls, and modest increases in the average mass transfer rates. The vortex generators have the effect of making the inter-rib profiles along the ribbed walls more uniform. Along the side walls, horse-shoe vortices that characterize the vortex generator wake are associated with significant mass transfer enhancements. The wake effects and the levels of enhancement decrease somewhat with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing pitch.

Hibbs, R.; Acharya, S.; Chen, Y. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Core Values | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Core Values Core Values Core Values People - People are our most important resource. We respect and use our experience and skills and appreciate our diversity. Business Excellence - We are fiscally responsible and actively pursue best business practices. Safety - We protect our human and material resources and promote safe work practices within the office and at our sites. Communication - We take full advantage of our virtual organization's strengths and share information freely across all levels of the organization. Leadership and Teamwork - We encourage leadership and teamwork at all levels of the organization. We value active participation and demonstrate respect for each other. Customer Service - We openly communicate with all our customers in a timely manner and actively seek opportunities to improve our services.

288

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Interactive out-of-core isosurface extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: interval tree, isosurface extraction, marching cubes, out-of-core computation, scientific visualization

Yi-Jen Chiang; Cláudio T. Silva; William J. Schroeder

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Multi-core Performance Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

core Performance Analysis core Performance Analysis HPC Computation 1 Performance Analysis * Compiler Feedback * HWPC Data * Load Balance 2 Compiler Feedback * Before optimizing code, it's critical to know what the compiler does to your code - Loop optimizations - Vectorization - Prefetching - ... * Equally important to what the compiler does is what it doesn't do, and why - Data dependencies - Misplaced branches - Unknown loop counts - ... 3 Enabling Compiler Feedback * Portland Group - Minfo=all - Mneginfo - Minfo=ccff (Common Compiler Feedback Format) * Cray - rm (Fortran) - hlist=m (C/C++) * Intel - vec-report1 * Pathscale - LNO:simd_verbose=ON:vintr_verbose=ON:prefetch_v erbose=ON * GNU - ftree-vectorizer-verbose=1

292

Free-fall core sampler  

SciTech Connect

The described free-fall corer apparatus consists of an expendable, elongated casing having an annular-shaped ballast member secured to it. A cylindrical housing surmounts this ballast member and accommodates a float which is tied to the core liner. During descent of the apparatus, the float is latched to the ballast element, but when the apparatus strikes bottom, a pilot weight suspended from the float latching means moves upward and allows the float to freely ascend within the ocean. This ascent unlatches the core liner from the expendable casing and the liner is thereafter raised to the surface. (13 claims)

Raymond, S.O.; Sachs, P.L.

1968-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Visualizing Spacetime Curvature via Frame-Drag Vortexes and Tidal Tendexes II. Stationary Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When one splits spacetime into space plus time, the Weyl curvature tensor (which equals the Riemann tensor in vacuum) splits into two spatial, symmetric, traceless tensors: the tidal field $E$, which produces tidal forces, and the frame-drag field $B$, which produces differential frame dragging. In recent papers, we and colleagues have introduced ways to visualize these two fields: tidal tendex lines (integral curves of the three eigenvector fields of $E$) and their tendicities (eigenvalues of these eigenvector fields); and the corresponding entities for the frame-drag field: frame-drag vortex lines and their vorticities. These entities fully characterize the vacuum Riemann tensor. In this paper, we compute and depict the tendex and vortex lines, and their tendicities and vorticities, outside the horizons of stationary (Schwarzschild and Kerr) black holes; and we introduce and depict the black holes' horizon tendicity and vorticity (the normal-normal components of $E$ and $B$ on the horizon). For Schwarzschil...

Zhang, Fan; Nichols, David A; Chen, Yanbei; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Matthews, Keith D; Owen, Robert; Thorne, Kip S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Many-core key-value store  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling data centers to handle task-parallel work-loads requires balancing the cost of hardware, operations, and power. Low-power, low-core-count servers reduce costs in one of these dimensions, but may require additional nodes to provide the required ... Keywords: 64-core Tilera TILEPro64, many-core key-value store, data centers, task-parallel workloads, low-core-count servers, low-power servers, under-utilizing memory, power consumption, high-core-count processor, clock rate, 4-core Intel Xeon L5520, 8-core AMD Opteron 6128 HE

M. Berezecki; E. Frachtenberg; M. Paleczny; K. Steele

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Definition: Core Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis Core Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Core Analysis Core samples are obtained from drilling a well, typically using a synthetic diamond coated bit that has a hollow center so cylindrical rock samples ("core") can be extracted. Core samples successfully recovered are visually inspected to determine rock type, mineralization, and fracture networks, then certain laboratory analyses may ensue to acquire detailed rock properties. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is

296

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effect of NO on extinction and re-ignition of vortex-perturbed hydrogen flames.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the dynamics of extinction and re-ignition of a vortex-perturbed non-premixed hydrogen-air flame is studied in a counterflow burner. A diffusion flame is established with counterflowing streams of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen at ambient temperature and air heated to a range of temperatures that brackets the auto-ignition temperature. Localized extinction is induced by impulsively driving a fuel-side toroidal vortex into the steady flame, and the recovery of the extinguished region is monitored by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the hydroxyl radical (OH). The dynamics of flame recovery depend on the air temperature and fuel concentration, and four different recovery modes are identified. These modes involve combinations of edge-flame propagation and the expansion of an auto-ignition kernel that forms within the extinguished region. The addition of a small amount of NO significantly alters the re-ignition process by shifting the balance between chain-termination and chain-propagation reactions to enhance auto-ignition. The ignition enhancement by this catalytic effect causes a shift in the conditions that govern the recovery modes. In addition, the effects of NO concentration and vortex strength on the flame recovery are examined. Direct numerical simulations of the flame-vortex interaction with and without NO doping show how the small amount of OH produced by NO-catalyzed reactions has a significant impact on the development of an auto-ignition kernel. This joint experimental and numerical study provides detailed insight into the interaction between transient flows and ignition processes.

Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Frank, Jonathan H.; Lee, Uen Do (KITECH, Cheonan, Chungnam, South Korea)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Tripolar vortex formation in dense quantum plasma with ion-temperature-gradients  

SciTech Connect

We have derived system of nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency electrostatic toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode for dense quantum magnetoplasma. For some specific profiles of the equilibrium density, temperature, and ion velocity gradients, the nonlinear equations admit a stationary solution in the form of a tripolar vortex. These results are relevant to understand nonlinear structure formation in dense quantum plasmas in the presence of equilibrium ion-temperature and density gradients.

Qamar, Anisa; Ata-ur-Rahman [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Numerical evidence of breaking of vortex lines in an ideal fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergence of singularity of vorticity at a single point, not related to any symmetry of the initial distribution, has been demonstrated numerically for the first time. Behavior of the maximum of vorticity near the point of collapse closely follows the dependence 1/(t0-t), where t0 is the time of collapse. This agrees with the interpretation of collapse in an ideal incompressible fluid as of the process of vortex lines breaking.

Kuznetsov, E A; Zheligovsky, V A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Combination pipe-rupture mitigator and in-vessel core catcher. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described which mitigates against the effects of a failed coolant loop in a nuclear reactor by restricting the outflow of coolant from the reactor through the failed loop and by retaining any particulated debris from a molten core which may result from coolant loss or other cause. The device reduces the reverse pressure drop through the failed loop by limiting the access of coolant in the reactor to the inlet of the failed loop. The device also spreads any particulated core debris over a large area to promote cooling.

Tilbrook, R.W.; Markowski, F.J.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Laminated grid and web magnetic cores  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

Sefko, John (Monroeville, PA); Pavlik, Norman M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Visualizing Spacetime Curvature via Frame-Drag Vortexes and Tidal Tendexes II. Stationary Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When one splits spacetime into space plus time, the Weyl curvature tensor (which equals the Riemann tensor in vacuum) splits into two spatial, symmetric, traceless tensors: the tidal field $E$, which produces tidal forces, and the frame-drag field $B$, which produces differential frame dragging. In recent papers, we and colleagues have introduced ways to visualize these two fields: tidal tendex lines (integral curves of the three eigenvector fields of $E$) and their tendicities (eigenvalues of these eigenvector fields); and the corresponding entities for the frame-drag field: frame-drag vortex lines and their vorticities. These entities fully characterize the vacuum Riemann tensor. In this paper, we compute and depict the tendex and vortex lines, and their tendicities and vorticities, outside the horizons of stationary (Schwarzschild and Kerr) black holes; and we introduce and depict the black holes' horizon tendicity and vorticity (the normal-normal components of $E$ and $B$ on the horizon). For Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes, the horizon tendicity is proportional to the horizon's intrinsic scalar curvature, and the horizon vorticity is proportional to an extrinsic scalar curvature. We show that, for horizon-penetrating time slices, all these entities ($E$, $B$, the tendex lines and vortex lines, the lines' tendicities and vorticities, and the horizon tendicities and vorticities) are affected only weakly by changes of slicing and changes of spatial coordinates, within those slicing and coordinate choices that are commonly used for black holes. [Abstract is abbreviated.

Fan Zhang; Aaron Zimmerman; David A. Nichols; Yanbei Chen; Geoffrey Lovelace; Keith D. Matthews; Robert Owen; Kip S. Thorne

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Stability of Molten Core Materials  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can be oriented clockwise or counterclockwise. Previous studies have shown that the polarity can be flipped on command. Now, using time-resolved magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at the ALS, researchers have shown for the first time how to use pulsed magnetic fields to reverse the circulation.

306

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can be oriented clockwise or counterclockwise. Previous studies have shown that the polarity can be flipped on command. Now, using time-resolved magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at the ALS, researchers have shown for the first time how to use pulsed magnetic fields to reverse the circulation.

307

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can be oriented clockwise or counterclockwise. Previous studies have shown that the polarity can be flipped on command. Now, using time-resolved magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at the ALS, researchers have shown for the first time how to use pulsed magnetic fields to reverse the circulation.

308

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can be oriented clockwise or counterclockwise. Previous studies have shown that the polarity can be flipped on command. Now, using time-resolved magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at the ALS, researchers have shown for the first time how to use pulsed magnetic fields to reverse the circulation.

309

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can be oriented clockwise or counterclockwise. Previous studies have shown that the polarity can be flipped on command. Now, using time-resolved magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at the ALS, researchers have shown for the first time how to use pulsed magnetic fields to reverse the circulation.

310

What happens when the geomagnetic field reverses?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During geomagnetic field reversals the radiation belt high-energy proton populations become depleted. Their energy spectra become softer, with the trapped particles of highest energies being lost first, and eventually recovering after a field reversal. The radiation belts rebuild in a dynamical way with the energy spectra flattening on the average during the course of many millennia, but without ever reaching complete steady state equilibrium between successive geomagnetic storm events determined by southward turnings of the IMF orientation. Considering that the entry of galactic cosmic rays and the solar energetic particles with energies above a given threshold are strongly controlled by the intensity of the northward component of the interplanetary magnetic field, we speculate that at earlier epochs when the geomagnetic dipole was reversed, the entry of these energetic particles into the geomagnetic field was facilitated when the interplanetary magnetic field was directed northward. Unlike in other compleme...

Lemaire, Joseph F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Time reversal signal processing for communication.  

SciTech Connect

Time-reversal is a wave focusing technique that makes use of the reciprocity of wireless propagation channels. It works particularly well in a cluttered environment with associated multipath reflection. This technique uses the multipath in the environment to increase focusing ability. Time-reversal can also be used to null signals, either to reduce unintentional interference or to prevent eavesdropping. It does not require controlled geometric placement of the transmit antennas. Unlike existing techniques it can work without line-of-sight. We have explored the performance of time-reversal focusing in a variety of simulated environments. We have also developed new algorithms to simultaneously focus at a location while nulling at an eavesdropper location. We have experimentally verified these techniques in a realistic cluttered environment.

Young, Derek P.; Jacklin, Neil; Punnoose, Ratish J.; Counsil, David T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Correlated magnetic reversal in periodic stripe patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetization reversal in a periodic magnetic stripe array has been studied with a combination of direct and reciprocal space methods: Kerr microscopy and polarized neutron scattering. Kerr images show that during magnetization reversal over a considerable magnetic-field range a ripple domain state occurs in the stripes with magnetization components perpendicular to the stripes. Quantitative analysis of polarized neutron specular reflection, Bragg diffraction, and off-specular diffuse scattering provides a detailed picture of the mean magnetization direction in the ripple domains as well as longitudinal and transverse fluctuations, and reveals a strong correlation of those components over a number of stripes.

Theis-Broehl, Katharina; Toperverg, Boris P.; Leiner, Vincent; Westphalen, Andreas; Zabel, Hartmut; McCord, Jeffrey; Rott, Karsten; Brueckl, Hubert [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01169 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University Bielefeld, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Logging-while-coring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydrologic characterization of four cores from the Geysers Coring Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of hydrologic tests on 4 representative core plugs from Geysers Coring Project drill hole SB-15-D were related to mineralogy and texture. Permeability measurements were made on 3 plugs from caprock and one plug from the steam reservoir. Late-stage microfractures present in 2 of the plugs contributed to greater permeability, but the values for the 2 other plugs indicate a typical matrix permeability of 1 to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}m{sup 2}. Klinkenberg slip factor b for these plugs is generally consistent with the inverse relation between slip factor and permeability observed by Jones (1972) for plugs of much more permeable material. The caprock and reservoir samples are nearly identical metagraywackes with slight mineralogical differences which appear to have little effect on hydrology. The late stage microfractures are suspected of being artifacts. The capillary pressure curves for 3 cores are fit by power-law relations which can be used to estimate relative permeability curves for the matrix rocks.

Persoff, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Hulen, J.B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Institute

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

On-demand generation of aqueous two-phase microdroplets with reversible phase transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aqueous two-phase systems contained entirely within microdroplets enable a bottom-up approach to mimicking the dynamic microcompartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within the cytoplasm of cells. Here, we demonstrate the on-demand generation of femtolitre aqueous two-phase droplets within a microfluidic oil channel. Gated pressure pulses were used to generate individual, stationary two-phase microdroplets with a well-defined time zero for carrying out controlled and sequential phase transformations over time. Reversible phase transitions between single-phase, two-phase, and core-shell microgel states were obtained via evaporation-induced dehydration and on-demand water rehydration. In contrast to other microfluidic aqueous two-phase droplets, which require continuous flows and high-frequency droplet formation, our system enables the controlled isolation and reversible transformation of a single microdroplet and is expected to be useful for future studies in dynamic microcompartmentation and affinity partitioning.

Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics  

SciTech Connect

Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Moretto, L.G.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Modified borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In attempt to develop lithium borohydrides as the reversible hydrogen storage materials with the high capacity, the feasibility to reduce dehydrogenation temperature of the lithium borohydride and moderate rehydrogenation condition has been explored. The commercial available lithium borohydride has been modified by ball milling with metal oxides and metal chlorides as the additives. The modified lithium borohydrides release 9 wt% hydrogen starting from 473K. The dehydrided modified lithium borohydrides absorb 7-9 wt% hydrogen at 873K and 7 MPa. The additive modification reduces dehydriding temperature from 673K to 473K and moderates rehydrogenation conditions to 923K and 15 MPa. XRD and SEM analysis discovered the formation of the intermediate compound TiB{sub 2} that may plays the key role in change the reaction path resulting the lower dehydriding temperature and reversibility. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of the oxide modified lithium borohydrides decreases gradually during hydriding-dehydriding cycling due to the lost of the boron during dehydrogenation. But, it can be prevented by selecting the suitable additive, forming intermediate boron compounds and changing the reaction path. The additives reduce dehydriding temperature and improve the reversibility, it also reduces the hydrogen storage capacity. The best compromise can be reached by optimization of the additive loading and introducing new process other than ball milling.

Au, Ming

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

TMI-2 core shipping preparations  

SciTech Connect

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations  

SciTech Connect

The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HyCore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon HyCore Jump to: navigation, search Name HyCore Place Norway Sector Hydro, Solar Product JV between Umicore and Norsk Hydro to manufacture solar-grade silicon....

322

Definition: Core Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holes Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Core Holes A core hole is a well that is drilled using a hallow drill bit coated with synthetic diamonds for the purposes of...

323

Principles of equilibrium statistical mechanics revisited: The idea of vortex energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the law of energy conservation with the fact of matter stability imply the existence of energy complementary to that given by the function of states of interacting systems and treated, with the environment, the function of states of interacting extended systems. The complementary energy, we called it vortex, is integral, not quantized, and causes trends contrary to that prescribed by equilibrium statistical mechanics. We formulate its principles and theorems, and question traditional insights in thermodynamics, entropy law, phase transitions, persistent currents, Brownian motion.

V. E. Shapiro

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Interconversion of dark soliton and Josephson vortex in a quasi-1D long Bose Josephson junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark soliton (DS) and Josephson vortex (JV) in quasi-1D long Bose Josephson junction (BJJ) can be interconverted by tuning Josephson coupling. Rates of the interconversion as well as of the thermally activated phase-slip effect, resulting in the JV switching its vorticity, have been evaluated. The role of quantum phase-slip in creating superposition of JVs with opposite vorticities as a qubit is discussed as well. Utilization of the JV for controlled and coherent transfer of atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is suggested.

V. M. Kaurov; A. B. Kuklov

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Office of Fossil EnergyDetailed Core Procedures Manual Volume 1 – Core Acquisition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This “Core Procedures Manual, Volume 1 ” contains a description of proposed best practices for use during coring operations for the Barrow Gas Hydrate Test Well Program. This document is designed to describe the responsibilities of well site operations personnel, primarily the core acquisition contractor and coring fluids contractor, Weatherford/Omni and Halliburton/Baroid

Barrow Gas Fields

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY...

327

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. Key Cyber...

328

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY...

329

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office...

330

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People...

331

SoCore Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SoCore Energy SoCore Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name SoCore Energy Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60601 Sector Solar Product Chicago-based solar installer and mounting solution company that also arranges for solar loans and PPAs. References SoCore Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SoCore Energy is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "SoCore Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SoCore_Energy&oldid=351218" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs

332

Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

Napolitano, M.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Storage III: Materials, Systems and Applications Symposium. Presentation Title, High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible ...

334

Dynamic analysis for reverse engineering and program understanding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main focus of program understanding and reverse engineering research has been on modeling the structure of a program by examining its code. This has been the result of the nature of the systems investigated and the perceived goals of the reverse ... Keywords: dynamic analysis, reverse engineering

Eleni Stroulia; Tarja Systä

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Intelligent reversible watermarking in integer wavelet domain for medical images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prime requirement of reversible watermarking scheme is that the system should be able to restore the cover work to its original state after extracting the hidden information. Reversible watermarking approaches, therefore, have wide applications in ... Keywords: Genetic algorithm (GA), Histogram recovery, Integer wavelet transform (IWT), Medical images, Reversible watermarking

Muhammad Arsalan; Sana Ambreen Malik; Asifullah Khan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

On the dynamics of flame edges in diffusion-flame/vortex interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the local flame extinction and reignition of a counterflow diffusion flame perturbed by a laminar vortex ring. Local flame extinction leads to the appearance of flame edges separating the burning and extinguished regions of the distorted mixing layer. The dynamics of these edges is modeled based on previous numerical results, with heat release effects fully taken into account, which provide the propagation velocity of triple and edge flames in terms of the upstream unperturbed value of the scalar dissipation. The temporal evolution of the mixing layer is determined using the classical mixture fraction approach, with both unsteady and curvature effects taken into account. Although variable density effects play an important role in exothermic reacting mixing layers, in this paper the description of the mixing layer is carried out using the constant density approximation, leading to a simplified analytical description of the flow field. The mathematical model reveals the relevant nondimensional parameters governing diffusion-flame/vortex interactions and provides the parameter range for the more relevant regime of local flame extinction followed by reignition via flame edges. Despite the simplicity of the model, the results show very good agreement with previously published experimental results. (author)

Hermanns, Miguel; Linan, Amable [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Pza. Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vera, Marcos [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were: (i) to understand the effects of heating one of the streams on the characteristics of shear layers, (ii) to investigate the changes in the characteristics of large scale vortex structures in the shear layer caused by the introduction of inert solid particles in one of the feed streams; (iii) to understand the effects of pyrolyzing solids on the shear layer behavior; and (iv) to study the effects of combustion of particles and their pyrolysis products on the shear layer structure, heat release rate, and pollutant emission characteristics. An experimental facility for generating two-dimensional shear layers containing vortex structures has been designed and fabricated. The experimental facility is essentially a low speed wind tunnel designed to (i) provide two gas streams, initially with uniform velocity profiles and isotropic turbulence, mixing at the end of a splitter plate, (ii) introduce vorticity by passively perturbing one of the streams, (iii) allow heating of one of the streams to temperatures high enough to cause pyrolysis of coal particles, and (iv) provide a natural gas flame in one of the streams to result in ignition and burning of coal particles.

Gollahalli, S.R.; Butuk, N.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Time Reversal in Solids (Linear and Nonlinear Elasticity): Multimedia Resources in Time Reversal  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Dynamic nonlinear elastic behavior, nonequilibrium dynamics, first observed as a curiosity in earth materials has now been observed in a great variety of solids. The primary manifestations of the behavior are characteristic wave distortion, and slow dynamics, a recovery process to equilibrium that takes place linearly with the logarithm of time, over hours to days after a wave disturbance. The link between the diverse materials that exhibit nonequilibrium dynamics appears to be the presence of soft regions, thought to be 'damage' at many scales, ranging from order 10-9 m to 10-1 m at least. The regions of soft matter may be distributed as in a rock sample, or isolated, as in a sample with a single crack [LANLhttp://www.lanl.gov/orgs/ees/ees11/geophysics/nonlinear/nonlinear.shtml]. The Geophysics Group (EES-11) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has posted two or more multimedia items under each of the titles below to demonstrate aspects of their work: 1) Source Reconstruction Using Time Reversal; 2) Robustness and Efficiency of Time Reversal Acoustics in Solid Media; 3) Audio Example of Time Reversal - Speech Privacy; 4) Crack Imagining with Time Reversal - Experimental Results; 5) Time Reversal of the 2004 (M9.0) Sumatra Earthquake.

339

Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquid—replacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time. Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear core and fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast flux nuclear core of a plurality of rodded, open-lattice assemblies having a rod pattern rotated relative to a rod support structure pattern. Elongated fuel rods are oriented on a triangular array and laterally supported by grid structures positioned along the length of the assembly. Initial inter-assembly contact is through strongbacks at the corners of the support pattern and peripheral fuel rods between adjacent assemblies are nested so as to maintain a triangular pitch across a clearance gap between the other portions of adjacent assemblies. The rod pattern is rotated relative to the strongback support pattern by an angle .alpha. equal to sin .sup.-1 (p/2c), where p is the intra-assembly rod pitch and c is the center-to-center spacing among adjacent assemblies.

Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are feasible. Safety and logistics force these URFC demonstration units to be small, transportable, and easily set up, hence they already prove the viability of URFC systems for portable applications.

Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay  

SciTech Connect

An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

Wasserman, E.G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy by reverse electrodialysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principles and history of converting the difference between the chemical potentials of concentrated and dilute salt solutions to useful energy by reverse electrodialysis (RED) are discussed. The potential sources of brines discussed include the brines of oil and natural gas fields, the brines from flooding of salt domes, the brines of salt lakes, seawater, and geothermal brines. Equations for predicting the performance of RED units are presented and discussed. A study of the effects of variables on power output from RED cells is given, and estimates of capital and operating costs of RED power units are detailed. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Analysis of the Impurity Flow Reversal Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments performed on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-A) tokamak have shown that poloidally asymmetric injection of hydrogen gas can alter the inward transport of injected impurity atoms. We have compared the observed transport times and the magnitude of the flow reversal effect with a model based on the neoclassical theory of impurity transport and find that the observations are consistent with the theory. However, uncertainities in the radial profiles and the atomic rate coefficients do not permit a truly definitive test of the theory.

Burrell, K.H.; Wong, S.K.; Amano, T.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Over Core Stress | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Over Core Stress Over Core Stress Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Over Core Stress Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Over Core Stress: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Rock Lab Analysis Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis Isotopic Analysis- Rock Over Core Stress Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis Rock Density X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) References Page Area Activity Start Date Activity End Date Reference Material

347

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C.T. Hamik, and O. Steinbock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C of the underlying anomalous dispersion relation. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.248301 PACS numbers: 82.40.Ck, 05.45.­a and physicochemical systems [1,2]. Important examples include neuronal and cardiac tissue as well as gas discharge

Steinbock, Oliver

348

Optimizing the WSR-88D Mesocyclone/Tornadic Vortex Signature Algorithm Using WATADS—A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tornado outbreak occurred in east-central Minnesota around 0000 UTC 22 July 1995, within 80 km of the KMPX WSR-88D, at the Minneapolis–Chanhassen Weather Service Forecast Office (WSFO). The WSR-88D Mesocyclone/Tornadic Vortex Signature ...

Gregory A. Tipton; Eric D. Howieson; John A. Margraf; Robert R. Lee

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ECMWF Analyses and Forecasts of Stratospheric Winter Polar Vortex Breakup: September 2002 in the Southern Hemisphere and Related Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breakup of the polar stratospheric vortex in the Northern Hemisphere is an event that is known to be predictable for up to a week or so ahead. This is illustrated using data from the 45-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) for the sudden warmings of ...

Adrian Simmons; Mariano Hortal; Graeme Kelly; Anthony McNally; Agathe Untch; Sakari Uppala

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Soliton trains and vortex streets as a form of Cerenkov radiation in trapped Bose-Einstein condensates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We numerically study the nucleation of gray solitons and vortex-antivortex pairs created by a moving impurity in, respectively, 1D and 2D Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) confined by a parabolic potential. The simulations emulate the motion of a localized ... Keywords: Bose-Einstein condensation, Matter waves, Nucleation, Solitons, Vortices

R. Carretero-González; P. G. Kevrekidis; D. J. Frantzeskakis; B. A. Malomed; S. Nandi; A. R. Bishop

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Core/Shell Nanophosphors for LED Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Symposium H: Advanced Ceramics. Presentation Title, Core/Shell Nanophosphors for LED Lighting. Author(s), Jinkyu Han, Gustavo Hirata, Jan B ...

352

Material with core-shell structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

SECA Core Technology Program Seal Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECA Core Technology Program (SECA CTP) led workshop on the topical area titled "SOFC seal: Technology, Challenges and Future Directions" was held on August 10, 2007 at...

354

SECA Core Technology Program - SOFC Interconnect Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Technology Program - SOFC Interconnect Meeting July 28-29, 2004 Table of Contents Disclaimer Participants PDF-17KB Presentations Products Disclaimer This report was prepared...

355

Reverse Auction Bidding - Multiple Group Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reverse Auction Bidding is a recently developed auction method. In this form of bidding process, the roles of the bidders and the owner are interchanged in terms of the form of the economic transaction. The owner's objective is to drive the unit rates down and the bidder's objective is to maintain an acceptable profit level. A study into Reverse Auction Bidding commenced at Texas A&M University in 2004 and continues to this time, with this the eighteenth study in the series. This study is the second multi-group study in the research. In this study, a multiple group comparison was made between different numbers of bidders, with Games One, Two and Three having three, four and ten bidders respectively. All participants were faculty and students from the Department of Construction Science. The critical requirement for the participants is that they should have no prior experience using the Reverse Auction Bidding system. The eighteen studies have concentrated on new players, with future studies planned for repeat participants. A number of the recent case studies have shown personality has an impact on the performance of the bidders. However, this work was not controlled for personality, as the research objective was to determine the impact of a different number of bidders in a game. The Keirsey Temperament Sorter test was completed by all participants so that the results could be understood in terms of personality impact on the level of return to each participant. The results showed the number of bidders has a significant impact on the individual returns confirming the earlier work on varying the number of bidders. An increase in the number of bidders was shown to lead to a more competitive economic environment, which given usual economic circumstances lead to a reduction in the number of firms interested in bidding, for the self-evident economic reasons. This work points to the need to investigate a bidding group size of five or six, which is likely to be the self-constrained upper limit in a real economic system. Some interesting observations on the personality types suggest that further work is required in this area.

Zhou, Xun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Dynamism in the solar core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results of a mixed shell model heated asymmetrically by transient increases in nuclear burning indicate the transient generation of small hot spots inside the Sun somewhere between 0.1 and 0.2 solar radii. These hot bubbles are followed by a nonlinear differential equation system with finite amplitude non-homologous perturbations which is solved in a solar model. Our results show the possibility of a direct connection between the dynamic phenomena of the solar core and the atmospheric activity. Namely, an initial heating about DQ_0 ~ 10^{31}-10^{37} ergs can be enough for a bubble to reach the outer convective zone. Our calculations show that a hot bubble can arrive into subphotospheric regions with DQ_final ~ 10^{28} - 10^{34} ergs with a high speed, up to 10 km s-1, approaching the local sound speed. We point out that the developing sonic boom transforms the shock front into accelerated particle beam injected upwards into the top of loop carried out by the hot bubble above its forefront traveling fro...

Grandpierre, Attila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method for the detection of a magnetic field utilizing a magnetic vortex  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the strength of an in-plane magnetic field utilizing one or more magnetically-soft, ferromagnetic member, having a shape, size and material whereas a single magnetic vortex is formed at remanence in each ferromagnetic member. The preferred shape is a thin circle, or dot. Multiple ferromagnetic members can also be stacked on-top of each other and separated by a non-magnetic spacer. The resulting sensor is hysteresis free. The sensor's sensitivity, and magnetic saturation characteristics may be easily tuned by simply altering the material, size, shape, or a combination thereof to match the desired sensitivity and saturation characteristics. The sensor is self-resetting at remanence and therefore does not require any pinning techniques.

Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Buchanan, Kristen (Batavia, IL)

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Characterization of waste tire incineration in a prototype vortexing fluidized bed combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the characteristics of incinerating waste tires in a prototype vortexing fluidized bed combustor, performance tests were conducted with two sizes of waste tire fragments. The results from the combustion experiments showed that increasing the tire particle size caused less of the volatiles to be burned in the freeboard and thus lowered freeboard temperature. Uniform bed temperature could also be achieved by increasing the size of the tire particles. Variations in the secondary and tertiary air rates simultaneously affected the swirling intensity and the axial gas velocity in the freeboard, and thus resulted in the variations in ash elutriation, combustion efficiency, and pollutant emissions for the combustion systems. 21 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

Teng, H.; Chyang, C.S.; Shang, S.H.; Ho, J.A. [Chung Yuan Christian Univ., Chung-Li (Taiwan, Province of China)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulations of 2D magnetic electron drift vortex mode turbulence in plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations are performed to investigate turbulent properties of nonlinearly interacting two-dimensional (2D) magnetic electron drift vortex (MEDV) modes in a nonuniform unmagnetized plasma. The relevant nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of the MEDV modes are the wave magnetic field and electron temperature perturbations in the presence of the equilibrium density and temperature gradients. The important nonlinearities come from the advection of the electron fluid velocity perturbation and the electron temperature, as well as from the nonlinear electron Lorentz force. Computer simulations of the governing equations for the nonlinear MEDV modes reveal the generation of streamer-like electron flows, such that the corresponding gradients in the direction of the inhomogeneities tend to flatten out. By contrast, the gradients in an orthogonal direction vary rapidly. Consequently, the inertial range energy spectrum in decaying MEDV mode turbulence exhibits a much steeper anisotropic spectral index. The magn...

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

Jablonowski, Christiane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple and safe to operate.

McGuire, P.L.; Barraclough, B.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Core equivalence in economy for modal logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a pure exchange economy under uncertainty with emphasis on the logical point of view; the traders are assumed to have a multi-modal logic with non-partitional information structures.We propose a generalized notion of rational expectations ... Keywords: core equivalence theorem, ex-post core, multi-modal logic, pure exchange economy under reflexive information structure, rational expectations equilibrium

Takashi Matsuhisa

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Moving core beam energy absorber and converter  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

364

Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, DMS (strain gauge?) Test bridge, Fatigue Extrapolation · Wind Diesel Systeme in kleinen Inselnetzen/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

Habel, Annegret

365

Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple and safe to operate.

McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Core Science Requirement ­ Final Document ­ Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

Lagalante, Anthony F.

367

Effects of surface roughness and vortex generators on the LS(1)-0417MOD airfoil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An 18-inch constant-chord model of the LS(l)-0417MOD airfoil section was tested under two dimensional steady state conditions ate University 7{times}10 Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The objective was to document section lift and moment characteristics model and air flow conditions. Surface pressure data was acquired at {minus}60{degrees} through + 230{degrees} geometric angles of attack, at a nominal 1 million Reynolds number. Cases with and without leading edge grit roughness were investigated. The leading edge mulated blade conditions in the field. Additionally, surface pressure data were acquired for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 and 2.0 million, with and without leading edge grit roughness; the angle of attack was limited to a {minus}20{degrees} to 40{degrees} range. In general, results showed lift curve slope sensitivities to Reynolds number and roughness. The maximum lift coefficient was reduced as much as 29% by leading edge roughness. Moment coefficient showed little sensitivity to roughness beyond 50{degrees} angle of attack, but the expected decambering effect of a thicker boundary layer with roughness did show at lower angles. Tests were also conducted with vortex generators located at the 30% chord location on the upper surface only, at 1 and 1.5 million Reynolds numbers, with and without leading edge grit roughness. In general, with leading edge grit roughness applied, the vortex generators restored 85 percent of the baseline level of maximum lift coefficient but with a more sudden stall break and at a higher angle of attack than the baseline.

Reuss, R.L.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Small power plant reverse trade mission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This draft report was prepared as required by Task No. 2 of the US Department of Energy, Grant No. FG07-89ID12850 Reverse Trade Mission to Acquaint International Representatives with US Power Plant and Drilling Technology'' (mission). As described in the grant proposal, this report covers the reactions of attendees toward US technology, its possible use in their countries, and an evaluation of the mission by the staff leaders. Note this is the draft report of one of two missions carried out under the same contract number. Because of the diversity of the mission subjects and the different attendees at each, a separate report for each mission has been prepared. This draft report has been sent to all mission attendees, specific persons in the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Lab., the California Energy Commission (CEC), and various other governmental agencies.

Not Available

1989-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Direct observation of time reversal violation  

SciTech Connect

A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Core File Settings | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core File Settings Core File Settings The following environment variables control core file creation and contents. Specify regular (non-script) jobs using the qsub argument --env (Note: two dashes). Specify script jobs (--mode script) using the --envs (Note: two dashes) or --exp_env (Note: two dashes) options of runjob. For additional information about setting environment variables in your job, visit http://www.alcf.anl.gov/user-guides/running-jobs#environment-variables. Generation The following environment variables control conditions of core file generation and naming: BG_COREDUMPONEXIT=1 Creates a core file when the application exits. This is useful when the application performed an exit() operation and the cause and location of the exit() is not known. BG_COREDUMPONERROR=1

371

Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

Cooper, Martin H. (Monroeville, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Aging, Fragility and Reversibility Window in Bulk Alloy Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-reversing relaxation enthalpies (DHnr) at glass transitions Tg(x) in the PxGexSe1-2x ternary display wide, sharp and deep global minima (~ 0) in the 0.09 age, in contrast to aging observed for fragile glass compositions outside the window. Thermal reversibility and lack of aging seem to be paradigms of self-organization which molecular glasses share with protein structures which repetitively and reversibly change conformation near Tg and the folding temperature respectively.

S. Chakravarty; D. G. Georgiev; P. Boolchand; M. Micoulaut

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Satellite Data Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction Models. Part II: Uses of Rain-Affected Radiances from Microwave Observations for Hurricane Vortex Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid variational scheme (HVAR) is developed to produce the vortex analysis associated with tropical storms. This scheme allows for direct assimilation of rain-affected radiances from satellite microwave instruments. In the HVAR, the ...

Fuzhong Weng; Tong Zhu; Banghua Yan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Recruiting Suppliers for Reverse Production Systems: an MDP ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key words Recruiting, Reverse Production System, MDP Heuristics. 1. ...... It is very important to select an action wisely as this is the exploration part of the RL.

375

Search for Time Reversal Violation in Polarized Neutron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search for Time Reversal Violation in Polarized Neutron Decay (emiT). Summary: The "emiT" experiment searches for - or will set an improved ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy, Mr. Everett Anderson, PROTON ON SITE Regenerative Fuel Cells for Energy Storage, Mr. Corky Mittelsteadt, Giner Electrochemical...

377

Reversible computation as a model for the quantum measurement process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-to-one reversible automata are introduced. Their applicability to a modelling of the quantum mechanical measurement process is discussed.

Karl Svozil

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Oil Markets After the Hurricanes: Reversion to the Mean or ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Markets After the Hurricanes: Reversion to the Mean or Return to Recent Trend? Macroeconomic Advisers Quarterly Meeting December 2005 Oil Markets After the ...

379

Reversible mechanism for spin crossover in transition-metal cyanides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the mechanisms for reversible and repeatable spin transition in a Prussian blue analog crystal, KCo[Fe(CN)[subscript 6

Kabir, Mohammad Mukul

380

Reverse osmosis desalination and reclamation : control of colloidal and biofouling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this thesis work was on the fundamentals of colloidal and biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination and reclamation. A novel sodium chloride… (more)

Chong, Tzyy Haur.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Validation Tests of TASS for Application to 3-D Vortex Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct analytical solutions can be useful in validating the core formulation of numerical systems. In this document an exact analytical solution to the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equation is compared to the numerical results from the three-dimensional Terminal ...

Switzer G. F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Competencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A core competency is a distinguishing integration of capabilities which enables an organization to deliver mission results. Core competencies represent the collective learning of an organization and provide the capacity to perform present and future missions. Core competencies are distinguishing characteristics which offer comparative advantage and are difficult to reproduce. They exhibit customer focus, mission relevance, and vertical integration from research through applications. They are demonstrable by metrics such as level of investment, uniqueness of facilities and expertise, and national impact. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has identified four core competencies which satisfy the above criteria. Each core competency represents an annual investment of at least $100M and is characterized by an integration of Laboratory technical foundations in physical, chemical, and materials sciences; biological, environmental, and social sciences; engineering sciences; and computational sciences and informatics. The ability to integrate broad technical foundations to develop and sustain core competencies in support of national R&D goals is a distinguishing strength of the national laboratories. The ORNL core competencies are: 9 Energy Production and End-Use Technologies o Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technology o Advanced Materials Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization & Neutron-Based Science and Technology. The distinguishing characteristics of each ORNL core competency are described. In addition, written material is provided for two emerging competencies: Manufacturing Technologies and Computational Science and Advanced Computing. Distinguishing institutional competencies in the Development and Operation of National Research Facilities, R&D Integration and Partnerships, Technology Transfer, and Science Education are also described. Finally, financial data for the ORNL core competencies are summarized in the appendices.

Roberto, J.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Berven, B.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.; Hartman, F.C.; Honea, R.B.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Moon, R.M. Jr.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shelton, R.B. [and others

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

1977-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Apparatus for controlling molten core debris  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Tilbrook, Roger W. (Monroeville, PA); Heylmun, Neal F. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

THE STABILITY AND REVERSIBILITY OF METALLIC BOROHYDRIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In effort to develop reversible metallic borohydrides with high hydrogen storage capacity and low dehydriding temperature, several new materials have been synthesized by modifying LiBH{sub 4} with various metal halides and hydrides. The investigation shows that the halide modification effectively reduced the dehydriding temperature through ion exchange interaction. The effective halides are TiCl{sub 3}, TiF{sub 3}, ZnF{sub 2} and AlF{sub 3}. The material LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiF{sub 3} desorbs 3.5wt% and 8.5wt% hydrogen at 150 C and 450 C respectively. It re-absorbed 6wt% hydrogen at 500 C and 70 bar after dehydrogenation. The XRD of the rehydrided samples confirmed the formation of LiBH{sub 4}. It indicates that the materials are reversible at the conditions given. However, a number of other halides: MgF{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2} and FeCl{sub 3}, did not reduce dehydriding temperature of LiBH{sub 4} significantly. TGA-RGA analysis indicated that some halide modified lithium borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1ZnF{sub 2} evolved diborane during dehydrogenation, but some did not such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiCl{sub 3}. The formation of diborane caused unrecoverable capacity loss resulting in irreversibility. It is suggested that the lithium borohydrides modified by the halides containing the metals that can not form metal borides with boron are likely to evolve diborane during dehydriding. It was discovered that halide modification reduces sensitivity of LiBH{sub 4}. The materials such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiCl{sub 3} and LiBH{sub 4}+0.5TiCl{sub 3} can be handled in open air without visible reaction.

Au, M

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Structural Transition Behavior of CdSe/ZnS Core/shell Quantum Dots under High Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural phase transition of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) has been studied by in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction under high pressure up to 53.6?GPa. The CdSe core transforms from wurtzite to rock-salt structure near 6.3?GPa and then to Cmcm or distorted Cmcm structure probably occurs at 45.1?GPa which has not been observed in CdSe nanomaterials before. The critical pressure from wurtzite to rock-salt and the bulk modulus of rock-salt phase are much higher than those for bulky and uncapped nanoparticle CdSe. The released sample can be kept in rock-salt phase for a certain time, verified by photoluminescence (PL) spectra, quite different from the reversible transition for pure CdSe. A reasonable interpretation of the experimental phenomena is given by comparing the bulk modulus of the core and shell and studying the stress sate of the core after decompression. Our study suggests that capping a hard shell is an effective approach to quench the high pressure phase of nanomaterial with a reversible phase transition.

Z Li; L Wang; B Liu; J Wang; B Liu; Q Li; B Zou; T Cui; Y Meng; H Mao

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modulated active charge exchange fast ion diagnostic for the C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic technique for measuring the fast-ion energy distribution in a field-reversed configuration plasma was developed and tested on the C-2 experiment. A deuterium neutral beam modulated at 22 kHz is injected into the plasma, producing a localized charge-exchange target for the confined fast protons. The escaping fast neutrals are detected by a neutral particle analyzer. The target beam transverse size ({approx}15 cm) defines the spatial resolution of the method. The equivalent current density of the target beam is {density ({approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) that highly exceeds the background neutral density in the core of C-2. The deuterium fast-ions due to the target beam (E{approx}27 keV), are not confined in C-2 and thus make a negligible contribution to the measured signals.

Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Clary, R.; Dettrick, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Deichuli, P.; Kondakov, A.; Murakhtin, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

BIMETALLIC LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDES TOWARD REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4} have been studied as candidates for hydrogen storage because of their high hydrogen contents (18.4 wt% for LiBH{sub 4}). Limited success has been made in reducing the dehydrogenation temperature by adding reactants such as metals, metal oxides and metal halides. However, full rehydrogenation has not been realized because of multi-step decomposition processes and the stable intermediate species produced. It is suggested that adding second cation in LiBH{sub 4} may reduce the binding energy of B-H. The second cation may also provide the pathway for full rehydrogenation. In this work, several bimetallic borohydrides were synthesized using wet chemistry, high pressure reactive ball milling and sintering processes. The investigation found that the thermodynamic stability was reduced, but the full rehydrogenation is still a challenge. Although our experiments show the partial reversibility of the bimetallic borohydrides, it was not sustainable during dehydriding-rehydriding cycles because of the accumulation of hydrogen inert species.

Au, M.

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

POLAR FIELD REVERSAL OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have been monitoring yearly variation in the Sun's polar magnetic fields with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode to record their evolution and expected reversal near the solar maximum. All magnetic patches in the magnetic flux maps are automatically identified to obtain the number density and magnetic flux density as a function of the total magnetic flux per patch. The detected magnetic flux per patch ranges over four orders of magnitude (10{sup 15}-10{sup 20} Mx). The higher end of the magnetic flux in the polar regions is about one order of magnitude larger than that of the quiet Sun, and nearly that of pores. Almost all large patches ({>=}10{sup 18} Mx) have the same polarity, while smaller patches have a fair balance of both polarities. The polarity of the polar region as a whole is consequently determined only by the large magnetic concentrations. A clear decrease in the net flux of the polar region is detected in the slow rising phase of the current solar cycle. The decrease is more rapid in the north polar region than in the south. The decrease in the net flux is caused by a decrease in the number and size of the large flux concentrations as well as the appearance of patches with opposite polarity at lower latitudes. In contrast, we do not see temporal change in the magnetic flux associated with the smaller patches (<10{sup 18} Mx) and that of the horizontal magnetic fields during the years 2008-2012.

Shiota, D. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN (Institute of Physics and Chemical Research), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsuneta, S.; Shimojo, M.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Ishikawa, R. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sako, N., E-mail: shiota@riken.jp [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Assessing Accelerator-Based HPC Reverse Time Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas companies trust Reverse Time Migration (RTM), the most advanced seismic imaging technique, with crucial decisions on drilling investments. The economic value of the oil reserves that require RTM to be localized is in the order of 10^{13} ... Keywords: Reverse time migration, accelerators, GPU, Cell/B.E., FPGA, geophysics.

Mauricio Araya-Polo; Javier Cabezas; Mauricio Hanzich; Miquel Pericas; Felix Rubio; Isaac Gelado; Muhammad Shafiq; Enric Morancho; Nacho Navarro; Eduard Ayguade; Jose Maria Cela; Mateo Valero

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Air Reverse Circulation Bit Internal Fluid Simulation Based on CFD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article instructs the work principle of the injector device and its application in the reverse-circulation sampling drilling bit. Then use the fluent fluid engineering emulator software to simulate the internal fluid territory of the injector when ... Keywords: air reverse circulation, bit, injector hole, optimization

Shuqing Hao; Hong-wei Huang; Kun Yin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

GreenCore Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenCore Capital GreenCore Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GreenCore Capital Name GreenCore Capital Address 10509 Vista Sorrento Parkway Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Region Southern CA Area Product Invests in developing promising renewable energy companies Website http://www.greencorecapital.co Coordinates 32.898095°, -117.215736° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.898095,"lon":-117.215736,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

Uhmeyer, Uwe [Kaiser Systems, Inc, 126 Sohier Road, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core The chemical composition of the Earth's core is surprisingly complicated, according to high-temperature, high-pressure experiments conducted by University of Chicago scientists using the William M. Keck High Pressure Laboratory at the GSECARS facility, APS sector 13. This research has produced experimental evidence suggesting that the Earth's inner core largely consists of two exotic forms of iron (rather than one as previously thought) that appear to be alloyed with silicon. Backscattered electron image of the quenched laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample from 31 GPa and 1976K. ( J.-F. Lin et al.) Above: Backscattered electron image of the quenched laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample from 31 GPa and 1976K. ( J.-F. Lin et al.)

396

Policy Core Information Model (PCIM) Extensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document specifies a number of changes to the Policy Core Information Model (PCIM, RFC 3060). Two types of changes are included. First, several completely new elements are introduced, for example, classes for header filtering, that extend PCIM ...

B. Moore

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The systems biology simulation core algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keller et al. : The systems biology simulation core algo-rithm. BMC Systems Biology 2013 7:55. Page 16 of 16 SubmitMacilwain C: Systems biology: evolving into the mainstream.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Multiple network interface core apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

Underwood, Keith D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hemmert, Karl Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Armor systems including coated core materials  

SciTech Connect

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Inner Core Strength of Atlantic Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the wind field beyond the radius of maximum winds is studied for 18 Atlantic tropical cyclones (TCs) with 989 research and reconnaissance flight legs. Inner core strength, defined as the storm relative mean tangential wind from ...

Mark Croxford; Gary M. Barnes

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

RADIOACTIVITY IN EARTH'S CORE Definition ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

pressures: implications for uranium solubility in planetary cores. ...... Kamiokande cavity in a horizontal mine drift in the Japa- nese Alps. The detector is ...... in aerial or space imagery. Tectonics. A field of study within geology concerned gen

403

Environmental impact of various kayak core materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis compares the environmental impact of fiberglass, Kevlar, carbon fiber, and cork. A kayak company is interested in using cork as a core material, and would like to claim that it is the most environmentally ...

Kirkland, David R. (David Roger)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow in a pebble-bed nuclear reactor,” Phys. Rev. E, vol.from the current fleet of nuclear reactors far outweigh thethrough the core of a nuclear reactor. This regime includes

Laufer, Michael Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MODULAR CORE UNITS FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular core unit for use in a nuclear reactor is described. Many identical core modules can be placed next to each other to make up a complete core. Such a module includes a cylinder of moderator material surrounding a fuel- containing re-entrant coolant channel. The re-entrant channel provides for the circulation of coolant such as liquid sodium from one end of the core unit, through the fuel region, and back out through the same end as it entered. Thermal insulation surrounds the moderator exterior wall inducing heat to travel inwardly to the coolant channel. Spaces between units may be used to accommodate control rods and support structure, which may be cooled by a secondary gas coolant, independently of the main coolant. (AEC)

Gage, J.F. Jr.; Sherer, D.B.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Incorporation of silica into baroplastic core-shell nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Core-shell baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit pressure-induced flow at low temperatures and high pressures. Core-shell baroplastics used in this work are comprised of a low Tg poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) core ...

Hewlett, Sheldon A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Argonne CNM Highlight: Complexity in Core-Shell Nanomagnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity in Core-Shell Nanomagnets Magnetgic hysteresis of core-shell nanoparticles (curves) Magnetic hysteresis of core-shell Fe@Fe3O4 nanoparticles at 5 K under field cooling...

409

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole...

410

Nonlinear Time-Reversal of Classical Waves: Experiment and Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider time-reversal of electromagnetic waves in a closed, wave-chaotic system containing a discrete, passive, harmonic-generating nonlinearity. An experimental system is constructed as a time-reversal mirror, in which excitations generated by the nonlinearity are gathered, time-reversed, transmitted, and directed exclusively to the location of the nonlinearity. Here we show that such nonlinear objects can be purely passive (as opposed to the active nonlinearities used in previous work), and develop a high-rate secure communication system based on nonlinear time-reversal. A model of the experimental system is developed, using a star-graph network of transmission lines, with one of the lines terminated by a model diode. The model simulates time-reversal of linear and nonlinear signals, demonstrates features seen in the experimental system, and supports our interpretation of the experimental results.

Matthew Frazier; Biniyam Taddese; Bo Xiao; Thomas Antonsen; Edward Ott; Steven M. Anlage

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

NETL: Control Technology: ElectroCore Separator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ElectroCore Separator ElectroCore Separator LSR Technologies and its subcontractors designed and installed a 8,500 m3/hr (5,000 acfm) Advanced ElectroCore system and a dry sulfur scrubber to test it using an exhaust gas slipstream at Alabama Power Company's Gaston Steam Plant. Shakedown is scheduled for August 15, 2001. The exhaust gas will be from Unit #4 of a 270 MWe sub-critical, pulverized coal boiler burning a low-sulfur bituminous coal. The Advanced ElectroCore system will consist of a conventional upstream ESP, a dry SO2 scrubber, a particle precharger and an Advanced ElectroCore separator. Particle concentrations and size distributions will be measured at the ESP inlet, at the dry scrubber outlet and at the ElectroCore outlet. The concentration of 12 common HAPs will be measured at these locations as well. For purposes of project organization and monitoring, the work will be divided into nine (9) tasks described below.

412

Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

FORMED CORE SAMPLER HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

Miller, D.; Reigel, M.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reduced gravity rankine cycle design and optimization with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) coupled with a fission reactor remain an attractive option for space power applications because system specific power and efficiency is very favorable for plant designs of 100 kW(e) or higher. Potential drawbacks to the technology in a reduced gravity environment include two-phase fluid management processes such as liquid-vapor phase separation. The most critical location for phase separation is at the boiler exit where only vapor must be sent to the turbine because blade erosion occurs from high velocity liquid droplets entrained by vapor flow. Previous studies have proposed that rotary separators be used to separate the liquid and vapor from a two phase mixture. However these devices have complex turbo machinery, require kilowatts of power and are untested for high vapor flow conditions. The Interphase Transport Phenomena (ITP) laboratory has developed a low-power, passive microgravity vortex phase separator (MVS) which has already proven to be an essential component of two-phase systems operating in low gravity environments. This thesis presents results from flight experiments where a Rankine cycle was operated in a reduced gravity environment for the first time by utilizing the MVS for liquid and vapor phase separation. The MVS was able to operate under saturated conditions and adjust to system transients as it would in the Rankine cycle by controlling the amount of liquid and vapor within the device. A new model is developed for the MVS to predict separation performance at high vapor flow conditions for sizing the separator at the boiler, condenser, and turbine locations within the cycle by using a volume limiting method. This model factors in the following separator characteristics: mass, pumping power, and available buffer volume for system transients. The study is concluded with overall Rankine efficiency and performance changes due to adding vortex phase separation and a schematic of the Rankine cycle with the integration of the MVS is presented. The results from this thesis indicate the thermal to electric efficiency and specific mass of the cycle can be improved by using the MVS to separate the two phases instead of a rotary separator.

Supak, Kevin Robert

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reduced gravity Rankine cycle system design and optimization study with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) coupled with a fission reactor remain an attractive option for space power applications because system specific power and efficiency is very favorable for plant designs of 100 kW(e) or higher. Potential drawbacks to the technology in a reduced gravity environment include two-phase fluid management processes such as liquid-vapor phase separation. The most critical location for phase separation is at the boiler exit where only vapor must be sent to the turbine because blade erosion occurs from high velocity liquid droplets entrained by vapor flow. Previous studies have proposed that rotary separators be used to separate the liquid and vapor from a two phase mixture. However these devices have complex turbo machinery, require kilowatts of power and are untested for high vapor flow conditions. The Interphase Transport Phenomena (ITP) laboratory has developed a low-power, passive microgravity vortex phase separator (MVS) which has already proven to be an essential component of two-phase systems operating in low gravity environments. This thesis presents results from flight experiments where a Rankine cycle was operated in a reduced gravity environment for the first time by utilizing the MVS for liquid and vapor phase separation. The MVS was able to operate under saturated conditions and adjust to system transients as it would in the Rankine cycle by controlling the amount of liquid and vapor within the device. A new model is developed for the MVS to predict separation performance at high vapor flow conditions for sizing the separator at the boiler, condenser, and turbine locations within the cycle by using a volume limiting method. This model factors in the following separator characteristics: mass, pumping power, and available buffer volume for system transients. The study is concluded with overall Rankine efficiency and performance changes due to adding vortex phase separation and a schematic of the Rankine cycle with the integration of the MVS is presented. The results from this thesis indicate the thermal to electric efficiency and specific mass of the cycle can be improved by using the MVS to separate the two phases instead of a rotary separator.

Supak, Kevin Robert

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reversible Parallel Discrete Event Formulation of a TLM-based Radio Signal Propagation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio signal strength estimation is essential in many applications, including the design of military radio communications and industrial wireless installations. For scenarios with large or richly- featured geographical volumes, parallel processing is required to meet the memory and computa- tion time demands. Here, we present a scalable and efficient parallel execution of the sequential model for radio signal propagation recently developed by Nutaro et al. Starting with that model, we (a) provide a vector-based reformulation that has significantly lower computational overhead for event handling, (b) develop a parallel decomposition approach that is amenable to reversibility with minimal computational overheads, (c) present a framework for transparently mapping the conservative time-stepped model into an optimistic parallel discrete event execution, (d) present a new reversible method, along with its analysis and implementation, for inverting the vector-based event model to be executed in an optimistic parallel style of execution, and (e) present performance results from implementation on Cray XT platforms. We demonstrate scalability, with the largest runs tested on up to 127,500 cores of a Cray XT5, enabling simulation of larger scenarios and with faster execution than reported before on the radio propagation model. This also represents the first successful demonstration of the ability to efficiently map a conservative time-stepped model to an optimistic discrete-event execution.

Seal, Sudip K [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Toroidal fusion reactor design based on the reversed-field pinch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The toroidal reversed-field pinch (RFP) achieves gross equilibrium and stability with a combination of high shear and wall stabilization, rather than the imposition of tokamak-like q-constraints. Consequently, confinement is provided primarily by poloidal magnetic fields, poloidal betas as large as approximately 0.58 are obtainable, the high ohmic-heating (toroidal) current densities promise a sole means of heating a D-T plasma to ignition, and the plasma aspect ratio is not limited by stability/equilibrium constraints. A reactor-like plasma model has been developed in order to quantify and to assess the general features of a power system based upon RFP confinement. An ''operating point'' has been generated on the basis of this plasma model and a relatively detailed engineering energy balance. These results are used to generate a conceptual engineering model of the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR) which includes a general description of a 750 MWe power plant and the preliminary consideration of vacuum/fueling, first wall, blanket, magnet coils, iron core, and the energy storage/transfer system.

Hagenson, R.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Elliptical Warm-Core Rings in a Two-Layer Ocean with Ambient Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rodon solution for an elliptical vortex with outcropping interface is extended from the reduced-gravity limit to the two-layer model. Motions in the lower layer consist of a reaction to the presence of the upper-layer vortex, or of an ...

Benoit Cushman-Roisin; Shabnam Merchant-Both

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Structural mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores A fast reactor core is composed of a closely packed hexagonal arrangement of fuel, control, blanket , and shielding assemblies....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Boitnott, 2003) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Greg N. Boitnott (2003) Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of...

422

Recovery Act - Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act - Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity Recovery Act - Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity A report detailling the Solid State...

423

Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Vostok Ice Core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vostok Ice Core Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Vostok Ice Core graphics Graphics data Data Investigators J.-M. Barnola, D. Raynaud, C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciologie...

424

Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Siple Station Ice Core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siple Station Ice Core Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Siple Station Ice Core graphics Graphics data Data Investigators A. Neftel, H. Friedli, E. Moor, H. Ltscher, H....

425

Phase-locked antiguided multiple-core ribbon fiber - IEEE ...  

With the evanescent technique, the field energy is localized on the gain cores, and nearest neighbor cores are cou- ... guide components as discussed above, ...

426

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with...

427

SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT The first phase of the Lemnos Interoperable Security Program shall lay the foundation for...

428

Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Engineering Nanocolumnar Defect Configurations for Optimized Vortex Pinning in High Temperature Superconducting Nanocomposite Wires  

SciTech Connect

High temperature superconducting (HTS), coated conductor wires based on nanocomposite films containing self-assembled, insulating BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumnar defects have previously been reported to exhibit enhanced vortex pinning. Here, we report on microstructural design via control of BZO nanocolumns density in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO)+BZO nancomposite films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc(H, ,T). X-ray diffraction and microstructural examination shows increasing number density of epitaxial BZO nanocolumns in the highly cube-textured YBCO matrix with increasing nominal BZO additions. Transport property measurement reveals that an increase in BZO content upto 4 vol% is required to sustain the highest pinning and Jc performance as the magnetic field increases. By growing thicker, single-layer nanocomposite films (~4 m) with controlled density of BZO columnar defects, the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A/cm at 77 K, self-field and the minimum Ic of 455 A/cm at 65 K and 3 T for all magnetic field orientations were obtained. This is the highest Ic reported to date for films on metallic templates which are the basis for the 2nd generation, coated conductor-based HTS wires.

Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Ahuja, Raj [Waukesha Electric Systems Inc.; Abiade, J. [North Carolina A& T State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Effects of surface roughness and vortex generators on the NACA 4415 airfoil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines in the field can be subjected to many and varying wind conditions, including high winds with rotor locked or with yaw excursions. In some cases the rotor blades may be subjected to unusually large angles of attack that possibly result in unexpected loads and deflections. To better understand loadings at unusual angles of attack, a wind tunnel test was performed. An 18-inch constant chord model of the NACA 4415 airfoil section was tested under two dimensional steady state conditions in the Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 7 x 10 Subsonic Wind Tunnel (7 x 10). The objective of these tests was to document section lift and moment characteristics under various model and air flow conditions. These included a normal angle of attack range of {minus}20{degree} to +40{degree}, an extended angle of attack range of {minus}60{degree} to +230{degree}, applications of leading edge grit roughness (LEGR), and use of vortex generators (VGs), all at chord Reynolds numbers as high as possible for the particular model configuration. To realistically satisfy these conditions the 7 x 10 offered a tunnel-height-to-model-chord ratio of 6.7, suggesting low interference effects even at the relatively high lift and drag conditions expected during the test. Significantly, it also provided chord Reynolds numbers up to 2.0 million. 167 figs., 13 tabs.

Reuss, R.L.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Winding numbers and scaling tilts from random vortex-antivortex pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that random distributions of vortex-antivortex pairs (rather than of individual vortices) lead to scaling of typical winding numbers W trapped inside a loop of circumference C with the square root of C when the expected winding numbers are large. Such scaling is consistent with the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM). By contrast, distribution of individual vortices with randomly assigned topological charges would result in the dispersion of W scaling with the square root of the area inside C. Scaling of the dispersion of W and of the probability of detection of non-zero W with C can be also studied for loops so small that non-zero windings are rare. In this case I show a doubling of the scaling of dispersion with C when compared to the scaling of dispersion in the large W regime. Moreover, probability of trapping of a non-zero W becomes, in this case, proportional to the area subtended by C (hence, to the square of circumference). This quadruples, as compared with large winding numbers regime, the exponent in the power law dependence of the frequency of trapping of W=+1 or W=-1 on C. Such change of the power law exponent by a FACTOR OF FOUR implies quadrupling of the scaling of the frequency of winding number trapping with the quench rate, and is of key importance for experimental tests of KZM.

Wojciech H. Zurek

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Reversibility and Adiabatic Computation: Trading Time and Space for Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future miniaturization and mobilization of computing devices requires energy parsimonious `adiabatic' computation. This is contingent on logical reversibility of computation. An example is the idea of quantum computations which are reversible except for the irreversible observation steps. We propose to study quantitatively the exchange of computational resources like time and space for irreversibility in computations. Reversible simulations of irreversible computations are memory intensive. Such (polynomial time) simulations are analysed here in terms of `reversible' pebble games. We show that Bennett's pebbling strategy uses least additional space for the greatest number of simulated steps. We derive a trade-off for storage space versus irreversible erasure. Next we consider reversible computation itself. An alternative proof is provided for the precise expression of the ultimate irreversibility cost of an otherwise reversible computation without restrictions on time and space use. A time-irreversibility trade-off hierarchy in the exponential time region is exhibited. Finally, extreme time-irreversibility trade-offs for reversible computations in the thoroughly unrealistic range of computable versus noncomputable time-bounds are given.

Ming Li; Paul Vitanyi

1997-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

Argonne CNM Highlight: Reverse Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reverse Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film Reverse Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film Reverse Chemmical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film Ferroelectric materials display a spontaneous electric polarization below the Curie temperature that can be reoriented, typically by applying an electric field. In this study, researchers from Argonne, Northern Illinois University, and The University of Pennsylvania have demonstrated that the chemical environment can control the polarization orientation in an ultrathin ferroelectric film. This is complementary to recent predictions that polarization can affect surface chemistry and illuminates potential applications in sublithographic patterning and electrically tunable catalysts. In situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements showed that high or low

434

CA Core Competency Worksheet August 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA Core Competency Worksheet August 2010 CA Core Competency Worksheet August 2010 1 DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Key Cyber Security Role: Certification Agent (CA) (Also referred to as Security Control Assessor) Role Definition: The CA is the individual responsible for assessing the management, operational, assurance, and technical security controls implemented on an information system via security testing and evaluation (ST&E) methods. This individual must be independent of system development, operation, and deficiency mitigation. Competency Area: Data Security Functional Requirement: Design Competency Definition: Refers to the application of the principles, policies, and procedures necessary to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, availability, and privacy of data in all forms of media (i.e., electronic

435

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

Moore, W.T.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fuel fabrication acceptance report FSV: initial core  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of the Fort St. Vrain initial core is described. Detailed summaries of the final fuel element metal loadings and other properties are given. Problems that occurred during fabrication and their resolutions have been given special attention, including the results of analyses made prior to their adoption. A final substantiation for the Fort St. Vrain initial core was provided by a full-core, three-dimensional analysis considering control rod insertion and fuel depletion and with explicit representation of the as-built fuel elements. The calculated power distributions from the three dimensional analysis are well within the limits specified for the reference design. During fabrication of the initial core fuel elements, some difficulties with assayed quantities of uranium and thorium were encountered. These difficulties resulted from changes in the fuel rod standards used in assay equipment calibration and in the techniques employed for assaying fuel particles and fuel rods. As a result the apparent values for the average metal loadings for some fuel rods and fuel elements changed. For certain blends some already-assembled fuel elements were outside the tolerances given in the fuel specification. A study was undertaken to make recommendations on the disposition of already-fabricated fuel and adjustments for the remainder of fuel fabrication. This study focused on utilizing, as much as possible, already-fabricated fuel without compromising the performance of the core. A variety of adjustments were considered and used in some instances, but the most successful method was the imposition of a layer location on fuel elements. By use of this additional core assembly requirement, a distribution of high metal load and low metal load fuel elements was obtained that assured that power perturbations would be small and localized and that temperature perturbations would be small and confined to axial layers where temperatures are nominally low. (auth)

Kapernick, R.J.; Nirschl, R.J.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

ACOUSTIC SIGNATURES OF THE HELIUM CORE FLASH  

SciTech Connect

All evolved stars with masses M {approx}< 2 M{sub Sun} undergo an initiating off-center helium core flash in their M{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 0.48 M{sub Sun} He core as they ascend the red giant branch (RGB). This off-center flash is the first of a few successive helium shell subflashes that remove the core electron degeneracy over 2 Myr, converting the object into a He-burning star. Though characterized by Thomas over 40 years ago, this core flash phase has yet to be observationally probed. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) code, we show that red giant asteroseismology enabled by space-based photometry (i.e., Kepler and CoRoT) can probe these stars during the flash. The rapid ({approx}< 10{sup 5} yr) contraction of the red giant envelope after the initiating flash dramatically improves the coupling of the p-modes to the core g-modes, making the detection of l = 1 mixed modes possible for these 2 Myr. This duration implies that 1 in 35 stars near the red clump in the H-R diagram will be in their core flash phase. During this time, the star has a g-mode period spacing of {Delta}P{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 70-100 s, lower than the {Delta}P{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 250 s of He-burning stars in the red clump, but higher than the RGB stars at the same luminosity. This places them in an underpopulated part of the large frequency spacing ({Delta}{nu}) versus {Delta}P{sub g} diagram that should ease their identification among the thousands of observed red giants.

Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Moore, Kevin; Macias, Phillip J. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Discriminative features in reversible stochastic attribute-value grammars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reversible stochastic attribute-value grammars (de Kok et al., 2011) use one model for parse disambiguation and fluency ranking. Such a model encodes preferences with respect to syntax, fluency, and appropriateness of logical forms, as weighted features. ...

Daniël de Kok

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Wind shear and buoyancy reversal at the stratocumulus top  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical experiment is designed to study the interaction at the stratocumulus top between a mean vertical shear and the buoyancy reversal due to evaporative cooling, without radiative cooling. Direct numerical simulation is used to eliminate ...

Juan Pedro Mellado; Bjorn Stevens; Heiko Schmidt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect

This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reversible and irreversible binding of nanoparticles to polymeric surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reversible and irreversible binding of CdSe-nanoparticles and nanorods to polymeric surfaces via a strong, multiple hydrogen bond (= Hamilton-receptor/barbituric acid) is described. Based on ROMP-copolymers, the supramolecular interaction on a thin polymer ...

Wolfgang H. Binder; Marina Lomoschitz; Robert Sachsenhofer; Gernot Friedbacher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Reversible Record Breaking and Variability: Temperature Distributions across the Globe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on counts of record highs and lows, and employing reversibility in time, an approach to examining natural variability is proposed. The focus is on intrinsic variability; that is, variance separated from the trend in the mean. A variability ...

Amalia Anderson; Alexander Kostinski

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Vorticity and Instability during Flow Reversals on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow reversals during relaxation of the equatorward wind on the northern California shelf are studied with observations and a simple numerical model. Data from the CODE experiment are used to document the changes in the cross-shelf profiles of ...

Uwe Send

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Average-case analysis of perfect sorting by reversals - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 15, 2011 ... operator acting on a signed permutation, reversing the order and ..... magnitude O(n?c) and the remaining terms have magnitude O(n?c?1).

446

Reversion of the Malignant Phenotype of Human Breast Cells in ...  

The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525/97/04/231/15 $2.00 The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 137, Number 1, April 7, 1997 231–245 231 Reversion of the ...

447

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

SECA Core Technology Program Seal Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECA Core Technology Program Seal Workshop Workshop held at Hyatt Regency, San Antonio August 10, 2007 Workshop organized by: Dr. Ayyakkannu Manivannan, National Energy technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Dr. Prabhakar Singh Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 1 2 Table of Content * Executive Summary * Meeting Agenda * Presentations * List of Attendees 3 Executive Summary SECA Core Technology Program (SECA CTP) led workshop on the topical area titled "SOFC seal: Technology, Challenges and Future Directions" was held on August 10, 2007 at Hyatt Regency, San Antonio, TX. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers presently involved in the development, engineering, fabrication, and testing of

449

Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

Jones, Robert D. (Irwin, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Basic criticality relations for gas core design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Minimum critical fissile concentrations are calculated for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Am-242m mixed homogeneously with hydrogen at temperatures to 15,000K. Minimum critical masses of the same mixtures in a 1000 liter sphere are also calculated. It is shown that propellent efficiencies of a gas core fizzler engine using Am-242m as fuel would exceed those in a solid core engine as small as 1000L operating at 100 atmospheres pressure. The same would be true for Pu-239 and possibly U-233 at pressures of 1000 atm. or at larger volumes.

Tanner, J.E.

1992-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Reactor Core Assembly - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Facilities › HFIR › Reactor Core Assembly Home › Facilities › HFIR › Reactor Core Assembly Reactor Core Assembly The reactor core assembly is contained in an 8-ft (2.44-m)-diameter pressure vessel located in a pool of water. The top of the pressure vessel is 17 ft (5.18 m) below the pool surface, and the reactor horizontal mid-plane is 27.5 ft (8.38 m) below the pool surface. The control plate drive mechanisms are located in a subpile room beneath the pressure vessel. These features provide the necessary shielding for working above the reactor core and greatly facilitate access to the pressure vessel, core, and reflector regions. In-core irradiation and experiment locations (cross section at horizontal midplane) Reactor core assembly Reactor core assembly: (1) in-core irradiation and experiment locations,

452

Supernova Reverse Shocks and SiC Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new mechanisms by which the isotopic compositions of X-type grains of presolar SiC are altered by reverse shocks in Type II supernovae. We address three epochs of reverse shocks: pressure wave from the H envelope near t = 10$^6$s; reverse shock from the presupernova wind near 10$^8-10^9$s; reverse shock from the ISM near 10$^{10}$s. Using 1-D hydrodynamics we show that the first creates a dense shell of Si and C atoms near 10$^6$s in which the SiC surely condenses. The second reverse shock causes precondensed grains to move rapidly forward through decelerated gas of different isotopic composition, during which implantation, sputtering and further condensation occur simultaneously. The third reverse shock causes only further ion implantation and sputtering, which may affect trace element isotopic compositions. Using a 25M$_{\\odot}$ supernova model we propose solutions to the following unsolved questions: where does SiC condense?; why does SiC condense in preference to graphite?; why is condensed SiC $^{28}$Si-rich?; why is O richness no obstacle to SiC condensation?; how many atoms of each isotope are impacted by a grain that condenses at time t$_0$ at radial coordinate r$_0$? These many considerations are put forward as a road map for interpreting SiC X grains found in meteorites and their meaning for supernova physics.

E. A. -N. Deneault; D. D. Clayton; A. Heger

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

Supernova Reverse Shocks and SiC Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new mechanisms by which the isotopic compositions of X-type grains of presolar SiC are altered by reverse shocks in Type II supernovae. We address three epochs of reverse shocks: pressure wave from the H envelope near t = 10 6 s; reverse shock from the presupernova wind near 10 8-10 9 s; reverse shock from the ISM near 10 10 s. Using 1-D hydrodynamics we show that the first creates a dense shell of Si and C atoms near 10 6 s in which the SiC surely condenses. The second reverse shock causes precondensed grains to move rapidly forward through decelerated gas of different isotopic composition, during which implantation, sputtering and further condensation occur simultaneously. The third reverse shock causes only further ion implantation and sputtering, which may affect trace element isotopic compositions. Using a 25M ? supernova model we propose solutions to the following unsolved questions: where does SiC condense?; why does SiC condense in preference to graphite?; why is condensed SiC 28 Si-rich?; why is O richness no obstacle to SiC condensation?; how many atoms of each isotope are impacted by a grain that condenses at time t0 at radial coordinate r0? These many considerations are put forward as a road map for interpreting SiC X grains found in meteorites and their meaning for supernova physics. Subject headings: —supernova remnants —dust extinction —infrared:stars —astrochemistry 1.

Ethan A. -n. Deneault; Donald D. Clayton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Investigation of vortex generators for augmentation of wind turbine power performance  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the use of vortex generators (VGs) for performance augmentation of the stall-regulated AWT-26 wind turbine. The goal was to design a VG array which would increase annual energy production (AEP) by increasing power output at moderate wind speeds, without adversely affecting the loads or stall-regulation performance of the turbine. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at the University of Washington to evaluate the effect of VGs on the AWT-26 blade, which is lofted from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) S-series airfoils. Based on wind-tunnel results and analysis, a VG array was designed and then tested on the AWT-26 prototype, designated P1. Performance and loads data were measured for P1, both with and without VGs installed. the turbine performance with VGs met most of the design requirements; power output was increased at moderate wind speeds with a negligible effect on peak power. However, VG drag penalties caused a loss in power output for low wind speeds, such that performance with VGs resulted in a net decrease in AEP for sites having annual average wind speeds up to 8.5 m/s. While the present work did not lead to improved AEP for the AWT-2 turbine, it does provide insight into performance augmentation of wind turbines with VGs. The safe design of a VG array for a stall-regulated turbine has been demonstrated, and several issues involving optimal performance with VGs have been identified and addressed. 15 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

Griffin, D.A. [Lynette (R.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Vortex induced vibration for aquatic clean power (VIVACE)NOTE FROM ACM: It has been determined that the author of this article plagiarized the contents from a previously published paper. Therefore ACM has shut off access to this paper.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOTE FROM ACM: It has been determined that the author of this article plagiarized the contents from a previously published paper. Therefore ACM has shut off access to this paper. The paper by M. K. Raj and B. G. Muthuraj plagiarizes the ... Keywords: VIVACE, reynolds number, undulations, vortex shedding, vortex vibrations

M. K. Raj; B. G. Muthuraj

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Assessment of the Poloidal Distribution of Core Plasma Fueling and Impurity Sources in DIII-D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements and modeling of the 2D poloidal D{sub {alpha}} intensity distribution in DIII-D low density L-mode and medium density ELMy H-mode plasmas indicate that the core plasma is predominately fueled near the divertor x-point region. The neutral hydrogen and ion carbon emission were measured in the divertor and inner main chamber scrape-off layer (SOL) using a plasma imaging technique, covering 85% of the poloidal cross-section. Typically, the peak emission in the inner main SOL at the tokamak midplane was three orders of magnitude lower than in the divertor. For discharges with the ion Bx{del}B drift direction toward the lower divertor the UEDGE/DEGAS codes predict strong core plasma fueling from the significantly higher density and lower temperature plasma calculated in the inner divertor leg. The concomitant carbon ion flow reversal in the inner divertor leg enhances the leakage of carbon from the divertor into the main SOL, and hence into the core.

Groth, M; Owen, L; Porter, G; Brooks, N; Fenstermacher, M; Meyer, W; Leonard, A; Petrie, T; Rudakov, D; Wang, G; Watkins, J; Wolf, N

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

Active galactic nuclei and massive galaxy cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Context) Central active galactic nuclei (AGN) are supposed to play a key role in the evolution of their host galaxies. In particular, the dynamical and physical properties of the gas core must be affected by the injected energy. (Aims) Our aim is to study the effects of an AGN on the dark matter profile and on the central stellar light distribution in massive early type galaxies. (Methods) By performing self-consistent N-body simulations, we assume in our analysis that periodic bipolar outbursts from a central AGN can induce harmonic oscillatory motions on both sides of the gas core. (Results) Using realistic AGN properties, we find that the motions of the gas core, driven by such feedback processes, can flatten the dark matter and/or stellar profiles after 4-5 Gyr. These results are consistent with recent observational studies that suggest that most giant elliptical galaxies have cores or are "missing light" in their inner part. Since stars behave as a "collisionless" fluid similar to dark matter, the density profile both of stars and dark matter should be affected in a similar way, leading to an effective reduction in the central brightness.

Sebastien Peirani; Scott Kay; Joe Silk

2006-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Sinking of Warm-Core Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense cooling of a warm-core ring or warming of the fluids surrounding a ring can increase the density of that ring relative to the surrounding fluids. This increase in density can cause the ring to sink under the surrounding fluids. A simple ...

Rick Chapman; Doron Nof

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Power excursion analysis for high burnup cores  

SciTech Connect

A study was undertaken of power excursions in high burnup cores. There were three objectives in this study. One was to identify boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients in which there is significant energy deposition in the fuel. Another was to analyze the response of BWRs to the rod drop accident (RDA) and other transients in which there is a power excursion. The last objective was to investigate the sources of uncertainty in the RDA analysis. In a boiling water reactor, the events identified as having significant energy deposition in the fuel were a rod drop accident, a recirculation flow control failure, and the overpressure events; in a pressurized water reactor, they were a rod ejection accident and boron dilution events. The RDA analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the space- dependent neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the calculated maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important uncertainties in each of these categories are discussed in the report.

Diamond, D.J.; Neymotin, L.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Alternative Transport Architecture for Core ATM Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to remain competitive in an increasingly aggressive market-place, it is essential that network operators deliver cost-effective, resilient bulk transport. This will enable the unit costs of circuit delivery in the core network to be reduced, ...

P. A. Veitch

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Propagation of an arbitrary vortex pair through an astigmatic optical system and determination of its net topological charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We embed a pair of vortices with different topological charges in a Gaussian beam and study its evolution through an astigmatic optical system, a tilted lens. The propagation dynamics is explained by a closed-form analytical expression. Furthermore, we show that a careful examination of the intensity distribution at a predicted position past the lens can provide us with the net charge present in the beam. To the best of our knowledge, our method is the first non-interferometric technique to measure the net charge of an arbitrary vortex pair. Our experimental results are in close agreement with the theoretical predictions.

Reddy, Salla Gangi; Aadhi, A; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Coring unconsolidated sands in the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Diamant Board Stratabit has achieved coring recovery rates in soft, unconsolidated formations as high as 99 percent. These rates are achieved using conventional coring equipment in a special configuration to minimize frictional resistance to the core as it passes through the bit and core catcher assembly and enters the inner barrel. This paper describes DBS's coring experience with its Maximum Core Protection System, which has been used at depths from 3000 ft to below 20,000 ft and in deviated holes up to 57 degrees. In the Gulf of Mexico, the system cored over 5800 ft from Matagorda Island to Charlotte Harbor, with an overall recovery rate of 93 percent. In most applications, the hole size dictates the core barrel and core size. Through 9 5/8-in. casing with an 8 1/2-in. by 4-in. core bit, the 6 3/4-in. by 4-in. by 30-ft conventional core barrel will be used with a Fibertube inner barrel to replace the steel inner barrel, allowing a full 4-in. core to be cut. In smaller hole sizes, other equipment with the Maximum Core Protection System will be used. With a top drive unit or long Kelly, a 45-ft or 60-ft barrel may be used. Many times an unconsolidated formation will not support more than 30 ft of core, therefore 30-ft barrels are normally used.

Wilcox, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Collapse and Fragmentation of Molecular Cloud Cores. X. Magnetic Braking of Prolate and Oblate Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collapse and fragmentation of initially prolate and oblate, magnetic molecular clouds is calculated in three dimensions with a gravitational, radiative hydrodynamics code. The code includes magnetic field effects in an approximate manner: magnetic pressure, tension, braking, and ambipolar diffusion are all modelled. The parameters varied for both the initially prolate and oblate clouds are the initial degree of central concentration of the radial density profile, the initial angular velocity, and the efficiency of magnetic braking (represented by a factor $f_{mb} = 10^{-4}$ or $10^{-3}$). The oblate cores all collapse to form rings that might be susceptible to fragmentation into multiple systems. The outcome of the collapse of the prolate cores depends strongly on the initial density profile. Prolate cores with central densities 20 times higher than their boundary densities collapse and fragment into binary or quadruple systems, whereas cores with central densities 100 times higher collapse to form single...

Boss, Alan P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Quantum Dots-based Reverse Phase Protein Microarray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Qdots, with two STV per Qdot. CdSe/ZnS Qdots are embedded inf_chen@lbl.gov Abstract CdSe nanocrystals, also calledmaterials made of a CdSe core of a few nanometers, and

Shingyoji, Masato; Gerion, Daniele; Pinkel, Dan; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Magnetic Blockade Mechanism for Quantum Nucleation of Superconducting Vortex-Antivortex Pairs in Zero External Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a magnetic dual of the Coulomb blockade effect for quantum nucleation of flux vortex pairs in high-Tc superconducting (HTS) films and grain boundaries in zero applied field. The magnetic blockade instability occurs at {\\theta} = {\\pi}, where {\\theta} is the "vacuum" or theta angle. The {\\theta} term has recently been discussed in the context of several other systems, including charge and spin density waves, topological insulators, the quantum Hall effect, and spontaneous CP violation. Our model predicts a sharp pair creation threshold current at {\\theta} = {\\pi}, analogous to the Coulomb blockade voltage of a tunnel junction, and explains the observed thickness dependence of critical currents in HTS coated conductors. We use the Schr\\"odinger equation to compute the evolving macrostate amplitudes, coupled by a generalized tunneling matrix element. The simulations yield excellent quantitative agreement with measured voltage-current characteristics of bi-crystal and other HTS grain boundary junctions. The model also predicts non-sinusoidal behavior in the voltage oscillations resulting from time-correlated vortex tunneling.

J. H. Miller Jr.; A. I. Wijesinghe

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

475

Next Generation CANDU Core Physics Innovations  

SciTech Connect

NG CANDU is the 'Next Generation' CANDU{sup R} reactor, aimed at producing electrical power at a capital cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. A key element of cost reduction is the use of H{sub 2}O as coolant and Slightly Enriched Uranium fuel in a tight D{sub 2}O-moderated lattice. The innovations in the CANDU core physics result in substantial improvements in economics as well as significant enhancements in reactor licensability, controllability, and waste reduction. The full-core coolant-void reactivity in NG CANDU is about -3 mk. Power coefficient is substantially negative. Fuel burnup is about three times the current natural-uranium burnup. (authors)

Chan, P.S.W.; Hopwood, J.M.; Love, J.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Preservation under Substructures modulo Bounded Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a model-theoretic property that generalizes the classical notion of "preservation under substructures". We call this property \\emph{preservation under substructures modulo bounded cores}, and present a syntactic characterization via $\\Sigma_2^0$ sentences for properties of arbitrary structures definable by FO sentences. Towards a sharper characterization, we conjecture that the count of existential quantifiers in the $\\Sigma_2^0$ sentence equals the size of the smallest bounded core. While we do not have a proof of the conjecture yet, we show that it holds for special fragments of FO and also over special classes of structures. We present a (not FO-definable) class of finite structures for which the conjecture fails, but for which the classical {\\L}o\\'s-Tarski preservation theorem holds. As a fallout of our studies, we have obtained combinatorial proofs of the {\\L}o\\'s-Tarski theorem for some of the aforementioned cases.

Sankaran, Abhisekh; Madan, Vivek; Kamath, Pritish; Chakraborty, Supratik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Synthesis of Reversible Functions Beyond Gate Count and Quantum Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many synthesis approaches for reversible and quantum logic have been proposed so far. However, most of them generate circuits with respect to simple metrics, i.e. gate count or quantum cost. On the other hand, to physically realize reversible and quantum hardware, additional constraints exist. In this paper, we describe cost metrics beyond gate count and quantum cost that should be considered while synthesizing reversible and quantum logic for the respective target technologies. We show that the evaluation of a synthesis approach may differ if additional costs are applied. In addition, a new cost metric, namely Nearest Neighbor Cost (NNC) which is imposed by realistic physical quantum architectures, is considered in detail. We discuss how existing synthesis flows can be extended to generate optimal circuits with respect to NNC while still keeping the quantum cost small.

Robert Wille; Mehdi Saeedi; Rolf Drechsler

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

478

Wind reversals in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of irregular cessation and subsequent reversal of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is theoretically analysed. The force and thermal balance on a single plume detached from the thermal boundary layer yields a set of coupled nonlinear equations, whose dynamics is related to the Lorenz equations. For Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range $10^{-2} \\leq \\Pr \\leq 10^{3}$ and $10^{7} \\leq \\Ra \\leq 10^{12}$, the model has the following features: (i) chaotic reversals may be exhibited at Ra $\\geq 10^{7}$; (ii) the Reynolds number based on the root mean square velocity scales as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Ra^{[0.41 ... 0.47]}$ (depending on Pr), and as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Pr^{-[0.66 ... 0.76]}$ (depending on Ra); and (iii) the mean reversal frequency follows an effective scaling law $\\omega / (\

Francisco Fontenele Araujo; S. Grossmann; D. Lohse

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

479

Combined Ideal and Kinetic Effects on Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes  

SciTech Connect

A theory of Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAEs) is developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, qmin, is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with qmin above integer values. Corrected by special analytic FLR condition MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

N.N. Gorelenkov, G.J. Kramer, and R. Nazikian

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

480

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

Puechl, K.H.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces.

Fortescue, P.

1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

Kwasniewski, Bartosz K [Institute of Mathematics, University of Bialystok (Poland)

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Wideband silicon bolometers'' on the LSX field reversed configuration experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon photodiode detectors, which have nearly flat energy response from 1 eV to 6 keV (R. Korde and L. Randall Canfield, Proc. SPIE {bold 1140}, 126 (1989)), were used as bolometers in the field reversed theta pinch experiment LSX. Plasma escaping from the field reversed configuration is naturally diverted to the ends of the vacuum enclosure. There it affects the bolometer measurements either by direct energy deposition or by emission of low energy photons. These two particle effects can be avoided by optimizing the location of the bolometers and restricting their field of view. Good agreement is observed between the silicon bolometers and a gold foil calorimeter.

Maqueda, R.J.; Wurden, G.A. (Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, FL-10, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Crawford, E.A. (STI Optronics, 2755 Northup Way, Bellevue, Washington 98004 (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media  

SciTech Connect

An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

Anderson, Brian E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulrich, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larmat, Carene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guyer, Robert A [UNR; Griffa, Michele [ETH ZURICH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Extended core for motor/generator - Energy Innovation Portal  

An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses ...

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