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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU .Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal

2

Low-amplitude magnetic vortex core reversal by non-linear interaction between azimuthal spin waves and the vortex gyromode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show, by experiments and micromagnetic simulations in vortex structures, that an active “dual frequency” excitation of both the sub-GHz vortex gyromode and multi-GHz spin waves considerably changes the frequency response of spin wave mediated vortex core reversal. Besides additional minima in the switching threshold, a significant broadband reduction of the switching amplitudes is observed, which can be explained by non-linear interaction between the vortex gyromode and the spin waves. We conclude that the well known frequency spectra of azimuthal spin waves in vortex structures are altered substantially, when the vortex gyromode is actively excited simultaneously.

Sproll, Markus; Noske, Matthias; Kammerer, Matthias; Dieterle, Georg; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Bauer, Hans; Gangwar, Ajay; Woltersdorf, Georg; Back, Christian H. [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)] [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU .Magnetic Vortex Core

4

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU .Magnetic Vortex CoreMagnetic

5

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU .Magnetic Vortex

6

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

7

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

8

Origin of Reversed Vortex Ratchet Motion W. Gillijns, A. V. Silhanek, and V. V. Moshchalkov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Origin of Reversed Vortex Ratchet Motion W. Gillijns, A. V. Silhanek, and V. V. Moshchalkov INPAC. This rectified motion of particles, known as a rocked ratchet, is basically the result of the broken spatial that the particles (flux lines) cannot be regarded as independent entities leads to a far richer ratchet motion

Moshchalkov, Victor V.

9

X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analysed by high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex core radius was observed, from #24; ~38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Kasai, S.; Yamada, K.; Ono, T.; Thiaville, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to sell. Is there a physical limit to how far this process can go? At the heart of each digital device is a way to physically store data in binary form (01, updown, onoff)....

11

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . SChromatographyMagnetic

12

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU .

13

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail ofDensityTrainingandNationalMPDX

14

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail ofDensityTrainingandNationalMPDXMagnetic

15

Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency {omega}{sub D} for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that {sigma}=1/{omega}{sub D} and ?{Delta}t={pi}/2 p/{omega}{sub D} . The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. This work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

Jung, H.; Choi, Y. -S.; Yoo, M. -W.; Im, M. -Y.; Kim, S. -K.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Effect of Field Dependent Core Size on Reversible Magnetization of High-? Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field dependence of the vortex core size {zeta}(B) is incorporated in the London model, in order to describe reversible magnetization M(B,T) for a number of materials with large Ginzburg-Landau parameter {kappa}. The dependence {zeta}(B) is directly related to deviations in M(ln B) from linear behavior prescribed by the standard London model. A simple method to extract {zeta}(B) from the magnetization data is proposed. For most materials examined, {zeta}(B) so obtained decreases with increasing field and is in qualitative agreement both with behavior extracted from {micro}SR and small-angle neutron-scattering data and with that predicted theoretically.

Kogan, V. G. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Prozorov, R. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Bud'ko, S. L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, P. C. [Ames Laboratory; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Karpinski, J. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; Zhigadlo, N. D. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; Miranovic, P. [University of Montenegro, Serbia and Montenegro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Role of the Vortex-Core Energy on the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition in Thin Films of NbN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of the Vortex-Core Energy on the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition in Thin Films-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition in thin films of NbN at various film thickness, by probing the effect of vortex played by the vortex-core energy in determining the characteristic signatures of the BKT physics, and we

Raychaudhuri, Pratap

18

Memory-bit selection and recording by rotating fields in vortex-core cross-point architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In one of our earlier studies [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 022509 (2008)], we proposed a concept of robust information storage, recording and readout, which can be implementaed in nonvolatile magnetic random-access memories and is based on the energetically degenerated twofold ground states of vortex-core magnetizations. In the present study, we experimentally demonstrate reliable memory-bit selection and information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture, specifically using a two-by-two vortex-state disk array. In order to efficiently switch a vortex core positioned at the intersection of crossed electrodes, two orthogonal addressing electrodes are selected, and then two Gaussian pulse currents of optimal pulse width and time delay are applied. Such tailored pulse-type rotating magnetic fields which occurs only at the selected intersection is prerequisite for a reliable memory-bit selection and low-power-consumption recording of information in the existing cross-point architecture.

Yu, Y. -S.; Jung, H.; Lee, K. -S.; Fischer, P.; Kim, S. -K.

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dynamic decay of a single vortex into vortex-antivortex pairs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of metastable states, including vortices, antivortices, and their combinations, is typical for magnetically soft, thin films and patterned structures. The physics of individual spin vortices in patterned structures has been rather extensively explored. In contrast, there are few studies of the vortex–antivortex–vortex (v-av-v) system, in part because the configuration is rather challenging to obtain experimentally. We demonstrate herein how a recently proposed resonant-spin-ordering technique can be used to induce the dynamic decay of a single vortex into v-av states in elongated elements. The approach is based on first driving the system from the linear regime of constant vortex gyrations to the non-linear regime of vortex-core reversals at a fixed excitation frequency, and then subsequently reducing the excitation field back to the linear regime. This procedure stabilizes the system into a v-av-v state that is completely decoupled from the initialization excitation frequency. The newly acquired state is stable in remanence. The dynamic response of this system is expected to demonstrate a number of collective modes, depending on the combination of the vortex core polarities, and/or the excitation field direction, and, hence, is of interest for future studies.

Lendínez, Sergi [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Universidad Barcelona, Departamento Fisica Fonamental, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn, E-mail: novosad@anl.gov; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Tejada, Javier [Universidad Barcelona, Departamento Fisica Fonamental, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bader, Samuel D. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors S.J. Chapman #3;y G. Richardson zx of a curvilinear vortex in an inhomogeneous type-II superconducting material in the limit as the vortex core radius of the superconducting electrons acts as a pinning potential for the vortex, so that vortices will be attracted

Chapman, Jon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vortex motion rectification in Josephson junction arrays with a ratchet potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of electrical transport measurements we have studied the rectified motion of vortices in ratchet potentials engineered on over-damped Josephson junction arrays. The rectified voltage as a function of the vortex density shows a maximum efficiency close a matching condition to the period of the ratchet potential indicating a collective vortex motion. Vortex current reversals where detected varying the driving force and vortex density revealing the influence of vortex-vortex interaction in the ratchet effect.

D. E. Shalom; H. Pastoriza

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vortex Interactions and Barotropic Aspects of Concentric Eyewall Formation HUNG-CHI KUO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a tropical cyclone core with nearby weaker vorticity of various spatial scales. This paper considers, separation distance, companion vortex size, and core vortex skirt parameter. A vorticity skirt on the core­6 times as strong as the larger companion vortex. An additional requirement is that the separation

Schubert, Wayne H.

23

Vortex Structure in Charged Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study magnetic fields in the charged condensate that we have previously argued should be present in helium-core white dwarf stars. We show that below a certain critical value the magnetic field is entirely expelled from the condensate, while for larger values it penetrates the condensate within flux-tubes that are similar to Abrikosov vortex lines; yet higher fields lead to the disruption of the condensate. We find the solution for the vortex lines in both relativistic and nonrelativistic theories that exhibit the charged condensation. We calculate the energy density of the vortex solution and the values of the critical magnetic fields. The minimum magnetic field required for vortices to penetrate the helium white dwarf cores ranges from roughly 10^7 to 10^9 Gauss. Fields of this strength have been observed in white dwarfs. We also calculate the London magnetic field due to the rotation of a dwarf star and show that its value is rather small.

Gabadadze, Gregory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Vortex Structure in Charged Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study magnetic fields in the charged condensate that we have previously argued should be present in helium-core white dwarf stars. We show that below a certain critical value the magnetic field is entirely expelled from the condensate, while for larger values it penetrates the condensate within flux-tubes that are similar to Abrikosov vortex lines; yet higher fields lead to the disruption of the condensate. We find the solution for the vortex lines in both relativistic and nonrelativistic theories that exhibit the charged condensation. We calculate the energy density of the vortex solution and the values of the critical magnetic fields. The minimum magnetic field required for vortices to penetrate the helium white dwarf cores ranges from roughly 10^7 to 10^9 Gauss. Fields of this strength have been observed in white dwarfs. We also calculate the London magnetic field due to the rotation of a dwarf star and show that its value is rather small.

Gregory Gabadadze; Rachel A. Rosen

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Vortex configurations of bosons in an optical lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single-vortex problem in a strongly correlated bosonic system is investigated self-consistently within the mean-field theory of the Bose-Hubbard model. Near the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition, the vortex core has a tendency toward the Mott-insulating phase, with the core particle density approaching the nearest commensurate value. If the nearest-neighbor repulsion exists, the charge-density wave order may develop locally in the core. The evolution of the vortex configuration from the strong- to weak-coupling regions is studied. This phenomenon can be observed in systems of rotating ultracold atoms in optical lattices and Josephson-junction arrays.

Wu Congjun; Zhang Shoucheng [Department of Physics, McCullough Building, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Chen Handong [Department of Applied Physics, McCullough Building, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Hu Jiangpiang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Dissipative dynamics of a vortex state in a trapped Bose-condensed gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss dissipative dynamics of a vortex state in a trapped Bose-condensed gas at finite temperature and draw a scenario of decay of this state in a static trap. The interaction of the vortex with the thermal cloud transfers energy from the vortex to the cloud and induces the motion of the vortex core to the border of the condensate. Once the vortex reaches the border, it immediately decays through the creation of excitations. We calculate the characteristic life-time of a vortex state and address the question of how the dissipative dynamics of vortices can be studied experimentally.

P. O. Fedichev; G. V. Shlyapnikov

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reversal modes in magnetic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The magnetic switching of ferromagnetic nanotubes is investigated as a function of their geometry. Two independent methods are used: Numerical simulations and analytical calculations. It is found that for long tubes the reversal of magnetization is achieved by two mechanism: The propagation of a transverse or a vortex domain wall depending on the internal and external radii of the tube.

P. Landeros; S. Allende; J. Escrig; E. Salcedo; D. Altbir; E. E. Vogel

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC) and Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Dobrovolskiy, O. V. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Physics Department, V. Karazin National University, Kharkiv (Ukraine); Prieto, J. L. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Huth, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Vortex diode jet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Holographic Superconductor Vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gravity dual of a superconductor at finite temperature has been recently proposed. We present the vortex configuration of this model and study its properties. In particular, we calculate the free energy as a function of an external magnetic field, the magnetization and the superconducting density. We also find the two critical magnetic fields that define the region in which the vortex configurations are energetically favorable.

Marc Montull; Alex Pomarol; Pedro J. Silva

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Mixing in a vortex breakdown flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Kohlman 1971; Hall 1972; Lowson & Riley 1995) where it creates a sudden drop of the lift and an increase the core of the vortex. Artificial tornadoes within a chimney have been proposed as a way of converting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Dynamics of a relativistic Rankine vortex for a two-constituent superfluid in a weak perturbation of cylindrical symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a recent study of a stationary cylindrical solution for a relativistic two-constituent superfluid at low temperature limit, we propose to specify this solution under the form of a relativistic generalisation of a Rankine vortex (Potential vortex whose the core has a solid body rotation).Then we establish the dynamics of the central line of this vortex by supposing that the deviation from the cylindrical configuration is weak in the neighbourhood of the core of the vortex. In "stiff" material the Nambu-Goto equations are obtained.

B. Boisseau

1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

The internal structure of a vortex in a two-dimensional superfluid with long healing length and its implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the motion of quantum vortices in a two-dimensional spinless superfluid within Popov’s hydrodynamic description. In the long healing length limit (where a large number of particles are inside the vortex core) the superfluid dynamics is determined by saddle points of Popov’s action, which, in particular, allows for weak solutions of the Gross–Pitaevskii equation. We solve the resulting equations of motion for a vortex moving with respect to the superfluid and find the reconstruction of the vortex core to be a non-analytic function of the force applied on the vortex. This response produces an anomalously large dipole moment of the vortex and, as a result, the spectrum associated with the vortex motion exhibits narrow resonances lying within the phonon part of the spectrum, contrary to traditional view.

Klein, Avraham [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Aleiner, Igor L., E-mail: aleiner@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Agam, Oded [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Controlling the magnetization reversal in exchange-biased Co/CoO elongated nanorings This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia E-mail: eleaao@nus.edu.sg Received 15 September 2008 head-on (180 ) domain walls [2]. Due to elimination of the high energy vortex core, the vortex state

Adeyeye, Adekunle

38

UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A., E-mail: irinasun@stanford.edu [Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Variable residence time vortex combustor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

All-optical discrete vortex switch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce discrete vortex solitons and vortex breathers in circular arrays of nonlinear waveguides. The simplest vortex breather in a four-waveguide coupler is a nonlinear dynamic state changing its topological charge between +1 and -1 periodically during propagation. We find the stability domain for this solution and suggest an all-optical vortex switching scheme.

Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Dennis, Mark R. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Ferrando, Albert [Interdisciplinary Modeling Group, InterTech and Departament d'Optica, Universitat de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental results show similar trends as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results presented in this report; however, some differences exist that will need to be assessed in future studies. The results of this testing will be used to improve the diode design to be tested in the liquid salt loop system.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E...

Nemirovskii, Sergey K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Superconducting vortex pinning with artificially prepared nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. Schuller, “Enhanced superconducting vortex pinning withat T/Tc = 0.99 of a superconducting Nb thin film on aof the triangles. The superconducting critical temperature

Rosen, Yaniv Jacob

44

Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water...

45

Light propagation around a relativistic vortex flow of dielectric medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We determine the path of the light around a dielectric vortex described by the relativistic vortex flow of a perfect fluid.

B. Linet

2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Characterization of The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 Vortex Using Surface Entrained Sensor Fish Device: Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the pilot study to characterize The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 vortex using a surface entrained Sensor Fish device. It was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on April 13 and 14, 2006. The total spill was controlled at approximately 110 kcfs, the forebay elevation was 157.89 ft, and the discharge of Bay 6 at the tested gate opening of 14 ft was approximately 18 kcfs. The objectives of the full study are to (1) develop baseline conditions for the detailed analysis of Sensor Fish measurements by deploying Sensor Fish in different surface locations in the vortex periphery; (2) observe the entrainment pattern and extract hydraulic data of interest such as acceleration, rotation, pressure, and estimated velocity of Sensor Fish or drogues; (3) integrate the experimental results with companion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and inertial particle tracking studies. A total of 12 Sensor Fish were released in the surface at upstream edge, left edge, downstream edge, and the core of the vortex at Bay 6. Because of the high discharge, the vortex patterns at the test condition were less consistent than the patterns observed at lower discharges. Compared with the Sensor Fish released at mid-bay at Bay 6, Sensor Fish released from the surface at the vortex experienced higher pressure fluctuations, a larger percentage of severe events, and much more rapid angular velocities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

The idea of vortex energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work formulates and gives grounds for general principles and theorems that question the energy function doctrine and its quantum version as a genuine law of nature without borders of adequacy. The emphasis is on the domain where the energy of systems is conserved -- I argue that only in its tiny part the energy is in the kinetic, potential and thermal forms describable by a generalized thermodynamic potential, whereas otherwise the conserved energy constitutes a whole linked to vortex forces, and can be a factor of things like persistent currents and dark matter.

V. E. Shapiro

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ergoregion instability: The hydrodynamic vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes with an ergoregion but no horizon have been shown to be linearly unstable against a superradiant-triggered mechanism. This result has wide implications in the search for astrophysically viable alternatives to black holes, but also in the understanding of black holes and Hawking evaporation. Here we investigate this instability in detail for a particular setup which can be realized in the laboratory: the {\\it hydrodynamic vortex}, an effective geometry for sound waves, with ergoregion and without an event horizon.

Leandro A. Oliveira; Vitor Cardoso; Luís C. B. Crispino

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Stability of vortex solitons in a photorefractive optical lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.njp.org/ DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/6/1/047 Abstract. Stability of on- and off-site vortex solitons with unit stable than off-site ones. Increasing the DC field stabilizes both types of vortex solitons. Contents 1. Introduction 2 2. Off-site vortex solitons 4 3. On-site vortex solitons 9 4. Summary 11 Acknowledgments 11

Yang, Jianke

50

Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

Koshelev, A. E., E-mail: koshelev@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division (United States); Dodgson, M. J. W. [Cavendish Laboratory, Theory of Condensed Matter Group (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, Theory of Condensed Matter Group (United Kingdom)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Life of a Vortex Knot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The idea that the knottedness (hydrodynamic Helicity) of a fluid flow is conserved has a long history in fluid mechanics. The quintessential example of a knotted flow is a knotted vortex filament, however, owing to experimental difficulties, it has not been possible until recently to directly generate knotted vortices in real fluids. Using 3D printed hydrofoils and high-speed laser scanning tomography, we generate vortex knots and links and measure their subsequent evolution. In both cases, we find that the vortices deform and stretch until a series of vortex reconnections occurs, eventually resulting several disjoint vortex rings. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion at the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cells and vortices are the respective source of PV production and building blocks for the meso-?-scale vortices. Finally, this thesis discusses issues related to the multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclone formation. For instance, the tracking...

Sippel, Jason Allen

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Airfoil Vortex Induced Vibration suppression devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) is a major concern of the offshore oil industry. This problem leads to fatigue failure in the marine risers and causes costly replacement of the risers. Appendages such as helical strakes ...

Lee, Evan J. (Evan Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI . Submitted to the Offic of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major... Subject: Aerospace Engineering A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI Submitted to Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content...

Mani, Somnath

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Josephson vortex lattice melting in Bi-2212  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B-T diagram of Josephson vortex lattice melting in Bi-2212 is analyzed (B is magnetic induction parallel to the layers, T is temperature). It is shown that the Josephson vortex lattice melting at B > B* = 0.6-0.7 T is associated with Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in individual Bi-2212 superconducting layers and is a second-order phase transition.

Latyshev, Yu. I.; Pavlenko, V. N., E-mail: vit@cplire.ru; Orlov, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Phases of Atom-Molecule Vortex Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study ground state vortex configurations in a rotating atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. It is found that the coherent coupling between the atomic and molecular condensates can render a pairing of atomic and molecular vortices into a composite structure that resembles a carbon dioxide molecule. Structural phase transitions of vortex lattices are also explored through different physical parameters including the rotational frequency of the system.

Woo, S. J.; Bigelow, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Park, Q-Han [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

Sergey K. Nemirovskii

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Transitions between turbulent and laminar superfluid vorticity states in the outer core of a neutron star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the global transition from a turbulent state of superfluid vorticity to a laminar state, and vice versa, in the outer core of a neutron star. By solving numerically the hydrodynamic Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations for a rotating superfluid in a differentially rotating spherical shell, we find that the meridional counterflow driven by Ekman pumping exceeds the Donnelly-Glaberson threshold throughout most of the outer core, exciting unstable Kelvin waves which disrupt the rectilinear vortex array, creating a vortex tangle. In the turbulent state, the torque exerted on the crust oscillates, and the crust-core coupling is weaker than in the laminar state. This leads to a new scenario for the rotational glitches observed in radio pulsars: a vortex tangle is sustained in the differentially rotating outer core by the meridional counterflow, a sudden spin-up event brings the crust and core into corotation, the vortex tangle relaxes back to a rectilinear vortex array, then the crust spins down electromagnetically until enough meridional counterflow builds up to reform a vortex tangle. The turbulent-laminar transition can occur uniformly or in patches; the associated time-scales are estimated from vortex filament theory. We calculate numerically the global structure of the flow with and without an inviscid superfluid component, for Hall-Vinen and Gorter-Mellink forms of the mutual friction. We also calculate the post-glitch evolution of the angular velocity of the crust and its time derivative, and compare the results with radio pulse timing data, predicting a correlation between glitch activity and Reynolds number.

C. Peralta; A. Melatos; M. Giacobello; A. Ooi

2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fractal powers in Serrin's swirling vortex solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a modification of the fluid flow model for a tornado-like swirling vortex developed by J. Serrin, where velocity decreases as the reciprocal of the distance from the vortex axis. Recent studies, based on radar data of selected severe weather events, indicate that the angular momentum in a tornado may not be constant with the radius, and thus suggest a different scaling of the velocity/radial distance dependence. Motivated by this suggestion, we consider Serrin's approach with the assumption that the velocity decreases as the reciprocal of the distance from the vortex axis to the power $b$ with a general $b>0$. This leads to a boundary-value problem for a system of nonlinear differential equations. We analyze this problem for particular cases, both with nonzero and zero viscosity, discuss the question of existence of solutions, and use numerical techniques to describe those solutions that we cannot obtain analytically.

Pavel B?lík; Douglas P. Dokken; Kurt Scholz; Mikhail M. Shvartsman

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Vortex reconnections between coreless vortices in binary condensates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vortex reconnections plays an important role in the turbulent flows associated with the superfluids. To understand the dynamics, we examine the reconnections of vortex rings in the superfluids of dilute atomic gases confined in trapping potentials using Gross-Petaevskii equation. Further more we study the reconnection dynamics of coreless vortex rings, where one of the species can act as a tracer.

Gautam, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560 012 (India); Suthar, K.; Angom, D. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad-380 009 (India)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 125108 (2012) Quantum vortex reconnections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is continuous, not discrete, and parts of the initial vortical tubes can be left behind as vortex threads, whichPHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 125108 (2012) Quantum vortex reconnections S. Zuccher,1 M. Caliari,1 A. W that the minimum distance between vortices scales differently with time before and after the vortex reconnection

Zuccher, Simone

63

Correlated vortex pinning in slightly orthorhombic twinned Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 single crystals: Possible shift of the vortex-glass/liquid transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interest in twin-boundary (TB) planes as a source of vortex pinning has been recently renewed with the discovery of the new iron-arsenide pnictide superconductors. In the family of compounds Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 a structural transition from a tetragonal to orthorhombic lattice takes place for compounds with xvortex cores. In this work we investigate the changes in anisotropy produced by subtle differences in the Co doping level, in the neighborhood of the structural transition, in good-quality single crystals. Using a scaling approach we are able to determine the angular regions where correlated or uncorrelated disorder prevails. In the tetragonal samples (x>xcr) there is no twinning and we find good agreement with the expected scaling function under uncorrelated disorder, with small anisotropy values similar to those reported in the literature. We show that in the orthorhombic samples (xvortex liquid-glass transition temperature.

Bermudez, M. Marziali [Universidad de Buenos Aires; Pasquini, G. [Universidad de Buenos Aires; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Laboratory

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

A numerical study of steady-state vortex configurations and vortex pinning in type-II superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are presented. Transitions between different multi-vortex states as H is changed is demonstrated by abrupt changes in vortex configurations and jumps in the B vs H plot. An efficient scheme to determine the equilibrium vortex configuration in a mesoscopic system...

Kim, Sangbum

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases and phase transitions in condensed matter systems with random pinning. The broader impact of the program includes the training of future generation of neutron scientists, and further development of neutron scattering and complementary techniques for studies of superconducting materials. The graduate and undergraduate students participating in this project will learn the state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques, acquire a wide range of materials research experiences, and participate in the frontier research of superconductivity. This should best prepare the students for future careers in academia, industry, or government.

Xinsheng Ling

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vortex generation in protoplanetary disks with an embedded giant planet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortices in protoplanetary disks can capture solid particles and form planetary cores within shorter timescales than those involved in the standard core-accretion model. We investigate vortex generation in thin unmagnetized protoplanetary disks with an embedded giant planet with planet to star mass ratio $10^{-4}$ and $10^{-3}$. Two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of a protoplanetary disk with a planet are performed using two different numerical methods. The results of the non-linear simulations are compared with a time-resolved modal analysis of the azimuthally averaged surface density profiles using linear perturbation theory. Finite-difference methods implemented in polar coordinates generate vortices moving along the gap created by Neptune-mass to Jupiter-mass planets. The modal analysis shows that unstable modes are generated with growth rate of order $0.3 \\Omega_K$ for azimuthal numbers m=4,5,6, where $\\Omega_K$ is the local Keplerian frequency. Shock-capturing Cartesian-grid codes do not generate very much vorticity around a giant planet in a standard protoplanetary disk. Modal calculations confirm that the obtained radial profiles of density are less susceptible to the growth of linear modes on timescales of several hundreds of orbital periods. Navier-Stokes viscosity of the order $\

M. de Val-Borro; P. Artymowicz; G. D'Angelo; A. Peplinski

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Vortex Jitter in Hover Swathi M. Mula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

78712, USA Abstract The trajectory of the tip vortex of a reduced-scale, 1 m diameter, four-bladed rotor condition of the rotor is at a blade loading of CT / = 0.0645 and a rotational speed of 1240RPM wake dominated by the tip vortices shed from the rotor blades. The complexity of the flow

Tinney, Charles E.

69

Quenching Processes in Flame-Vortex Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes 1 , Chicago, IL 60637 y Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University-vortex interactions in order to understand quenching of thermonuclear ames. The key question is|can a ther- monuclear. If a ame encounters a 1) The Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes is supported by the Department

Zingale, Michael

70

Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the interaction of a pair of counter-rotating vortices Phys. Fluids 24, 014107 (2012) The onset of oblique vortex shedding behind a heated circular cylinder in laminar wake regime Phys. Fluids 24, 011701 fluids Phys. Fluids 23, 115106 (2011) Asymptotic properties of wall-induced chaotic mixing in point

Shashikanth, Banavara N.

71

Bifurcation to vortex solutions in superconducting lms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bifurcation to vortex solutions in superconducting #12;lms T. Boeck #3; S.J. Chapman y Mathematical state to a superconducting state in a decreasing magnetic #12;eld is studied for a slab geometry of these behaviours will occur in practice. 1 Introduction If a superconducting body is placed in a suÃ?ciently strong

Chapman, Jon

72

Jammed vortex matter Hajime Yoshino1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract: Irrationally frustrated Josephson junction array (JJA), namely JJA with irrational number density point. Figure 1: Josephson junction array (JJA) on a square lattice. The vertexes and bonds represent- not develop usual periodic vortex lattices. 1 Introduction Josephson junction array under mag- netic field

Katsumoto, Shingo

73

Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a vortex-pinning mechanism in high- temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centers in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

Llordes, Anna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Coll, M. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ye, S. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Rouco, V [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Magen Dominguez, Cesar [ORNL; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Deterministic Josephson Vortex Ratchet with a load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate experimentally a deterministic underdamped Josephson vortex ratchet -- a fluxon-particle moving along a Josephson junction in an asymmetric periodic potential. By applying a sinusoidal driving current one can compel the vortex to move in a certain direction, producing average dc voltage across the junction. Being in such a rectification regime we also load the ratchet, i.e., apply an additional dc bias current I_dc (counterforce) which tilts the potential so that the fluxon climbs uphill due to the ratchet effect. The value of the bias current at which the fluxon stops climbing up defines the strength of the ratchet effect and is determined experimentally. This allows us to estimate the loading capability of the ratchet, the output power and efficiency. For the quasi-static regime we present a simple model which delivers simple analytic expressions for the above mentioned figures of merit.

M. Knufinke; K. Ilin; M. Siegel; D. Koelle; R. Kleiner; E. Goldobin

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

All Skate, Now Reverse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All Skate, Now Reverse is a memoir that consists of personal narratives that are set in or are about my growing up in Nebraska. It is about life and its defining moments, and the collection summons up childhood epiphanies ...

Glover, Angela l.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Core Specialization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCoolWhyCopyTheCore

77

Acceleration and vortex filaments in turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report recent results from a high resolution numerical study of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow. Single particle trajectories were followed for a time range spanning more than three decades, from less than a tenth of the Kolmogorov time-scale up to one large-eddy turnover time. We present some results concerning acceleration statistics and the statistics of trapping by vortex filaments.

F. Toschi; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte

2005-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Reversible Ratchet Effects for Vortices in Conformal Pinning Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A conformal transformation of a uniform triangular pinning array produces a structure called a conformal crystal which preserves the six-fold ordering of the original lattice but contains a gradient in the pinning density. Here we use numerical simulations to show that vortices in type-II superconductors driven with an ac drive over gradient pinning arrays produce the most pronounced ratchet effect over a wide range of parameters for a conformal array, while square gradient or random gradient arrays with equivalent pinning densities give reduced ratchet effects. In the conformal array, the larger spacing of the pinning sites in the direction transverse to the ac drive permits easy funneling of interstitial vortices for one driving direction, producing the enhanced ratchet effect. In the square array, the transverse spacing between pinning sites is uniform, giving no asymmetry in the funneling of the vortices as the driving direction switches, while in the random array, there are numerous easy-flow channels present for either direction of drive. We find multiple ratchet reversals in the conformal arrays as a function of vortex density and ac amplitude, and correlate the features with a reversal in the vortex ordering, which is greater for motion in the ratchet direction. The enhanced conformal pinning ratchet effect can also be realized for colloidal particles moving over a conformal array, indicating the general usefulness of conformal structures for controlling the motion of particles.

C. Reichhardt; D. Ray; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Optical vortex interaction and generation via nonlinear wave mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical vortex beams are made to interact via degenerate two-wave mixing in a Kerr-like nonlinear medium. Vortex mixing is shown to occur inside the medium, leading to exchange of topological charge and cascaded generation of vortex beams. A mean-field model is developed and is shown to account for the selection rules of the topological charges observed after the wave-mixing process. Fractional charges are demonstrated to follow the same rules as for integer charges.

Lenzini, F. [INLN, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U. [INLN, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Arecchi, F. T. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the secondary structures into the vortex system are shown as well as variations in characteristics such as trajectory, size, vorticity, and circulation for the vortices as they move downstream. iv To the loved ones who have encouraged me along the way. v.... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 30 13 Non-Dimensional Vorticity at the Swirl Strength Peak for the Pri- mary Vortex Within the Vortex System Versus Non-Dimensional Horizontal Location of the Centroid. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 14 Non-Dimensional Circulation...

Whilden, Kerri Ann

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Vortex state in a doped Mott insulator M. Franz and Z. Tesanovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predicts two types of singly quantized vortices: an insulating ``holon'' vortex in the underdoped and a metallic ``spinon'' vortex in the overdoped region of the phase diagram. We argue that the holon vortex

Tesanovic, Zlatko

83

Zero-energy states bound to a magnetic pi-flux vortex in a two-dimensional topological insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the existence of a pair of zero-energy modes bound to a vortex carrying a pi-flux is a generic feature of the topologically non-trivial phase of the M-B model, which was introduced to describe the topological band insulator in HgTe quantum wells. We explicitly find the form of the zero-energy states of the corresponding Dirac equation, which contains a novel momentum-dependent mass term and describes a generic topological transition in a band insulator. The obtained modes are exponentially localized in the vortex-core, with the dependence of characteristic length on the parameters of the model matching the dependence extracted from a lattice version of the model. We consider in full generality the short-distance regularization of the vector potential of the vortex, and show that a particular choice yields the modes localized and simultaneously regular at the origin. Finally, we also discuss a realization of two-dimensional spin-charge separation through the vortex zero-modes.

Andrej Mesaros; Robert-Jan Slager; Jan Zaanen; Vladimir Juricic

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Energy Separation And Lox Separation Studies In Vortex Tubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Vortex Tube (VT) is a simple device having no moving mechanical parts, in which compressed gas at high pressure is injected through one or more… (more)

Behera, Upendra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

An application of vortex cancellation to vortex generator techniques in low speed wind tunnels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'lugs/ft-sec Axial distance between sets of vortex generators root chord lengths /Y Vertical dimension of duct cross section Tube height/Y in. none ~St i t ()i ()2 (), ( )?q Measured at station g 1 Measured at Station 0 8 Upstream srl... to accomplish these objectives. The usefulness of many of them was limited because they were either too expensive, they could not be installed easily in existing wind tunnels, or their use involved excessive energy dissipation. Vortex Generators In 1/46 a...

Mount, Glynn O., Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctica polar vortex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from MIPAS on Envisat make it hard to tell that the polar vortex... , produced by data assimilation, bringing the model and the observations together. The polar vortex... and...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced vortex element Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

method of plasma Summary: with the new simple explanation of the energy separation in vortex tubes described here. Advanced numerical... vortex method of plasma insulation and...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated vortex ring Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

left behind... forces were derived from the vortex rings, assuming all propulsive energy to be compiled in the rings... , ending up in a separate vortex ... Source:...

89

Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

ENERGY LEVEL SPECTROSCOPY OF A BOUND VORTEX-ANTIVORTEX PAIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vortex- antivortex (VAV) state in an annular Josephson junction. The bound VAV pair is formed microwave spectroscopy. Keywords: Macroscopic quantum effects, long Josephson junctions, vortex­9]. Most of the studied systems, such as dc-biased Josephson junctions (JJ), supercon- ducting quantum

Wallraff, Andreas

91

Vortex Lattice Modelling of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex Lattice Modelling of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades Mads Døssing Risø-R-1621(EN) Risø Title: Vortex Lattice Modelling of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades Departments: Wind Energy Department turbines can be increased by the use of winglets without increasing the swept area. This makes them

92

Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

Sohal, Manohar S. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Vortex and Droplet Engineering in Holographic Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a detailed account of the construction of non--trivial localized solutions in a 2+1 dimensional model of superconductors using a 3+1 dimensional gravitational dual theory of a black hole coupled to a scalar field. The solutions are found in the presence of a background magnetic field. We use numerical and analytic techniques to solve the full Maxwell--scalar equations of motion in the background geometry, finding condensate droplet solutions, and vortex solutions possessing a conserved winding number. These solutions and their properties, which we uncover, help shed light on key features of the (B,T) phase diagram.

Tameem Albash; Clifford V. Johnson

2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Vortex lattice for a holographic superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the vortex lattice solution in a (2+1)-dimensional holographic model of superconductors constructed from a charged scalar condensate. The solution is obtained perturbatively near the second-order phase transition and is a holographic realization of the Abrikosov lattice. Below a critical value of magnetic field, the solution has a lower free energy than the normal state. Both the free energy density and the superconducting current are expressed by nonlocal functions, but they reduce to the expressions in the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory at long wavelength. As a result, a triangular lattice becomes the most favorable solution thermodynamically as in the GL theory of type II superconductors.

Kengo Maeda; Makoto Natsuume; Takashi Okamura

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electron vortex beams in a magnetic field and spin filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the propagation of electron vortex beams in a magnetic field. It is pointed out that when electron vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum propagate in a magnetic field, the Berry curvature associated with the scalar electron moving in a cyclic path around the vortex line is modified from that in free space. This alters the spin-orbit interaction, which affects the propagation of nonparaxial beams. The electron vortex beams with tilted vortex lead to spin Hall effect in free space. In presence of a magnetic field in time space we have spin filtering such that either positive or negative spin states emerge in spin Hall currents with clustering of spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ states.

Debashree Chowdhury; Banasri Basu; Pratul Bandyopadhyay

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Dynamics of Magnetized Vortex Tubes in the Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use 3D radiative MHD simulations to investigate the formation and dynamics of small-scale (less than 0.5 Mm in diameter) vortex tubes spontaneously generated by turbulent convection in quiet-Sun regions with initially weak mean magnetic fields. The results show that the vortex tubes penetrate into the chromosphere and substantially affect the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. The vortex tubes are mostly concentrated in intergranular lanes and are characterized by strong (near sonic) downflows and swirling motions that capture and twist magnetic field lines, forming magnetic flux tubes that expand with height and which attain magnetic field strengths ranging from 200 G in the chromosphere to more than 1 kG in the photosphere. We investigate in detail the physical properties of these vortex tubes, including thermodynamic properties, flow dynamics, and kinetic and current helicities, and conclude that magnetized vortex tubes provide an important path for energy and momentum transfer from the con...

Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Time reversal communication system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Non-Riemannian geometry of vortex acoustics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of acoustic torsion is introduced by making use of the scalar wave equation in Riemann-Cartan spacetime. Acoustic torsion extends the acoustic metric previously given by Unruh (PRL-1981). The wave equation describes irrotational perturbations in rotational nonrelativistic fluids. This physical motivation allows us to show that the acoustic line element can be conformally mapped to the line element of a stationary torsion loop in non-Riemannian gravity. Two examples of such sonic analogues are given. The first is the stationary torsion loop in teleparallel gravity. In the far from the vortex approximation, the Cartan torsion vector is shown to be proportional to the quantum vortex number of the superfluid. The torsion vector is also shown to be proportional to the superfluid vorticity in the presence of vortices. The formation of superfluid vortices is shown not to be favored by torsion loops in Riemann-Cartan spacetime, as long as this model is concerned. It is suggested that the teleparallel model may help to find a model for superfluid neutron stars vortices based on non-Riemannian gravity.

Garcia de Andrade, L.C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, Maracana, 20550, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Potential Flow Model of a Vortex Street Near a Fish-like Body  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Flow Model of a Vortex Street Near a Fish-like Body Joshua Brulé, University of Maryland to inviscid, irrotational solutions of Navier-Stokes · Vortex potential: "A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing." Ren Z, Mohseni K. 2012 #12;Vortex near a (circular) fish · (Insert your own spherical

Anlage, Steven

100

Vortex-vacancy interactions in two-dimensional easy-plane magnets G. M. Wysin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex-vacancy interactions in two-dimensional easy-plane magnets G. M. Wysin Department of Physics of a magnetic vacancy site on a nearby magnetic vortex are analyzed on square, hexagonal and triangular lattices. When the vortex is centered on a vacancy, the critical anisotropies where the stable vortex structure

Wysin, Gary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Irreversible flow of vortex matter: Polycrystal and amorphous phases Paolo Moretti and M.-Carmen Miguel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems exhibiting this phenomenol- ogy, flux line vortex lattices in type II superconductors rep- resent

Miguel-Lopez, Carmen

102

Reversed field pinch diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

Weber, P.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Colloidal fouling of reverse osmosis membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rate of fouling of reverse osmosis membranes treating32, 127-135. fouling of reverse osmosis membranes." Buros,Colloidal fouling of reverse osmosis membranes." J. Colloid

Elimelech, Menachem

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Sound Wave in Vortex with Sink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Komar's definition, we give expressions for the mass and angular momentum of a rotating acoustic black hole. We show that the mass and angular momentum so defined, obey the equilibrium version of the first law of Black Hole thermodynamics. We also show that when a phonon passes by a vortex with a sink, its trajectory is bent. The angle of bending of the sound wave to leading order is quadratic in $A/cb$ and $B/cb$, where $b$ is the impact parameter and $A$ and $B$ are the parameters in the velocity of the fluid flow. The time delay in the propagation of sound wave which to first order depends only on $B/c^2$ and is independent of $A$.

Soumen Basak

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-reversal symmetry breaking superconductors are exotic phases of matter with fascinating properties, which are, however, encountered rather sparsely. Here we identify the possibility of realizing such a superconducting ground state that exhibits an $f+is$ pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, we argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. We show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed here in the framework of an $\\epsilon$-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which topologically nontrivial quantum spin Hall insulator. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions.

Bitan Roy; Vladimir Juricic

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

A study on passive methods of vortex induced vibrations suppression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of engineering systems, including those found in offshore operations, are often affected by vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). This phenomenon is caused by the interaction between a structure and shed vortices which ...

Galvao, Richardo A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Drag amplification and fatigue damage in vortex-induced vibrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fatigue damage and drag force amplification due to Vortex-Induced-Vibrations (VIV) continue to cause significant problems in the design of structures which operate in ocean current environments. These problems are magnified ...

Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Vortex-induced vibration of slender structures in unsteady flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) results in fatigue damage of offshore oil exploration and production structures. In recent years, the offshore industry has begun to employ curved slender structures such as steel catenary ...

Liao, Jung-Chi, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Vortex hair on AdS black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse vortex hair for charged rotating asymptotically AdS black holes in the abelian Higgs model. We give analytical and numerical arguments to show how the vortex interacts with the horizon of the black hole, and how the solution extends to the boundary. The solution is very close to the corresponding asymptotically flat vortex, once one transforms to a frame that is non-rotating at the boundary. We show that there is a Meissner effect for extremal black holes, with the vortex flux being expelled from sufficiently small black holes. The phase transition is shown to be first order in the presence of rotation, but second order without rotation. We comment on applications to holography.

Gregory, Ruth; Kubiznak, David; Mann, Robert B; Wills, Danielle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reversible brazing process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

Pierce, Jim D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Reversal bending fatigue testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a source of vortex pinning in high-temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centres in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

Llordes, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Reverse Osmosis Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reverse slapper detonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Senesac, Lawrence R. (Knoxville, TN); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ultra-Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

Edmonds, R.G. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Steele, R.C. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Williams, J.T. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar (California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ULTRA-LOW NOX ADVANCED VORTEX COMBUSTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

Ryan G. Edmonds; Robert C. Steele; Joseph T. Williams; Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Avtar Bining

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Relativistic generation of vortex and magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implications of the recently demonstrated relativistic mechanism for generating generalized vorticity in purely ideal dynamics [Mahajan and Yoshida, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 095005 (2010)] are worked out. The said mechanism has its origin in the space-time distortion caused by the demands of special relativity; these distortions break the topological constraint (conservation of generalized helicity) forbidding the emergence of magnetic field (a generalized vorticity) in an ideal nonrelativistic dynamics. After delineating the steps in the ''evolution'' of vortex dynamics, as the physical system goes from a nonrelativistic to a relativistically fast and hot plasma, a simple theory is developed to disentangle the two distinct components comprising the generalized vorticity--the magnetic field and the thermal-kinetic vorticity. The ''strength'' of the new universal mechanism is, then, estimated for a few representative cases; in particular, the level of seed fields, created in the cosmic setting of the early hot universe filled with relativistic particle-antiparticle pairs (up to the end of the electron-positron era), are computed. Possible applications of the mechanism in intense laser produced plasmas are also explored. It is suggested that highly relativistic laser plasma could provide a laboratory for testing the essence of the relativistic drive.

Mahajan, S. M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Yoshida, Z. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: raettig@mpia.de, E-mail: klahr@mpia.de, E-mail: Wladimir.Lyra@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Core Drilling Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

123

Wave–vortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a theoretical study of wave–vortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wave–vortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wave–vortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

Guo, Yuan, E-mail: yuanguo@cims.nyu.edu; Bühler, Oliver [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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125

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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126

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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127

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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128

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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129

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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130

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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131

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imaging of the

132

Experimental Investigations of Vortex Induced Vibration of A Flat Plate in Pitch Oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bluff structure placed in a flowing fluid, may be subjected to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). For a flat plate with only rotational degree of freedom, the VIV is rotational oscillation. Based on the experimental investigation, vortex...

Yang, Yi

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid and Nambu Goto dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By a weak deformation of the cylindrical symmetry of the potential vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid, we study the possible dynamics of the central line of this vortex. In "stiff" material the Nanbu-Goto equations are obtained

B. Boisseau

1999-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Generation and Propagation of Inertia Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets Shuguang Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation and Propagation of Inertia Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets Shuguang Wang generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model, moist convection, fronts, upper level jets, geostrophic adjustment and spontaneous generation (Fritts

135

Reversible micromachining locator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reversible micromachining locator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Vortex-line condensation in three dimensions: A physical mechanism for bosonic topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bosonic topological insulators (BTI) in three spatial dimensions are symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases with U(1)$\\rtimes$Z$^T_2$ symmetry, where U(1) is boson particle number conservation, and Z$^T_2$ is time-reversal symmetry with $\\mathcal{T}^2=1$. BTI were first proposed based on the group cohomology theory which suggests two distinct root states, each carrying a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ index. Soon after, surface anomalous topological orders were proposed to identify different root states of BTI, leading to a new BTI root state beyond the group cohomology classification. Nevertheless, it is still unclear what is the universal physical mechanism for BTI phases and what kinds of microscopic Hamiltonians can realize them. In this paper, we answer the first question by proposing a universal physical mechanism via vortex-line condensation in a superfluid, which can potentially be realized in realistic systems, e.g., helium-4 or cold atoms in optical lattices. Using such a simple physical picture, we find three root phases, of which two of them are classified by group cohomology theory while the other is beyond group cohomology classification. The physical picture also leads to a "natural" bulk dynamic topological quantum field theory (TQFT) description for BTI phases and gives rise to a possible physical pathway towards experimental realizations. Finally, we generalize the vortex-line condensation picture to other symmetries and find that in three dimensions, even for a unitary Z$_2$ symmetry, there could be a nontrivial Z$_2$ SPT phase beyond the group cohomology classification.

Peng Ye; Zheng-Cheng Gu

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruptions events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push surrounding material up, generating quasiperiodic shocks. Our simulations reveal a complicated high-speed flow patterns, and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. We found that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by the high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere, and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers.

Kitiashvili, I N; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The effect of surface tension on the Moore singularity of vortex sheet dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of surface tension on the Moore singularity of vortex sheet dynamics F. de la Hoz , M's singularities by surface tension in the evolution of vortex sheets and its dependence on Weber number (which is inversely proportional to surface tension coefficient). The curvature of the vortex sheet, instead

Fontelos, Marco

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Traveling Waves from the Arclength Parameterization: Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traveling Waves from the Arclength Parameterization: Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension Benjamin for the vortex sheet with surface tension. We use the angle- arclength description of the interface rather than prove that there exist traveling vortex sheets with surface tension bifurcating from equilibrium. We

Wright, J. Douglas

142

CALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the stretched-spiral vortex has been suc- cessfully applied to the calculation of the energy spectrum,6 and some for larger scales is perhaps questionable. Most quantitative vortex-based models have utilized tube and sheetCALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model

Barr, Al

143

Vortex reconnections in atomic condensates at finite temperature A. J. Allen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, reconnections of stream lines, vortex lines and magnetic flux tubes change the topology of the flowVortex reconnections in atomic condensates at finite temperature A. J. Allen1 , S. Zuccher2 , M (Dated: May 28, 2014) The study of vortex reconnections is an essential ingredient of understanding

Zuccher, Simone

144

Tailoring magnetic properties of core/shell nanoparticles and Shouheng Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in electromagnetic and permanent magnetic applications.10,11 In such a system, the intimate contact be- tween the core and shell leads to effective exchange coupling and therefore cooperative magnetic switching coupled and magneti- zation of both core and shell reverses cooperatively. As a result, the magnetic

Liu, J. Ping

145

Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: II. Vortex Formation, Evolution and Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of experimental investigations of inhomogeneities of gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma obtained by using the nonperturbing experimental methods [N.A. Kervalishvili, arXiv:1502.02516 [physics.plasm-ph] (2015)] have been presented. Inhomogeneities are the dense solitary vortex structures stretched along the magnetic field, the lifetime of which is much greater than the time of electron-neutral collisions. The processes of formation, evolution and dynamics of vortex structures were studied. The periodic sequence of these processes is described for different geometries of discharge device.

Kervalishvili, N A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium Triborane in the Solid State Under Moderate Conditions. Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to...

147

LINEAR DISPERSIVE DECAY ESTIMATES FOR VORTEX SHEETS WITH SURFACE TENSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

governing irrotational vortex sheets and water waves with surface tension. Using oscillatory integral order, well- posedness theory poses difficulties; however, local-in-time existence for water waves by the kinematic condition in that the interface does not break. This implies the component of the velocity field

Spirn, Daniel

148

High-Resolution Simulations of Parallel BladeVortex Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= perturbation pressure coefficient, p ps= 1 2 1U2 1 c = rotor blade chord p = instantaneous airfoil surface­vortex interaction computations Introduction A MAJOR source of rotorcraft noise is generated by the rotor blades on the rotor blades. BVI noise is especially important because it is known to propagate out

Alonso, Juan J.

149

Creation and pinning of vortex-antivortex pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer modeling is reported about the creation and pinning of a magnetic vortex-antivortex (V-AV) pair in a superconducting thin film, due to the magnetic field of a vertical magnetic dipole above the film, and two antidot pins inside the film...

Kim, Sangbum; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, Malcolm J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

General-Relativistic Curvature of Pulsar Vortex Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motion of a neutron superfluid condensate in a pulsar is studied. Several theorems of general-relativistic hydrodynamics are proved for a superfluid. The average density distribution of vortex lines in pulsars and their general-relativistic curvature are derived.

A. A. Shatskiy

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Vortex Shedding on Hydrofoils Its dark and lonely down there...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex Shedding on Hydrofoils Its dark and lonely down there... Improving marine vehicle an underwater vehicle moves, it displaces water, genera6ng a unique velocity that it can u6lize rather than fight those flows, saving energy and improving

152

WAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parcel dynamics, linear modes, balan- ced models, gravity waves, weather and climate prediction Introduction Numerical weather and climate prediction is complicated because only the flow scales larger thanWAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE PREDICTION Onno Bokhove Numerical Analysis

Vellekoop, Michel

153

Vortex phase-jitter in acoustically excited bluff body flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex phase-jitter in acoustically excited bluff body flames Santosh J. Shanbhogue, Michael disturbances. Phase locked particle image velocimetry was carried out over a range of conditions", manifested as cycle-to-cycle variation in flame and vorticity field at the same excitation phase. Phase

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

154

Onset of superradiant instabilities in the hydrodynamic vortex model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrodynamic vortex, an effective spacetime geometry for propagating sound waves, is studied analytically. In contrast with the familiar Kerr black-hole spacetime, the hydrodynamic vortex model is described by an effective acoustic geometry which has no horizons. However, this acoustic spacetime possesses an ergoregion, a property which it shares with the rotating Kerr spacetime. It has recently been shown numerically that this physical system is linearly unstable due to the superradiant scattering of sound waves in the ergoregion of the effective spacetime. In the present study we use analytical tools in order to explore the onset of these superradiant instabilities which characterize the effective spacetime geometry. In particular, we derive a simple analytical formula which describes the physical properties of the hydrodynamic vortex system in its critical (marginally-stable) state, the state which marks the boundary between stable and unstable fluid configurations. The analytically derived formula is shown to agree with the recently published numerical data for the hydrodynamic vortex system.

Shahar Hod

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modified Black Hole with Polar Jet and Vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are many models relating an accretion disk of Black Hole to jet outflow. The herein heuristic model describes the continuation of an external accretion disk to an internal accretion disk for less than Black Hole horizon, and subsequent polar jet outflow along polar axis out of polar vortex wherein the event horizon is no longer descriptive.

T. Tmmalm

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

-STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS MATTHIAS KURZKE AND DANIEL SPIRN Abstract. 1. Introduction 1.1. Physical background. The evolution of a superconducting material is usu- ally of the magnetic field and the electric field potential for a superconducting sample R2 . The parameter

Spirn, Daniel

157

Inhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a 2D rotating Bose gas described by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) theory and investigate the properties of the ground state of the theory for rotational speeds close to the critical speed for vortex nucleation. While one could expect that the vortex distribution should be homogeneous within the condensate we prove by means of an asymptotic analysis in the strongly interacting (Thomas-Fermi) regime that it is not. More precisely we rigorously derive a formula due to Sheehy and Radzihovsky [Phys. Rev. A 70, 063620(R) (2004)] for the vortex distribution, a consequence of which is that the vortex distribution is strongly inhomogeneous close to the critical speed and gradually homogeneizes when the rotation speed is increased. From the mathematical point of view, a novelty of our approach is that we do not use any compactness argument in the proof, but instead provide explicit estimates on the difference between the vorticity measure of the GP ground state and the minimizer of a certain renormalized energy...

Correggi, Michele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Inhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be homogeneous within the condensate we prove by means of an asymptotic analysis in the strongly interactingInhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates M. Correggia , N. Rougerieb, France. May 10, 2012 Abstract We consider a 2D rotating Bose gas described by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Inhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should be homogeneous within the condensate we prove by means of an asymptotic analysis in the stronglyInhomogeneous Vortex Patterns in Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates M. Correggia , N. Rougerieb, France. September 19, 2012 Abstract We consider a 2D rotating Bose gas described by the Gross

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

160

-The Core of CS -Curricula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Advanced Courses #12;The Core of CS Curricula #12;CS Body of Knowledge Area > Unit > Topic Core vs elective#12;ACM vs U S I #12;- The Core of CS - Curricula - Introductory Courses - Intermediate Courses Introductory Intermediate Advanced Core Elective Units #12;Courses Introductory Intermediate Advanced Core

Hauswirth, Matthias

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Core shroud corner joints  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effects of pressure gradient on global Alfvén eigenmodes in reversed field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of pressure gradient on the existence of global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE) in Reversed Field Pinch are studied by numerical calculation. It is found that GAEs near the plasma core can exist when pressure gradient is sufficiently large. The calculated mode frequency and structure are consistent with the experimental results in the Madison Symmetric Torus.

Cai, Huishan, E-mail: hscai@mail.ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fu, Guoyong, E-mail: fu@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lin, Liang; Ding, Weixing; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Liu, D. Y. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Hu, Y. J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Plasma engineering design of a compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given.

Bathke, C.G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reverse ventilation--perfusion mismatch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patients having lobar airway obstruction or consolidation usually have decreases of both ventilation and perfusion on lung scans. We report three patients in whom hypoxic vasoconstriction was apparently incomplete, resulting in a ''reversed'' ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Perfusion of the hypoxic lobe on the radionuclide scan was associated with metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary venous and pulmonary arterial hypertension in these patients.

Palmaz, J.C.; Barnett, C.A.; Reich, S.B.; Krumpe, P.E.; Farrer, P.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Emergency core cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Vortex energy and 360 Neel walls in thinfilm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel walls in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

168

Vortex topology and the continuum limit of lattice gauge theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the stability of Z_2 topological vortex excitations in d+1 dimensional SU(2) Yang-Mills theory on the lattice at T=0. This is found to depend on d and on the coupling considered. We discuss the connection with lattice artifacts causing bulk transitions in the beta_A-beta_F plane and draw some conclusions regarding the continuum limit of the theory.

G. Burgio

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Reduction of the planar 4-vortex system at zero momentum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the plane the nth vortex has location zn = xn + iyn Ppl (C2 )N . The Hamiltonian and symplectic form- nally on each factor C of Ppl by (ei , a) · z ei z + a. A momentum mapping is Jpl - N n=1 n 1 2 |zn|2]. To calculate the quotient µe : (Jpl )-1 (µe) (Ppl )µe (Jpl )-1 (µe)/SE(2), one may first translate

Patrick, George

170

Vortex energy and 360 Neel wall in thinfilm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12 of the magnetization in thickness direction as well as its out of plane component are energetically strongly penalized of a single vortex at the center of the disc. The aim of our paper is to analyze the energetic cost

Ignat, Radu

171

Transient vortex events in the initial value problem for turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A vorticity surge event that could be a paradigm for a wide class of bursting events in turbulence is studied to examine how the energy cascade is established and how this event could serve as a new test of LES turbulence models. This vorticity surge event is tied to the formation of the energy cascade in a direct numerical simulation by the traditional signatures of a turbulent energy cascade such as spectra approaching -5/3 and strongly Beltramized vortex tubes. A coherent mechanism is suggested by the nearly simultaneous development of a maximum of the peak vorticity $\\|\\omega\\|_\\infty$, growth of the dissipation, the appearance of a helically aligned local vortex configuration and strong, transient oscillations in the helicity wavenumber spectrum. This coherence is also examined for two LES models, a traditional purely dissipative eddy viscosity model and a modern method (LANS$-\\alpha$) that respects the nonlinear transport properties of fluids. Both LES models properly represent the spectral energy and energy dissipation associated with this vorticity surge event. However, only the model that preserves nonlinear fluid transport properties reproduces the helical properties, including Beltrami-like vortex tubes.

Darryl D. Holm; Robert M. Kerr

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effects of the resistivity profile on the formation of a reversed configuration and single helicity states in compressible simulations of the reversed-field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) are presented. Previous simulations of the RFP, including density and pressure evolution, showed that a stationary state with a reversed toroidal magnetic field could not be obtained, contrary to the results produced with numerical codes neglecting density and pressure dynamics. The simulations described in the present paper show that including density and pressure evolution, a stationary RFP configuration can be obtained if the resistivity has a radial profile steeply increasing close to the wall. Such resistivity profile is more realistic than a uniform resistivity, since the temperature at the wall is lower than in the plasma core.

Onofri, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)] [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Malara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - axisymmetric vortex breakdown Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the breakdown of vortex rings in the cycle following t 300T. Downstream... A straight tube with a smooth axisymmetric constriction is an idealised representation of a stenosed...

174

Reverse engineering of integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

Chisholm, Gregory H. (Shorewood, IL); Eckmann, Steven T. (Colorado Springs, CO); Lain, Christopher M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Veroff, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

TMI-2 core examination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper.

Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder with combined in-line and cross-flow motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep water, string-like, marine risers subject to strong ocean currents, suffer from vortex-induced vibrations (VIV), where vortex shedding interacts with the structural properties of the riser, resulting in large amplitude ...

Dahl, Jason (Jason Michael)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Carlson-Simpson Lemma in Reverse Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6.3 Reverse Mathematicswords . . . . . 1.4 Reverse Mathematics diagrams Miller-1.1 Reverse Mathematics . . . . . . 1.2 The Dual Ramsey

Erhard, Julia Christina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electromagnetic pump stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 144511 (2011) Rectification of vortex motion in a circular ratchet channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 144511 (2011) Rectification of vortex motion in a circular ratchet channel N and induces a net vortex flow without any unbiased external drive, i.e., the ratchet effect. We show containing a single weak-pinning circular ratchet channel in a Corbino geometry and observed a substantial

Plourde, Britton L. T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Generalized London free energy for high-Tc vortex lattices Ian Affleck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized London free energy for high-Tc vortex lattices Ian Affleck Department of Physics-1829 97 50402-4 The London free energy provides a very simple way of studying the vortex lattice that this effect can arise from additional quartic derivative terms in the Ginzburg-Landau GL free energy4­7 or

Franz, Marcel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The geometric phase and the geometrodynamics of relativistic electron vortex beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied here the geometrodynamics of relativistic electron vortex beams from the perspective of the geometric phase associated with the scalar electron encircling the vortex line. It is pointed out that the electron vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum is a natural consequence of the skyrmion model of a fermion. This follows from the quantization procedure of a fermion in the framework of Nelson's stochastic mechanics when a direction vector (vortex line) is introduced to depict the spin degrees of freedom. In this formalism a fermion is depicted as a scalar particle encircling a vortex line. It is here shown that when the Berry phase acquired by the scalar electron encircling the vortex line involves quantized Dirac monopole we have paraxial (non-paraxial) beam when the vortex line is parallel (orthogonal) to the wavefront propagation direction. Non-paraxial beams incorporate spin-orbit interaction. When the vortex line is tilted with respect to the propagation direction the Berry phase involves non-quantized monopole. The temporal variation of the direction of the tilted vortices is studied here taking into account the renormalization group flow of the monopole charge and it is predicted that this gives rise to spin Hall effect.

Pratul Bandyopadhyay; Banasri Basu; Debashree Chowdhury

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Vortex patterns and infinite degeneracy in the uniformly frustrated XY models and lattice Coulomb gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex patterns and infinite degeneracy in the uniformly frustrated XY models and lattice Coulomb gas Myoung Kwan Ko,1 Sung Jong Lee,2 Jooyoung Lee,3 and Bongsoo Kim4 1 Department of Physics, Konkuk state vortex con- figurations of a uniformly frustrated XY model on a square lattice for cases

Lee, Jooyoung

183

Efficiently computing vortex lattices in fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensates Yanzhi Zhang1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiently computing vortex lattices in fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensates Yanzhi Zhang1-Einstein condensates (BECs) with strongly repulsive interactions. The key ingredients of the method is to discretize method in time. Different vortex lattice structures of condensate ground state in two-dimensional (2D

Bao, Weizhu

184

Progress in year 2001 1. Observation of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Progress in year 2001 1. Observation of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates Quantized in rotating gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) [2, 3]. We have observed the formation of highly-ordered vortex lattices in a rotating Bose- condensed gas [4]. They were produced by rotating the condensate

185

van Hove singularities and vortex motion in superconductors B. I. Ivlev,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´ 78000, Mexico Received 16 February 2001; published 18 June 2001 When vortices move in a type by an electric current, any peculiarity of the vortex radiation friction due to emission of acoustic waves vortices. When a vortex moves under the action of a transport electric current, an electric field

Kunchur, Milind N.

186

Nucleation-controlled vortex entry in a square-columnar Josephson-junction array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial magnetization curve of square-columnar Josephson-junction arrays is calculated from fundamental laws. It is found that the first vortex entry is controlled by vortex nucleation rather than surface depinning and it occurs at a field greater than that predicted by the traditional surface-barrier theory. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Chen, D.; Moreno, J.J.; Hernando, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, RENFE-UCM-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, RENFE-UCM-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Generation and Propagation of InertiaGravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets SHUGUANG WANG*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation and Propagation of Inertia­Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets SHUGUANG WANG) ABSTRACT This study investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex, geostrophic adjust- ment, and spontaneous generation (Fritts and Alexander 2003, and references therein

188

Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Vortex ratchet effects in films with a periodic array of antidots Clcio C. de Souza Silva,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex ratchet effects in films with a periodic array of antidots Clécio C. de Souza Silva,1, * J The vortex ratchet effect has been studied in Al films patterned with square arrays of submicron antidots. We. In addition, the experiments reveal interesting collective phenomena in the vortex ratchet effect. At fields

Moshchalkov, Victor V.

190

Effect of time-dependent piston velocity program on vortex ring formation in a piston/cylinder arrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of time-dependent piston velocity program on vortex ring formation in a piston An analytical model describing laminar vortex ring formation in a nozzle flow generator piston/ cylinder.1063/1.2188918 I. INTRODUCTION Vortex rings are usually generated in the laboratory by the motion of a piston

Dabiri, John O.

191

arXiv:1206.2498v2[cond-mat.other]19Nov2012 Quantum vortex reconnections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and parts of the initial vortical tubes can be left behind as vortex threads, which then undergo successivearXiv:1206.2498v2[cond-mat.other]19Nov2012 Quantum vortex reconnections S. Zuccher,1 M. Caliari,1 A with time before and after the vor- tex reconnection. We also compute vortex reconnections using the Biot

Caliari, Marco

192

The role of boundary conditions in a simple model of incipient vortex breakdown F. Gallaire and J.-M. Chomaz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the labora- tory, it is preferentially studied in vortex tubes, where it is seen in many cases to give riseThe role of boundary conditions in a simple model of incipient vortex breakdown F. Gallaire and J of a hairpin vortex in a shear-thinning fluid governed by a power-law model Phys. Fluids 25, 101703 (2013); 10

Boyer, Edmond

193

Quantum dynamics of a vortex in a Josephson junction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the tunneling character of vortex in an asymmetrical potential well with a finite barrier by using the periodic instanton method. We obtain the total decay rate which is valid for the entire range of temperature and show how it reduces to the appropriate results for the classical thermal activation at high temperatures, the thermally assisted tunneling at intermediate temperatures, and the pure quantum tunneling at low temperature. We can even give the exact definition of the 'crossover' temperature and find experimental data to support our theoretical analysis.

Li Hong; Liu Wuming [Joint Laboratory of Advanced Technology in Measurements, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Shen Shunqing [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Liang Jiuqing [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Interaction of Josephson Junction and Distant Vortex in Narrow Thin-Film Superconducting Strips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase difference between the banks of an edge-type planar Josephson junction crossing the narrow thin-film strip depends on wether or not vortices are present in the junction banks. For a vortex close to the junction this effect has been seen by Golod, Rydh, and Krasnov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 227003 (2010)], who showed that the vortex may turn the junction into ? type. It is shown here that even if the vortex is far away from the junction, it still changes the 0 junction to a ? junction when situated close to the strip edges. Within the approximation used, the effect is independent of the vortex-junction separation, a manifestation of the topology of the vortex phase which extends to macroscopic distances of superconducting coherence.

Kogan, V. G. [Ames Laboratory; Mints, R. G. [Tel Aviv University

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

Bieg, L.F.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Relation Between Dry Vortex Merger and Tropical Cyclone Genesis over the Atlantic Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strong, convective African tropical disturbance has a greater chance to develop into a Tropical 23 Depression (TD) if it merges with a shallow, dry vortex (D-vortex) from the north of the African 24 easterly jet (AEJ) after leaving the western coast. Using 11-year reanalysis data we found that the 25 western tip of a vortex strip at northwestern Africa can serve as dry vortices for the D-vortex 26 merger if it shifts southward. Another source of D-vortices is the westward propagating lows 27 along the southern edge of the Saharan air. The D-vortex merger process occurred for 63.5% of 28 tropical cyclones (TCs) or developing systems over the main development region of the Atlantic 29 Ocean, while it occurred for 54% of non-developing systems. TC genesis could be largely 30 controlled by the large-scale environment, but the differences in characteristics of vortices 31 associated with the D-vortex merger between developing and non-developing systems could 32 potentially help determine their destinies; in general, developing systems were dominated by a 33 more intense and moist south vortex, while non-developing systems were dominated by a north 34 vortex which was more intense, drier, and larger in size. Analysis also shows that 74% of intense 35 developing systems were involved with the D-vortex merger process. More attention needs to be 36 paid to the D-vortex merger and the characteristics of those vortices as they can play significant 37 roles or have a strong indication in Atlantic TC genesis.

Chen, Shu-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chin

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electromagnetic pump stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reverse Computation for Rollback-based Fault Tolerance in Large Parallel Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reverse computation is presented here as an important future direction in addressing the challenge of fault tolerant execution on very large cluster platforms for parallel computing. As the scale of parallel jobs increases, traditional checkpointing approaches suffer scalability problems ranging from computational slowdowns to high congestion at the persistent stores for checkpoints. Reverse computation can overcome such problems and is also better suited for parallel computing on newer architectures with smaller, cheaper or energy-efficient memories and file systems. Initial evidence for the feasibility of reverse computation in large systems is presented with detailed performance data from a particle simulation scaling to 65,536 processor cores and 950 accelerators (GPUs). Reverse computation is observed to deliver very large gains relative to checkpointing schemes when nodes rely on their host processors/memory to tolerate faults at their accelerators. A comparison between reverse computation and checkpointing with measurements such as cache miss ratios, TLB misses and memory usage indicates that reverse computation is hard to ignore as a future alternative to be pursued in emerging architectures.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Park, Alfred J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

Dickinson, Robert J. (Shaler Township, Allegheny County, PA); Wetherill, Todd M. (Lower Burrell, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Current Reversals and Synchronization in Coupled Ratchets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current reversal is an intriguing phenomenon that has been central to recent experimental and theoretical investigations of transport based on ratchet mechanism. By considering a system of two interacting ratchets, we demonstrate how the coupling can be used to control the reversals. In particular, we find that current reversal that exists in a single driven ratchet system can ultimately be eliminated with the presence of a second ratchet. For specific coupling strengths a current-reversal free regime has been detected. Furthermore, in the fully synchronized state characterized by the coupling threshold $k_{th}$, a specific driving amplitude $a_{opt}$ is found for which the transport is optimum.

U. E. Vincent; A. Kenfack; D. V. Senthilkumar; D. Mayer; J. Kürths

2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Diplomarbeit Reverse approximation of rate-independent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-discretizations have been used to construct energetic solutions, but it is also possible to reverse this process zeitdiskreten Gegenstück untersuchen. Solche Zeitdiskretisierungen werden ver- wende

Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

205

Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Dr. Robert J. Remick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mr. Douglas Wheeler DJW...

206

Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles The OCIO has developed core competency worksheets for...

207

Reversible Modification of CdSe-CdS/ZnS Quantum Dot Fluorescence by Surrounding Ca2+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversible Modification of CdSe-CdS/ZnS Quantum Dot Fluorescence by Surrounding Ca2+ Ions Li Li (3-MPA) coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell QDs when free Ca2+ ions were added to and subsequently removed from the QD solution. It was found that QD fluorescence intensity was reduced when Ca2+ ions were

Haviland, David

208

Magnetic response of holographic Lifshitz superconductors:Vortex and Droplet solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper a holographic model of $s$-wave superconductor with anisotropic Lifshitz scaling has been considered. In the presence of an external magnetic field our holographic model exhibits both vortex and droplet solutions. Based on analytic methods we have shown that the anisotropy has no effect on the vortex and droplet solutions whereas it may affect the condensation. Our vortex solution closely resembles the Ginzburg-Landau theory and a relation between the upper critical magnetic field and superconducting coherence length has been speculated from this comparison. Using Sturm-Liouville method, the effect of anisotropy on the critical parameters in insulator/superconductor phase transitions has been analyzed.

Arindam Lala

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pinning-modulated non-collective Josephson-vortex motion in stacked Josephson junctions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Josephson vortices in naturally stacked Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} tunneling junctions display rich dynamic behavior that derives from the coexistence of three basic states: static Josephson vortex lattice, coherently moving lattice, and incoherent quasiparticle tunneling state. The rich structure of hysteretic branches observed in the current-voltage characteristics can be understood as combinatorial combinations of these three states which are realized in different junctions and evolve separately with magnetic field and bias current. In particular, the multiple Josephson vortex flow branches at low-bias currents arise from the individual depinning of Josephson vortex rows in each junction.

Jin, Y.-D.; Lee, G.-H.; Lee, H.-J.; Bae, M.-H.; Koshelev, A. E.; Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology; Univ. of Illinois

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Core Measure Results  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate EarthEnergyDistrict EnergyCensus,Core Measure Results

211

Core-tube data logger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as {sigma}{sub n,m}, are spaces of C{sub n}-invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of {sigma}{sub n,m} are investigated, and it is found that {sigma}{sub n,n-1} is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3{pi}n){sup -1}. The geodesic flow on {sigma}{sub n,m} and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

Krusch, S. [School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NF (United Kingdom); Speight, J. M. [Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Vortex radiation in long narrow Josephson junctions: Theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study theoretically and experimentally the dynamics of vortices in long, extremely narrow Josephson junctions. Using a variational approach, the current-voltage characteristics are calculated for junctions of different widths. The analytically and numerically calculated current-voltage characteristics show good agreement. We find that the decrease of the junction width leads to a substantial increase of the maximum velocity of vortices. Due to the interaction with stray magnetic fields outside the junction, the vortices radiate Cherenkov waves as they move in the junction. Locking of the vortex oscillation frequency to that of the Cherenkov radiation leads to novel resonances on the current-voltage characteristics. We observe such resonances in experiments, and their voltage positions and current magnitudes are in qualitative agreement with our theoretical analysis.

Abdumalikov, A.A. Jr.; Ustinov, A.V. [Physikalisches Institut III, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Fistul, M.V. [Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

Spectral Techniques for Solving PDE Stability Model of Vortex Rope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper spectral methods are applied to investigate the hydrodynamic instability of swirling flow with application to Francis hydraulic turbine. Spectral methods imply representing the problem solution as truncated series of smooth global functions. An L2 - projection and the collocation methods are developed assessing both analytically methodology and computational techniques using symbolic and numerical conversions. Remarks concerning the efficiency and the accuracy of each method in this case are presented. The model of the trailing vortex is used to validate the numerical algorithms with existing results in the literature. All the results are compared to existing ones and they prove to agree quite well. The advantages of using this methods in flow control problems are pointed out.

Bistrian, Diana Alina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of traveling waves on Vortex-Induced Vibration of long flexible cylinders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offshore marine risers and pipelines, exposed to ocean currents, are susceptible to Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV). Accurate prediction of VIV is necessary for estimating the fatigue life as well as for taking corrective ...

Jaiswal, Vivek, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Vortex-induced vibration of flexible cylinders in time-varying flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates two aspects of Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) on long flexible cylinders. The work is split into a minor and major part. The minor part addresses the effect of Reynolds number on flexible cylinder ...

Resvanis, Themistocles L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Vortex-Induced Vibration of a slender horizontal cylinder in currents and waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV) is a concern when dealing with slender, flexible structural members of deepwater platforms. While much is known about the characteristics of VIV in uniform and sheared current flows, very little is known about...

Chitwood, James Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

The vortex merger rate in freely decaying, two-dimensional turbulence J. H. LaCascea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vortex models in which energy-conserving mergers were allowed. Trizac19 used a molecular dynamics in laboratory experiments in which vortices were generated by electromagnetic excitation in an electrolyte.10

LaCasce, Joseph H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Dynamical mass of a quantum vortex in a Josephson junction array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The real-time response to a small external perturbation of a vortex in a quantum Josephson junction array, with long-range Coulomb interaction between Cooper pairs, is analyzed. While the static damping is zero for vortex velocities below some threshold value v{sub th} (which implies the possibility of ballistic motion), a dynamical friction due to the coupling to the plasma oscillations is always present for frequencies higher than a given threshold {omega}{sub th}. The latter approaches zero when the velocity increases to v{sub th}. However, radiative dissipation of the vortex affects the threshold for ballistic motion. We discuss the conditions under which a mass can be defined for the vortex as a quantum particle. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Eckern, U. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Luciano, G.; Tagliacozzo, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli, Mostra dOltremare Pad. 19, I-80125 Napoli (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli, Mostra dOltremare Pad. 19, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), I-16152 Genova (Italy)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - axially-symmetric cyclonic vortex Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 1 APRIL 2002 1213W A N G 2002 American Meteorological Society Summary: and wind fields of the vortex Rossby waves are quasi-balanced, with confluent cyclonic (divergent... ,...

223

Effects of trailing edge flap dynamic deployment on blade-vortex interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical and experimental investigation is undertaken to determine the effects of an actively deployable trailing edge flap on the disturbances created during blade-vortex interactions (BVI). The theoretical model consists of an unsteady panel...

Nelson, Carter T.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Steady-state and equilibrium vortex configurations, transitions, and evolution in a mesoscopic superconducting cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the system passes through nearly metastable intermediate configurations while seeking the final minimum-energy steady state consistent with the square symmetry of the sample. An efficient scheme to determine the equilibrium vortex configuration in a...

Kim, S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, MJ.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of Blade Vortex Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of parallel ics. Blade Vortex Interaction (BV1) with an active Trailing Edge Flap (TEF) is presented. The two-dimensional 1111-steady problem is solved by a higher order upwind Euler method...

Kim, Kyu-Sup

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Vortex life cycles in two-and three-layer quasi-geostrophic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coherent vortices and their properties were studied in two- and three-layer quasi-geostrophic beta-plane turbulence. Much research has discussed vortex characteristics in a number of applications, but no significant study of vortices in turbulent...

Fox, Amanda Katherine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Annular Vortex Generation for Inertial Fusion Energy Beam-Line Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of swirling annular vortex flow inside beam entrance tubes can protect beam-line structural materials in chambers for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. An annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of a tube wall with both axially and azimuthally directed velocity components. A layer of liquid then lines the beam tube wall, which may improve the effectiveness of neutron shielding, and condenses and removes vaporized coolant that may enter the beam tubes. Vortex tubes have been constructed and tested with a thickness of three-tenths the pipe radius. Analysis of the flow is given, along with experimental examples of vortex tube fluid mechanics and an estimate of the layer thickness, based on simple mass conservation considerations.

Pemberton, Steven J.; Abbott, Ryan P.; Peterson, Per F. [University of California (United States)

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

On the vortex parameter estimation using wide band signals in active acoustic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an important operation in a large number of applications such as turbine monitoring, de- tection of a vortex in a closed hydraulic test loop. The objective of the work is to emphasize the effect

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

229

Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

Bernitsas, Michael M. (Saline, MI); Raghavan, Kamaldev (Houston, TX)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Application of the vortex-box method to the unsteady incompressible flow over finite wings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OP THE VORTEX-BOX MRTHOD TO THE UNSTEADT INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW OVER FINITE WINGS A Thesis by CHARLES UPTON SONCRANT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering APPLICATION OF THE VORTEX-BOX METHOD TO THE UNSTEADY INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW OVER FINITE WINGS A Thesis by CHARLES UPTON SONCRANT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Soncrant, Charles Upton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effect of a surface boundary layer on an intensifying, downward-propagating vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department...

Wood, Vincent Tunstall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Vortex in a weakly relativistic Bose gas at zero temperature and relativistic fluid approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bogoliubov procedure in quantum field theory is used to describe a relativistic almost ideal Bose gas at zero temperature. Special attention is given to the study of a vortex. The radius of the vortex in the field description is compared to that obtained in the relativistic fluid approximation. The Kelvin waves are studied and, for long wavelengths, the dispersion relation is obtained by an asymptotic matching method and compared with the non relativistic result.

B. Boisseau

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

233

Explicit mean-field radius for nearly parallel vortex filaments in statistical equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophysical research has focused on flows, such as ocean currents, as two dimensional. Two dimensional point or blob vortex models have the advantage of having a Hamiltonian, whereas 3D vortex filament or tube systems do not necessarily have one, although they do have action functionals. On the other hand, certain classes of 3D vortex models called nearly parallel vortex filament models do have a Hamiltonian and are more accurate descriptions of geophysical and atmospheric flows than purely 2D models, especially at smaller scales. In these ``quasi-2D'' models we replace 2D point vortices with vortex filaments that are very straight and nearly parallel but have Brownian variations along their lengths due to local self-induction. When very straight, quasi-2D filaments are expected to have virtually the same planar density distributions as 2D models. An open problem is when quasi-2D model statistics behave differently than those of the related 2D system and how this difference is manifested. In this paper we study the nearly parallel vortex filament model of Klein, Majda, Damodaran in statistical equilibrium. We are able to obtain a free-energy functional for the system in a non-extensive thermodynamic limit that is a function of the mean square vortex position $R^2$ and solve \\emph{explicitly} for $R^2$. Such an explicit formula has never been obtained for a non-2D model. We compare the results of our formula to a 2-D formula of \\cite{Lim:2005} and show qualitatively different behavior even when we disallow vortex braiding. We further confirm our results using Path Integral Monte Carlo (Ceperley (1995)) \\emph{without} permutations and that the Klein, Majda, Damodaran model's asymptotic assumptions \\emph{are valid} for parameters where these deviations occur.

Timothy D. Andersen; Chjan C. Lim

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

HTTF Core Stress Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Entanglement spectrum: Identification of the transition from vortex-liquid to vortex-lattice state in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use entanglement to investigate the transition from vortex-liquid phase to vortex-lattice phase in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. For the torus geometry, the ground-state entanglement spectrum is analyzed to distinguish these two phases. The low-lying part of the ground-state entanglement spectrum, as well as the behavior of its lowest level, changes clearly when the transition occurs. For the sphere geometry, the entanglement gap in the conformal limit is also studied. We also show that the decrease in entanglement between particles can be regarded as a signal of the transition.

Liu Zhao; Guo Hongli; Fan Heng [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Vedral, Vlatko [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA); Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Consani, Keith A. (Richland, WA)

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reversible chemisorption on highly dispersed Ru catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorptions have been studied by static gas volumetric measurement on a range of highly dispersed Y-zeolite-supported ruthenium catalysts prepared by ion exchange. At ambient temperature, the absorption isotherms indicated two distinct types of adsorption - reversible (composed of both physisorption and weak chemisorption) and irreversible (strongly chemisorbed). The catalysts were highly dispersed and had average particle diameters ranging from 0.9 to 1.6 nm. Reversible hydrogen chemisorption was found to be a function of average particle diameter and dispersion. On the other hand, reversible carbon monoxide chemisorption seemed to be mainly due to interaction with the support.

Yang, C.H.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low Cost Reversible fuel cell systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes a 3-phase program performed from March 2000 through September 2003 with a particular focus on Phase III. The overall program studied TMI's reversible solid oxide stack, system concepts, and potential applications. The TMI reversible (fuel cell-electrolyzer) system employs a stack of high temperature solid-oxide electrochemical cells to produce either electricity (from a fuel and air or oxygen) or hydrogen (from water and supplied electricity). An atmospheric pressure fuel cell system operates on natural gas (or other carbon-containing fuel) and air. A high-pressure reversible electrolyzer system is used to make high-pressure hydrogen and oxygen from water and when desired, operates in reverse to generate electricity from these gases.

Technology Management Inc.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Characterization of ion selective membranes for application in reverse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of ion selective membranes for application in reverse electrodialysis systems I would have imagined when I started. i #12;Abstract Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a renewable

Kjelstrup, Signe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable magnesium...

242

Improved peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid chromatography-MS by incorporating peptide sequence Improved peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid...

243

Discrimination reversal learning in yearling horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISCRIMINATION REVERSAL LEARNING IN YEARLING HORSES A Thesis by JEANNA CHASTAIN FISKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976... Major Subjects Animal Science DISCRIMINATION REVERSAL LEARNING IN YEARLING HORSES A Thesis by JEANNA CHASTAIN FISKE Approved as to style and content by& Chai an o Committee ad oi epartment Member Nem er December 1976 ABSTRACT Discrimination...

Fiske, Jeanna Chastain

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Topological superconductivity, topological confinement, and the vortex quantum Hall effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topological matter is characterized by the presence of a topological BF term in its long-distance effective action. Topological defects due to the compactness of the U(1) gauge fields induce quantum phase transitions between topological insulators, topological superconductors, and topological confinement. In conventional superconductivity, because of spontaneous symmetry breaking, the photon acquires a mass due to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. In this paper we derive the corresponding effective actions for the electromagnetic field in topological superconductors and topological confinement phases. In topological superconductors magnetic flux is confined and the photon acquires a topological mass through the BF mechanism: no symmetry breaking is involved, the ground state has topological order, and the transition is induced by quantum fluctuations. In topological confinement, instead, electric charge is linearly confined and the photon becomes a massive antisymmetric tensor via the Stueckelberg mechanism. Oblique confinement phases arise when the string condensate carries both magnetic and electric flux (dyonic strings). Such phases are characterized by a vortex quantum Hall effect potentially relevant for the dissipationless transport of information stored on vortices.

Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Perugia, via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); SwissScientific, chemin Diodati 10, CH-1223 Cologny (Switzerland)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Core Values | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on γ-Al2O3. | EMSL Coordinatively-4Core FileCoreCore

246

A Robust Numerical Method for Integration of Point-Vortex Trajectories in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The venerable 2D point-vortex model plays an important role as a simplified version of many disparate physical systems, including superfluids, Bose-Einstein condensates, certain plasma configurations, and inviscid turbulence. This system is also a veritable mathematical playground, touching upon many different disciplines from topology to dynamic systems theory. Point-vortex dynamics are described by a relatively simple system of nonlinear ODEs which can easily be integrated numerically using an appropriate adaptive time stepping method. As the separation between a pair of vortices relative to all other inter-vortex length scales decreases, however, the computational time required diverges. Accuracy is usually the most discouraging casualty when trying to account for such vortex motion, though the varying energy of this ostensibly Hamiltonian system is a potentially more serious problem. We solve these problems by a series of coordinate transformations: We first transform to action-angle coordinates, which, to lowest order, treat the close pair as a single vortex amongst all others with an internal degree of freedom. We next, and most importantly, apply Lie transform perturbation theory to remove the higher-order correction terms in succession. The overall transformation drastically increases the numerical efficiency and ensures that the total energy remains constant to high accuracy.

Spencer A. Smith; Bruce M. Boghosian

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reverse-Engineering Banks' Financial Strength Ratings Using ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 27, 2006 ... reverse-engineering a superior bank rating system, which turns out to ...... sector (

mal92

2009-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

New designs of reversible sequential devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A clear protocol for synthesis of sequential reversible circuits from any particular gate library has been provided. Using that protocol, reversible circuits for SR latch, D latch, JK latch and T latch are designed from NCT gate library. All the circuits have been optimized with the help of existing local optimization algorithms (e.g. template matching, moving rule and deletion rule). It has been shown that the present proposals have lower gate complexities, lower number of garbage bits, lower quantum cost and lower number of feedback loops compared to the earlier proposals. For a fair comparison, the optimized sequential circuits have been compared with the earlier proposals for the same after converting the earlier proposed circuits into equivalent NCT circuits. Further, we have shown that the advantage in gate count obtained in some of the earlier proposals by introduction of New gates is an artifact and if it is allowed then every reversible circuit block can be reduced to a single gate. In this context, some important conceptual issues related to the designing and optimization of sequential reversible circuits have been addressed. A protocol for minimization of quantum cost of reversible circuit has also been proposed here.

Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open channel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open the obstacle, two main flow structures are observed: i a hydraulic jump in the near-surface region and ii turbulent regime , the detachment length of the hydraulic jump exceeds the one of the horseshoe vortex

Boyer, Edmond

251

Joule heating induced by vortex motion in a type-II superconductor Z. L. Xiao and E. Y. Andrei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joule heating induced by vortex motion in a type-II superconductor Z. L. Xiao and E. Y. Andrei-II superconductor due to Joule heating induced by vortex motion. The effect of Joule heating is detected s duration, where the Joule heating is negligible and saturates, respectively. The thermometry is based

Andrei, Eva Y.

252

Femtosecond laser fabrication of micro and nano-disks in single layer graphene using vortex Bessel beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond laser fabrication of micro and nano-disks in single layer graphene using vortex Bessel deposition graphene on glass substrate using femtosecond laser ablation with vortex Bessel beams. The fabricated graphene disks with diameters ranging from 650 nm to 4 µm were characterized by spatially resolved

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Method for the assessment of airborne off-target pesticide spray concentrations due to aircraft wing-tip vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that spherical spray droplets are transported by a two dimensional parametric representation of a spray-engulfing aircraft wing-tip vortex pair. Two distinctive flow regions were considered for the spray-vortex dynamics. The first occurs in the vicinity...

Oliva, Sergio Eduardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Vortex dipoles by PIV method Click here to see the images and the short movies from this lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction A vortex dipole is a jet flow with a system of two vortices of opposite sign at its front. Vortex of density stratification. The simplest case of stratification is a two-layer system. A Plexiglas tank a two-layer system without mixing the fluids, one can float a sheet of paper on top of the salt water

deYoung, Brad

255

Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Shear Banding and Spatiotemporal Oscillations in Vortex Matter in Nanostructured Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple nanostructured pinning array geometry where a rich variety of complex vortex shear banding phenomena can be realized. A single row of pinning sites is removed from a square pinning array. Shear banding effects arise when vortex motion in the pin-free channel nucleates motion of vortices in the surrounding pinned regions, creating discrete steps in the vortex velocity profile away from the channel. Near the global depinning transition, the width of the band of moving vortices undergoes oscillations or fluctuations that can span the entire system. We use simulations to show that these effects should be observable in the transport properties of the system. Similar large oscillations and shear banding effects are known to occur for sheared complex fluids in which different dynamical phases coexist.

C. Reichhardt; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Spectro-Polarimetric Properties of Small-Scale Plasma Eruptions Driven by Magnetic Vortex Tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly turbulent nature of convection on the Sun causes strong multi-scale interaction of subsurface layers with the photosphere and chromosphere. According to realistic 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ubiquitous small-scale vortex tubes are generated by turbulent flows below the visible surface and concentrated in the intergranular lanes. The vortex tubes can capture and amplify magnetic field, penetrate into chromospheric layers and initiate quasi-periodic flow eruptions that generates Alfv\\'enic waves, transport mass and energy into the solar atmosphere. The simulations revealed high-speed flow patterns, and complicated thermodynamic and magnetic structures in the erupting vortex tubes. The spontaneous eruptions are initiated and driven by strong pressure gradients in the near-surface layers, and accelerated by the Lorentz force in the low chromosphere. In this paper, the simulation data are used to further investigate the dynamics of the eruptions, their spectro-polarimetric characteristics for the...

Kitiashvili, Irina N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Alkali solution treatment on sandstone cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used for filtering the solution before the injection into the core. Hassler-t e Core Holder A stainless steel core holder was used to hold the core for treatment with the solutions. The core sample was positioned in the center of the core holder... and heat the water in the flask. Electric Heatin Ta e A silicone rubber embedded flexible heating tape was used to wrap the core holder to heat the core sample to the desired temperature. The maximum 0 continuous operating temperature of the tape...

Lee, Suk Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Phase-locking of driven vortex lattices with transverse ac force and periodic pinning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a vortex lattice moving in a periodic array we show analytically and numerically that a new type of phase locking occurs in the presence of a longitudinal dc driving force and a transverse ac driving force. This phase locking is distinct from the Shapiro step phase locking found with longitudinal ac drives. We show that an increase in critical current and a fundamental phase-locked step width scale with the square of the driving ac amplitude. Our results should carry over to other systems such as vortex motion in Josephson-junction arrays.

Reichhardt, Charles; Kolton, Alejandro B.; Dominguez, Daniel; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The effects of a jet on vortex breakdown over a sharp leading-edge delta wing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF A JET ON VORTEX BREAKDOWN OVER A SHARP LEADING-EDGE DELTA WING A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering THE EFFECTS OF A JET ON VORTEX BREAKDOWN OVER A SHARP LEADING-EDGE DELTA WING A Thesis by IAN KENNETH MAYNARD Approved as to style and content by: Cyrus Ostowar (Chairman of Committee) Stan J Miley (M er...

Maynard, Ian Kenneth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Combination pipe-rupture mitigator and in-vessel core catcher. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is described which mitigates against the effects of a failed coolant loop in a nuclear reactor by restricting the outflow of coolant from the reactor through the failed loop and by retaining any particulated debris from a molten core which may result from coolant loss or other cause. The device reduces the reverse pressure drop through the failed loop by limiting the access of coolant in the reactor to the inlet of the failed loop. The device also spreads any particulated core debris over a large area to promote cooling.

Tilbrook, R.W.; Markowski, F.J.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Reverse osmosis desalination with osmotic polyelectrolyte intermediate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are studying these problems, and many different processes are being developed for pro- duction of potable water from saline water. The major processes being developed to date are flash di. stillation, falling film distillation, electrodialysis, reverse... REVERSE OSNOSIS DESALIK@' !ON VIlH OSNO'IIC POLYEI ECI'RO!:~TE INTER&:L&KATE A heeie THORNS TIXODORE N;", CONNEI I Submitted to the Credueee , 'o! lege of the Texae A6N ll. :~ivereid:y i, :~ !~a~tiel fulfillment. of the requiremente for !: he...

McConnell, Thomas Theodore

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reverse circling supercurrents along a superconducting ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reason why high temperature superconductivity has been being debated is that many basic ideas in literatures are wrong. This work shows that the magnetic flux quantum in a superconducting ring have been inaccurately explained in fact, thus we suggest a reinterpretation of the magnetic flux quantum in a superconducting ring on the basis of the translations of pairs. We also predict that the internal and external surface of a superconducting tube have the reverse circling supercurrents. This means that a more thick tube could trap a larger amount of flux. Both the magnetic flux quantum and the reverse circling supercurrents could not be found with the London equation.

Tian De Cao

2012-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Performance of cholesterol oxidase sequestered within reverse micelles formed in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the first results on an enzyme-induced reaction within the water core of reverse micelles that have been formed in supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}). By using a perfluoropolyether ammonium carboxylate (PFPE) surfactant, the authors form reverse micelles in scCO{sub 2} with water cores and the authors show that the oxidation of cholesterol by cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The results of their experiments also show that (1) the optimum ChOx activity occurs when the molar ratio of H{sub 2}O-to-PFPE (R) exceeds {approximately}12, (2) the rate constant describing the conversion of the ChOx-cholesterol complex to product ({kappa}{sub cat,app}) is similar to values reported using reverse micelle systems formed in liquid alkanes, (3) the equilibrium constant that describes the ChOx-cholesterol complex dissociation (K{sub m,app}) is optimal at high R values, (4) the best-case K{sub m,app} is {approximately}2-fold better than the value reported using reverse micelles formed in liquid alkanes, (5) there is little change in the ChOx {kappa}{sub cat,app} and K{sub m,app} as the authors adjust the CO{sub 2} pressure between 100 and 260 bar, and (6) the ChOx was active within the PFPE water pool for at least 5 h; however, after 8 or more hours within the PFPE water pool, ChOx became temporarily inactive.

Kane, M.A.; Baker, G.A.; Pandey, S.; Bright, F.V.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Mitochondrial modulation: reversible phosphorylation takes center stage?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 billion years, mitochondria have evolved from oxygen-scavenging bacterial symbionts into pri- mary controlMitochondrial modulation: reversible phosphorylation takes center stage? David J. Pagliarini1 and Center for Human Genetics Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA In the past 1

Pagliarini, David J.

268

ccsd00001476, NEGATIVE ENERGIES AND TIME REVERSAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kinetic energy, so-called phantom #12;elds, have recently been proposed [1] [2] [3] as new sources leadingccsd­00001476, version 6 ­ 31 Mar 2005 NEGATIVE ENERGIES AND TIME REVERSAL IN QUANTUM FIELD THEORY The theoretical and phenomenological status of negative energies is reviewed in Quantum Field Theory leading

269

An analysis of reversible multiplier circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiplier circuits play an important role in reversible computation, which is helpful in diverse areas such as low power CMOS design, optical computing, DNA computing and bioinformatics. Here we propose a new reversible multiplier circuit with optimized hardware complexity. The optimized multiplier circuit is compared with the earlier proposals. We have shown that the quantum cost of earlier proposals can be further reduced with the help of existing local optimization algorithms (e.g. template matching, moving rule and deletion rule). A systematic protocol for reduction of quantum cost has been proposed. It has also been shown that the advantage in gate count obtained in some of the earlier proposals by introduction of new reversible gates is an artifact and if it is allowed then every circuit block can be reduced to a single gate. Further, it is shown that the 4x4 reversible gates proposed for designing of a component of multiplier circuit (full adder) is neither unique nor special and many such 4x4 gates may be proposed. As example three such new gates have been presented here and it is shown that the proposed gates are universal. It is also shown that the total cost of our design is minimum.

Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Species Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

droughts. Eco- logical responses to climate change in regions with Mediterranean climate regimes maySpecies Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to Changing Climate K. B. Suttle,1 * Meredith A. Thomsen,2 Mary E. Power1 Predictions of ecological response to climate change are based largely on direct

Wilmers, Chris

271

An Explanation for Beta's Mean-reversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the designation as an UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR Approved by Research Advisor: Dr. Dennis Jansen May 2014 Major: Economics TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT.................................................................................................................................. 8 1 ABSTRACT An Explanation for Beta’s Mean Reversion. (May 2014) Connor Matthew Bodkin Department of Economics Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Dennis Jansen Department of Economics This study aims to improve upon...

Bodkin, Connor Matthew

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reversing entanglement change by a weak measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 82, 052323 (2010) Reversing entanglement change by a weak measurement Qingqing Sun,1,* M. Al-Amri,2 Luiz Davidovich,3 and M. Suhail Zubairy1 1Department of Physics and Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering, Texas A...

Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Davidovich, Luiz; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of Mature Computations Ganesh Venkatesh, Jack Sampson! Dark Silicon #12;9 Conservation Cores Specialized cores for reducing energy ­ Automatically generated Conservation Core Architecture & Synthesis Patchable Hardware Results Conclusions #12;12 Constructing a C

Wang, Deli

274

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Spatiotemporal vortex solitons in hexagonal arrays of waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By means of a systematic numerical analysis, we demonstrate that hexagonal lattices of parallel linearly coupled waveguides, with the intrinsic cubic self-focusing nonlinearity, give rise to three species of stable semidiscrete complexes (which are continuous in the longitudinal direction) with embedded vorticity S: triangular modes with S=1, hexagonal ones with S=2, both centered around an empty central core, and compact triangles with S=1, which do not not include the empty site. Collisions between stable triangular vortices are studied too. These waveguiding lattices can be realized in optics and Bose-Einstein condensate.

Leblond, Herve [Laboratoire de Photonique d'Angers, EA 4464, Universite d'Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, F-49000 Angers (France); Malomed, Boris A. [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv IS-69978 (Israel); ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Mihalache, Dumitru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), 407 Atomistilor, Magurele-Bucharest, R-077125 (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, 54 Splaiul Independentei, R-Bucharest 050094 (Romania); Laboratoire de Photonique d'Angers, EA 4464, Universite d'Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, F-49000 Angers (France)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Intrinsic Shapes of Molecular Cloud Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conduct an analysis of the shapes of molecular cloud cores using recently compiled catalogs of observed axis ratios of individual cores mapped in ammonia or through optical selection. We apply both analytical and statistical techniques to deproject the observed axis ratios in order to determine the true distribution of cloud core shapes. We find that neither pure oblate nor pure prolate cores can account for the observed distribution of core shapes. Intrinsically triaxial cores produce distributions which agree with observations. The best-fit triaxial distribution contains cores which are more nearly oblate than prolate.

C. E. Jones; Shantanu Basu; John Dubinski

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ion and electron local transport inside single helicity islands in the reversed field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ion and electron diffusion coefficients inside the helical magnetic core in a single helicity reversed field pinch (RFP) toroidal plasma have been numerical determined by a Monte Carlo test particle approach. A new algorithm aimed at approximating with polyhedra the magnetic surfaces obtained with Poincare cross sections has been developed. Stationary simulations of test ion and electron transport have been performed: they allow the determination of the average diffusion coefficients inside the helical core both for ions and electrons, which are much lower than those found in standard multiple helicity plasmas. Results are discussed and compared with those found in previous RFP simulations. The technique may be relevant also for stellarator and tokamak studies.

Gobbin, M.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; White, R. B. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Core Universities | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on γ-Al2O3. | EMSL Coordinatively-4Core FileCore

282

Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Two regimes of vortex penetration into platelet-shaped type-II superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vortex penetration into a thin superconducting strip of a rectangular cross section is considered at an increasing applied magnetic field H{sub a}, taking an interplay between the Bean-Livingston and the geometric barriers in the sample into account. We calculate the magnetic field H{sub p} at which the penetration begins and show that two regimes of vortex penetration are possible. In the first regime, vortices appearing at the corners of the strip at H{sub a} = H{sub p} immediately move to its center, where a vortex dome starts to develop. In the second regime, the penetration occurs in two stages. In the first stage, at H{sub a} < H{sub p}, tilted vortices penetrate into the edge regions of the strip, where novel domes are shown to be formed at the top, bottom, and lateral surfaces. In the second stage, at H{sub a} = H{sub p}, the vortex propagation to the center becomes possible. The difference between the regimes manifests itself in slightly different dependences of the magnetic moment of the strip on H{sub a}.

Brandt, E. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung (Germany); Mikitik, G. P., E-mail: mikitik@ilt.kharkov.ua [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering (Ukraine); Zeldov, E. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Condensed Matter Physics (Israel)] [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Condensed Matter Physics (Israel)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Vortex-Pair Dynamics in Anisotropic Bistable Media: A Kinematic Approach Aric Hagberg1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex-Pair Dynamics in Anisotropic Bistable Media: A Kinematic Approach Aric Hagberg1 and Ehud typically evolves into rotating spiral waves. In an anisotropic system, instead of spiral waves, the vortices can form wave fragments that propagate with a constant speed in a given direction determined

Hagberg, Aric

285

Computational Analysis of a Tip Vortex Structure Shed from a Bioinspired Blade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design for this purpose. Different rotor blade designs and relevant insect wings are under study Computational Analysis of a Tip Vortex Structure Shed from a Bioinspired Blade Sebastian was generated with SolidWorks CAD software from measurements performed on a wing sample obtained from

Maccabe, Barney

286

VIVDR -Vortex-induced vibration data repository An overview of available riser datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIVDR - Vortex-induced vibration data repository An overview of available riser datasets http://oe.mit.edu/VIV H. Mukundan and M. Triantafyllou 20 April 2008 #12;NDP 38m long riser model datasets #12;33 q Rig q Tension applied through spring-supported clump weights NDP 38m long riser model datasets

287

Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Vortex Suppress Device Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used in an investigation into the suppression of a surface vortex that forms and the south-most spilling bay at The Dalles Project. The CFD work complemented work at the prototype and the reduced-scale physical models. The CFD model was based on a model developed for other work in the forebay but had additional resolution added near the spillway. Vortex suppression devices (VSDs) were to placed between pier noses and/or in the bulkhead slot of the spillway bays. The simulations in this study showed that placing VSD structures or a combination of structures to suppress the vortex would still result in near-surface flows to be entrained in a vortex near the downstream spillwall. These results were supported by physical model and prototype studies. However, there was a consensus of the fish biologists at the physical model that the fish would most likely move north and if the fish went under the VSD it would immediately exit the forebay through the tainter gate and not get trapped between VSDs or the VSDs and the tainter gate if the VSDs were deep enough.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Tip Vortex Field Resolution Using an Adaptive Dual-Mesh Computational Nathan Hariharan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the aforementioned unsteady, vortical fields. 1. Introduction 1.1 Background Vortical wakes introduce important AMR in an unstructured Euler solver. Potsdam[3] also applied unstructured AMR to wind turbine wake1 Tip Vortex Field Resolution Using an Adaptive Dual-Mesh Computational Paradigm Nathan Hariharan

Steffen, Michael

289

Vortex Rings in Bio-inspired and Biological Jet Propulsion Paul S. Krueger1, a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, J. Tyler Nichols1,c , Ian K. Bartol2,d , and William J. Stewart2,e 1 Department of Mechanical of the pulse is ejected as a trailing jet. Recent results from mechanical pulsed- jets have demonstrated that vortex rings lead to thrust augmentation through the acceleration of additional ambient fluid

Hynes, Wayne L.

290

DETECTION OF VORTEX TUBES IN SOLAR GRANULATION FROM OBSERVATIONS WITH SUNRISE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated a time series of continuum intensity maps and corresponding Dopplergrams of granulation in a very quiet solar region at the disk center, recorded with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) on board the balloon-borne solar observatory SUNRISE. We find that granules frequently show substructure in the form of lanes composed of a leading bright rim and a trailing dark edge, which move together from the boundary of a granule into the granule itself. We find strikingly similar events in synthesized intensity maps from an ab initio numerical simulation of solar surface convection. From cross sections through the computational domain of the simulation, we conclude that these granular lanes are the visible signature of (horizontally oriented) vortex tubes. The characteristic optical appearance of vortex tubes at the solar surface is explained. We propose that the observed vortex tubes may represent only the large-scale end of a hierarchy of vortex tubes existing near the solar surface.

Steiner, O.; Franz, M.; Bello Gonzalez, N.; Nutto, Ch.; Rezaei, R.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Martinez Pillet, V.; Bonet Navarro, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de Astronomia y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Knoelker, M., E-mail: steiner@kis.uni-freiburg.d [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vortex Liquid Crystals in Anisotropic Type II Superconductors E.W. Carlson,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex Liquid Crystals in Anisotropic Type II Superconductors E.W. Carlson,1,2 A. H. Castro Neto,1 September 2002; published 25 February 2003) In an isotropic type II superconductor in a moderate magnetic been much interest in high tem- perature superconductors in a magnetic field. Various ex- periments

Carlson, Erica

292

2094 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 21 / November 1, 2003 Fundamental and vortex solitons in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2094 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 21 / November 1, 2003 Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optical lattice Jianke Yang Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington-dimensional optically induced waveguide array are reported. In the strong localization regime the fundamental soliton

Yang, Jianke

293

Effect of asymmetric axial strain on the behavior of the juncture vortex system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research was to investigate the behavior of the vortex formed in a wing-body juncture in a water tunnel flow. The wing-body juncture was created by mounting a symmetrical airfoil with an elliptical leading edge normal to a flat...

Trosper, Jeffrey Randall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Observations of wave-generated vortex ripples on the North Carolina continental shelf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 2002. [1] Sand ripples with wavelengths between 0.5 and 3 m were observed on the bottom across, 1882; Forel, 1883; Dingler, 1974; Vincent and Osborne, 1993; Gallagher et al., 1998; Traykovski et al ripples'' by Bagnold [1946], exert a much larger drag on the flow than friction on sand grains. Vortex

Kirby, James T.

295

Josephson Vortex Qubit: Design, Preparation and Read-Out , A. Wallraff, and A. V. Ustinov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a qubit based on a single Josephson vortex trapped in a shaped long Josephson junction is discussed on small Josephson junctions in the phase or charge regime have been shown to achieve parameters which Josephson junction was proposed. A major difference from the small Josephson junction qubit proposals where

Wallraff, Andreas

296

Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%. For propane/air combustion, the stability limits ranged from ~ 0.25 to 2 for the 124 mm3 combustor. Methane of a small combustor not only makes the heat generated from the combustion process hard to keep pace1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A

Yang, Vigor

297

Fluid Dynamics Research 33 (2003) 333356 Leapfrogging vortex rings: Hamiltonian structure, geometric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid Dynamics Research 33 (2003) 333­356 Leapfrogging vortex rings: Hamiltonian structure that if the rings are modeled as coaxial circular ÿlaments, their dynamics and Hamil- tonian structure is derivable of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA b Control and Dynamical

Shashikanth, Banavara N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Vortex-peak interaction and lattice shape in rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex-peak interaction and lattice shape in rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates: November 28, 2011) When a two component Bose-Einstein condensate is placed into rotation, a lattice component condensate is set into rotation, topological defects of both order parameters are created, which

Wei, Jun-cheng

299

Formation and Decay of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates at Finite Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation and Decay of Vortex Lattices in Bose-Einstein Condensates at Finite Temperatures Gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) are a testbed for many-body theory. Recently, rotating condensates was observed non-destructively by monitoring the centrifugal distortions of the rotating condensate

300

ccsd00003161, Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Furthermore we restrict our analysis to the case of a two-dimensional gas in the xy plane, assumingccsd­00003161, version 1 ­ 26 Oct 2004 Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate, France (Dated: October 26, 2004) For a fast rotating condensate in a harmonic trap, we investigate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 2315 #12;Combustion noise in gas turbines consists of direct noise related to the unsteady combustion process itself and indirect noise. As known, indirect noise is produced when entropy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Cherenkov resonances in vortex dissipation in superconductors B. I. Ivlev and S. Mejia-Rosales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mexico M. N. Kunchur Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South-two superconductors the magnetic flux is carried by vortices. If the transport electric current greatly exceeds in the crystal the dissipa- tion increases due to Cherenkov emission of sound waves. Each moving vortex creates

Kunchur, Milind N.

303

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 27, NO. 2, 2010, 243252 Mesoscale Barotropic Instability of Vortex Rossby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 27, NO. 2, 2010, 243­252 Mesoscale Barotropic Instability of Vortex Rossby Waves in Tropical Cyclones ZHONG Wei1 ( Í), LU Han-Cheng1 (ö ), and Da-Lin ZHANG2 1 Institute of Meteorology, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 211101 2 Department

Zhang, Da-Lin

304

First-order disorder-driven transition and inverse melting of the vortex lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

`inverse' melting behavior. � 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Type-II superconductivity-order transition (FOT) [1±5] whereas at low temperatures the ordered vortex lattice transforms into a disordered open questions in the phase diagram of HTS is the thermodynamic nature of the disorder-dri- ven

Zeldov, Eli

305

Direct numerical simulation of autoignition of a hydrogen vortex ring reacting with hot air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct numerical simulation of auto­ignition of a hydrogen vortex ring reacting with hot air Jeff2/air combustion proposed by Mueller et al. [2]. Diluted H2 at ambient temperature (300 K) is injected into hot air. The simulations study the effect of fuel/air ratios, oxidizer temperature, Lewis

Mahesh, Krishnan

306

A REVERSE SHOCK IN GRB 130427A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present extensive radio and millimeter observations of the unusually bright GRB 130427A at z = 0.340, spanning 0.67-12 days after the burst. We combine these data with detailed multi-band UV, optical, NIR, and Swift X-ray observations and find that the broadband afterglow emission is composed of distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions. The reverse shock emission dominates in the radio/millimeter and at ?< 0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-rays and at ?> 0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR. We further find that the optical and X-ray data require a wind circumburst environment, pointing to a massive star progenitor. Using the combined forward and reverse shock emission, we find that the parameters of the burst include an isotropic kinetic energy of E{sub K,{sub iso}} ? 2 × 10{sup 53} erg, a mass loss rate of M-dot ?3×10{sup -8} M{sub ?} yr{sup –1} (for a wind velocity of 1000 km s{sup –1}), and a Lorentz factor at the deceleration time of ?(200 s) ? 130. Due to the low density and large isotropic energy, the absence of a jet break to ?15 days places only a weak constraint on the opening angle, ?{sub j} ?> 2.°5, and therefore a total energy of E{sub ?} + E{sub K} ?> 1.2 × 10{sup 51} erg, similar to other gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The reverse shock emission is detectable in this burst due to the low circumburst density, which leads to a slow cooling shock. We speculate that this property is required for the detectability of reverse shocks in radio and millimeter bands. Following on GRB 130427A as a benchmark event, observations of future GRBs with the exquisite sensitivity of the Very Large Array and ALMA, coupled with detailed modeling of the reverse and forward shock contributions, will test this hypothesis.

Laskar, T.; Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Margutti, R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Chakraborti, S.; Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Ray, A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Stability of Molten Core Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced chemistry laboratory I CHM 335 3 Advanced chemistry laboratory II Mat 33 3 Engineering materialsChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

Napier, Terrence

309

Wright State University CORE Scholar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wright State University CORE Scholar Psychology Faculty Publications Psychology 10-1-2010 The Statistical Properties of the Survivor Interaction Contrast Joseph W. Houpt Wright State University - Main Campus, joseph.houpt@wright.edu James T. Townsend Follow this and additional works at: http://corescholar.libraries.wright

Townsend, James T.

310

On Reverse Engineering in the Cognitive and Brain Andreas Schierwagen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Reverse Engineering in the Cognitive and Brain Sciences Andreas Schierwagen Institute #12;On Reverse Engineering in the Cognitive and Brain Sciences Andreas Schierwagen Institute research initiatives try to utilize the operational principles of organisms and brains to develop

Schierwagen, Andreas

311

Logging-while-coring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

On the Synthesis of Sequential Reversible Circuit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversible circuits for SR flip flop, JK flip flop, D flip flop, T flip flop, Master Slave D flip flop and Master Slave JK flip flop have been provided with three different logical approaches. All the circuits have been optimized with the help of existing local optimization algorithms (e.g. template matching, moving rule and deletion rule) and the optimized sequential circuits have been compared with the earlier proposals for the same. It has been shown that the present proposals have lower gate complexities and lower number of garbage bits compared to the earlier proposals. It has also been shown that the advantage in gate count obtained in some of the earlier proposals by introduction of New gates is an \\textcolor{black}{artifact} and if it is allowed then every circuit block (unless there is a measurement) can be reduced to a single gate. Further, it is shown that a reversible flip flop can be constructed even without a feedback. In this context, some important conceptual issues related to the designing and optimization of sequential reversible circuits have also been addressed.

Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deposit Control for Reverse Osmosis Systems , Technicalon Colloidal Fouling in Reverse Osmosis and NanofiltrationSiO 2 ) Scaling for Reverse Osmosis , ASTM Designation D

Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Does phentolamine mesylate reverse soft-tissue anesthesia after 3% mepivacaine?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reversal of soft-tissue anesthesia after dental procedures.following local anesthesia reversal with phentolamineet al. Reversal of soft-tissue anesthesia with phentolamine

Silvera, Andreia Minasian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

EARLY EVOLUTION OF PRESTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prestellar cores are approximated by singular polytropic spheres. Their early evolution is studied analytically with a Bondi-like scheme. The considered approximation is meaningful for polytropic exponents {gamma} between 0 and 6/5, implying radial power-law density profiles between r {sup -1} and r {sup -2.5}. Gravitationally unstable Jeans and Bonnor-Ebert masses differ at most by a factor of 3.25. Tidally stable prestellar cores must have a mean density contrast {approx}> 8 with respect to the external parent cloud medium. The mass-accretion rate relates to the cube of equivalent sound speed, as in Shu's seminal paper. The prestellar masses accreted over 10{sup 5} years cover the whole stellar mass spectrum; they are derived in simple closed form, depending only on the polytropic equation of state. The stellar masses that can be formed via strict conservation of angular momentum are at most of the order of a brown dwarf.

Horedt, G. P., E-mail: g.horedt@online.de [Kronwinkler 50, D-81245, Munich (Germany)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Time Reversal in Solids (Linear and Nonlinear Elasticity): Multimedia Resources in Time Reversal  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Dynamic nonlinear elastic behavior, nonequilibrium dynamics, first observed as a curiosity in earth materials has now been observed in a great variety of solids. The primary manifestations of the behavior are characteristic wave distortion, and slow dynamics, a recovery process to equilibrium that takes place linearly with the logarithm of time, over hours to days after a wave disturbance. The link between the diverse materials that exhibit nonequilibrium dynamics appears to be the presence of soft regions, thought to be 'damage' at many scales, ranging from order 10-9 m to 10-1 m at least. The regions of soft matter may be distributed as in a rock sample, or isolated, as in a sample with a single crack [LANLhttp://www.lanl.gov/orgs/ees/ees11/geophysics/nonlinear/nonlinear.shtml]. The Geophysics Group (EES-11) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has posted two or more multimedia items under each of the titles below to demonstrate aspects of their work: 1) Source Reconstruction Using Time Reversal; 2) Robustness and Efficiency of Time Reversal Acoustics in Solid Media; 3) Audio Example of Time Reversal - Speech Privacy; 4) Crack Imagining with Time Reversal - Experimental Results; 5) Time Reversal of the 2004 (M9.0) Sumatra Earthquake.

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc jet heated Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 7 Electrical discharges in theElectrical discharges in the Reverse Vortex FlowReverse Vortex Flow Summary: in Vortex Flows -- ICP Discharge in Vortex FlowsICP...

319

TMI-2 core shipping preparations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

Fanning, A.W.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Overrelaxation phenomena during the formation of reversed-field pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch (RFP) [Phys. Scr. {bold 49}, 224 (1994)] have shown that the formation of the RFP configuration is quite sensitive to the relative programming of the toroidal field and Ohmic heating circuits. In this paper, new measurements of the evolution of the current density profile and of the spectral structure of the fluctuations during the setup phase of RFP plasmas in the T1 experiment are presented. These measurements improve the understanding of the role of different spectral components in the dynamics of RFP formation. Under unfavorable (slow) setup conditions, comparatively high energy is accumulated in {ital m}=1 internal kinks prior to reversal of the edge toroidal field. At reversal, nonlinearly driven {ital m}=0 modes trigger a rapid broadening of the {ital m}=1 spectrum. This behavior is associated with a violent suppression of the current density in the core, leading to an overrelaxation of the discharge involving a hollowing of the parallel current density profile. The setup conditions are found to affect the volt-second consumption and plasma/wall interaction during RFP formation, as well as the flat-top discharge performance. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics (Association EURATOM-NFR), Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics (Association EURATOM-NFR), Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Reversing the Weak Quantum Measurement for a Photonic Qubit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the conditional reversal of a weak (partial-collapse) quantum measurement on a photonic qubit. The weak quantum measurement causes a nonunitary transformation of a qubit which is subsequently reversed to the original state after a successful reversing operation. Both the weak measurement and the reversal operation are implemented linear optically. The state recovery fidelity, determined by quantum process tomography, is shown to be over 94% for partial-collapse strength up to 0.9. We also experimentally study information gain due to the weak measurement and discuss the role of the reversing operation as an information erasure.

Yong-Su Kim; Young-Wook Cho; Young-Sik Ra; Yoon-Ho Kim

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

324

Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Matrix Acidizing Parallel Core Flooding Apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and provide this information to the field. To conduct various experiments, core flooding setups are created. The setup consists of a core holder, accumulator, overburden pump, injection pump, accumulator, pressure sensors, and a back pressure regulator...

Ghosh, Vivek

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquid—replacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

GCFR core thermal-hydralic design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach for developing the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is reviewed, and key considerations for improving the core performance at all power and flow conditions are discussed. It is shown how the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs evolve from evaluations of plant size, material limitations, safety criteria, and structural performance considerations.

Schleuter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Bennett, F.O.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Russian techniques for more productive core drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a short discussion of the trends and technology being used in Russia to increase the production of core drilling. The currently used rigs are given with the plans for improvement in drive methods and to reduce trip time in the recovery of cores. The recommendations by the Russians to improve the core recovery quality and quantity are also given.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra- tions, in-core neutron noise, shell- mode vibrations CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS IN A 1-D, TWO-GROUP, TWO-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZI�RE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology

Demazière, Christophe

330

Sawteeth in the MST reversed field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamo mechanism has been used in astrophysics to explain the self-generation of the magnetic fields observed throughout the universe. This same type of phenomenon is believed to occur in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The RFP dynamo has been a major theoretical and experimental investigation since the first observations of the self-reversal process in early pinch research. A discrete dynamo event has been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas; this event is termed the RFP sawtooth. This phenomenon is similar to the sawtooth phenomenon observed in tokamak plasmas, but the two events differ in many respects. Both events are a result of the inward diffusion of the plasma current density. This causes the plasma to become unstable to the m = 1 tearing modes. It has been shown theoretically that the nonlinear interaction of these modes can generate the reversed toroidal field in the RFP. This thesis is a study of the RFP sawtooth phenomenon on the MST RFP. This includes experimental observations as well as 1-D numerical simulations of the sawtooth rise-time. During the rise-time of the sawtooth, the plasma is undergoing a purely diffusive process -- no dynamo is occurring during this phase. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. During the rise-time, the m = 1 modes are observed to grow, and nonlinear interactions are observed prior to the sawtooth crash. At the time of the crash, many of the plasma profiles are flattened; these include the current density, the plasma temperature and the plasma density. The period of the sawteeth is observed to increase with the plasma current, as well as the magnetic Reynolds number, S.

Beckstead, J.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effects of atmospheric conditions and control surface deflections on vortex characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7, SST Ci'rcorde, C-SA, and others, induce 'tr. ailing r, ing iiI! vor'-ic, s ?aiich pr: sent a hazard Lo stnal1er ait craft. In this Itir!Osti(dation such vr. i tex charac'ieristics as I!ave Fornations, r;0!e Ienrgths, b(eak t&1es, and vortex...''1(is r! ' 0 . L'I' I i I 21, I r'. . r ot' j(IS Ls I'rtn(. 'cst b'r'('1';s OLCLII'I'0 I 11r!01 ' 'I; ' rlr'rr. 'X:' ". :: ":I, '. L '. I'Il . IrI rI(:cray occurred in aparoximately 1/2 the time of a si. -iilsr vortex ! nduced ;. i th ~ head...

Shenkir, Calvin Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Time reversal duality of magnetohydrodynamic shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shock conditions in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are reduced to their most concise, three-parameter, distilled form by consistent use of the scale independence of the MHD equations and of the de Hoffmann-Teller transformation. They then exhibit a distinct time reversal duality between entropy-allowed shocks and entropy-forbidden jumps. This yields a new classification of MHD shocks by means of the monotonicity properties with respect to upstream and downstream Alfven Mach numbers, it exhibits the central role of intermediate discontinuities, and permits straightforward construction of all relevant dimensionless quantities of the shocks. An exhaustive overview is presented of solutions in the different parameter regimes.

Goedbloed, J. P. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics 'Rijnhuizen', Nieuwegein and Astronomical Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht 3439 MN (Netherlands)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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334

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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335

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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336

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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337

Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September 2010 B O N N EwebforatReversing

338

Reverse Osmosis Optimization | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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339

Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergyHydrokineticClothes7, 2014Energy SystemsReverse

340

Reduced gravity Rankine cycle system design and optimization study with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REDUCED GRAVITY RANKINE CYCLE SYSTEM DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION STUDY WITH PASSIVE VORTEX PHASE SEPARATION A Thesis by KEVIN ROBERT SUPAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... SEPARATION A Thesis by KEVIN ROBERT SUPAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Frederick...

Supak, Kevin Robert

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. Key Cyber...

342

Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is an ideal candidate for the formation of current-vortex sheets in complex magnetic fields and, therefore, the enhanced heating and connectivity change associated with the instabilities of such layers.

Wyper, P. F. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Time reversal symmetry and collapse models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collapse models are modifications of quantum theory where the wave function is treated as physically real and the collapse of the wave function is a physical process. This appears to introduce a time reversal asymmetry into the dynamics of the wave function since the collapses affect only the future state. This paper challenges this conclusion, showing that in three different examples of time asymmetries associated with collapse models, if the physically real part of the model can be reduced to the locations in space and time about which collapses occur, then such a model works both forward and backward in time, in each case satisfying the Born rule. Despite the apparent asymmetry of the collapse process, these models in fact have time reversal symmetry. Any physically observed time asymmetries that arise in such models are due to the asymmetric imposition of initial or final time boundary conditions, rather than from an inherent asymmetry in the dynamical law. This is the standard explanation of time asymmetric behaviour resulting from time symmetric laws.

Daniel Bedingham; Owen Maroney

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Multi-core Performance Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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345

Multi-core Performance Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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346

The core legion object model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Dynamo-free plasma in the reversed-field pinch: Advances in understanding the reversed-field pinch improved confinement mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation and sustainment of the reversed field pinch (RFP) magnetic configuration normally relies on dynamo activity. The externally applied electric field tends to drive the equilibrium away from the relaxed, minimum energy state which is roughly described by a flat normalized parallel current density profile and is at marginal stability to tearing modes. Correlated fluctuations of magnetic field and velocity create a dynamo electric field which broadens the parallel current density profile, supplying the necessary edge current drive. These pervasive magnetic fluctuations are also responsible for destruction of flux surfaces, relegating the standard RFP to a stochastic-magnetic transport-limited device. Application of a tailored electric field profile (which matches the relaxed current density profile) allows sustainment of the RFP configuration without dynamo-driven edge current. The method used to ascertain that a dynamo-free RFP plasma has been created is reported here in detail. Several confinement improvements during the accompanying periods of low magnetic fluctuations are observed. Namely, the magnetic fluctuation level is reduced to the point where stochastic-magnetic transport is no longer the dominant process in the core and nested flux surfaces are restored in the core of the dynamo-free RFP.

Anderson, J.K.; Adney, J.; Almagri, A.; Blair, A.; Cengher, M.; Chapman, B.E.; Choi, S.; Craig, D.; Hartog, D.J. den; Ebrahimi, F.; Ennis, D.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J.; Holly, D.; Hudson, B.; Kaufman, M.; Lovell, T.; McCollam, K.; Mirnov, V.V. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States) and the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (US)] (and others)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Novel 4-Way Refrigerant Reversing Valve for Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is nearing completion. Since the last progress report (November, 1999), all experimental tests have been completed. Preliminary analysis shows the refrigerant pressure drops through the reversing valve were reduced by an average of about 60{percent}, when compared to traditional reversing valves. Also, the prototype reversing valve reduced the overall coefficient of performance (COP) by an average of only 0.45{percent}.

Darin W. Nutter

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Reverse-Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) is usually dominated by the emission lines of the supernova (SN) ejecta, which are widely believed being crossed and thus heated by the inwards propagating reverse shock (RS). Previous works using imaging X-ray data have shown that the ejecta are heated by the RS by locating the peak emission region of the most recently ionized matter, which is found well separated towards the inside from the outermost boundary. Here we report the discovery of a systematic increase of the Sulfur (S) to Silicon (Si) K$\\alpha$ line flux ratio with radius in Tycho's SNR. This allows us, for the first time, to present continuous radial profiles of the ionization age and, furthermore, the elapsed ionization time since the onset of the ionization, which tells the propagation history of the ionization front into the SNR ejecta.

Lu, F J; Zheng, S J; Zhang, S N; Long, X; Aschenbach, B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Direct observation of time reversal violation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Digital reverse propagation in focusing Kerr media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lenses allow the formation of clear images in homogeneous linear media. Holography is an alternative imaging method, but its use is limited to cases in which it provides an advantage, such as three-dimensional imaging. In nonlinear media, lenses no longer work. The light produces intensity-dependent aberrations. The reverse propagation method used in digital holography to form images from recorded holograms works even in Kerr media [M. Tsang, D. Psaltis, and F. G. Omenetto, Opt. Lett. 28, 1873 (2003).]. The principle has been experimentally demonstrated recently in defocusing media [C. Barsi, W.Wan, and J.W. Fleischer, Nat. Photonics 3, 211 (2009).]. Here, we report experimental results in focusing media.

Goy, Alexandre; Psaltis, Demetri [Laboratoire d'Optique, School of Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dynamic simulation of a reverse Brayton refrigerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test refrigerator based on the modified Reverse Brayton cycle has been developed in the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently. To study the behaviors of this test refrigerator, a dynamic simulation has been carried out. The numerical model comprises the typical components of the test refrigerator: compressor, valves, heat exchangers, expander and heater. This simulator is based on the oriented-object approach and each component is represented by a set of differential and algebraic equations. The control system of the test refrigerator is also simulated, which can be used to optimize the control strategies. This paper describes all the models and shows the simulation results. Comparisons between simulation results and experimental data are also presented. Experimental validation on the test refrigerator gives satisfactory results.

Peng, N.; Xiong, L. Y.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q. [State Key Laboratory of Technologies in Space Cryogenic Propellants, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, CAS, Beijing, 100190 (China); Lei, L. L.; Tang, J. C. [State Key Laboratory of Technologies in Space Cryogenic Propellants, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, CAS, Beijing, 100190 China and Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

Roy, Debangsu, E-mail: debangsu@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Anil Kumar, P. S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electrical detection of microwave assisted magnetization reversal by spin pumping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microwave assisted magnetization reversal has been investigated in a bilayer system of Pt/ferromagnet by detecting a change in the polarity of the spin pumping signal. The reversal process is studied in two material systems, Pt/CoFeB and Pt/NiFe, for different aspect ratios. The onset of the switching behavior is indicated by a sharp transition in the spin pumping voltage. At a threshold value of the external field, the switching process changes from partial to full reversal with increasing microwave power. The proposed method provides a simple way to detect microwave assisted magnetization reversal.

Rao, Siddharth; Subhra Mukherjee, Sankha; Elyasi, Mehrdad; Singh Bhatia, Charanjit; Yang, Hyunsoo, E-mail: eleyang@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and NUSNNI, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

antivenom reverses metabolic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

automatically reverse engineer the network from the data. Genetic programming (Koza, Bennett, Andre, and Keane. Koza Biomedical Informatics, Department of Medicine Department of...

356

ascorbic acid reverses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Containing Chimeric Amino Acids as Preferred Reverse-Turn Ye Che and Garland R. Marshall* Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: making almost a complete 180 turn in...

357

acid reverses valproic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Containing Chimeric Amino Acids as Preferred Reverse-Turn Ye Che and Garland R. Marshall* Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: making almost a complete 180 turn in...

358

Reversible computation as a model for the quantum measurement process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-to-one reversible automata are introduced. Their applicability to a modelling of the quantum mechanical measurement process is discussed.

Karl Svozil

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Enhanced efficiency of p-type doping by band-offset effect in wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using first principles calculation based on density-functional theory, we investigated p-type electronic structures and the doping mechanism in wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires (NWs) along the [0001] and [111] directions, respectively. Comparing the doping in WZ and ZB core-shell NWs, we found it is easier and more stable to realize dopant in WZ NWs. Due to the type I band-offset, p-type doping in the GaAs-core of GaAs{sub core}/InAs{sub shell} for both WZ and ZB NWs makes that the valence band-edge electrons in the InAs-shell can spontaneously transfer to the impurity states, forming one-dimensional hole gas. In particular, this process accompanies with a reverse transition in WZ core-shell nanowire due to the existence of antibonding and bonding states.

Song, Changsheng; Wang, Jiqing, E-mail: jqwang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Lin, Weixian; Mao, Huibing; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Pingxiong [Key Laboratory of Polarized Materials and Devices, East china Normal University, shanghai 200241 (China); Xing, Huaizhong [Department of Applied Physics, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Test report -- Prototype core sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this test is to determine the adequacy of the prototype sampler, provided to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by DOE-RL. The sampler was fabricated for DOE-RL by the Concord Company by request of DOE-RL. This prototype sampler was introduced as a technology that can be easily deployed (similar to the current auger system) and will reliably collect representative samples. The sampler is similar to the Universal Sampler i.e., smooth core barrel and piston with an O-ring seal, but lacks a rotary valve near the throat of the sampler. This makes the sampler inappropriate for liquid sampling, but reduces the outside diameter of the sampler considerably, which should improve sample recovery. Recovery testing was performed with the supplied sampler in three different consistencies of Kaolin sludge simulants.

Linschooten, C.G.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The ARIES-RS power core -- Recent development in Li/V designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARIES-RS fusion power plant design study is based on reversed-shear (RS) physics with a Li/V (lithium breeder and vanadium structure) blanket. The reversed-shear discharge has been documented in many large tokamak experiments. The plasma in the RS mode has a high beta, low current, and low current drive requirements. Therefore, it is an attractive physics regime for a fusion power plant. The blanket system based on a Li/V has high temperature operating capability, good tritium breeding, excellent high heat flux removal capability, long structural life time, low activation, low after heat and good safety characteristics. For these reasons, the ARIES-RS reactor study selected Li/V as the reference blanket. The combination of attractive physics and attractive blanket engineering is expected to result in a superior power plant design. This paper summarizes the power core design of the ARIES-RS power plant study.

Sze, D.K.; Billone, M.C.; Hua, T.Q. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Material with core-shell structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Coupled Full-Core Problem witssh VERA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inc Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Core Physics, Inc. Southern States Energy Board City University of New York Texas A&M University Florida State University University of...

364

Non-equilibrium coherent vortex states and subharmonic giant Shapiro steps in Josephson junction arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a review of recent work on the dynamic response of Josephson junction arrays driven by dc and ac currents. The arrays are modeled by the resistively shunted Josephson junction model, appropriate for proximity effect junctions, including self-induced magnetic fields as well as disorder. The relevance of the self-induced fields is measured as a function of a parameter $\\kappa=\\lambda_L/a$, with $\\lambda_L$ the London penetration depth of the arrays, and $a$ the lattice spacing. The transition from Type II ($\\kappa>1$) to Type I ($\\kappa <1$) behavior is studied in detail. We compare the results for models with self, self+nearest-neighbor, and full inductance matrices. In the $\\kappa=\\infty$ limit, we find that when the initial state has at least one vortex-antivortex pair, after a characteristic transient time these vortices unbind and {\\it radiate} other vortices. These radiated vortices settle into a parity-broken, time-periodic, {\\em axisymmetric coherent vortex state} (ACVS), characterized by alternate rows of positive and negative vortices lying along a tilted axis. The ACVS produces subharmonic steps in the current voltage (IV) characteristics, typical of giant Shapiro steps. For finite $\\kappa$ we find that the IV's show subharmonic giant Shapiro steps, even at zero external magnetic field. We find that these subharmonic steps are produced by a whole family of coherent vortex oscillating patterns, with their structure changing as a function of $\\kappa$. In general, we find that these patterns are due to a break down of translational invariance produced, for example, by disorder or antisymmetric edge-fields. The zero field case results are in good qualitative agreement with experiments

Daniel Domínguez; Jorge V. José

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modulated active charge exchange fast ion diagnostic for the C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diagnostic technique for measuring the fast-ion energy distribution in a field-reversed configuration plasma was developed and tested on the C-2 experiment. A deuterium neutral beam modulated at 22 kHz is injected into the plasma, producing a localized charge-exchange target for the confined fast protons. The escaping fast neutrals are detected by a neutral particle analyzer. The target beam transverse size ({approx}15 cm) defines the spatial resolution of the method. The equivalent current density of the target beam is {<=}0.15 A/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a neutral density ({approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) that highly exceeds the background neutral density in the core of C-2. The deuterium fast-ions due to the target beam (E{approx}27 keV), are not confined in C-2 and thus make a negligible contribution to the measured signals.

Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Clary, R.; Dettrick, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Deichuli, P.; Kondakov, A.; Murakhtin, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range k?{sub s} ? 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ? f ? 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ? n{sub e} ? 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup ?3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

Schmitz, L., E-mail: lschmitz@ucla.edu; Peebles, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ruskov, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

Bredemann, Michael V

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Control Flow Analysis for Reverse Engineering of Sequence Diagrams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Flow Analysis for Reverse Engineering of Sequence Diagrams Atanas Rountev Olga Volgin and in software main- tenance. In static analysis for such reverse engineering, an open question is how to map an iteration. As pointed out in one popular book on modern software development [13], in this context

Rountev, Atanas "Nasko"

369

Reversible plasticity in amorphous materials Micah Lundberg1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversible plasticity in amorphous materials Micah Lundberg1 , Kapilanjan Krishan1 , Ning Xu2 to external loads. Plasticity, i.e. dis- sipative and irreversible macroscopic changes in a material for reversible plastic events at the microscopic scale in both experiments and simulations of two

Dennin, Michael

370

Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/DOE Reversible Fuel Cell Workshop 5 Proton OnSite · Manufacturer of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen Fuel Cell Workshop PEM Cell Stacks Complete Systems 6 Proton Capabilities · Complete product/DOE Reversible Fuel Cell Workshop 9 PEM Fuel Cell & Electrolysis · Humidified gas streams vs. liquid water

371

Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 15 Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back Roie Levy and Elhanan Borenstein the environments in which they evolved and are adapted to. Re- verse Ecology--an emerging new frontier's ecology. The Reverse Ecology framework facilitates the translation of high-throughput genomic data

Borenstein, Elhanan

372

Geometry and scaling of tangled vortex lines in three-dimensional random wave fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The short- and long-scale behaviour of tangled wave vortices (nodal lines) in random three-dimensional wave fields is studied via computer experiment. The zero lines are tracked in numerical simulations of periodic superpositions of three-dimensional complex plane waves. The probability distribution of local geometric quantities such as curvature and torsion are compared to previous analytical and new Monte Carlo results from the isotropic Gaussian random wave model. We further examine the scaling and self-similarity of tangled wave vortex lines individually and in the bulk, drawing comparisons with other physical systems of tangled filaments.

Alexander J. Taylor; Mark R. Dennis

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Interconversion of dark soliton and Josephson vortex in a quasi-1D long Bose Josephson junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark soliton (DS) and Josephson vortex (JV) in quasi-1D long Bose Josephson junction (BJJ) can be interconverted by tuning Josephson coupling. Rates of the interconversion as well as of the thermally activated phase-slip effect, resulting in the JV switching its vorticity, have been evaluated. The role of quantum phase-slip in creating superposition of JVs with opposite vorticities as a qubit is discussed as well. Utilization of the JV for controlled and coherent transfer of atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is suggested.

V. M. Kaurov; A. B. Kuklov

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Linear multistep methods for integrating reversible differential equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies multistep methods for the integration of reversible dynamical systems, with particular emphasis on the planar Kepler problem. It has previously been shown by Cano & Sanz-Serna that reversible linear multisteps for first-order differential equations are generally unstable. Here, we report on a subset of these methods -- the zero-growth methods -- that evade these instabilities. We provide an algorithm for identifying these rare methods. We find and study all zero-growth, reversible multisteps with six or fewer steps. This select group includes two well-known second-order multisteps (the trapezoidal and explicit midpoint methods), as well as three new fourth-order multisteps -- one of which is explicit. Variable timesteps can be readily implemented without spoiling the reversibility. Tests on Keplerian orbits show that these new reversible multisteps work well on orbits with low or moderate eccentricity, although at least 100 steps/radian are required for stability.

Wyn Evans; Scott Tremaine

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Core Science Requirement ­ Final Document ­ Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

Lagalante, Anthony F.

376

Femtosecond laser fabrication of micro and nano-disks in single layer graphene using vortex Bessel beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the fabrication of micro and nano-disks in single layer chemical vapor deposition graphene on glass substrate using femtosecond laser ablation with vortex Bessel beams. The fabricated graphene disks with diameters ranging from 650?nm to 4??m were characterized by spatially resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy. The variation of ablation threshold was investigated as a function of the number of pulses showing an incubation effect. A very high degree of size control of the fabricated graphene disks is enabled using a sequence of femtosecond pulses with different vortex orders.

Wetzel, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.wetzel@femto-st.fr; Xie, Chen; Lacourt, Pierre-Ambroise; Dudley, John M.; Courvoisier, Francois [Département d'Optique P.M. Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR–6174 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 25030 Besançon (France)] [Département d'Optique P.M. Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR–6174 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 25030 Besançon (France)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

Rigid-rotor, field-reversed configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radial profiles, n(r), B{sub z}(r), and E{sub r}(r), for a Flux-Coil (“inductively driven”), Field-Reversed Configuration (FC-FRC) are measured and compared to the predictions of the Rigid-Rotor Model (RRM), which is an analytic, one-dimensional, time-independent, equilibrium description for the FRC. Injectors mounted on both ends of the confinement vessel provide a pre-fill plasma. Coaxial coils mounted outside the vacuum boundaries of the annular-confinement vessel accelerate the plasma and produce the FRC. The density profile is measured by laser interferometry, the magnetic-field profile using an in-situ probe array, and the electric-field profile using an in-situ, floating-probe array. Free parameters for each profile are measured, which also allow other intrinsic-plasma parameters to be determined, using computer-fit algorithms: null radius, radial thickness, plasma temperature, rotation frequencies, the latter of which are independently verified by spectroscopy. All radial profiles agree with the RRM predictions, for the experimental configuration, parameter regime, and specified-time interval studied here.

Conti, F., E-mail: conti@df.unipi.it; Giammanco, F. [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies Ltd., Via Giuntini 63, 56023 Navacchio (PI) (Italy); Wessel, F. J.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Bolte, N.; Morehouse, M.; Qerushi, A.; Rahman, H. U.; Roche, T.; Slepchenkov, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)] [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reversible piezomagnetoelectric switching in bulk polycrystalline ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling in materials offer tremendous advantages in device functionality enabling technologies including advanced electronic memory, combining electronic speed, and efficiency with magnetic robustness. However, low cost polycrystalline ME materials are excluded from most commercial applications, operating only at cryogenic temperatures, impractically large electric/magnetic fields, or with low ME coefficients (1-100 mV/cm?Oe). Despite this, the technological potential of single compound ME coupling has continued to drive research into multiferroics over the last two decades. Here we show that by manipulating the large induced atomic strain within the polycrystalline, room temperature multiferroic compound 0.7BiFeO{sub 3}–0.3PbTiO{sub 3}, we can induce a reversible, piezoelectric strain controlled ME effect. Employing an in situ neutron diffraction experiment, we have demonstrated that this piezomagnetoelectric effect manifests with an applied electric field >8 kV/mm at the onset of piezoelectric strain, engineered in to the compound by crystallographic phase mixing. This produces a remarkable intrinsic ME coefficient of 1276 mV/cm?Oe, due to a strain driven modification to the oxygen sub-lattice, inducing an increase in magnetic moment per Fe{sup 3+} ion of +0.142 ?{sub B}. This work provides a framework for investigations into strain engineered nanostructures to realize low-cost ME devices designed from the atoms up, as well as contributing to the deeper understanding of single phase ME coupling mechanisms.

Stevenson, T., E-mail: t.j.stevenson@leeds.ac.uk; Bennett, J.; Brown, A. P.; Wines, T.; Bell, A. J.; Comyn, T. P. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Smith, R. I. [ISIS Neutron Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

382

Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core

Escolano, Francisco

383

Moving core beam energy absorber and converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

Philippe André; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Enrollment for Core Infrastructure Customer Datasheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Core Infrastructure Suite (CIS) Datacenter or Standard Edition, or a mix of both. Either edition offers), with each Datacenter Edition license the number of virtual OSEs is unlimited. Core Infrastructure Suites of your IT environment. CIS Suite Datacenter Supports an unlimited number of virtual OSEs CIS Suite

Narasayya, Vivek

386

Origin of the Core Francis Nimmo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Origin of the Core Francis Nimmo Dept. Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz F. Nimmo, Dept. Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA (fnimmo@es.ucsc.edu), tel. 831-459-1783, fax. 831-459-3074 1 #12;Origin of the Core All major bodies of the inner solar

Nimmo, Francis

387

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

Jablonowski, Christiane

388

Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conversion Process · Location Dependence of Wind Energy Potential and Wind Energy Forecasting/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

Habel, Annegret

389

PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cores with 4 · 106 transistors each gives 10 times the performance as 1 big core 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 108Number of transistors P e r f o r m a n c e CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.8/36 Everyone is going parallel Every major chip vendor... on Many-core Processors – p.22/36 Stencil operations Evaluate ?2u?x2 on a regular grid: DO K=2,NK-1 DO J=2,NJ-1 DO I=2,NI-1 D2UDX2(I,J,K) = (U(I+1,J,K) - 2.0*U(I,J,K) + & U(I-1,J,K))/(DX*DX) END DO END DO END DO CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.23...

Brandvik, Tobias

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of vortex state in circular magnetic nanodots: Theory and experiment RID A-9247-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare magnetic reversal of nanostructured circular magnetic dots of different sizes. This comparison is based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, neutron scattering, Monte Carlo simulation, and analytical...

Mejia-Lopez, J.; Altbir, D.; Landeros, P.; Escrig, J.; Romero, A. H.; Roshchin, Igor V.; Li, C-P; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Batlle, X.; Schuller, Ivan K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Nature of the Dense Core Population in the Pipe Nebula: Thermal Cores Under Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present the results of a systematic investigation of an entire population of starless dust cores within a single molecular cloud. Analysis of extinction data shows the cores to be dense objects characterized by a narrow range of density. Analysis of C18O and NH3 molecular-line observations reveals very narrow lines. The non-thermal velocity dispersions measured in both these tracers are found to be subsonic for the large majority of the cores and show no correlation with core mass (or size). Thermal pressure is thus the dominate source of internal gas pressure and support for most of the core population. The total internal gas pressures of the cores are found to be roughly independent of core mass over the entire range of the core mass function (CMF) indicating that the cores are in pressure equilibrium with an external source of pressure. This external pressure is most likely provided by the weight of the surrounding Pipe cloud within which the cores are embedded. Most of the cores appear to be pressure confined, gravitationally unbound entities whose nature, structure and future evolution are determined by only a few physical factors which include self-gravity, the fundamental processes of thermal physics and the simple requirement of pressure equilibrium with the surrounding environment. The observed core properties likely constitute the initial conditions for star formation in dense gas. The entire core population is found to be characterized by a single critical Bonnor-Ebert mass. This mass coincides with the characteristic mass of the Pipe CMF indicating that most cores formed in the cloud are near critical stability. This suggests that the mass function of cores (and the IMF) has its origin in the physical process of thermal fragmentation in a pressurized medium.

Charles J. Lada; August A. Muench; Jill M. Rathborne; Joao F. Alves; Marco Lombardi

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC)

Mumin, Md Abdul, E-mail: pcharpentier@eng.uwo.ca; Akhter, Kazi Farida, E-mail: pcharpentier@eng.uwo.ca; Charpentier, Paul A., E-mail: pcharpentier@eng.uwo.ca [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Western University, London Ontario (Canada)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

MAP, MAC, and Vortex-rings Configurations in the Weinberg-Salam Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the presence of new axially symmetric monopoles, antimonopoles and vortex-rings solutions of the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) Weinberg-Salam model of electromagnetic and weak interactions. When the $\\phi$-winding number $n=1$, and 2, the configurations are monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and monopole-antimonopole chain (MAC) with poles of alternating sign magnetic charge arranged along the $z$-axis. Vortex-rings start to appear from the MAP and MAC configurations when the winding number $n=3$. The MAP configurations possess zero net magnetic charge whereas the MAC configurations possess net magnetic charge of $4\\pi n/e$. In the MAP configurations, the monopole-antimonopole pair is bounded by the ${\\cal Z}^0$ field flux string and there is an electromagnetic current loop encircling it. The monopole and antimonopole possess magnetic charges $\\pm\\frac{2\\pi n}{e}$ respectively. In the MAC configurations there is no string connecting the monopole and the adjacent antimonopole and they possess magnetic charges $\\pm\\frac{4\\pi n}{e}$ respectively. The MAC configurations possess infinite total energy and zero magnetic dipole moment whereas the MAP configurations which are actually sphalerons possess finite total energy and magnetic dipole moment. The configurations were investigated for varying value of Higgs boson mass $0\\leq M_H^2\\leq 80$ at Weinberg angle $\\theta_W=\\frac{\\pi}{4}$.

Rosy Teh; Ban-Loong Ng; Khai-Ming Wong

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

Axisymmetric-coherent-vortex states in current-driven Josephson-junction arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from an extensive analysis of the dynamic response of Josephson-junction arrays driven by external currents of the form [ital I]=[ital I][sub dc]+[ital I][sub ac]sin(2[pi][nu][ital t]). The dynamics is given by the resistively shunted Josephson-junction model with Johnson noise. We find a stationary [ital axisymmetric][minus][ital coherent][minus][ital vortex] [ital state] (ACVS) away from equilibrium and above a minimum lattice size ([similar to]20[times]20) whenever the initial state has at least one antivortex and a vortex. The ACVS is characterized by tilted rows of oscillating positive and negative vortices, produced by the combined effect of the driving current plus the collective coupling of the nonlinear Josephson oscillators. The ACVS is manifested in the current-voltage characteristics as giant half-integer Shapiro steps, leading to period-two resonances in the spectral function. The stability and properties of the ACVS are studied as a function of frequency, temperature, disorder, edge magnetic fields, and lattice sizes. It is found that the ACVS is a very robust two-dimensional dynamical state that is produced under very diverse circumstances. A connection between the ACVS and half-integer steps seen in proximity effect arrays in zero field is also discussed.

Dominguez, D.; Jose, J.V. (Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N?=?1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2??1000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN, UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A. [CNR-SPIN, UOS Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Wang, X.; Paparo, D. [CNR-SPIN, UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity reverse- electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC), was recently shown to produce hydrogen gas from acetate

398

Fouling of reverse osmosis membranes by hydrocarbonated and fluorinated surfactants contained in firefighting water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Fouling of reverse osmosis membranes by hydrocarbonated and fluorinated surfactants osmosis efficiently treated the water from fire extinguishment. In this work we focused on the reverse surfactants [1]. Experimental results indicated that electrocoagulation and filtration followed by reverse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

Purication of reghting water containing a uorinated surfactant by reverse osmosis coupled to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purication of reghting water containing a uorinated surfactant by reverse osmosis coupled. Reverse osmosis of pretreated pilot reghting water and concentrated model solutions of pretreated reghting. The concentrate from reverse osmosis could be recycled in electrocoagulation-ltration. Experimental results

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

Core analysis workstation development and verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering workstation utilizing a three-dimensional reactor simulator along with a series of auxiliary programs has been developed for use in predicting core reactivity and power distributions. This workstation can be used by both core analysis and core operations personnel. Expected applications are power distribution analyses, technical specification limit verification, and various types of reactivity analyses. Reactor operations personnel can quickly simulate load follow or other reactor maneuvers and, through the interactive graphics capability of the personal computer, the reactor responses, such as power distribution and control rod position, can be displayed and understood by operations personnel.

Mays, C.W.; Kochendarfer, R.A.; Mays, B.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C.T. Hamik, and O. Steinbock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C obtained from a chemical reaction-diffusion system in which wave propagation is limited to a finite band of wavelengths and in which no solitary pulses exist. Wave patterns increase their size through repeated

Steinbock, Oliver

402

Direct observation of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a periodic array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct observation of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a periodic array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures T. Shapoval,1,* V. Metlushko,2 M. Wolf,1 B. Holzapfel,1 V. Neu,1, Illinois 60612, USA Received 13 November 2009; published 11 March 2010 Strong pinning of superconducting

Metlushko, Vitali

403

A finite element method with mesh adaptivity for computing vortex states in fast-rotating Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Einstein condensates Ionut Danaila,a,b , Fr´ed´eric Hechta,b aUPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques Abstract Numerical computations of stationary states of fast-rotating Bose-Einstein condensates require-Einstein condensate, vortex, Sobolev gradient, descent method. 1. Introduction Recent research efforts in the field

Boyer, Edmond

404

A finite element method with mesh adaptivity for computing vortex states in fastrotating BoseEinstein condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­Einstein condensates Ionut Danaila #,a,b , Frâ??edâ??eric Hecht a,b a UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques Abstract Numerical computations of stationary states of fast­rotating Bose­Einstein condensates require­Einstein condensate, vortex, Sobolev gradient, descent method. 1. Introduction Recent research e#orts in the field

Recanati, Catherine

405

ccsd-00003161,version1-26Oct2004 Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the rotating gas increases and tends to infinity, and the number of vortices in the condensate diverges [5, 6. Furthermore we restrict our analysis to the case of a two- dimensional gas in the xy plane, assumingccsd-00003161,version1-26Oct2004 Vortex patterns in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

406

Quantum Dissociation of a Vortex-Antivortex Pair in a Long Josephson Junction M.V. Fistul,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Dissociation of a Vortex-Antivortex Pair in a Long Josephson Junction M.V. Fistul,1 A VAV pair manifests itself in a switching of the Josephson junction from the superconducting biased single Josephson junctions (JJs), various SQUIDs, and small Josephson junction arrays, contain

Wallraff, Andreas

407

Quantum Hasimoto transformation and nonlinear waves on a superfluid vortex filament under the quantum local induction approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hasimoto transformation between the classical LIA (local induction approximation, a model approximating the motion of a thin vortex filament) and the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) has proven very useful in the past, since it allows one to construct new solutions to the LIA once a solution to the NLS is known. In the present paper, the quantum form of the LIA (which includes mutual friction effects) is put into correspondence with a type of complex nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation (PDE) with cubic nonlinearity (similar in form to a Ginsburg-Landau equation, with additional nonlinear terms). Transforming the quantum LIA in such a way enables one to obtain quantum vortex filament solutions once solutions to this dispersive PDE are known. From our quantum Hasimoto transformation, we determine the form and behavior of Stokes waves and a standing 1-soliton solution under normal and binormal friction effects. The soliton solution on a quantum vortex filament is a natural generalization of the classical 1-soliton solution constructed mathematically by Hasimoto (which motivated subsequent real-world experiments). The quantum Hasimoto transformation is useful when normal fluid velocity is relatively weak, so for the case where the normal fluid velocity is dominant we resort to other approaches. We consider the dynamics of the tangent vector to the vortex filament directly from the quantum LIA, and this approach, while less elegant than the quantum Hasimoto transformation, enables us to study waves primarily driven by the normal fluid velocity.

Robert A. Van Gorder

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reversible Poisoning of the Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poisoning of the NickelZirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen Chloride in Coal Gas. Reversible Poisoning of the NickelZirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen...

409

Application of real options to reverse logistics process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, real options are used to identify the optimal model for the reverse logistics process of a technology company in the circuit board business. Currently, customers return defective boards and the company ...

Kaga, Akihiro, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions Climate change is real not only emitting less greenhouse gas (GHG), but actually sources of negative carbon. We then present two

411

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University & Lake Michigan students who have transferred to Michigan State University (MSU) in completing an associate's degree at Lake Michigan College (LMC). This initiative is an extension of the transfer agreements already

413

Analysis of pressure drops under reversing flow conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines pressure-drop data from the Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The data comprise part of an initial series of measurements conducted with pressurized helium gas under reversing flow conditions. The characteristics of fluid pressure drops in compressible, reversing flows are discussed in the paper and compared with pressure-drop measurements for steady, incompressible flows. The methodology used to calculate instantaneous mass flows in the test section of the RFTF is summarized. The measured pressure drops are analyzed in terms of their frictional and inertial components. Pressure-drop data are presented for both tubes and wire mesh regenerators over a range of flow reversal frequencies. The results are discussed with reference to other experimental data and analytical models available in the literature. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Krazinski, J.L.; Holtz, R.E.; Uherka, K.L.; Lottes, P.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Incorporation of silica into baroplastic core-shell nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Core-shell baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit pressure-induced flow at low temperatures and high pressures. Core-shell baroplastics used in this work are comprised of a low Tg poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) core ...

Hewlett, Sheldon A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Magnetic core studies at LBNL and LLNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LLNL) and DE-AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL). References Wayne Meier,Magnetic Core Studies at LBNL and LLNL A. W. Molvik a,* , A.Livermore, CA 94550, USA LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c

Molvik, A.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Multiple network interface core apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

Underwood, Keith D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hemmert, Karl Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

PRELIMINARY TIME ESTIMATES FOR CORING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EQUATIONS 17 FIGURE 1. DRILL STRING ROUND TRIP 19 FIGURE 2. STANDARD ROTARY CORING (RCB) WIRELINE TRIP 21) WIRELINE TRIP 25 FIGURE 5. ESTIMATED RIGGING, WIRELINE, AND SCANNING TIME FOR REENTRY. 27 #12;Preliminary

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - analogue reverse transcriptase Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Summary: of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase by d4TTP: an Equivalent Incorporation... (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), there is little detailed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...

422

Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

Di, Zengfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

428

Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy . Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State...

429

Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell Nanoparticle Synthesis. Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell...

430

Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

431

Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution of Gold-Platinum Nanoparticles and Their Electrocatalytic Effect Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell...

432

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA Cybersecurity Program Manager (CSPM...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-suspended solid-core fibers Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solid core subwavelength ber (a) and suspended porous core... December 2011 | 41 TERAHERTZ Suspended Core Subwavelength Plastic ... Source: Skorobogatiy, Maksim -...

434

Vortex arrays and meso-scale turbulence of self-propelled particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the Turing mechanism for pattern formation, we propose a simple self-propelled particle model with short-ranged alignment and anti-alignment at larger distances. It is able to produce orientationally ordered states, periodic vortex patterns as well as meso-scale turbulence. The latter phase resembles observations in dense bacterial suspensions. The model allows a systematic derivation and analysis of a kinetic theory as well as hydrodynamic equations for density and momentum fields. A phase diagram with regions of such pattern formation as well as spatially homogeneous orientational order and disorder is obtained from a linear stability analysis of these continuum equations. Microscopic Langevin simulations of the self-propelled particle system are in agreement with these findings.

Robert Grossmann; Pawel Romanczuk; Markus Bär; Lutz Schimansky-Geier

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Analytic treatment of vortex states in cylindrical superconductors in applied axial magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We solve the linear Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation in the presence of a uniform magnetic field with cylindrical symmetry and we find analytic expressions for the eigenfunctions in terms of the confluent hypergeometric functions. The discrete spectrum results from an implicit equation associated to the boundary conditions and it is resolved in analytic form using the continued fractions formalism. We study the dependence of the spectrum and the eigenfunctions on the sample size and the surface conditions for solid and hollow cylindrical superconductors. Finally, the solutions of the nonlinear GL formalism are constructed as expansions in the linear GL eigenfunction basis and selected by minimization of the free energy. We present examples of vortex states and their energies for different samples in enhancing/suppressing superconductivity surroundings.

Ludu, A. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, Louisiana 71497 (United States); Van Deun, J.; Cuyt, A. [Departement Wiskunde-Informatica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Middelheimlaan 1, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Milosevic, M. V.; Peeters, F. M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method for the detection of a magnetic field utilizing a magnetic vortex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The determination of the strength of an in-plane magnetic field utilizing one or more magnetically-soft, ferromagnetic member, having a shape, size and material whereas a single magnetic vortex is formed at remanence in each ferromagnetic member. The preferred shape is a thin circle, or dot. Multiple ferromagnetic members can also be stacked on-top of each other and separated by a non-magnetic spacer. The resulting sensor is hysteresis free. The sensor's sensitivity, and magnetic saturation characteristics may be easily tuned by simply altering the material, size, shape, or a combination thereof to match the desired sensitivity and saturation characteristics. The sensor is self-resetting at remanence and therefore does not require any pinning techniques.

Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Buchanan, Kristen (Batavia, IL)

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Vortex precession frequency and its amplitude-dependent shift in cylindrical nanomagnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frequency of free magnetic vortex precession in circular soft ferromagnetic nano-cylinders (magnetic dots) of various sizes is an important parameter, used in design of spintronic devices (such as spin-torque microwave nano-oscillators) and characterization of magnetic nanostructures. Here, using a recently developed collective-variable approach to non-linear dynamics of magnetic textures in planar nano-magnets, this frequency and its amplitude-dependent shift are computed analytically and plotted for the full range of cylinder geometries. The frequency shift is positive in large planar dots, but becomes negative in smaller and more elongated ones. At certain dot dimensions, a zero frequency shift is realized, which can be important for enhancing frequency stability of magnetic nano-oscillators.

Metlov, Konstantin L., E-mail: metlov@fti.dn.ua [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Technology NAS, Donetsk 83114 (Ukraine)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn? with H?c  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn? with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, ?=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition, an increased disordering of the VL is observed.

Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Petrovic, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Rotational response of superconductors: magneto-rotational isomorphism and rotation-induced vortex lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of nonclassical rotational response of superfluids and superconductors was performed by Onsager (in 1949) \\cite{Onsager} and London (in 1950) \\cite{London} and crucially advanced by Feynman (in 1955) \\cite{Feynman}. It was established that, in thermodynamic limit, neutral superfluids rotate by forming---without any threshold---a vortex lattice. In contrast, the rotation of superconductors at angular frequency ${\\bf \\Omega}$---supported by uniform magnetic field ${\\bf B}_L\\propto {\\bf \\Omega}$ due to surface currents---is of the rigid-body type (London Law). Here we show that, neglecting the centrifugal effects, the behavior of a rotating superconductor is identical to that of a superconductor placed in a uniform fictitious external magnetic filed $\\tilde{\\bf H}=- {\\bf B}_L$. In particular, the isomorphism immediately implies the existence of two critical rotational frequencies in type-2 superconductors.

Egor Babaev; Boris Svistunov

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cyclostrophic adjustment in swirling gas flows and the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis of cyclostrophic adjustment is presented; i.e., adjustment to balance between pressure gradient and centrifugal force in axisymmetric flow of an inviscid gas is examined. The solution to the problem is represented as the sum of a time-independent (balanced) and time-dependent (wave) components. It is shown that the wave component of the flow in an unbounded domain decays with time, and the corresponding solution reduces to the balanced component. In a bounded domain, the balanced flow component exists against the background of undamped acoustic waves. It is found that the balanced flow is thermally stratified at Mach numbers close to unity, with a substantial decrease in gas temperature (to between -50 and -100 deg. C) in the axial region. This finding, combined with the results of special experiments, is used to explain the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect.

Kalashnik, M. V., E-mail: lingel@obninsk.com; Visheratin, K. N. [SPA Typhoon (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kvisher@typhoon.obninsk.ru

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells coupled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis 2013 Keywords: Microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell Ammonium bicarbonate Hydrogen reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack into the MEC, which was called a microbial reverse-electrodialysis

443

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing This article has been downloaded from.1088/1748-3182/7/3/036016 A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing Zheng Ren1 and Kamran Mohseni1,2,3,4 1 Department.iop.org/BB/7/036016 Abstract In this paper, the lateral line trunk canal (LLTC) of a fish is modeled

Mohseni, Kamran

447

A survey of ideal fluid propeller theories and a study of the effects of aerodynamic propeller loading on trailing vortex induced velocity and thrust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SURVEY OF IDEAL FLUID PRO~ THEORIES AND A STUIE OP THE EFFECTS OF AERODYNAMIC PRO~ LOADING ON TRAILING VORTEX INDUCED VELOCITY AND THRUST A Thesis EDWARD MADISON ~ Suhmitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1969 h'h, jor Suhgect: Mechanical Engineering A SURVEY OF IDEAL FLUID PROPELLEB THEORIES AND A STUDY OF THE EFFKTS OF AERODYKVGC PROPELLER LOADING ON TRAILING VORTEX INDUCED...

Kelley, Edward Madison

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

E-print Network : Main View : Search Results for Title: "Reversible...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reversible control of spin-polarized supercurrents in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions" Author: Banerjee AND Robinson...

449

Deterministic Ratchets, Circle Maps, and Current Reversals R. Salgado-Garcia,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- rameters such as ``current quantization,'' current reversal, and devil's staircase phenomena [6,7]. Though

Aldana, Maximino

450

Exchange bias in Core-Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exchange bias study has been performed on core-shell iron-iron oxide (Fe-Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) of size 11 nm and 14 nm carrying a different core to shell ratio. NCs show complicated behaviors due to competition between interfacial exchange and Zeeman energy in the presence of magnetic field during cooling. These behaviors are accompanied by the evolution of size- dependent cluster structures in the ferromagnetic-core/ferri- or antiferro-magnetic-shell. Smaller clusters have larger coercive field, exchange bias field, and vertical magnetization shift due to the greater contribution from frozen spins of shell/interfaces. These smaller clusters thus also show more dramatic changes with the training effect. Both sizes of clusters display an additional anomaly of the upper part of the hysteresis loop at 10 K under low cooling field (0.1 kOe). This anomaly decreases with number of loop cycles with same field, and disappear with large cooling field (> 0.1 kOe). It may be caused by the competition between the magnetization reversal and the magnetostatic interactions.

Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Qiang, You

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

451

Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Simulation Results

Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.

Anwesh Mazumdar; Sarbani Basu; Braxton L. Collier; Pierre Demarque

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Wind reversals in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenon of irregular cessation and subsequent reversal of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is theoretically analysed. The force and thermal balance on a single plume detached from the thermal boundary layer yields a set of coupled nonlinear equations, whose dynamics is related to the Lorenz equations. For Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range $10^{-2} \\leq \\Pr \\leq 10^{3}$ and $10^{7} \\leq \\Ra \\leq 10^{12}$, the model has the following features: (i) chaotic reversals may be exhibited at Ra $\\geq 10^{7}$; (ii) the Reynolds number based on the root mean square velocity scales as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Ra^{[0.41 ... 0.47]}$ (depending on Pr), and as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Pr^{-[0.66 ... 0.76]}$ (depending on Ra); and (iii) the mean reversal frequency follows an effective scaling law $\\omega / (\

Francisco Fontenele Araujo; S. Grossmann; D. Lohse

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effect of various solvents on core behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Section of Core Holder with Core 12 6. Effect of Dri-Film on Sessile Drop Ratios of Kerosene on Silica Crystals in Brine 7. Bar Graph Showing Results of Water Flood Test 8. Plot of Resistivity vs. Brine Saturation for Tests No. 1, 4, 7, 9 and 14 27 9. Plot... Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations For Displacement of Brine with Kerosene 35 III. Electrical Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations for Displacement of Brine with East Texas Crude-Kerosene Mixture 36 ABSTRACT Recently...

Irby, Tom L

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Thermal metastabilities in the solar core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linear stability analysis indicates that solar core is thermally stable for infinitesimal internal perturbations. For the first time, thermal metastabilities are found in the solar core when outer perturbations with significant amplitude are present. The obtained results show that hot bubbles generated by outer perturbations may travel a significant distance in the body of the Sun. These deep-origin hot bubbles have mass, energy, and chemical composition that may be related to solar flares. The results obtained may have remarkable relations to activity cycles in planets like Jupiter and also in extrasolar planetary systems.

Attila Grandpierre; Gabor Agoston

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Core Values Postcard | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCoolWhyCopyTheCoreCore

458

Interstitials, Vacancies and Dislocations in Flux-Line Lattices: A Theory of Vortex Crystals, Supersolids and Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a three dimensional Abrikosov vortex lattice in the presence of an equilibrium concentration of vacancy, interstitial and dislocation loops. Vacancies and interstitials renormalize the long-wavelength bulk and tilt elastic moduli. Dislocation loops lead to the vanishing of the long-wavelength shear modulus. The coupling to vacancies and interstitials - which are always present in the liquid state - allows dislocations to relax stresses by climbing out of their glide plane. Surprisingly, this mechanism does not yield any further independent renormalization of the tilt and compressional moduli at long wavelengths. The long wavelength properties of the resulting state are formally identical to that of the ``flux-line hexatic'' that is a candidate ``normal'' hexatically ordered vortex liquid state.

M. Cristina Marchetti; Leo Radzihovsky

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Forward and reverse energy transfer in Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transport of electronic excitations among chromophores randomly distributed in Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers is described. In this theoretical analysis, it has been assumed that excitation energy can be transferred forward and reverse between two-dimensional layers. Fluorescence decays have been calculated for each layer. A numerical analysis of fluorescence decays is given in order to show the influence of reverse energy transfer on photophysical properties of Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers. The discussion of results in connection with recent and future experimental studies is presented.

Sienicki, K. (Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada))

1990-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

Anderson, Brian E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulrich, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larmat, Carene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guyer, Robert A [UNR; Griffa, Michele [ETH ZURICH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

Kwasniewski, Bartosz K [Institute of Mathematics, University of Bialystok (Poland)

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

510 Plant Disease / Vol. 97 No. 4 Etiology of Moldy Core, Core Browning, and Core Rot of Fuji Apple in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province, 712000, P. R. China; and Alan R. Biggs, Kearneysville Tree Fruit Research and Education Center., Zhang, R., Sun, G. Y., Zha, Y. L., and Biggs, A. R. 2013. Etiology of moldy core, core browning

Biggs, Alan R.

463

Observational constraints on the tropospheric and near-surface winter signature of the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the stratosphere by radiative 116 processes. The possibility that the polar vortex anomalies were themselves produced by 117 waves generated in the troposphere was acknowledged in most studies (e.g., Polvani and 118 Waugh, 2004; Gerber and Polvani, 2009... irradiance. Other such features, which will not be covered within the current study, are early 133 Siberian snowfall (Cohen et al. 2007), as well as North Pacific and Indian Ocean sea-surface 134 temperatures (Hurwitz et al., 2012; Fletcher and Kushner...

Graf, Hans-F.; Zanchettin, Davide; Timmreck, Claudia; Bittner, Matthias

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

464

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Reconnections of Vortex Loops in the Superfluid Turbulent HeII. Rates of the Breakdown and Fusion processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetics of merging and breaking down vortex loops is the important part of the whole vortex tangle dynamics. Another part is the motion of individual lines, which obeys the Biot-Savart law in presence of friction force and of applied external velocity fields if any. In the present work we evaluate the coefficients of the reconnection rates $A(l_{1},l_{2},l)$ and $B(l,l_{1},l_{2})$. Quantity $A$ is a number (per unit of time and per unit of volume) of events, when two loops with lengths $l_{1}$and $l_{2}$ collide and form the single loop of length $ l=l_{1}+l_{2}$. Quantity $% B(l,l_{1},l_{2}) $ describes the rate of events, when the single loop of the length $l$ breaks down into two the daughter loops of lengths $ l_{1}$ and $l_{2}$. These quantities ave evaluated as the averaged numbers of zeroes of vector $\\mathbf{S}%_{s}(\\xi_{2},\\xi_{1},t)$ connecting two points on the loops of $\\xi_{2}$ and $ \\xi_{1}$ at moment of time $t$. Statistics of the individual loops is taken from the Gaussian model of vortex tangle. PACS-number 67.40

Sergey K. Nemirovskii

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores Panagiotis Manolios and Daron Vroon College@ccs.neu.edu, daron.vroon@gmail.com Abstract. Recent advances in termination analysis have yielded new methods and determining how to proceed. In this paper, we address the issue of building termination analysis engines

Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

467

Improving the economics of PWR cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic fuel cycles have become of paramount importance to the nuclear power industry due to the increasing impact of deregulation and competition. This paper describes the PWR core design techniques being employed at Entergy in the quest to meet the ever-decreasing fuel cost targets for these units.

Ober, T.G. [Entergy Operations, Jackson, MS (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Magnetic Fields in Quasar Cores II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-frequency polarimetry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescope has revealed absolute Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) in excess of 1000 rad/m/m in the central regions of 7 out of 8 strong quasars studied (e.g., 3C 273, 3C 279, 3C 395). Beyond a projected distance of ~20 pc, however, the jets are found to have |RM| < 100 rad/m/m. Such sharp RM gradients cannot be produced by cluster or galactic-scale magnetic fields, but rather must be the result of magnetic fields organized over the central 1-100 pc. The RMs of the sources studied to date and the polarization properties of BL Lacs, quasars and galaxies are shown to be consistent so far with the predictions of unified schemes. The direct detection of high RMs in these quasar cores can explain the low fractional core polarizations usually observed in quasars at centimeter wavelengths as the result of irregularities in the Faraday screen on scales smaller than the telescope beam. Variability in the RM of the core is reported for 3C 279 between observations taken 1.5 years apart, indicating that the Faraday screen changes on that timescale, or that the projected superluminal motion of the inner jet components samples a new location in the screen with time. Either way, these changes in the Faraday screen may explain the dramatic variability in core polarization properties displayed by quasars.

G. B. Taylor

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Core Language of Aldwych Matthew HUNTBACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a tiny core language which captures the essential mechanisms of its programming style. This idea has been with its basis in CSP [4]. More recently, the pi-calculus [19] has received much attention as the suggested basis for a model of interactive computing. Unlike CSP, the pi-calculus is a name-passing calculus

Huntbach, Matthew

470

Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D. [Advanced Methods and Materials, Inc., 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Road, Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Houts, Mike [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

471

Glitches Induced by the Core Superfluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-term evolution of the relative rotation of the core superfluid in a neutron star with respect to the rest of the star, at different radial distances from the rotation axis, is determined through model calculations. The core superfluid rotates at a different rate (faster, in young pulsars), while spinning down at the same steady-state rate as the rest of the star, because of the assumed pinning between the superfluid vortices and the superconductor fluxoids. We find that the magnitude of this rotational lag changes with time and also depends on the distance from the rotation axis; the core superfluid supports an evolving pattern of differential rotation. We argue that the predicted change of the lag might occur as discrete events which could result in a sudden rise of the spin frequency of the crust of a neutron star, as is observed at glitches in radio pulsars. This new possibility for the triggering cause of glitches in radio pulsars is further supported by an estimate of the total predicted excess angular momentum reservoir of the core superfluid. The model seems to offer also resolutions for some other aspects of the observational data on glitches.

M. Jahan-Miri

2001-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Experimental optimization of a free vortex propeller runner for micro hydro application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The turbine technology for low head application in the micro hydro range has been vastly neglected despite niche available in scattered regions of valley flows as well as in wastewater canals and other energy recovery schemes, where the available head does not exceed 2 meters. The goal of this study is to develop hydraulically optimized propeller turbines for the micro hydro range with a particular focus on ease of manufacture. This paper presents a wide range of geometrical optimization steps carried out on a propeller runner, whose blades have been designed using the free vortex theory, and operating with a gross head from 1.5 to 2 m and discharge of approximately 75 l/s. It further illustrates 3 stages of geometrical modifications carried out on the runner with an objective of optimizing the runner performance. These modifications comprised of changes to the tip angles (both at the runner inlet and exit) as well as the hub angles (at the runner inlet) of the runner blades. The paper also presents an interesting theoretical methodology to analyze the effects of each optimization stage. This method looks at the relative changes to shaft power and discharge at constant head and speed and gives wonderful insight as to how the internal parameters like Euler shaft work and runner hydraulic losses are behaving with respect to each optimization stage. It was found that the performance of the runner was very sensitive to changes to exit tip angle. At two levels of modification, the discharge increased in the range of 15-30%, while shaft power increased in the range of 12-45%, thus influencing the efficiency characteristics. The results of the runner inlet tip modification were very interesting in that a very significant rise of turbine efficiency was recorded from 55% to 74% at the best efficiency point, which was caused by a reduced discharge consumption as well as a higher power generation. It was also found that the optimization study on a propeller runner has reasonably validated the estimates of the free vortex theory despite small deviations. The final runner configuration demonstrated a maximum efficiency of 74% ({+-}1.8%), which is very encouraging from the perspectives of micro hydro application. The paper concludes with recommendations of a series of optimization steps to increase the efficiency of the runner. It also recommends the attempt of Computational Fluid Dynamics both as a validation and optimization tool for future research on propeller runners. (author)

Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Flame-vortex interaction driven combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion dynamics of propane-hydrogen mixtures are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We systematically vary the equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and fuel composition to determine the stability map of the combustor. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio entering the flame is temporally and spatially uniform, and the combustion dynamics are governed only by flame-vortex interactions. Four distinct dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. At high but lean equivalence ratios, the flame is unstable and oscillates strongly as it is wrapped around the large unsteady wake vortex. At intermediate equivalence ratios, weakly oscillating quasi-stable flames are observed. Near the lean blowout limit, long stable flames extending from the corner of the step are formed. At atmospheric inlet temperature, the unstable mode resonates at the 1/4 wavemode of the combustor. As the inlet temperature is increased, the 5/4 wavemode of the combustor is excited at high but lean equivalence ratios, forming the high-frequency unstable flames. Higher hydrogen concentration in the fuel and higher inlet temperatures reduce the equivalence ratios at which the transitions between regimes are observed. We plot combustion dynamics maps or the response curves, that is the overall sound pressure level as a function of the equivalence ratio, for different operating conditions. We demonstrate that numerical results of strained premixed flames can be used to collapse the response curves describing the transitions among the dynamic modes onto a function of the heat release rate parameter alone, rather than a function dependent on the equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and fuel composition separately. We formulate a theory for predicting the critical values of the heat release parameter at which quasi-stable to unstable and unstable to high-frequency unstable modes take place. (author)

Altay, H. Murat; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Enhancing entanglement trapping by weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a scheme to enhance trapping of entanglement of two qubits in the environment of a photonic band gap material. Our entanglement trapping promotion scheme makes use of combined weak measurements and quantum measurement reversals. The optimal promotion of entanglement trapping can be acquired with a reasonable finite success probability by adjusting measurement strengths.

Ying-Jie Zhang; Wei Han; Heng Fan; Yun-Jie Xia

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

476

Rotational stability of a long field-reversed configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rotationally driven modes of long systems with dominantly axial magnetic field are considered. We apply the incompressible model and order axial wavenumber small. A recently developed gyro-viscous model is incorporated. A one-dimensional equilibrium is assumed, but radial profiles are arbitrary. The dominant toroidal (azimuthal) mode numbers ?=1 and ?=2 modes are examined for a variety of non-reversed (B) and reversed profiles. Previous results for both systems with rigid rotor equilibria are reproduced. New results are obtained by incorporation of finite axial wavenumber and by relaxing the assumption of rigid electron and ion rotation. It is shown that the frequently troublesome ?=2 field reversed configuration (FRC) mode is not strongly affected by ion kinetic effects (in contrast to non-reversed cases) and is likely stabilized experimentally only by finite length effects. It is also shown that the ?=1 wobble mode has a complicated behavior and is affected by a variety of configuration and profile effects. The rotationally driven ?=1 wobble is completely stabilized by strong rotational shear, which is anticipated to be active in high performance FRC experiments. Thus, observed wobble modes in these systems are likely not driven by rotation alone.

Barnes, D. C., E-mail: coronadocon@msn.com; Steinhauer, L. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)] [Tri Alpha Energy, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

Honig, E.M.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

478

EddyViscosity Time Reversing Waves a Dissipative Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where linear shallow water speed is given o o . The kinematic viscosity denoted parameter ratio been shown [6] nonlinear (inviscid) shallow water waves pres­ ence a random topography and alsoEddyViscosity Time Reversing Waves a Dissipative Environment Josselin Garnier Laboratoire

Garnier, Josselin

479

Quasi-Reversible Oxygen Exchange of Amorphous IGZO Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MRSEC Quasi-Reversible Oxygen Exchange of Amorphous IGZO Thin Films NSF Grant # 1121262 A. U. Adler of varying oxygen partial pressure. Oxygen exchange was confirmed by 18O tracer diffusion (time of carrier content vs. pO2) analysis should be applicable for studying the underlying carrier generation

Shahriar, Selim

480

TIME REVERSAL IN CHANGING ENVIRONMENT GUILLAUME BAL AND RAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIME REVERSAL IN CHANGING ENVIRONMENT GUILLAUME BAL #3; AND RAM #19; ON VER #19; ASTEGUI y Abstract of the refocused signal as the backward propagation medium departs from the forward propagation medium, Wigner transform, changing environment. AMS subject classi#12;cations. 35R60 35L40 78A45 82D30 1

Bal, Guillaume

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex core reversal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Supporting Information Reversible and Persistent Electrical Bistability in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S1 Supporting Information Reversible and Persistent Electrical Bistability in Single-Crystals of a Self-Assembled -Conjugated Tetraaryl System: A Sub-Micron Scale Electrical Characterization Shay Tal1 N(Bu)4 + PF6 - ; scan rate=0.125 - 3Vs-1 ; reference electrode=Ag/AgNO3; working and counter

Gunawardena, Jeremy

482

PREDICTORS OF QUALITY OF LIFE WITH AXILLARY REVERSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acknowledgements I would like to thank Dr. Carol Connor and Dr. Jennifer Klemp for allowing me access to their data base for women undergoing Axillary Reverse Mapping. The findings support my clinical experience with managing women’s post axillary surgery...

Adkins, Barbara

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Low Cost, High Efficiency Reversible Fuel Cell Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Cost, High Efficiency Reversible Fuel Cell Systems DE-FC36-99GO-10455 POC: Doug Hooker Dr Approach: System Concept Fuel Cell Subsystem Battery Subsystem Converter Electrolyzer Subsystem Inverter, -- (216) 541(216) 541--10001000 Slide 5 Approach: Challenges ·Electrolyzer Subsystem Efficiency ·Fuel Cell

484

Highly Reversible Open Framework Nanoscale Electrodes for Divalent Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue family of open framework materials, such as nickel hexacyanoferrate, allow for the reversible of protons and lithium ions into solid materials has led to the success of nickel metal hydride and lithium materials have been studied extensively.15,16,18,20-23 Electrodeposited PB thin films have demonstrated

Cui, Yi

485

Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Winchester, Benjamin Michael

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Reversible Space Equals Deterministic Space KlausJorn Lange \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(see [Ne66]), physical laws do not preclude using an arbitrarily small amount of energy to perform logically reversible computing steps [La61], see [Fey96, Chapter 5]. More recently, renewed interest'erationnelle, Universit'e de Montr'eal, C.P. 6128 succursale Centre­Ville, Montr'eal, H3C 3J7 Canada. Work supported

McKenzie, Pierre

487

Time Reversal Invariance Violation in Neutron Deuteron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time reversal invariance violating (TRIV) effects for low energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for meson exchange and EFT-type of TRIV potentials in a Distorted Wave Born Approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The relation between TRIV and parity violating observables are discussed.

Young-Ho Song; Rimantas Lazauskas; Vladimir Gudkov

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

LOW COST, HIGH EFFICIENCY REVERSIBLE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

common hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., natural gas, propane, and bio-derived fuel) as well as hydrogenLOW COST, HIGH EFFICIENCY REVERSIBLE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS Dr. Christopher E. Milliken, Materials Group Boulevard Cleveland, Ohio 44108 216-541-1000 Abstract Fuel cell technologies are described in the 2001 DOE

489

Reversing Flow Test Facility. Technical report, March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) is intended for the study of fluid flow and heat transfer under the reversing-flow conditions that occur in Stirling engines. the facility consists of four major parts: (1) Mechanical Drive - two cylinders with cam-driven pistons which generate the reversing gas flow, (2) Test Section - a U-shaped section containing instrumented test pieces, (3) Instruments -l high-speed transducers for measuring gas pressure and temperature, piston positions, and other system parameters, and (4) Data Acquisition System - a computer-based system able to acquire, store, display and analyze the data from the instruments. The RFTF can operate at pressures up to 8.0 MPa, hot-side temperatures to 800/sup 0/C, and flow-reversal frequencies to 50 Hz. Operation to data has used helium as the working gas at pressures of 3.0 and 6.0 MPa, at ambient temperature, and at frequencies from 1 to 50 Hz. The results show that both frictional and inertial parts of the pressure drop are significant in the heater, coolers and connecting tubes; the inertial part is negligible in the regenerators. In all cases, the frictional part of the pressure drop is nearly in phase with the mass flow. 18 refs., 22 figs., 13 tabs.

Roach, P.D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Lessons Learned in Applying Formal Concept Analysis to Reverse Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned in Applying Formal Concept Analysis to Reverse Engineering Gabriela Ar´evalo, St in "International Conference on Formal Concept Analysis (ICFCA '05) (2005)" #12;Lessons Learned in Applying Formal artifacts. In this paper we describe our approach, outline three case studies, and draw various lessons from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

491

aot water reverse: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aot water reverse First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Probing the Structure and Dynamics of...

492

Accepted Manuscript Title: Imaging the spread of reversible brain inactivations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reversible suppression of neurophysiological activity. Interpretations of the effects of muscimol infusions demonstrated that the behavioral effects of FCM infusion are similar to the behavioral effects of muscimol infusion. FCM infusion into the rat amygdala before fear conditioning impaired both cued and contextual

Laubach, Mark

493

The effect of disorder on the critical points in the vortex phase diagram of YBCO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of line disorder induced by heavy ion irradiation and of point disorder induced by proton and electron irradiation on the upper and lower critical points in the vortex phase diagram of YBCO is presented. The authors find that dilute line disorder induces a Bose glass transition at low fields which is replaced at the lower critical point by first order melting at higher fields. Strong pinning point defects raise the lower critical point, while weak pinning point defects have little or no effect on the lower critical point. The upper critical point is lowered by point disorder, but raised by line disorder. First order melting is suppressed by point disorder in two ways, by lowering of the upper critical point only for weak point pins, or by merging of the upper and lower critical points for strong point pins. The differing responses of the upper and lower critical points to line and point disorder can be understood in a picture of transverse and longitudinal spatial fluctuations.

Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Olsson, R. J.; Karapetrov, G.; Tobos, V.; Moulton, W. G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

494

Development of a vortex combustor (VC) for space/water heating applications (combustion tests). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-87PC79660 on ``Combustion Test`` for vortex combustor (VC) development for commercial applications. The work culminated in the successful demonstration of a 2 MB/H proof-of-concept (POC) model firing coal-water fuel (CWF). This development is concerned with a new concept in combustion, and was a general lack of relevant information. The work therefore began (in addition to the companion cold flow modeling study) with the design and test of two subscale models (0.15 and 0.3 MB/H) and one full scale model (3 MB/H) to obtain the needed information. With the experience gained, the 2 MB/H POC model was then designed and demonstrated. Although, these models were designed somewhat differently from one another, they all performed well and demonstrated the superiority of the concept. In summary, test results have shown that VC can be fired on several coal fuels (CWF, dry ultrafine coal, utility grind pulverized coal) at high combustion efficiency (>99%), high firing intensity (up to 0.44 MB/H-ft{sup 3}), and at temperatures sufficiently low or dry ash removal. The combustion process is completed totally inside the combustor. Conventional combustion enhancement techniques such as: preheating (air and/or fuel), pre-combustion, and post combustion are not needed.

Fu, T.T. [Naval Civil Engineering Lab., Port Hueneme, CA (United States); Nieh, S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Combustion and Multiphase Flows Lab.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Development of a vortex combustor (VC) for space/water heating applications (combustion tests)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-87PC79660 on Combustion Test'' for vortex combustor (VC) development for commercial applications. The work culminated in the successful demonstration of a 2 MB/H proof-of-concept (POC) model firing coal-water fuel (CWF). This development is concerned with a new concept in combustion, and was a general lack of relevant information. The work therefore began (in addition to the companion cold flow modeling study) with the design and test of two subscale models (0.15 and 0.3 MB/H) and one full scale model (3 MB/H) to obtain the needed information. With the experience gained, the 2 MB/H POC model was then designed and demonstrated. Although, these models were designed somewhat differently from one another, they all performed well and demonstrated the superiority of the concept. In summary, test results have shown that VC can be fired on several coal fuels (CWF, dry ultrafine coal, utility grind pulverized coal) at high combustion efficiency (>99%), high firing intensity (up to 0.44 MB/H-ft[sup 3]), and at temperatures sufficiently low or dry ash removal. The combustion process is completed totally inside the combustor. Conventional combustion enhancement techniques such as: preheating (air and/or fuel), pre-combustion, and post combustion are not needed.

Fu, T.T. (Naval Civil Engineering Lab., Port Hueneme, CA (United States)); Nieh, S. (Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Combustion and Multiphase Flows Lab.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Static solitons of the sine-Gordon equation and equilibrium vortex structure in Josephson junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of vortex structure in a single Josephson junction in an external magnetic field, in the absence of transport currents, is reconsidered from a new mathematical point of view. In particular, we derive a complete set of exact analytical solutions representing all the stationary points (minima and saddle-points) of the relevant Gibbs free-energy functional. The type of these solutions is determined by explicit evaluation of the second variation of the Gibbs free-energy functional. The stable (physical) solutions minimizing the Gibbs free-energy functional form an infinite set and are labeled by a topological number N{sub v}=0,1,2,... . Mathematically, they can be interpreted as nontrivial 'vacuum' (N{sub v}=0) and static topological solitons (N{sub v}=1,2,...) of the sine-Gordon equation for the phase difference in a finite spatial interval: solutions of this kind were not considered in previous literature. Physically, they represent the Meissner state (N{sub v}=0) and Josephson vortices (N{sub v}=1,2,...). Major properties of the new physical solutions are thoroughly discussed. An exact, closed-form analytical expression for the Gibbs free energy is derived and analyzed numerically. Unstable (saddle-point) solutions are also classified and discussed.

Kuplevakhsky, S. V.; Glukhov, A. M. [B. I. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 47 Lenin Avenue, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Twisted toroidal vortex-solitons in inhomogeneous media with repulsive nonlinearity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toroidal modes in the form of so-called Hopfions, with two independent winding numbers, a hidden one (twist, s), which characterizes a circular vortex thread embedded into a three-dimensional soliton, and the vorticity around the vertical axis m, appear in many fields, including the field theory, ferromagnetics, and semi- and superconductors. Such topological states are normally generated in multi-component systems, or as trapped quasi-linear modes in toroidal potentials. We uncover that stable solitons with this structure can be created, without any linear potential, in the single-component setting with the strength of repulsive nonlinearity growing fast enough from the center to the periphery, for both steep and smooth modulation profiles. Toroidal modes with s=1 and vorticity m=0,1,2 are produced. They are stable for m1. An approximate analytical solution is obtained for the twisted ring with s=1, m=0. Under the application of an external torque, it rotates like a solid ring. The setting can be implemented in BEC, by means of the Feshbach resonance controlled by inhomogene-ous magnetic fields.

Y. V. Kartashov; B. A. Malomed; Y. Shnir; L. Torner

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

498

CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

499

Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z