Sample records for volume upper limit

  1. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  2. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  3. Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dimock

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

  4. Upper limits on stray force noise for LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a torsion pendulum facility for LISA gravitational reference sensor ground testing that allows us to put significant upper limits on residual stray forces exerted by LISA-like position sensors on a representative test mass and to characterize specific sources of disturbances for LISA. We present here the details of the facility, the experimental procedures used to maximize its sensitivity, and the techniques used to characterize the pendulum itself that allowed us to reach a torque sensitivity below 20 fNm /sqrt{Hz} from 0.3 to 10 mHz. We also discuss the implications of the obtained results for LISA.

  5. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  6. Statistical Confirmation of a Stellar Upper Mass Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the expectation value for the maximum stellar mass (m_max) in an ensemble of N stars, as a function of the IMF upper-mass cutoff (m_up) and N. We statistically demonstrate that the upper IMF of the local massive star census observed thus far in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds clearly exhibits a universal upper mass cutoff around 120 - 200 M_sun for a Salpeter IMF, although the result is more ambiguous for a steeper IMF.

  7. Upper limit on branching ratio the decay B. Bassalleck,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory (BNL). The decay forbidden angular momentum conservation neutrinos purely massless left## # cosmological constraints neutrino masses imply more stringent limits. branching 0 ## case massive Majorana Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New 11973, USA TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia

  8. Upper limits on electric dipole moments of tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Grozin; I. B. Khriplovich; A. S. Rudenko

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss upper limits on the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  9. Upper limits on electric dipole moments of tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grozin, A G; Rudenko, A S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss upper limits on the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  10. COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200, 11 and Peter T. Timbie6 Receivved 2003 Auggust 19; accepted 2004 April 12 ABSTRACT COMPASS is an on with the Cosmic Microwave Polari- zation at Small Scales (COMPASS) telescope. Although this limit is about

  11. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 2. Appendix. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The report presents the result of the phase I studies investigations recommends the alternatives to be pursued to develop the Upper Arun River. Volume 2 contains tables, figures and other supporting materials.

  12. Upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Klaja; P. Moskal; S. D. Bass; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; T. Johansson; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; B. Rejdych; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction has been determined near the kinematical threshold in the excess energy range from 0 to 24 MeV. The measurement was performed using the COSY-11 detector setup, a deuteron cluster target, and the proton beam of COSY with a momentum of 3.35 GeV/c. The energy dependence of the upper limit of the cross section was extracted exploiting the Fermi momenta of nucleons inside the deuteron. Comparison of the determined upper limit of the ratio R_eta' = sigma(pn --> pn eta') / sigma(pp --> pp eta') with the corresponding ratio for eta-meson production does not favor the dominance of the N*(1535) resonance in the production process of the eta' meson and suggests nonidentical production mechanisms for eta and eta' mesons.

  13. CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009 The CDF of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bV/c2 in steps of 5 GeV/c2 , assuming Standard Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson

  14. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  15. Computing flux upper-limits for non-detections F. Masci, 10/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    to "real" detections (e.g., in a spectrum), the quoted upper limits often lack probabilistic power. One in the first place, i.e., has flux measurement > some threshold set according to some maximum tolerable interval) that probably contains the true flux can then be assigned using the uncertainties. If a source

  16. A very reduced upper limit on the interstellar abundance of beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Hébrard; Martin Lemoine; Roger Ferlet; Alfred Vidal-Madjar

    1997-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of observations of the $\\lambda 3130.4$ \\AA interstellar absorption line of Be II in the direction of zeta Per. The data were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6m Telescope using the Coud\\'e f/4 Gecko spectrograph at a resolving power $\\simeq 1.1 \\times 10^5$, and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N $\\simeq$ 2000. The Be II line is not detected, and we obtain an upper limit on the equivalent width $W_{3130.4}\\leq30$ $\\mu$\\AA. This upper limit is 7 times below the lowest upper limit ever reported hitherto. The derived interstellar abundance is ($^9$Be/H) $\\leq 7 \\times 10^{-13}$, not corrected for the depletion of Be onto interstellar grains; it corresponds to an upper limit $\\delta_{Be} \\leq -1.5$ dex on the depletion factor of Be. As such, it argues in favour of models of formation of dust grains in stellar atmospheres.

  17. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of W-Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections of the reaction e+e- --> W+W-, as measured at LEP-II at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 207 GeV are used to derive the upper limits on the parameters of CP-violating (P-odd and C-even) triple gauge-boson couplings WW\\gamma and WWZ. The 95% CL limits |\\widetilde{\\kappa}_Z|<0.13 and |\\widetilde{\\lambda}_Z|<0.31 are obtained assuming local SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge invariance. Our results are comparable with the previous ones obtained through the analysis of the W decay products. We also discuss the upper limits on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  18. Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Suk Bum

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

  19. Upper limit on the primary photon fraction from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risse, Markus; /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Auger Observatory, an upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction of 26% (at 95% confidence level) is derived for primary energies above 10{sup 19} eV. Additional observables recorded with the surface detector array, available for a sub-set of the data sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favoured.

  20. Upper limits for PH3 and H2S in Titan's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Horst, Sarah M; 10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.024

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the presence of simple P and S-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere, by looking for the characteristic signatures of phosphine and hydrogen sulfide in infrared spectra obtained by Cassini CIRS. As a result we have placed the first upper limits on the stratospheric abundances, which are 1 ppb (PH3) and 330 ppb (H2S), at the 2-sigma significance level.

  1. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  2. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; D’Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  3. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Phi--(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanes Egiyan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the {Phi}{sup --}(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} decay channel using CLAS. The invariant mass spectrum of the {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M = 1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of {Phi}{sup --}(1860) with a consecutive decay into {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} in the photon energy range 4.5 GeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 5.5 GeV.

  4. Upper limits for undetected trace species in the stratosphere of Titan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, Connor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Kleiner, I.; Dehayem-kamadjeu, A.; Brown, Linda R.; Sams, Robert L.; Bezard, Bruno; Coustenis, Athena; Ansty, Todd M.; Mamoutkine, Andrei; Vinatier, Sandrine; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe a first quantitative search for several molecules in Titans stratosphere ni Cassini CIRS infrared spectra. These are: ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO), and acetonitrile (CH3CN), all of which are predicted by photochemical models but only the last of which observed, and not in the infrared,. We find non-detections in all cases, but derive upper limits on the abundances from low-noise observations at 25 degreesS and 75 degreesN. Comparing these constraints to model predictions, we conclude that CIRS is highly unlikely to see NH3 or CH3OH emissions. However, CH3CN and H2CO are closer to CIRS detectability, and we suggest ways in which the sensitivity threshold may be lowered towards this goal.

  5. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  6. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  8. GeV Gamma-ray Flux Upper Limits from Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., M Ackermann et

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium. Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the intracluster medium, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) from August 2008 to February 2010. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV towards a sample of observed clusters (typical va...

  9. A New Upper Limit on the Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher O'Dell

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) is an invaluable probe of the conditions of the early universe. Recent measurements of its spatial anisotropy have allowed accurate determinations of several fundamental cosmological parameters, such as the curvature of the universe, the shape of the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations, and the contribution of baryons, dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being spatially non-uniform, the CMB is theorized to be slightly polarized. Measurements of this polarization, particularly at large angular scales, have the potential to provide information on primordial gravitational waves, theories of inflation, and the ionization history of the universe, as well as help further constrain cosmological parameters. Polarization has not yet been detected in the CMB. This thesis describes a recent search for CMB polarization at large angular scales, conducted in the spring of 2000 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After a general introduction on both CMB polarization and general microwave polarimetry, details of the experiment itself are given, as well as a full description of the data selection and analysis techniques. Using these techniques, our data lead to a new upper limit on CMB polarization at large angular scales of 10 $\\mu$K in both E- and B-type polarization at 95% confidence. If B-polarization is assumed to be zero, the limit for E-type polarization is lowered to 8 $\\mu$K. This experiment is the first of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation.

  10. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  11. Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industry’s analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

  12. Infrared behavior and infinite-volume limit of gluon and ghost propagators in Yang-Mills theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attilio Cucchieri; Tereza Mendes

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice studies of the infrared behavior of gluon and ghost propagators are a key probe of confinement scenarios in Yang-Mills theories. However, finite-volume effects become an important issue as the infrared limit is approached. By considering general quantities -- namely an associated susceptibility in the gluon case and properties of the lowest-lying eigenmode of the Faddeev-Popov matrix in the ghost case -- one can derive rigorous upper and lower bounds for the propagators. The bounds allow a better control over the extrapolation of lattice results to the infinite-volume limit. In the case of the gluon propagator, an intuitive statistical argument suggests a precise volume dependence for the bounds. This dependence is nicely confirmed by the lattice data, leading to a finite gluon propagator at zero momentum. At the same time, an enhancement of the ghost propagator in the infrared limit seems unlikely. Our analysis is applied to the case of Landau gauge and SU(2) gauge group, using the largest lattice sizes to date.

  13. Upper limits on the solar-neutron flux at the Yangbajing neutron monitor from BATSE-detected solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsuchiya; H. Miyasaka; E. Takahashi; S. Shimoda; Y. Yamada; I. Kondo; K. Makishima; F. Zhu; Y. Tan; H. Hu; Y. Tang; J. Zhang; H. Lu; X. Meng

    2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to search the Yangbajing neutron monitor data obtained between 1998 October and 2000 June for solar neutrons associated with solar flares. Using the onset times of 166 BATSE-detected flares with the GOES peak flux (1 -- 8 \\AA) higher than $1.0 \\times 10^{-5}$ $\\mathrm{Wm^{-2}}$, we prepare for each flare a light curve of the Yangbajing neutron monitor, spanning $\\pm$ 1.5 hours from the BATSE onset time. Based on the light curves, a systematic search for solar neutrons in energies above 100 MeV from the 166 flares was performed. No statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found in the present work. Therefore, we put upper limits on the $>$ 100 MeV solar-neutron flux for 18 events consisting of 2 X and 16 M class flares. The calculation assumed a power-law shaped neutron energy spectrum and three types of neutron emission profiles at the Sun. Compared with the other positive neutron detections associated with X-class flares, typical 95% confidence level upper limits for the two X-class flares are found to be comparable to the lowest and second lowest neutron fluxes at the top of the atmosphere.In addition, the upper limits for M-class flares scatter in the range of $10^{-2}$ to 1 neutrons $\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. This provides the first upper limits on the solar-neutron flux from M-class solar flares, using space observatories as well as ground-based neutron monitors.

  14. Robust upper limit on the neutron single-particle energy of the $i_{13/2}$ orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Lei; H. Jiang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The boundary of the neutron $i_{13/2}$ single-particle energy is investigated with exact shell-model calculations, where random two-body interactions are adopted to overcome the bias from effective interactions. Excitation energies of $3^-_1$ state in $^{134}$Te and $^{136}$Xe, as well as those of $13/2^+_1$ states in $^{135}$Te and $^{137}$Xe, are taken as touchstones of our samplings. A robust upper limit of $\\varepsilon_{i13/2}mixing of $i_{13/2}$ single-neutron configuration and $f_{7/2}\\otimes 3^-$ configuration in $13/2^+_1$ states of $N=83$ isotones.

  15. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  16. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of Tau-Lepton and Heavy Quarks from e+e- Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections measured at LEP for e+e- annihilation into tau+tau-, c\\bar{c} and b\\bar{b} at 2E ~ 200 GeV are used to derive the upper limits 3*10^{-17}, 5*10^{-17}, 2*10^{-17} e*cm for the electric dipole moments and 4*10^{-17}, 7*10^{-17}, 2.5*10^{-17} e*cm for the weak dipole moments of the tau-lepton, c-, and b-quarks, respectively. Some of the existing limits on these moments are improved and for the b-quark the improvement is rather significant.

  17. Polarimetric Observations of the Masers in NGC 4258: An Upper Limit on the Large-Scale Magnetic Field 0.2 pc from the Central Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Herrnstein; J. M. Moran; L. J. Greenhill; E. G. Blackman; P. J. Diamond

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report VLA 1 sigma upper limits of 1.5% and 3% on the intrinsic circular and linear fractional polarizations, respectively, of the water vapor maser emission 0.2 pc from the central engine of NGC 4258. A corresponding 0.5% upper limit on any Zeeman-splitting-induced circular polarization translates to a 1 sigma upper limit on the parallel, or toroidal, component of the magnetic field of 300 mG. Assuming magnetic and thermal pressure balance in the disk, this magnetic field upper limit corresponds to a model-dependent estimate of the accretion rate through the molecular disk of 10^-1.9 alpha solar masses per year for the case where the magnetic field lies along the line of sight.

  18. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000 Hz band, Omega_GW(f)<0.14*(f/900 Hz)^3, a factor of 2.5 lower than the best previously reported upper limits. We find Omega_GW(f)<1.8x10^-4 using a spectral index of zero for 170-600 Hz and Omega_GW(f)<1.0*(f/1300 Hz)^3 for 1000-1726 Hz, bands in which no previous direct limits have been placed. The limits in these four bands are the lowest direct measurements to date on the stochastic background. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the recent claim by the BICEP2 experiment of the possible evidence for inflationary gravitational waves.

  19. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 1. Report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The scope of work included reviewing the original project concepts establishing development alternatives investigations in the following fields: Toposurvey Mapping; Geology Geotechnics; Hydrology; Power Market; and Plan formulations.

  20. Upper limits for the existence of long-lived isotopes of roentgenium in natural gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellinger, F.; Kutschera, W.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Wallner, A.; Winkler, G. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive search for isotopes of a superheavy element (SHE) in natural gold materials has been performed with accelerator mass spectrometry at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, which is based on a 3-MV tandem accelerator. Because the most likely SHE in gold is roentgenium (Rg, Z = 111), the search concentrated on Rg isotopes. Two different mass regions were explored: (i) For the neutron-deficient isotopes {sup 261}Rg and {sup 265}Rg, abundance limits in gold of 3x10{sup -16} were reached (no events observed). This is in stark contrast to the findings of Marinov et al.[Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 18, 621 (2009)], who reported positive identification of these isotopes with inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry in the (1-10)x10{sup -10} abundance range. (ii) Theoretical models of SHEs predict a region of increased stability around the proton and neutron shell closures of Z = 114 and N = 184. We therefore investigated eight heavy Rg isotopes, {sup A}Rg, A = 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, and 296. For six isotopes no events were observed, setting limits also in the 10{sup -16} abundance range. For {sup 291}Rg and {sup 294}Rg we observed two and nine events, respectively, which results in an abundance in the 10{sup -15} range. However, pileup of a particularly strong background in these cases makes a positive identification as Rg isotopes--even after pileup correction--unlikely.

  1. An upper limit on the ratio between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the bolometric luminosities of stars hosting habitable planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Sujan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types has already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape along with hydrogen, I present an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-t...

  2. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /La Plata U. /Pierre Auger Observ. /CNEA, San Martin /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana; ,

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  3. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  4. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000...

  5. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Upper Snake­Rock, Portneuf, Blackfoot, Willow, Teton, Beaver­Camas, and the Upper and Lower Henrys Fork province. (Source: ICBEMP 1997.) Major Hydrologic Unit (Watershed)a Snake Headwaters Subbasin Relative province. (Source GAP II, Scott et al. 2002) Focal Habitat Type High Low Medium Very High Very Low Riparian

  6. version 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg H W +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    ,82 D. Brown ,22 E. Brubaker ,83 X.B. Bu ,8 D. Buchholz ,86 J. Budagov ,53 H.S. Budd ,115 S. Budd ,87. Campanelli ,68 M. Campbell ,104 F. Canelli ,82, 83 A. Canepa ,123 B. Carls ,87 D. Carlsmith ,134 R. Carosiversion 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg

  7. Upper limit of the energy of the photon and the phase change of photon to material particles at the Scwartzschild radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Radhakrishnan Nair

    2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of Scwartzschild radius is extended to the photon and the upper limit imposed on the energy of a photon as a result of the three characteristics of the photon--the constancy of the velocity of light, the spin value of $1\\hslash$ and the zero rest mass of the photon--is shown. Further the phase change that occurs to the photon at the Scwartzschild radius, from energy to matter as a result of vacuum fluctuations is indicated.

  8. The Carnot efficiencybetween these temperatures is: This provides an absolute upper limit to the Rankine cycle effi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    to the Rankine cycle effi- ciency. Heat Absorbed from Stream 3 Power Produced by Steam Turbine Required Power a steam cycle alongsidethe gas turbine cycle. LITERATURE CITED Christodoulou,K., Diploma Thesis, N Output of Gas Turbine For the Gas Turbine Cycle Calculated for Case 2, Upper Exhaust Temperature T6

  9. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

  10. ISO/SWS observations of SN 1987A: II. A refined upper limit on the mass of Ti-44 in the ejecta of SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Lundqvist; C. Kozma; J. Sollerman; C. Fransson

    2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO/SWS observations of SN 1987A on day 3425 show no emission in [Fe I] 24.05 microns and [Fe II] 25.99 microns down to the limits of roughly 0.39 Jy and 0.64 Jy, respectively. Assuming a homogeneous distribution of Ti-44 inside 2000 km/s and negligible dust cooling, we have made time dependent theoretical models to estimate an upper limit on the mass of ejected Ti-44. Assessing various uncertainties of the model, and checking the late optical emission it predicts, we obtain an upper limit of 1.1EE-4 solar masses. This is lower than in our previous estimate using other ISO data, and we compare our new result with other models for the late emission, as well as with expected yields from explosion models. We also show that steady-state models for the optical emission are likely to overestimate the mass of ejected Ti-44. The low limit we find for the mass of ejected Ti-44 could be higher if dust cooling is important. A direct check on this is provided by the gamma-ray emission at 1.157 Mev as a result of the radioactive decay of Ti-44.

  11. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  12. CO mass upper limits in the Fomalhaut ring - the importance of NLTE excitation in debris discs and future prospects with ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrà, L; Wyatt, M C; Dent, W R F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, gas has been observed in an increasing number of debris discs, though its nature remains to be determined. Here, we analyse CO molecular excitation in optically thin debris discs, and search ALMA Cycle-0 data for CO J=3-2 emission in the Fomalhaut ring. No significant line emission is observed; we set a 3-$\\sigma$ upper limit on the integrated line flux of 0.16 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We show a significant dependency of the CO excitation on the density of collisional partners $n$, on the gas kinetic temperature $T_k$ and on the ambient radiation field $J$, suggesting that assumptions widely used for protoplanetary discs (e.g. LTE) do not necessarily apply to their low density debris counterparts. When applied to the Fomalhaut ring, we consider a primordial origin scenario where H$_2$ dominates collisional excitation of CO, and a secondary origin scenario dominated by e$^-$ and H$_2$O. In either scenario, we obtain a strict upper limit on the CO mass of 4.9 $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ M$_{\\oplus}$. This arises...

  13. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125

  14. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CDF, The; Collaborations, D0; Phenomena, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, 140 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small ({approx} 1{sigma}) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125 < m{sub H} < 155 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156 < m{sub H} < 177 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion region of 148 < m{sub H} < 180 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Search for quantum transducers between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation: A measurement of an upper limit on the transducer conversion efficiency of yttrium barium copper oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao; W. J. Fitelson; A. D. Speliotopoulos

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimal coupling rule for the coupling of the electron spin to curved spacetime in general relativity suggests the possibility of a coupling between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation mediated by means of a quantum fluid. Thus quantum transducers between these two kinds of radiation fields might exist. We report here on the first attempt at a Hertz-type experiment, in which a high-$\\rm{T_c}$ superconductor (YBCO) was the sample material used as a possible quantum transducer to convert EM into GR microwaves, and a second piece of YBCO in a separate apparatus was used to back-convert GR into EM microwaves. An upper limit on the conversion efficiency of YBCO was measured to be $1.6\\times10^{-5}$ at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  16. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  17. Utilities and offsite design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III contains information on: water treatment (potable, process and waste water) and waste solids handling. (LTN)

  18. Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

  19. The local environmental dependence of galaxy properties in the volume-limited sample of Main Galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Fa Deng; Ji-Zhou He; Qun Zhang; Cong-Gen He; Peng Jiang; Yong Xin

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a volume-limited sample of Main Galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 5, we investigate the dependence of galaxy properties on local environment. For each galaxy, the local three-dimensional density is calculated. We find that galaxy morphologies strongly depend on local environment: galaxies in dense environments have predominantly early type morphologies, but other galaxy properties do not present significant dependence on local environment. Clearly, this puts a important constraint on proposed physical mechanisms.

  20. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.T.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second paper of this series, we evaluate two additional well designs for production from permafrost-associated (PA) hydrate deposits. Both designs are within the capabilities of conventional technology. We determine that large volumes of gas can be produced at high rates (several MMSCFD) for long times using either well design. The production approach involves initial fluid withdrawal from the water zone underneath the hydrate-bearing layer (HBL). The production process follows a cyclical pattern, with each cycle composed of two stages: a long stage (months to years) of increasing gas production and decreasing water production, and a short stage (days to weeks) that involves destruction of the secondary hydrate (mainly through warm water injection) that evolves during the first stage, and is followed by a reduction in the fluid withdrawal rate. A well configuration with completion throughout the HBL leads to high production rates, but also the creation of a secondary hydrate barrier around the well that needs to be destroyed regularly by water injection. However, a configuration that initially involves heating of the outer surface of the wellbore and later continuous injection of warm water at low rates (Case C) appears to deliver optimum performance over the period it takes for the exhaustion of the hydrate deposit. Using Case C as the standard, we determine that gas production from PA hydrate deposits increases with the fluid withdrawal rate, the initial hydrate saturation and temperature, and with the formation permeability.

  1. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  2. Method of estimating maximum VOC concentration in void volume of vented waste drums using limited sampling data: Application in transuranic waste drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles as well as limited waste drum sampling data. The model consists of a series of material balance equations describing steady-state VOC transport from each distinct void volume in the drum. The primary model input is the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model parameters are determined or estimated based on available process knowledge. The model effectiveness in estimating VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement was examined for vented waste drums containing different waste types and configurations. This paper summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions in vented transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste.

  3. Upper bounds for multiphase composites in any dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Silvestre

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a rigorous upper bound for the effective conductivity of an isotropic composite made of several isotropic components in any dimension. This upper bound coincides with the Hashin Shtrikman bound when the volume ratio of all phases but any two vanish.

  4. Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yin

    2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

  5. Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

  6. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact...

  7. The Weak-Coupling Limit of Simplicial Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Thorleifsson; P. Bialas; B. Petersson

    1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the weak-coupling limit, kappa_0 going to infinity, the partition function of simplicial quantum gravity is dominated by an ensemble of triangulations with the ratio N_0/N_D close to the upper kinematic limit. For a combinatorial triangulation of the D--sphere this limit is 1/D. Defining an ensemble of maximal triangulations, i.e. triangulations that have the maximal possible number of vertices for a given volume, we investigate the properties of this ensemble in three dimensions using both Monte Carlo simulations and a strong-coupling expansion of the partition function, both for pure simplicial gravity and a with a suitable modified measure. For the latter we observe a continuous phase transition to a crinkled phase and we investigate the fractal properties of this phase.

  8. Simple general limiting law for the overall decay of organic compounds with global pollution potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller-Herold, U. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is rigorously shown that the effective decay rate in the environment of a chemical is between the minimum decay rate in one of its possible compartments and an upper value, which is the weighted-average decay rates in all compartments. The weights are the compartments` volumes and the equilibrium concentrations that would have occurred in the compartment due to transport alone, with no degradation. This upper value is approached, in the sense of a general limiting law, if degradation is much slower than transport. This limiting law, together with an estimate for the spatial range of a persistent chemical, could serve as a minimal base for exposure-based assessment of environmental risk. As a first illustration, the result is applied to DDT and hexachloroethane. A broader group of chemicals will be discussed elsewhere. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  10. Upper limits on charm-changing neutral-current interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1988-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    in the D -D system and/or large branching ratios for charmed-hadron decays into oppositely charged leptons. Thus far, no experimental evidence exists for D -D mixing. Previous studies of charm-changing neutral- current interactions have been made by seeking...- ence Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contracts No. DE-AC02-76ER01428, No. De- AC02-76ER03066, No. De-AC02-76ER03064, No. DE-AC02-76ER01545, No. DE-AC02-78ER05001, and No. F605-86-ER40272. 'S. L. Glashow, J. Iliopoulos, and L. Maiani...

  11. Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portland, Oregon Prepared by December 2004 #12;BOI043620012.DOC/KG ii Contents Section Page Inventory

  12. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 12 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 22 MARCH 1999 Electronic Structure and Optical Limiting Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Ji

    a hollow cylinder. Little ,5% non-nanotube materials such as metal (catalyst) particles, amorphous carbon sheets remains unchanged in the carbon nano- tubes. The shift of the (002) reflection from 2u 26VOLUME 82, NUMBER 12 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 22 MARCH 1999 Electronic Structure

  13. Volume 1, Issue 5 | March 2012 POLICYMATTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    Volume 1, Issue 5 | March 2012 POLICYMATTERS Policy Levers to Reduce Poverty and Build Prosperity in the Upper Midwest and Pacific Northwest By john a. powell POVERTY AND RACE THROUGH A BELONGINGNESS LENS #12 to reduce poverty and build sustainable prosperity. Everything we do is rooted in our conviction

  14. Low volume flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  15. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Jaeho [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  16. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevisionof EnergyUpper Los

  17. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 JUNE 1998 Time Delay Induced Death in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodla, Ramana

    in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators D. V. Ramana Reddy,* A. Sen, and G. L. Johnston Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, India (Received 19 December 1997) We investigate the dynamical behavior

  18. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  19. Evaluation of the upper shelf energy for ferritic steels from miniaturized Charpy specimen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurishita, Hiroaki; Narui, Minoru; Kayano, Hideo [Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Shibahara, Itaru; Mizuta, Syunji [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The small specimen technology is required in mechanical testing of irradiated materials because of very limited irradiation volume in currently available high flux reactors and future accelerator-based high energy neutron sources. In order to develop the methodology to evaluate the upper shelf energy (USE) for full size Charpy specimens of ferritic steels from miniaturized specimen data, the effects of specimen size and notch dimensions (notch root radius and notch depth) on the USE were studied for high strength ferritic steels with relatively low USE values of 135 and 107 J. The USE for miniaturized specimens, normalized by Bb{sup 2} or (Bb){sup 3/2} (B is the specimen thickness, b is the ligament size), was essentially independent of specimen size and tended to decrease with increasing the elastic stress concentration factor, K{sub t}, but the K{sub t} dependence was not significant. The normalized USE for full size specimens was considerably lower than that for miniaturized specimens. A general relationship was found that allows to determine the USE of full size specimens of ferritic steels directly from miniaturized specimen data.

  20. Educing the volume out of the phase space boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel A. Cobas; M. A. R. Osorio; María Suárez

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We explicitly show that, in a system with T-duality symmetry, the configuration space volume degrees of freedom may hide on the surface boundary of the region of accessible states with energy lower than a fixed value. This means that, when taking the decompactification limit (big volume limit), a number of accessible states proportional to the volume is recovered even if no volume dependence appears when energy is high enough. All this behavior is contained in the exact way of computing sums by making integrals. We will also show how the decompactification limit for the gas of strings can be defined in a microcanonical description at finite volume.

  1. Half-life Limit of 19Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Frank; T. Baumann; D. Bazin; R. R. C. Clement; M. W. Cooper; P. Heckman; W. A. Peters; A. Stolz; M. Thoennessen; M. S. Wallace

    2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for 19Mg was performed using projectile fragmentation of a 150 MeV/nucleon 36Ar beam. No events of 19Mg were observed. From the time-of-flight through the fragment separator an upper limit of 22 ns for the half-life of 19Mg was established.

  2. Improved limits on scalar weak couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelberger, E.G. (PPE Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland) Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I point out that [beta]-delayed proton spectroscopy is a powerful probe of possible scalar contributions to nuclear [beta] decay, and use Schardt and Riisager's data on the shape of the beta-delayed proton peaks from the superallowed decays of [sup 32]Ar and [sup 33]Ar to set improved upper limits on such couplings. Implications of these limits for leptoquark masses are mentioned.

  3. VOLUME 89, NUMBER 2 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 JULY 2002 Magnetization in the Ultraquantum Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebard, Arthur F.

    Alamos, New Mexico 87545 4 National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee], a high electrical conductivity normal metal, in which we are able to observe quantum oscillations below. An induced net diamagnetic moment in the sample occurs at fields between 7 and 32 T above the quantum limit

  4. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  5. Upper Cumberland EMC- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient...

  6. Diffusion limited reactions in confined environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy D. Schmit; Ercan Kamber; Jané Kondev

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of confinement on diffusion limited bimolecular reactions within a lattice model where a small number of reactants diffuse amongst a much larger number of inert particles. When the number of inert particles is held constant the rate of the reaction is slow for small reaction volumes due to limited mobility from crowding, and for large reaction volumes due to the reduced concentration of the reactants. The reaction rate proceeds fastest at an intermediate confinement corresponding to volume fraction near 1/2 and 1/3 in two and three dimensions, respectively. We generalize the model to off-lattice systems with hydrodynamic coupling and predict that the optimal reaction rate for monodisperse colloidal systems occurs when the volume fraction is ~0.18. Finally, we discuss the application of our model to bimolecular reactions inside cells as well as the dynamics of confined polymers.

  7. Some simulation estimates of mean annual increment of douglas-fir: Results, limitations, and implications for management. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, R.O.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns of development of mean annual increment in relation to age predicted by the widely used DFSM, SPS, TASS, and ORGANON simulators were examined. Although predictions differ considerably among simulators for portions of the range of sites, ages, and treatments, comparisons indicated that (1) culmination is relatively late, (2) the curve is relatively flat in the vicinity of culmination, and (3) systematic thinning tends to delay culmination. Harvest ages of 40 to 50 years reduce volume production relative to potential by amounts ranging from moderate to large according to site, treatment regime, and simulator. Within unknown upper limits, moderate extension of rotations to minimize conflicts among timber production and environmental, aesthetic, and wildlife values would not materially reduce long-term volume production and might increase value production.

  8. Volume Comparison

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and InstitutionalArea:Mnt(N)3.1.Liquids ReserveVolume

  9. Process Limits on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

  10. area upper engadine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Niles; Adam Pease 2001-01-01 18 An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in Transient Source Systems Engineering Websites Summary: An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in...

  11. Expanded solar-system limits on violations of the equivalence principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Overduin; Jack Mitcham; Zoey Warecki

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most attempts to unify general relativity with the standard model of particle physics predict violations of the equivalence principle associated in some way with the composition of the test masses. We test this idea by using observational uncertainties in the positions and motions of solar-system bodies to set upper limits on possible differences $\\Delta$ between the gravitational and inertial mass of each body. For suitable pairs of objects, it is possible to constrain three different linear combinations of $\\Delta$ using Kepler's third law, the migration of stable Lagrange points, and orbital polarization (the Nordtvedt effect). Limits of order $10^{-10}-10^{-6}$ on $\\Delta$ for individual bodies can then be derived from planetary and lunar ephemerides, Cassini observations of the Saturn system, and observations of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids as well as recently discovered Trojan companions around the Earth, Mars, Neptune, and Saturnian moons. These results can be combined with models for elemental abundances in each body to test for composition-dependent violations of the universality of free fall in the solar system. The resulting limits are weaker than those from laboratory experiments, but span a larger volume in composition space.

  12. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 1 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY The purpose of the project inventory is to provide a generalized picture of the types of fish and wildlife team participants through the project inventory website or through direct submission. Additional

  13. Advances in Lung Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Advances in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery The Ohio University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction LungVolumeReductionSurgery Spring 2010 © 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center ­ 04 Consult Ohio State's #12;The Ohio State University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Patient

  14. Upper Mahiao Binary GEPP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpperMahiao

  15. On the -Volume Limit of the Focusing Cubic Schrdinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Brian

    on the line. For the periodic problem the appropriate ensemble was introduced by Lebowitz, Rose, and Speer [3 Periodicals, Inc. #12;1232 B. C. RIDER The problem owes its inception to Lebowitz, Rose, and Speer (LRS) [3

  16. The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

  17. Upper bounds for Steklov eigenvalues on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girouard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give explicit isoperimetric upper bounds for all Steklov eigenvalues of a compact orientable surface with boundary, in terms of the genus, the length of the boundary, and the number of boundary components. Our estimates generalize a recent result of Fraser-Schoen, as well as the classical inequalites obtained by Hersch-Payne-Schiffer, whose approach is used in the present paper.

  18. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  19. Draft Management Plan Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................4-5 Consistency with Idaho's Water Quality Management Plan...........................4-5 303(dDraft Management Plan Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Quality Anti-Degradation Policy (39-3603) ............................................4-8 ESA and CWA

  20. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  1. Effects of upper-plenum steam condensation phenomena on heat transfer in a rod bundle. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chon, W.Y.; Addabbo, C.; Liao, N.S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System performance and thermohydraulic response to simultaneous bottom and top water injection were investigated in a 3 x 3 rod bundle Reflood Test Facility. An extensive series of tests, encompassing both simple bottom and combined injection reflooding, were carried out. A number of phenomenological events governing the thermodynamic coupling between the bottom reflood updraft and the top deluge were identified. Due to the countercurrent motion of the upflowing steam and water injected in the upper plenum counter current flow limiting phenomena hindered the penetration of water from inventory in the upper plenum into the bundle section. Consequently, condensation phenomena in the upper plenum and in the venting pipework characterized the thermohydraulic response of the bundle to simultaneous bottom and top water injection.

  2. Limits on flavor changing neutral currents in D-0 meson Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have searched for flavor changing neutral currents and lepton family number violations in D-0 meson decays. The upper limits on the branching fractions ...

  3. THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    . 2005; O'Dwyer et al. 2005; Donzelli 2006), and uses iden- tical aluminum coated carbon fiber reflectors gear.12 This table, as described in Mei

  4. Assessment of the Upper Particle Size Limit for Quantitative Analysis of Aerosols Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, David W.

    the vaporization dynamics of individual aerosol particles, such as thermophoretic forces and vapor expulsion. Since

  5. New upper limits on the tau-neutrino mass from primordial helium considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, A.D.; Rothstein, I.Z. (The Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States))

    1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we reconsider recently derived bounds on MeV tau neutrinos, taking into account previously unaccounted for effects. We find that, assuming that the neutrino lifetime is longer than [similar to]100 sec, the constraint [ital N][sub eff][lt]3.6 rules out [nu][sub [tau

  6. A New Upper Limit on the Large Angular Scale Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    , dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property knowledge, Brian Keat- ing, also deserves much credit. Thanks to him I have finally memorized the radiometer

  7. CLNS 01/1739 Improved Upper Limits on the FCNC Decays B ! K` + ` \\Gamma and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 7 University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 8 Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 9 Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 10 University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 11 University of Texas ­ Pan American, Edinburg, Texas 78539 12 Vanderbilt

  8. New Upper Limits on the Tau Neutrino Mass from Primordial Helium Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov; I. Z. Rothstein

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we reconsider recently derived bounds on $MeV$ tau neutrinos, taking into account previously unaccounted for effects. We find that, assuming that the neutrino life-time is longer than $O(100~sec)$, the constraint $N_{eff}Majorana neutrinos and $0.74~(MeV)neutrinos. Given that the present laboratory bound is 35 MeV, our results lower the present bound to $0.5$ and $0.74$ for Majorana and Dirac neutrinos respectively.

  9. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  10. Computer News, Volume 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

  12. Pattern Alteration: Upper Arm Sleeve Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in the upper arm are unbecoming and may form excess vertical folds (Fig. 2). The Personal Measurement Chart (line 10) shows how much to alter. Figure 1. Tight sleeve Figure 2. Loose sleeve 2... ................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 3. Tissue paper Figure 4. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 5. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 6. Figure 7. Sleeve Figure 8. Spread Lap Spread Lap Cut away Tissue Tissue Basic and raglan style garments 1. Trace the cutting line of the set-in sleeve cap on tissue...

  13. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, D.W.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  14. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  15. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Association of White Matter Hyperintensity Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Association of White Matter Hyperintensity Volume With Decreased Cognitive was restricted to the study of older in- dividuals, limiting our understanding of the full impact of WMH

  16. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  17. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  18. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  19. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  20. FINITE VOLUME APPROXIMATION OF THE EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION MATRIX: THE CASE OF INDEPENDENT BOND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINITE VOLUME APPROXIMATION OF THE EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION MATRIX: THE CASE OF INDEPENDENT BOND with independent jump rates across nearest neighbour bonds of the lattice. We show that the infinite volume effective diffusion matrix can be almost surely recovered as the limit of finite volume periodized effective

  1. An Upper Bound on Neutron Star Masses from Models of Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Bedaque, Paulo F; Miller, M Coleman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of two neutron stars with gravitational masses $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ has placed a strong lower limit on the maximum mass of a slowly rotating neutron star, and with it a strong constraint on the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear density. Current upper mass limits are much looser. Here we note that, if most short gamma-ray bursts are produced by the coalescence of two neutron stars, and if the merger remnant collapses quickly, then the upper mass limit is constrained tightly. We find that if the rotation of the merger remnant is limited only by mass-shedding (which seems plausible based on current numerical studies), then the maximum gravitational mass of a slowly rotating neutron star is between $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ and $\\approx 2.2~M_\\odot$ if the masses of neutron stars that coalesce to produce gamma-ray bursts are in the range seen in Galactic double neutron star systems. These limits are increased by $\\sim 4$% if the rotation is slowed by $\\sim 30$%, and by $\\sim 15$% if the merger remna...

  2. Apply early! Limited enrollment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcano. Experience the culture and history of Hawaii, and the impact of human activitiesApply early! Limited enrollment. Environmental Science in the Hawaiian Islands Observe, research

  3. OxfordRoadOxfordRoadOxfordRoad UpperBrookStreetUpperBrookStreet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane Platt Lane UpperLloydStreet HartLane Claremont Road Mauldeth RoadMauldeth Road West Albert Road Coupland Chapel 43. Roby URC 44. Quadria Jilamia Islamic Centre 45. Platt Lane Methodist Church 46. Holy Trinity, Platt Church of England 47. Platt Fields Park, open space with a lake. 48. Allen Hall 49. The Islah

  4. Computer News, Volume 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

  5. Computer News, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  6. Computer News, Volume 36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  7. Computer News, Volume 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

  8. Computer News, Volume 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

  9. Computer News, Volume 20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

  10. Computer News, Volume 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

  13. Computer News, Volume 34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version

  14. Computer News, Volume 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 33. How I teach big calculus lectures with a tablet PC. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  15. Computer News, Volume 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  16. Computer News, Volume 38

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  17. Computer News, Volume 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

  18. Computer News, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  19. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  20. Computer News, Volume 35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  1. Computer News, Volume 32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bañuelos

  2. Computer News, Volume 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  3. Computer News, Volume 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

  4. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 48. Prime...

  5. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 48. Prime...

  6. LANL Volume 2_Final

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

  7. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  8. On the Eddington limit in accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Heinzeller; W. J. Duschl

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Eddington limit has originally been derived for stars, recently its relevance for the evolution of accretion discs has been realized. We discuss the question whether the classical Eddington limit - which has been applied globally for almost all calculations on accretion discs - is a good approximation if applied locally in the disc. For this purpose, a critical accretion rate corresponding to this type of modified classical Eddington limit is calculated from thin alpha-disc models and slim disc models. We account for the non-spherical symmetry of the disc models by computing the local upper limits on the accretion rate from vertical and radial force equilibria separately. It is shown that the results can differ considerably from the classical (global) value: The vertical radiation force limits the maximum accretion rate in the inner disc region to much less than the classical Eddington value in thin alpha-discs, while it allows for significantly higher accretion rates in slim discs. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of accretion discs and their central objects.

  9. Calculating exclusion limits for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle direct detection experiments without background subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M Green

    2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Competitive limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) spin-independent scattering cross section are currently being produced by 76Ge detectors originally designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, such as the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments. In the absence of background subtraction, limits on the WIMP interaction cross section are set by calculating the upper confidence limit on the theoretical event rate, given the observed event rate. The standard analysis technique involves calculating the 90% upper confidence limit on the number of events in each bin, and excluding any set of parameters (WIMP mass and cross-section) which produces a theoretical event rate for any bin which exceeds the 90% upper confidence limit on the event rate for that bin. We show that, if there is more than one energy bin, this produces exclusion limits that are actually at a lower degree of confidence than 90%, and are hence erroneously tight. We formulate criteria which produce true 90% confidence exclusion limits in these circumstances, including calculating the individual bin confidence limit for which the overall probability that no bins exceeds this confidence limit is 90% and calculating the 90% minimum confidence limit on the number of bins which exceed their individual bin 90% confidence limits. We then compare the limits on the WIMP cross-section produced by these criteria with those found using the standard technique, using data from the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments.

  10. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ? 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  11. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  12. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  13. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

  14. Synchronization of Limit Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changpin Li; Weihua Deng

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we derive a sufficient condition of synchronizing limit sets (attractors and repellers) by using the linear feedback control technique proposed here. There examples are included. The numerical simulations and computer graphics show that our method work well.

  15. Upper Cretaceous coccoliths from Texas and Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bukry, D.

    1969-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    huxleyi (Lohmann) HAY & MOHLER, for example, is known from all oceans in the tropics, subarctic, and subantarctic. Other species, however, are more limited, and low-latitude coc- colithophore floras are more diverse than are high-latitude ones (HAsLE, 1960... huxleyi (Lohmann) HAY & MOHLER, for example, is known from all oceans in the tropics, subarctic, and subantarctic. Other species, however, are more limited, and low-latitude coc- colithophore floras are more diverse than are high-latitude ones (HAsLE, 1960...

  16. Quantum Limits of Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Stace

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of $N$ particles is shot noise limited, improving as $\\sim1/\\sqrt{N}$. For high precision thermometry and thermometric standards this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to $\\sim1/N$, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  17. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Hand, Jr, Samuel W. (Hopewell Township, Mercer County, NJ); Ksayian, Haig (Titusville, NJ)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in a tokamak fusion reactor having a midplane magnetic coil on the inner wall of an evacuated toriodal chamber within which a neutral beam heated, fusing plasma is magnetically confined, a neutral beam armor shield and plasma limiter is provided on the inner wall of the toroidal chamber to shield the midplane coil from neutral beam shine-thru and plasma deposition. The armor shield/plasma limiter forms a semicircular enclosure around the midplane coil with the outer surface of the armor shield/plasma limiter shaped to match, as closely as practical, the inner limiting magnetic flux surface of the toroidally confined, indented, bean-shaped plasma. The armor shield/plasma limiter includes a plurality of semicircular graphite plates each having a pair of coupled upper and lower sections with each plate positioned in intimate contact with an adjacent plate on each side thereof so as to form a closed, planar structure around the entire outer periphery of the circular midplane coil. The upper and lower plate sections are adapted for coupling to heat sensing thermocouples and to a circulating water conduit system for cooling the armor shield/plasma limiter.The inner center portion of each graphite plate is adapted to receive and enclose a section of a circular diagnostic magnetic flux loop so as to minimize the power from the plasma confinement chamber incident upon the flux loop.

  18. Computer News, Volume 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

  19. Computer News, Volume 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

  20. Computer News, Volume 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

  1. Computer News, Volume 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

  2. Computer News, Volume 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  3. Imaging using volume holograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Arnab, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume holograms can be thought of as self-aligned 3D stacks of diffractive elements that operate coherently on incident fields as they propagate through the structure. In this thesis, we propose, design and implement ...

  4. Limits on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraktchieva, Z; Link, O; Amsler, Claude; Avenier, M; Broggini, C; Busto, J; Cerna, C; Gervasio, G; Jeanneret, J B; Jonkmans, G; Koang, D H; Lebrun, D; Ould-Saada, F; Puglierin, G; Stutz, A; Tadsen, A; Vuilleumier, J L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MUNU experiment was carried out at the Bugey nuclear power reactor. The aim was the study of electron antineutrino-electron elastic scattering at low energy. The recoil electrons were recorded in a gas time projection chamber, immersed in a tank filled with liquid scintillator serving as veto detector, suppressing in particular Compton electrons. The measured electron recoil spectrum is presented. Upper limits on the neutrino magnetic moment were derived and are discussed.

  5. Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

  6. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  7. Ideal Quantum Gases with Planck Scale Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Collier

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermodynamic system of non-interacting quantum particles changes its statistical distribution formulas if there is a universal limitation for the size of energetic quantum leaps (magnitude of quantum leaps smaller than Planck energy). By means of a restriction of the a priori equiprobability postulate one can reach a thermodynamic foundation of these corrected distribution formulas. The number of microstates is determined by means of a suitable counting method and combined with thermodynamics via the Boltzmann principle. The result is that, for particle energies that come close to the Planck energy, the thermodynamic difference between fermion and boson distribution vanishes. Both distributions then approximate a Boltzmann distribution. The wave and particle character of the quantum particles, too, can be influenced by choosing the size of the temperature and particle energy parameters relative to the Planck energy, as you can see from the associated fluctuation formulas. In the case of non-relativistic degeneration, the critical parameters Fermi momentum (fermions) and Einstein temperature (bosons) vanish as soon as the rest energy of the quantum particles reaches the Planck energy. For the Bose-Einstein condensation there exists, in the condensation range, a finite upper limit for the number of particles in the ground state, which is determined by the ratio of Planck mass to the rest mass of the quantum particles. In the relativistic high-temperature range, the energy densities of photon and neutrino radiation have finite limit values, which is of interest with regard to the start of cosmic expansion.

  8. Radionuclide limits for vault disposal at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is developing a facility called the E-Area Vaults which will serve as the new radioactive waste disposal facility beginning early in 1992. The facility will employ engineered below-grade concrete vaults for disposal and above-grade storage for certain long-lived mobile radionuclides. This report documents the determination of interim upper limits for radionuclide inventories and concentrations which should be allowed in the disposal structures. The work presented here will aid in the development of both waste acceptance criteria and operating limits for the E-Area Vaults. Disposal limits for forty isotopes which comprise the SRS waste streams were determined. The limits are based on total facility and vault inventories for those radionuclides which impact groundwater, and or waste package concentrations for those radionuclides which could affect intruders.

  9. Viability Assessment Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs associated with three VA design options, as described in Volume 2. These costs are provided for information and are not compiled into the integrated cost summary.

  10. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  11. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  12. Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Christi Lynn

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly annual record Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nesting activity on the upper Texas coast (UTC; defined as beaches from Sabine Pass to Matagorda Peninsula), where scientifically verifiable nesting commenced in 2002, has occurred...

  13. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  14. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  15. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant collections and field data compiled during a one and a half year period for the upper Frio River, Texas, produced a flora that comprises 78 families, 223 genera and 319 species. Vascular plants were collected ...

  16. Viability Assessment Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

  17. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  18. Geology, volcanology and geochemistry Drainage pattern and regional morphostructure at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83 Guillaume Bardin, Jean-Paul Raynal, Guy Kieffer Volcanic markers in coarse alluvium at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ....................................................103 Gérard Poupeau, Guy

  19. Publications Edited Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    of Robots with Passive Environments: Application to Force Feedback Control Ed Colgate and Neville Hogan, J. Edward Colgate Industrial Robot, 26 (5), 1999, pp 335-341 Toward Robot-Assisted VascularPublications Edited Volume Advances in Robotics, Mechatronics, and Haptic Interfaces 1993 Edited

  20. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  1. Topology-controlled volume rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gunther H; Dillard, Scott E; Carr, Hamish; Pascucci, Valerio; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type. Even when volume render- ing is applied to nonmedicalin graphics hardware. We render tubes between saddles and

  2. acute non-variceal upper: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upper layer model Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Evaluation 65 Chapter 4 OSI Upper Layer Architecture and Model: Evaluation In this chapter the...

  3. The Limits of Quintessence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.R.; Linder, Eric V.

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the simplest particle-physics scalar-field models of dynamical dark energy can be separated into distinct behaviors based on the acceleration or deceleration of the field as it evolves down its potential towards a zero minimum. We show that these models occupy narrow regions in the phase-plane of w and w', the dark energy equation-of-state and its time-derivative in units of the Hubble time. Restricting an energy scale of the dark energy microphysics limits how closely a scalar field can resemble a cosmological constant. These results, indicating a desired measurement resolution of order \\sigma(w')\\approx (1+w), define firm targets for observational tests of the physics of dark energy.

  4. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  5. Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. González; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thüring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

  6. High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Keynote Automation 2 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements · Many of the ideas in this presentation were initially jointly developed with Doug Hoffman,as we developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos

  7. Viability Assessment Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

  8. Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite-time thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite publication 17 June 1993) Analytical expressionsfor the upper bounds of power and efficiency of an internal and expensiveto compute and analyze.2If we are interestedin maximum power output or in maximum effi- ciency

  9. Far-Infrared ISO Limits on Dust Disks around Millisecond Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. W. Lazio; J. Fischer; R. S. Foster

    2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report 60 and 90 micron observations of 7 millisecond pulsars with the ISOPHOT instrument and describe our analysis procedures. No pulsars were detected, and typical (3\\sigma) upper limits are 150 mJy. We combine our results with others in the literature and use them to place constraints on the existence of protoplanetary or dust disks around millisecond pulsars.

  10. Fundamental Limits for Light Absorption and Scattering Induced by Cooperative Electromagnetic Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption and scattering of electromagnetic waves by dielectric media are of fundamental importance in many branches of physics. In this Letter we analytically derived the ultimate upper limits for the absorbed and scattered powers by any system of optical resonators in mutual interaction. We show that these bounds depend only on the geometric configuration given an incident field. We give the conditions to fullfill to reach these limits paving so a way for a rational design of optimal metamaterials.

  11. Diffusion limited cluster aggregation with irreversible flexible bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujin Babu; Jean-Christophe Gimel; Taco Nicolai

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Irreversible diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) of hard spheres was simulated using Brownian cluster dynamics. Bound spheres were allowed to move freely within a specified range, but no bond breaking was allowed. The structure and size distribution of the clusters was investigated before gelation. The pair correlation function and the static structure factor of the gels were determined as a function of the volume fraction and time. Bond flexibility led to local densification of the clusters and the gels, with a certain degree of order. At low volume fractions densification of the clusters occurred during their growth, but at higher volume fractions it occurred mainly after gelation. At very low volume fractions, the large scale structure (fractal dimension), size distribution and growth kinetics of the clusters was found to be close to that known for DLCA with rigid bonds. Restructuring of the gels continued for long times, indicating that aging processes in systems with strong attraction do not necessarily involve bond breaking. The mean square displacement of particles in the gels was determined. It is shown to be highly heterogeneous and to increase with decreasing volume fraction.

  12. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

    1985-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

  13. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  14. Upper tropospheric jet streams over North America during summer 1988

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, David Edward

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA DURING SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfuillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1991 Ma j or Sub j ect: Meteorology UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Approved as to style and Content by: Dusan Djuric (Co-Chairman) James P. McGuirk (Co...

  15. Szlenk Index, Upper Estimates, and Embedding in Banach Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Causey, Ryan Michael

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and the topology of the space. But Enflo's famous example of a Banach space failing the approximation property [8] is also a Banach space failing to have either a Schauder basis or a finite dimensional decomposition. For this reason, one often wishes to determine... subsequential U upper tree estimates, then X embeds into Y . 8 (ii) If U, V are as in Theorem 1.2, then there exists a reflexive Banach space Z with FDD F satisfying subsequential V lower and subsequential U upper block estimates in Z such that if X ? REFL...

  16. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper Hot

  17. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper

  18. MODELING THE FATE AND TRANSPORT OF ATRAZINE IN THE UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Allan

    for agrochemicals in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, hydrodynamic model, atrazine, photolysis

  19. Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA NOAA is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content information and the upper ocean response. Upper oceanic energy decreases in these metrics are shown to persist

  20. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 1019 from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Henrique

    .S. Gold bx , F. Gomez Albarracin e , M. Go´mez Berisso a , R. Go´mez Herrero bd , M. Gonc¸alves do Amaral

  1. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009–2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J.

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the Universe that is ...

  2. Fermi-LAT Upper Limit for NGC 4151 and its Implications for Physics of Hot Accretion Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojaczynski, Rafal; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results of our analysis of the {\\it Fermi}-LAT data from the direction of NGC 4151. We find a new gamma-ray source with a statistical significance sigma > 5, shifted by 0.5degr from the position of NGC 4151. Apparently, the source was bright only during a 1.5-year period between December 2011 and June 2013 and it strongly contaminated the signal from NGC 4151. Therefore, we neglect this period in our analysis. We find two additional, persistent gamma-ray sources with high sigma, shifted from NGC 4151 by ~1.5degr and 5degr, whose presence has been recently confirmed in the Third Fermi Catalog. After subtracting the above sources, we still see a weak residual, with sigma ~processes in hot flows as well as the...

  3. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600–1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for ...

  4. Lokaratna, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muthukumarswamy and his colleagues of NFSC, Chennai to support this volume to be published in their web site for a global readership. On behalf of Folklore Foundation, Odisha Bhubaneswar , I wish a Happy and prosperous new Year 2012... (b)ali-B?eli,5 mythical Great Ancestress of the Kondhs and, at one time, a human manifestation of the earth goddess ? originally choose to manifest herself to man in her tiger form; after she had assumed such form, she killed a large quantity of game animals...

  5. FY 2005 Volume 4

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science

  6. FY 2005 Volume 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science6

  7. FY 2005 Volume 6

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science67

  8. FY 2005 Volume 7

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4

  9. Volume One Disc Two

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -Visualizing Brain Metals inVolume-One-Disc-Two

  10. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  11. Transdichotomous algorithms without multiplication some upper and lower bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodnik, Andrej "Andy"

    Trans­dichotomous algorithms without multiplication ­ some upper and lower bounds Andrej Brodnik 1 that on a RAM with addition, subtraction, bitwise Boolean operations and shifts, but no multiplication; 1g w of w­bit bit strings (or numbers between 0 and 2 w \\Gamma 1). An increasingly popular

  12. Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Annual Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour Aug. 31 ­ Sept. 2, 2010 #12;Tuesday Dept. of Ag & Biological Engineering 9:30 a.m. Horizon Wind Energy Farm ­ (Construction vs. Finished Phases) http://www.horizonwind.com/home/ Gary Freymiller, WISER & Peter Park, Horizon Wind Energy 11:00 a

  13. Tracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    of humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic, and impact of an animation or virtual environment the dynamics of the animated character. Figure 1 shows a human actor and two animated characters tracking hisTracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data with Dynamic Simulation Victor B. Zordan

  14. Detection of upper mantle flow associated with the African Superplume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    with warm, less dense material, the African seismic anomaly has been ascribed to a long-lived thermal upwelling from the lower mantle. Such a large-scale upwelling should also affect the regional horizontal flow field in the upper mantle. To test this model, we compare seismic anisotropy inferred from shear-wave

  15. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Acupuncture for Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation in Chronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaechter, Judith D.

    , and improvement trends in UE motor function (P .09) and digit ROM (P .06). Conclusions: Based on ITT analyses, we Sham-Controlled Study Peter M. Wayne, PhD, David E. Krebs, PhD, Eric A. Macklin, PhD, Rosa Schnyer, Lic. Acupuncture for upper- extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke: a randomized sham- controlled study. Arch

  17. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a series of micro-basins that function similarly to a multi-reservoir river system for water management arrangements for water management, and integration of geospatial information into "sustainability scenariosSimulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River

  18. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  19. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  20. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the floras of North Central Texas, Madison County, Robertson County and the La Copita Research Area. A total of 9 species endemic to Texas were collected along the upper Frio River. Throughout the northern portion of the study area there is exposed bedrock...

  1. LIMITS OF Nb3Sn ACCELERATOR MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pushing accelerator magnets beyond 10 T holds a promise of future upgrades to machines like the Tevatron at Fermilab and the LHC at CERN. Exceeding the current density limits of NbTi superconductor, Nb{sub 3}Sn is at present the only practical superconductor capable of generating fields beyond 10 T. Several Nb{sub 3}Sn pilot magnets, with fields as high as 16 T, have been built and tested, paving the way for future attempts at fields approaching 20 T. High current density conductor is required to generate high fields with reduced conductor volume. However this significantly increases the Lorentz force and stress. Future designs of coils and structures will require managing stresses of several 100's of MPa and forces of 10's of MN/m. The combined engineering requirements on size and cost of accelerator magnets will involve magnet technology that diverges from the one currently used with NbTi conductor. In this paper we shall address how far the engineering of high field magnets can be pushed, and what are the issues and limitations before such magnets can be used in particle accelerators.

  2. Petroleum geology of Carter sandstone (upper Mississippian), Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of combination petroleum traps makes the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama an attractive area for continued hydrocarbon exploration. More than 1,500 wells have been drilled, and more than 90 separate petroleum pools have been discovered. The primary hydrocarbon reservoirs are Upper Mississippian sandstones. The Carter sandstone is the most productive petroleum reservoir in the basin. Productivity of the Carter sandstone is directly related to its environment of deposition. The Carter accumulated within a high constructive elongate to lobate delta, which prograded into the basin from the northwest to the southeast. Carter bar-finger and distal-bar lithofacies constitute the primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. Primary porosity in the Carter sandstone has been reduced by quartz overgrowths and calcite cementation. Petroleum traps in the Carter sandstone in central Fayette and Lamar Counties, Alabama, are primarily stratigraphic and combination (structural-stratigraphic) traps. The potential is excellent for future development of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone. Frontier regions south and east of the known productive limits of the Black Warrior basin are ideal areas for continued exploration.

  3. On Issues of Precision for Hardware-based Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E C

    2003-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses issues with the limited precision of hardware-based volume visualization. We will describe the compositing OVER operator and how fixed-point arithmetic affects it. We propose two techniques to improve the precision of fixed-point compositing and the accuracy of hardware-based volume visualization. The first technique is to perform dithering of color and alpha values. The second technique we call exponent-factoring, and captures significantly more numeric resolution than dithering, but can only produce monochromatic images.

  4. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 1: Deep Convective Updraft Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, A. C.; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Collis, Scott M.; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Snow reflectivity can exceed 40 dBZ in a two-moment scheme when a constant bulk density of 100 kg m-3 is used. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to area rather than volume should somewhat alleviate this problem. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations. This is associated with large amounts of liquid water above the freezing level in updraft cores. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of large rainwater contents lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. Strong simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted, with some showing supercell characteristics. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 meters to 100 meters weakens strong updrafts, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may partly be a product of interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and large-scale environmental biases that promote different convective modes and strengths than observed.

  5. An insoluble residue study of the upper Walnut Formation, Comanche Peak Limestone, and Edwards Limestone, Bosque and western McLennan counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jimmie Darrell

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R' ERECERICKSBURG CROUP I &AHKH&HHwAT VVVVVV VvVV LINE AA' NORTHERN LIMIT OF CHERT LINE BBI SOUTHERN LIMIT OF KIAMICHI LINE CC' SOUTHERN LIMIT OF BIOHERMS SCALE WI IAIISOR' 25 50 . . : ~ :. ;: 0 GEORGETONN C ~ , ', 'T CI MILES Fig. 2... x Main Street Pawpaw Weno Denton Fort Worth Duck Creek Kiamichi 0-15& Edwards 15'-125' Comanche Peak 70'-125' Upper Marl Member Walnut 125'-175' Paluxy 0-25' g 5 Glen Rose Fig. 3. Columnar section of Early Cretaceous formation...

  6. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

  7. The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing Simona Ginsburg route for the transition from sensory processing to unlimited experiencing, or basic consciousness. We the transition. We believe that the raw mate- rial from which feelings were molded by natural selection

  8. Limit theory for overfit models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Grayson Ford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Asymptotic Theory and Main Results . . . . . . . . .Chapter 2 Limit theory for comparing over?t models out-of-

  9. Limits to the power density of very large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishino, Takafumi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

  10. New limits on extragalactic magnetic fields from rotation measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pshirkov, Maxim S; Urban, Federico R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NVSS catalogue to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-$\\alpha$ clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from low-luminosity distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Mpc coherence length to be below 1.2 nG at the $2\\sigma$ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.5 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  11. Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

  12. Upper Bound on Fidelity of Classical Sagnac Gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous quantum mechanical schemes have been proposed that are intended to improve the sensitivity to rotation provided by the classical Sagnac effect in gyroscopes. A general metric is needed that can compare the performance of the new quantum systems with the classical systems. The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between the measurement and the rotation rate) is proposed as a metric that is capable of this comparison. A theoretical upper bound is derived for the fidelity of an ideal classical Sagnac gyroscope. This upper bound for the classical Sagnac gyroscope should be used as a benchmark to compare the performance of proposed enhanced classical and quantum rotation sensors. In fact, the fidelity is general enough to compare the quality of two different apparatuses (two different experiments) that attempt to measure the same quantity.

  13. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  14. Performance Limits for Cherenkov Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hofmann

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Cherenkov instruments for the detection of very high energy gamma rays is ultimately limited by the fluctuations in the development of air showers. With particular emphasis on the angular resolution, the ultimate performance limits are investigated on the basis of simulations.

  15. Congressional Request Limiting the Magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as goals? Target: limit U.S. GHG emissions (e.g., national emission budget, or percent reduction) What is a reasonable share of U.S. emission reductions relative to the global targets? What is the implied emissions on atmospheric GHG concentrations? Target: limit atmospheric GHG concentrations (e.g., 450, 550 ppm CO2,eq) How

  16. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects and the Penile Bulb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nam, Jiho [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gagliardi, Giovanna [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); El Naqa, Issam; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose, volume, and clinical outcome data for penile bulb are reviewed for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy. Most, but not all, studies find an association between impotence and dosimetric parameters (e.g., threshold doses) and clinical factors (e.g., age, comorbid diseases). According to the data available, it is prudent to keep the mean dose to 95% of the penile bulb volume to <50 Gy. It may also be prudent to limit the D70 and D90 to 70 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively, but coverage of the planning target volume should not be compromised. It is acknowledged that the penile bulb may not be the critical component of the erectile apparatus, but it seems to be a surrogate for yet to be determined structure(s) critical for erectile function for at least some techniques.

  17. Diversity in the upper management of leading Texas contractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Anne Nicole

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission the power to go to the courts for implementation of the laws. The 1972 act extended an individual's right to sue in private actions to the right to sue against state and local governments as well. Previously, in 1963, the Equal Pay Act of 1963..., prejudice plus power, and discrimination (2000). It is upper management's responsibility to ensure that their company is diversified. "CEOs must be proactive [in] initiating and taking on the challenges inherent in managing a diverse workforce" (Work...

  18. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  19. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlawitschka, Mario

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ller. Volumeshop: o Interactive direct volume illustration.Kin04] [KKW05] [KTW06] Interactive Volume Rendering of Di?magic volume lens: An interactive focus+context technique

  20. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

  1. Upper critical fields and two-band superconductivity in Sr1-xEux(Fe0.89Co0.11)?As? (x=0.20 and 0.46)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Rongwei; Mun, Eun Deok; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Zapf, V. S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper critical fields Hc2(T) of single crystals of Sr1-xEux(Fe?.??Co?.??)?As? (x=0.20 and 0.46) were determined by radio-frequency penetration depth measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. Hc2(T) approaches the Pauli limiting field but shows an upward curvature with an enhancement from the orbital limited field, as inferred from the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory. We discuss the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields and the decreasing anisotropy using a two-band BCS model.

  2. Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    interventions ­at the upper division. Keywords: physics education research, course reform, electricityCognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock and Stephanie V. Chasteen* * Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA Department

  3. Proc. IODP | Volume 301 doi:10.2204/iodp.proc.301.101.2005 Fisher, A.T., Urabe, T., Klaus, A., and the Expedition 301 Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    penetrating the upper oceanic crust and established two new observatories penetrating to depths as great., and the Expedition 301 Scientists Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, Volume 301 Abstract Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 301 to the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

  4. Upper Adjoints for Fast Interprocedural Variable Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Upper Adjoints for Fast Inter­procedural Variable Equalities Markus MË?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl

  5. SECTION 34 Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan..............................................................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and formation of the Subbasin Work Teams and the process used to develop and adopt the management plan can34-1 SECTION 34 ­ Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan .........................................................................25 #12;34-2 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan The Upper Columbia Subbasin Management Plan

  6. Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 2 Upper Digestive Tract Anatomy Esophagus: A long muscular tube in the chest area occurs in the duodenum. Upper Digestive Disorders Reflux with Esophagitis: The flowing back (or reflux

  7. CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND MIXING.S. Geological Survey #12;CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE.H., Schemel, L.E., 2007, Chemical and hydrologic data form the Cement Creek and upper Animas River confluence

  8. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  9. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander n and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block­diagonalising the Terwilliger alge­ bra, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  10. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block-diagonalising the Terwilliger alge- bra of the Hamming, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  11. Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult task of neurophysiology Clinical signs of upper motor neuron involvement are an essential observation to support the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral scler- osis. However, clinical signs of upper motor neuron can be difficult

  12. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  13. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  14. REORIENTAO Ensino Mdio -Volume I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    REORIENTAÇÃO CURRICULAR PORTUGUÊS Ensino Médio - Volume I Materiais Didáticos #12;#12;GOVERNO DO SUBSECRETARIA ADJUNTA DE PLANEJAMENTO PEDAGÓGICO Alba Rodrigues Cruz #12;#12;GOVERNO DO ESTADO DO RIO DE JANEIRO

  15. Mima mound grasslands of the upper coastal prairie of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Arlene Camille

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21 28 31 34 44 47 49 52 55 57 71 74 76 79 87 94 LlST OF TABLES Table Physical and chemical soil characteristics for topographic variations within 3 soil complexes of the upper Coastal Prairie, Texas Page 27 Average absolute... ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O O 8 z z O V) CO iU CC LU O D IZ 31 The landscape had less slope than on Aris-like stands. Intermounds on Crowley/Edna-like soils appear nearly level. Results of physical and chemical analysis were very similar to Aris-like soils...

  16. Biostratigraphy of the upper cretaceous Austin Group, Travis County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William Maurice

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation is on the San Gabriel River at the Jonah-Hutto roadcrossing in Williamson County. At the type locality, the upper 35 feet of the Jonah is exposed; the lower 50 feet is exposed two-thirds of a mile upstream. 1he Jonah Formation ranges fr om 120... Forma- tion at Vinson Creek is 25 feet thick and the limestone beds are skeletal packstones. The thinning of the Jonah Formation is caused by the positive influence of the San Marcos Arch during deposition. 20 The contact between the Jonah Formation...

  17. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home StationaryUpper Rio Grande

  18. Upper Arlington, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper Arlington,

  19. Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper

  20. Liquidus temperature limited waste loading maximization for vitrified HLW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, P.; Vienna, J.D.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquidus temperature often limits the loading of vitrified high-level waste in the glass. For spinel primary crystallization phase, the maximum achievable waste loading is determined analytically using first-order models, and then calculated for a Hanford nominal blend waste. The results show that the glass volume can be reduced if the glass melting temperature is not constrained and no restrictions are imposed on minimum B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and U{sub 2}O concentrations in the glass.

  1. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors.; ,

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  2. Tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer demonstration sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) is the primary document describing field and laboratory activities and requirements for the tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer (CP) demonstration. It is written in accordance with Hanford Tank Initiative Tank 241-AX-104 Upper Vadose Zone Demonstration Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999). This technology demonstration, to be conducted at tank 241-AX-104, is being performed by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) Project as a part of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Program (EM-30) and the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) Tanks Focus Area. Sample results obtained as part of this demonstration will provide additional information for subsequent revisions to the Retrieval Performance Evaluation (RPE) report (Jacobs 1998). The RPE Report is the result of an evaluation of a single tank farm (AX Tank Farm) used as the basis for demonstrating a methodology for developing the data and analyses necessary to support making tank waste retrieval decisions within the context of tank farm closure requirements. The RPE includes a study of vadose zone contaminant transport mechanisms, including analysis of projected tank leak characteristics, hydrogeologic characteristics of tank farm soils, and the observed distribution of contaminants in the vadose zone in the tank farms. With limited characterization information available, large uncertainties exist as to the nature and extent of contaminants that may exist in the upper vadose zone in the AX Tank Farm. Traditionally, data has been collected from soils in the vadose zone through the installation of boreholes and wells. Soil samples are collected as the bore hole is advanced and samples are screened on site and/or sent to a laboratory for analysis. Some in-situ geophysical methods of contaminant analysis can be used to evaluate radionuclide levels in the soils adjacent to an existing borehole. However, geophysical methods require compensation for well casing interference and soil moisture content and may not be successful in some conditions. In some cases the level of interference must be estimated due to uncertainties regarding the materials used in well construction and soil conditions, Well casing deployment used for many in-situ geophysical methods is relatively expensive and geophysical methods do not generally provide real time values for contaminants. In addition, some of these methods are not practical within the boundaries of the tank farm due to physical constraints, such as underground piping and other hardware. The CP technologies could facilitate future characterization of vadose zone soils by providing vadose zone data in near real-time, reducing the number of soil samples and boreholes required, and reducing characterization costs.

  3. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  4. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  5. Volume-Duration-Frequencies for Ungaged Catchments in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devulapalli, Ravi S.; Valdes, Juan B.

    of individual phases, consists of two volumes. Volume I (titled Volume-Duration-Frequencies for Ungaged Catchments in Texas: Calculation of Regional Regression Equations) presents the regional regression equations developed, while Volume II (titled Volume...

  6. Page 1 of 14 UNSW Foundation Limited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    , Coca-Cola Amatil Limited and Ingeus Limited. David is Chairman of the National E-Health Transition

  7. Volume scaling of Dirac eigenvalues in SU(3) lattice gauge theory with color sextet fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I observe a rough volume-dependent scaling of the low eigenvalues of a chiral Dirac operator in lattice studies of SU(3) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of color sextet fermions, in its weak-coupling phase. The mean value of the ith eigenvalue scales with the simulation volume V=L^4 as L^p ~zeta_i, where zeta_i is a volume-independent constant. The exponent p is about 1.4. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that p is the leading relevant exponent associated with the fermion mass dependence of correlation functions in a theory whose zero-mass limit is conformal.

  8. IV CESPC, August 21 -25, 2011, Zlatibor, Serbia LIMITATIONS OF NOX REMOVAL BY PULSED CORONA REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Ute

    IV CESPC, August 21 - 25, 2011, Zlatibor, Serbia 37 LIMITATIONS OF NOX REMOVAL BY PULSED CORONA depends on the deposited energy. There are presently only a few papers investigating this problem [1 volume of 322 L. It is powered by pulses of 80 kV with 15 ns rise time, 150 ns width (power) and energy

  9. Upper bound on the cutoff in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veselov, A I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this presentation is to point out that the Upper bound on the cutoff in lattice Electroweak theory is still unknown. The consideration of the continuum theory is based on the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum. The internal structure of the lattice Weinberg - Salam model may appear to be more complicated especially in the region of the phase diagram close to the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase of the lattice model, where the continuum physics is to be approached. We represent the results of our numerical investigation of the quenched model at infinite bare scalar self coupling $\\lambda$. These results demonstrate that at $\\lambda = \\infty$ the upper bound on the cutoff is around $\\frac{\\pi}{a} = 1.4$ Tev. The preliminary results for finite $\\lambda$ are also presented. Basing on these results we cannot yet make a definite conclusion on the maximal value of the cutoff admitted in the lattice model, although we have found that ...

  10. Scattering resonances as viscosity limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Zworski

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the method of complex scaling we show that scattering resonances of $ - \\Delta + V $, $ V \\in L^\\infty_{\\rm{c}} ( \\mathbb R^n ) $, are limits of eigenvalues of $ - \\Delta + V - i \\epsilon x^2 $ as $ \\epsilon \\to 0+ $. That justifies a method proposed in computational chemistry and reflects a general principle for resonances in other settings.

  11. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 [times] 10[sup 5]pc[sup [minus]3]yr[sup [minus]1] at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  12. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 {times} 10{sup 5}pc{sup {minus}3}yr{sup {minus}1} at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  13. Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

  14. Split-Volume Treatment Planning of Multiple Consecutive Vertebral Body Metastases for Cyberknife Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)], E-mail: arjunsahgal@yahoo.com; Chuang, Cynthia; Larson, David; Huang, Kim; Petti, Paula [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinstein, Phil [Department of Neurologic Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyberknife treatment planning of multiple consecutive vertebral body metastases is challenging due to large target volumes adjacent to critical normal tissues. A split-volume treatment planning technique was developed to improve the treatment plan quality of such lesions. Treatment plans were generated for 1 to 5 consecutive thoracic vertebral bodies (CVBM) prescribing a total dose of 24 Gy in 3 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of the entire vertebral body(ies). Treatment plans were generated considering both the de novo clinical scenario (no prior radiation), imposing a dose limit of 8 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord, and the retreatment scenario (prior radiation) with a dose limit of 3 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord. The split-volume planning technique was compared with the standard full-volume technique only for targets ranging from 2 to 5 CVBM in length. The primary endpoint was to obtain best PTV coverage by the 24 Gy prescription isodose line. A total of 18 treatment plans were generated (10 standard and 8 split-volume). PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line worsened consistently as the number of CVBM increased for both the de novo and retreatment scenario. Split-volume planning was achieved by introducing a 0.5-cm gap, splitting the standard full-volume PTV into 2 equal length PTVs. In every case, split-volume planning resulted in improved PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line ranging from 4% to 12% for the de novo scenario and, 8% to 17% for the retreatment scenario. We did not observe a significant trend for increased monitor units required, or higher doses to spinal cord or esophagus, with split-volume planning. Split-volume treatment planning significantly improves Cyberknife treatment plan quality for CVBM, as compared to the standard technique. This technique may be of particular importance in clinical situations where stringent spinal cord dose limits are required.

  15. Modification and final alignment of the TFTR bumper limiter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSmith, M.D. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MO (United States); Loesser, G.D.; Owens, D.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past three Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel machine openings, an extensive effort was undertaken to optimize the distribution of heating of the bumper limiter tiles. The optimization was achieved by locating the limiter tiles relative to the toroidal magnetic field and adjusting their position relative to the magnetic field rather than to fixed points in the vacuum vessel walls. This paper will discuss the results of these alignments as measured during operation with the limiter thermocouple system and subsequent visual inspection during this past TFTR vacuum vessel opening. During the most recent in-vessel inspection (January 1993), damage to the top and bottom rows of the bumper limiter tiles was noted. More tiles were damaged on the lower row than the upper row. Tiles on the right side of the bottom row and to a lesser extent tiles on the left side of the top row were damaged. The location of the damage corresponds to the plasma power flux direction. Theories explaining the asymmetric damage (bottom versus top) are summarized. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPL) began a program to replace 223 of the originally installed tiles made from POCO AFX-5Q graphite. Of these 223 tiles, 151 were replaced with tiles made from carbon-fiber-composite (CFC) and 158 of these tiles were re-designed for installation on the top or bottom rows. The re-designed tiles have a tapered edge that reduces the angle of incidence of the power flux on the edge surface that was over-heating. This paper will review the in-vessel work and discuss the final modification of the TFTR bumper limiter to alleviate further damage at these locations prior to DT operation of TFTR.

  16. Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

  17. aeroacoustics volume 9 number 3 2010 pages 273305 273 Extensions and limitations of analytical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    technologies, such as cooling fans, wind turbines and turbofan engine blade rows. However meeting this need generated due to the formation of a coherent vortex shedding in the near wake of a thick trailing edge as sound at a trailing edge (trailing-edge noise), and the vortex shedding in the near wake of a blunt

  18. Volume 195, number 4 PHYSICS LETTERS B 17 September 1987 LIMITS ON COLD DARK MATTER CANDIDATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    'weakSd"corresponds to a standard heavy Majorana neutrino). The measurement of the nuclear recoil, due to the scattering of heavy Laboratory, Rtchland, WA 99352, USA a Harvard-Smtthsoman Centerfor Astrophysws, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA e particles. In particular, a halo dominated by heavy standard Dirac neutrinos (taken as an example

  19. Which BPS baryons minimize volume?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

  20. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A. (Tracy, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Willeke, Klaus (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  1. The Volume Fraction of Ionized Intergalactic Gas at Redshift z=6.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangeeta Malhotra; James Rhoads

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed number density of Lyman-alpha sources implies a minimum volume of the inter-galactic medium that must be ionized, in order to allow the Lyman-alpha photons to escape attenuation. We estimate this volume by assigning to each Lyman-alpha emitter the minimum Stromgren sphere that would allow half its Lyman-alpha photons to escape. This implies a lower limit to ionized gas volume fraction of 20-50% at redshift z=6.5. This is a lower limit in two ways: First, we conservatively assume that the Lyman-alpha sources seen (at a relatively bright flux limit) are the only ones present; and second, we assume the smallest Stromgren sphere volume that will allow the photons to escape. This limit is completely independent of what ionizing photon sources produced the bubbles. Deeper Lyman-alpha surveys are possible with present technology, and can strengthen these limits by detecting a higher density of Lyman-alpha galaxies.

  2. Thermodynamic Limits of Solar Cells with Non-ideal Optical Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, M Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shockley-Queisser (S-Q) theory defines the thermodynamic upper limits for Jsc, Voc, FF, and efficiency of a solar cell. The classical calculation assumes an abrupt onset of absorption at the band-edge, perfect absorption for all energies above the bandgap, and absence of non-radiative recombination. These assumptions are never satisfied for any practical solar cell. In this paper, we explain how the S-Q limits are redefined in the presence of the non-ideal optical effects, and we provide closed-form analytical expressions for the new limits for Jsc, Voc, and FF. Remarkably, these new limits can be achieved to a very high degree, even with significantly imperfect materials.

  3. Thermodynamic Limits of Solar Cells with Non-ideal Optical Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ryyan Khan; Peter Bermel; Muhammad A. Alam

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shockley-Queisser (S-Q) theory defines the thermodynamic upper limits for Jsc, Voc, FF, and efficiency of a solar cell. The classical calculation assumes an abrupt onset of absorption at the band-edge, perfect absorption for all energies above the bandgap, and absence of non-radiative recombination. These assumptions are never satisfied for any practical solar cell. In this paper, we explain how the S-Q limits are redefined in the presence of the non-ideal optical effects, and we provide closed-form analytical expressions for the new limits for Jsc, Voc, and FF. Remarkably, these new limits can be achieved to a very high degree, even with significantly imperfect materials.

  4. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  5. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Nils B. Becker; Thomas E. Ouldridge; A. Mugler

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.

  6. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  7. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for...

  8. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  9. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  10. Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information Associative Learning Enhances Population Coding colored dot denotes the mean response for two neurons to each of four stimuli. Each colored ellipse) For a positive relationship, neuron pairs with positive signal correlation and large noise correlation have

  11. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

  12. Klee-Minty's LP and Upper Bounds for Dantzig's Simplex Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomonari Kitahara

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 4, 2011 ... Klee-Minty's LP and Upper Bounds for Dantzig's Simplex Method. Tomonari ... Citation: This article will appear in Operations Research Letters.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic upper critical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media Summary: upper mantle. We calculated the synthetics for a series of laterally...

  14. Determining finite volume elements for the 2D Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.A. (California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics); Titi, E.S. (California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Mathematical Sciences Inst.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the 2D Navier-Stokes equations on a square with periodic boundary conditions. Dividing the square into N equal subsquares, we show that if the asymptotic behavior of the average of solutions on these subsquares (finite volume elements) is known, then the large time behavior of the solution itself is completely determined, provided N is large enough. We also establish a rigorous upper bound for N needed to determine the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation in terms of the physical parameters of the problem. 34 refs.

  15. Arnold Schwarzenegger HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL Prepared-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL EISG AWARDEE InterPhases Research 166 N. Moorpark Rd. Suite 204

  16. MINIMAL VOLUME Laurent BESSI`ERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remy, Bertrand

    MINIMAL VOLUME by Laurent BESSI`ERES Abstract. -- The aim of this text is to explain some rigidity manifold, simplicial volume, global topological meth- ods (`a la Gromov). #12;2 LAURENT BESSI`ERES 1

  17. Gradient limits and SCRF performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Pellin, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting rf gradients are limited by a number of mechanisms, among them are field emission, multipactor, Lorentz detuning, global and local heating, quench fields, Q-Slope, assembly defects, and overall power use. We describe how each of these mechanisms interacts with the cavity fields and show how significant improvements may be possible assuming improvements in control over the cavity surface. New techniques such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), the use of layered composites, Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) smoothing and Dry Ice Cleaning (DIC) have been proposed as ways to control the surface.

  18. Dose Limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonna Friend Donna FriendLimits

  19. Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th DayANVAblamp Limited Jump

  20. Novacem Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural PubNova AlincaNovacem Limited

  1. Bioethanol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons Biomass FacilityBioethanol Limited

  2. Lysanda Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme, NewLyonLysanda Limited

  3. Stratigraphic cyclicity and reservoir heterogeneity within upper San Andres and Grayburg strata (upper Permian-Guadalupian), Maljamar field, Se New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modica, Christopher James

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of upper San Andres strata. Cavernous porosity was later plugged with massive anhydrite, resulting in the degradation of reservoir quality. In the overlying Grayburg Formation, cycles consist of mixed sandstone and shallowwater carbonate facies...

  4. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  5. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

  6. Seismic Tomography Of Pg And Sg/lg And Its Use For Average Upper Crust Structure In Eurasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steck, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, W Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, M L [MSU

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic inversion oftravel times from first arriving compressional and shear waves for velocity structure has been applied with great success at all length scales, ranging from the laboratory bench-top to the entire Earth. Inversion of later arriving phases has seen a much more limited application. In this paper we present inversion results for regional Pg and Sg for the Eurasian continent to explore its use for understanding average upper crustal velocity structure. Inversion is performed using a damped, smoothed LSQR implementation that solves for site and event terms as well as for velocity along great circle paths between the source and receiver. Results are broadly consistent with published upper crustal velocities for the region. A spotcomparison of Vp/Vs from local and regional studies also compares well with the ratio of observed Pg to Sg velocities from our study where resolution is high. Resolution is determined through the use of checkerboard tests, and these suggest that in regions where data density is high we can resolve features down to at least 2 deg, with 4 deg possible over broader areas. RMS residual reductions are on the order of25% for Sg and 30% for Pg.

  7. Thermionic converters for an Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, W.G.; Horner-Richardson, K. [Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bimodal system which combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A thermionic converter was designed and fabricated for the ISUS system. The ISUS thermionic energy converters differ from previous designs, due to the significant changes in operating temperature prior to and during an eclipse, with the emitter temperature increasing from 1,900 K to 2,200 K, and then back again. A complete thermal and electrical model was developed for a planar diode to determine optimum operating dimensions and parameters. The model includes an overall energy balance for the diode, and changes the interelectrode gap spacing due to thermal expansion of the parts as the emitter and/or collector temperatures change. Cesium pressure can be chosen from an external liquid reservoir, an integral reservoir using cesium intercalated into graphite attached to the collector heat pipe, or optimum cesium pressure. With optimum cesium pressure, the maximum efficiency increases from 14% to 16% as the emitter temperature increases from 1,900 K to 2,200 K. The improvement in efficiency is only 2% as the emitter temperature is increased. Optimum efficiency requires an external, actively controlled liquid reservoir.

  8. Bitumen accumulation in Grosmont platform complex, Upper Devonian, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, C.F.; Strausz, O.P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation, a broad carbonate platform complex in Alberta, Canada, contains an estimated 300 billion bbl of bitumen. It has been suggested that these vast reserves are related to Lower Cretaceous Athabasca oil sands. Detailed gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric studies of a wide range of biologic marker compounds confirm this suggestion. The Grosmont Formation contains bitumen of similar maturity and source to the Athabasca deposit, but it has been subjected to a greater degree of biodegradation and water washing, possibly as a result of its reservoir rock characteristics. The difference in the degree of biodegradation is manifested by the absence of bicyclic terpanes and by the reduced concentrations of the C/sub 30/ and the 22R epimers of the extended hopanes in the Grosmont bitumen. Also, the greater degree of water washing of the Grosmont bitumen is inferred from the observed distribution of the bicyclic, tricyclic, and tetracyclic terpenoid sulfides, which shows a characteristic loss of the lower molecular weight members in the carbonate bitumen. The correlation established here between the two deposits suggests that if the precursor oil has indeed undergone long-distance migration, the Paleozoic carbonates could have acted as a path for migration. Finally, the observed distribution of steranes in the Grosmont bitumen corresponds to the suggestion that the Mannville Group shales were not the major source rocks of the oil-sand and carbonate bitumen accumulations of northern Alberta. 11 figures, 6 tables.

  9. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  10. Permissible loadings of generators and large motors. Facilities instructions, standards, and techniques. Volume 1-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, H.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is intended to fill the need for practical information concerning the temperature and mechanical and electrical overload limits of rotating electric equipment such as generators and large motors. Rotating electrical equipment cannot be overloaded on the same basis as transformers and is not as able to stand short-time overloads.

  11. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, R.L. [ed.

    1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  14. Physics of the Shannon Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple physical interpretation, in the context of the second law of thermodynamics, to the information inequality (a.k.a. the Gibbs' inequality, which is also equivalent to the log-sum inequality), asserting that the relative entropy between two probability distributions cannot be negative. Since this inequality stands at the basis of the data processing theorem (DPT), and the DPT in turn is at the heart of most, if not all, proofs of converse theorems in Shannon theory, it is observed that conceptually, the roots of fundamental limits of Information Theory can actually be attributed to the laws of physics, in particular, to the second law of thermodynamics, and at least indirectly, also to the law of energy conservation. By the same token, in the other direction: one can view the second law as stemming from information-theoretic principles.

  15. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  16. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  17. Limits to the lunar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, T.H. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C. (USA)); Shemansky, D.E. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of sodium and potassium on the Moon implies that other more abundant species should be present. Volatile molecules like H{sub 2}O are significantly more abundant than sodium in any of the proposed external atmospheric sources. Source mechanisms which derive atoms from the surface should favor abundant elements in the regolith. It is therefore puzzling that the Apollo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment set limits on the density of oxygen of N{sub O} < 5 {times} 10{sup 2} cm{sup {minus}3}, and that the Apollo Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment data imply N{sub O} < 50 cm{sup {minus}3} above the subsolar point. These limits are surprisingly small relative to the measured value for sodium. A simple consideration of sources and sinks predicts significantly greater densities of oxygen. It is possible but doubtful that the Apollo measurements occur ed during an epoch in which source rates were small. A preferential loss process for oxygen on the darkside of the Moon is considered in which ionization by electron capture in surface collisions leads to escape through acceleration in the local electric field. Cold trapping in permanently shadowed regions as a net sink is considered and discounted, but the episodic nature of cometary insertion may allow formation of ice layers which act as a stablized source of OH. On the basis of an assumed meteoroid impact source, the authors predict a possible emission brightness of {approximately} 50 R in the OH(A {minus} X)(0,0) band above the lunar bright limb. A very uncertain small comet source of H{sub 2}O could raise this value by more than two orders of magnitude.

  18. Opportunistic Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Upper Bounds for the Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mans, Bernard

    routing, in a realistic network model where link conditions are variable. We analyze the performance1 Opportunistic Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Upper Bounds for the Packet Propagation Speed to the destination. In this paper, we provide upper bounds on the packet propaga- tion speed for opportunistic

  19. Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere Piers M. Forster lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and elucidate the key role of ozone changes in driving of tropical ozone decreases at 70 hPa and lower pressures can lead to significant cooling not only

  20. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  1. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  2. Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism Rachel E. Pepper, Stephanie V. Chasteen, Steven J. Pollock, and Katherine K. Perkins Science Education 2011; published 27 March 2012) We discuss common difficulties in upper-division electricity

  3. Earth Planets Space, 64, 113120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Earth Planets Space, 64, 113­120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical E to the ionosphere providing momentum and energy transfer to the upper layers of the ionospheric plasma. While dependence rather closely follow the Chapman model (Gurnett et al., 2008; Morgan et al., 2008; Withers, 2009

  4. Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean;Abstract Processes which control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equa- torial Pacific forcing data have indicated that the thick isothermal layer in the western equatorial Pacific is found

  5. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  6. Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics Christopher M describe the development and implementation of a Studio Optics course for upper-division physics majors course in optics at the junior-senior and first year graduate student level that incorporates the methods

  7. Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States Investigators: T.J. Griffis and J.M. Baker Funding Source: United States Department of Energy, Office-soybean rotation systems located in the Upper Midwest. The management strategies will include: 1) Conventional corn

  8. Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

  9. Simulations of water isotope abundances in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    fractionation processes. The results indicate that water substance in the upper troposphere does not follow a Rayleigh distillation model due to the presence of condensed phase water. Stratospheric abundances and climate of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). It is broadly known that most of the air

  10. Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa C.

    Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River Watershed Jenna L the abundance, distribution, and habitat requirements of steelhead in the upper Salinas River watershed. We, and reproduce (Thompson & Larsen 2004). The Salinas River and its tributaries have been designated

  11. PID Admittance Control for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu, Jacob Rosen, Xiaoou Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    PID Admittance Control for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu, Jacob Rosen, Xiaoou Li Abstract PID control. Three force sensors in the upper-level send desired trajectories to the lower, a model-free PID type admittance control is applied, whose parameters can be designed by human impedance

  12. FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER if; Marine Biological LabofdiuryKay, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director FLUCTUATION IN TRAP NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER Gear used 3 Methods 5 Statistical considerations 5 Season trends in catch of trap nets 6 Black crappie

  13. viscosity in the upper mantle, the result of an ancient, failed rift in the region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    penetration in the upper ocean, and can be related to phy- toplankton abundance. Along with measure- ments biomass is a crucial measure of the health of ocean ecosystems. An impressive synthesis of the relevant of the upper-ocean concentration of chlorophyll, which is found in all phytoplank- ton, Secchi-disk depths

  14. Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a, , Anne Academy of Sciences (RCAG), P.O. Box 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o-wave splitting upper mantle Mongolia Hangay dome Siberian craton Bogd fault Mongolia represents the northernmost

  15. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  16. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

  17. Thermoelectric materials -- New directions and approaches. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 478

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritt, T.M.; Kanatzidis, M.G.; Lyon, H.B. Jr.; Mahan, G.D. [eds.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric materials are utilized in a wide variety of applications related to solid-state refrigeration or small-scale power generation. Thermoelectric cooling is an environmentally friendly method of small-scale cooling in specific applications such as cooling computer chips and laser diodes. Thermoelectric materials are used in a wide range of applications from beverage coolers to power generation for deep-space probes such as the Voyager missions. Over the past thirty years, alloys based on the Bi-Te systems {l{underscore}brace}(Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2} (Te{sub 1{minus}x}Se{sub x}){sub 3}{r{underscore}brace} and Si{sub 1{minus}x}Ge{sub x} systems have been extensively studied and optimized for their use as thermoelectric materials to perform a variety of solid-state thermoelectric refrigeration and power generation tasks. Despite this extensive investigation of the traditional thermoelectric materials, there is still a substantial need and room for improvement, and thus, entirely new classes of compounds will have to be investigated. Over the past two-to-three years, research in the field of thermoelectric materials has been undergoing a rapid rebirth. The enhanced interest in better thermoelectric materials has been driven by the need for much higher performance and new temperature regimes for thermoelectric devices in many applications. The essence of a good thermoelectric is given by the determination of the material's dimensionless figure of merit, ZT = ({alpha}{sup 2}{sigma}/{lambda})T, where {alpha} is the Seebeck coefficient, {sigma} the electrical conductivity and {lambda} the total thermal conductivity. The best thermoelectric materials have a value of ZT = 1. This ZT = 1 has been an upper limit for more than 30 years, yet no theoretical or thermodynamic reason exits for why it can not be larger. The focus of the symposium is embodied in the title, Thermoelectric Materials: New Directions and Approaches. Many of the researchers in the field believe that future advances in thermoelectric applications will come through research in new materials. The authors have many new methods of materials synthesis and much more rapid characterization of these materials than were available 20--30 years ago. They have tried to focus the symposium on new directions and new materials such as skutterudites, quantum well and superlattice structures, new metal chalcogenides, rare earth systems, and quasicrystals. Other new materials are also presented in these proceedings. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers in this volume.

  18. Soot volume fraction and temperature measurements in laminar nonpremixed flames using thermocouples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcenally, C.S.; Koeylue, U.O.; Pfefferle, L.D.; Rosner, D.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermocouple particle densitometry (TPD), a new method for measuring absolute soot volume fraction in flames which was suggested by Eisner and Rosner, has been successfully implemented in several laminar nonpremixed flames. This diagnostic relies on measuring the junction temperature history of a thermocouple rapidly inserted into a soot-containing flame region, then optimizing the fit between this history and one calculated from the principles of thermophoretic mass transfer. The TPD method is very simple to implement experimentally, yields spatially resolved volume fractions directly, can easily measure small volume fractions, and does not depend on the prevailing soot particle size, morphology, or optical characteristics. In a series of methane and ethylene counterflow flames whose soot volume fractions varied by more than an order of magnitude, the TPD results agreed to within experimental error with the authors own laser extinction measurements. In axisymmetric methane and ethylene co-flowing flames, the shape of TPD profiles agreed well with published laser extinction measurements, but the TPD concentrations were significantly larger in the early regions of the ethylene flame and throughout the methane flame; these discrepancies are probably attributable to visible light-transparent particles that are detectable with TPD but not with laser extinction. The TPD method is not applicable to the upper regions of these co-flowing flames since OH concentrations there suffice to rapidly oxidize any soot particles that deposit. Gas temperatures were obtained simultaneously with volume fraction by averaging the junction temperature history shortly after insertion. The error in these temperatures due to soot deposition-imposed changes in the junction diameter and emissivity were assessed and found to be moderate, e.g., less than 60 K near the centerline of the ethylene coflowing flame where the volume fraction was 6 ppm and the gas temperature was 1,550 K.

  19. GAISUS-1 thermionic converter for the integrated solar upper stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begg, L.L.; Heffernan, T.F.; Horner, M.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) system is a compact orbital transfer vehicle which generates thrust to boost payloads from LEO to higher orbits. It does this by collecting and concentrating solar flux into a sensible thermal storage, graphite receiver which is used to heat hydrogen propellant to temperatures of up to 2500 K. The ISUS receiver also radiates heat into an array of thermionic converters which produce electrical power. The GAISUS-1 thermionic converter is a first generation planar converter designed to produce electrical power when coupled with the ISUS receiver. GAISUS-1 will deliver over 31 W{sub e} at 1900 K. A wrought Re hotshoe accepts radiant heat from the receiver. The back side of the hotshoe forms the emitting surface of the converter. Special attention was paid to optimize the electrical and thermal losses experienced through the sleeve. Triple and single sleeve geometries were thermally modeled and evaluated, resulting in the selection of a single sleeve design. A high temperature metal/ceramic seal isolates the emitter sleeve from the collector. A Nb collector is used and is an integral part of a Nb/Na heat pipe. The heat pipe transports reject heat from the collector surface to a thermal radiator (condenser) portion of the heat pipe. The converter utilizes an integral graphite Cs reservoir. This type of reservoir automatically produces a rise in Cs pressure in response to a rise in emitter/collector temperatures. This Cs pressure feedback mechanism insures adequate Cs coverage of the emitter over a broad range of operating conditions (temperatures).

  20. Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin �������¢���������������� Madison under Dr. Turner�������¢����������������s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

  1. Stratigraphy of Smackover formation (Upper Jurassic), Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, M.L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeled eustatic sea level rise during Smackover deposition is recorded in rocks along the Wiggins Arch--Conecuh Ridge areas of the Manila embayment as a ''large-scale'' transgressive-regressive carbonate package. Transgression of Smackover carbonates in the Conecuh Ridge area was associated with the end of pronounced fault-block movement characteristic of earlier Norphlet deposits. Underlying Louann and Norphlet strata created a ramplike surface of transgression in the Wiggins arch area, whereas the Louann pinch-out and confinement or Norphlet coarse clastics between basement blocks in the far eastern Manila embayment resulted in a rapidly changing paleotopographic surface. The subdued paleotopographic (ramp) setting was dominated by lateral progradation of sedimentary environments; in contrast, carbonates to the east over basement features responded to the same eustatic changes by vertical upbuilding (aggradation) of facies-a ''tectonic dictator'' existed that controlled depositional relief and localized environments through time. Direct evidence for meter-scale relative sea level oscillations is from multiple exposure surfaces within upper Smackover grainstones. These diagenetic caps (up to four zones recognized in the Chunchula field area) at the top of coarsening-upward sequences are characterized by chemically coated grains, gravitational vadose cements, multiple dissolution-reprecipitation features, and localized radial-fibrous cements. Stacked sedimentary packages indicate that repeated relative sea level rises again initiated carbonate deposition after exposure. Correlation of exposure caps in four wells in Chunchula field reflect internal time lines generally parallel with the Norphlet-Smackover contact, and indicate lateral equivalence of grainstones with updip anhydrite.

  2. Photon and graviton mass limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

  3. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  4. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 872.9 1,737.8 282.7 2,893.4 W W 132.1 117.6 - 249.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  5. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    W NA W 1,666.1 W 2,880.1 NA W 134.2 125.5 - 259.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  6. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8,415.8 39,569.3 40,215.9 122,708.5 26,876.5 189,800.8 10,466.7 10,604.8 10,129.5 14,302.8 - 24,432.4 February ... 40,637.5 41,953.1 43,328.9 133,687.6...

  7. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,369.5 40,816.0 42,057.4 126,970.8 38,559.5 207,587.7 9,892.3 10,063.7 W 15,155.9 W 25,989.9 February ... 41,671.7 43,092.9 43,590.9 131,633.0 37,204.6...

  8. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the particle with external electromagnetic fields (i.e., wiggler, undulator) or media (i.e., transition radiation, Cerenkov, Smith-Purcell, etc.). The Fourier component,...

  9. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0 1996-2013 Lease1,706.6

  10. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170 09,369.5

  11. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170

  12. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,717041,706.6

  13. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE VOGTLE18

  14. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE

  15. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0, NUMBER

  16. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,

  17. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H Y

  18. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H

  19. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H0

  20. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P

  1. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3

  2. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,318 P H

  3. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  4. Volume 13, Number 6 9 June 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    in the upper mantle, creating significant thermal anomalies beneath the South China Block (SCB) relative and the Paleo- Pacific and Philippine plates initiated during Mesozoic to Cenozoic time (Figure 1). Previous

  5. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the USS Genesis. To CPT Kieran Bock and his crew, the officers and crew of the Southern Cross send their very best wishes and congratulations, and we wish them fair seas and LOTS of stars to follow. The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 1 5 USS Atlantis... will be forwarded separately to each individual member. Please forward any enquiries to the Intel Officer - ENS Ashley Walker on alwalk78@optusnet.com.au. ENS Ashley Walker Operations Intelligence Officer Welcoming New Crewmembers Savannah Clark Daniel...

  6. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?s Sunshine Award & Crewmember of the Year Award. Polls close on Friday, July 18. Crewmembers may vote in the official site, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/uss-southerncrossawards/. The results Will be announced at the Summit. Summit Event Venues... of our good friends in Adelaide, reacquaint myself with my ?old? mates and make friends with new ones. See you in SA. COL Bruce O?Brien Commanding Officer Newsletter Publisher http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ July / August 2008 Volume 2, Issue 4...

  7. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  8. New primordial-magnetic-field limit from the latest LIGO S5 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the energy momentum tensor of a magnetic field always contains a spin-2 component in its anisotropic stress, stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF) in the early universe must generate stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background. This process will greatly affect the relic gravitational wave (RGW), which is one of the major scientific goals of the laser interferometer GW detections. Recently, the fifth science (S5) run of laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) gave a latest upper limit {Omega}{sub GW}<6.9x10{sup -6} on the RGW background. Utilizing this upper limit, we derive new PMF limits: for a scale of galactic cluster {lambda}=1 Mpc, the amplitude of PMF, that produced by the electroweak phase transition, has to be weaker than B{sub {lambda}{<=}4}x10{sup -7} G; for a scale of supercluster {lambda}=100 Mpc, the amplitude of PMF has to be weaker than B{sub {lambda}{<=}9}x10{sup -11} G. In this manner, GW observation has potential to make interesting contributions to the study of primordial magnetic field.

  9. New Primordial-Magnetic-Field Limit from The Latest LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang Wang

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the energy momentum tensor of a magnetic field always contains a spin-2 component in its anisotropic stress, stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF) in the early universe must generate stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background. This process will greatly affect the relic gravitational wave (RGW), which is one of major scientific goals of the laser interferometer GW detections. Recently, the fifth science (S5) run of laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) gave a latest upper limit $\\Omega_{GW}<6.9\\times10^{-6}$ on the RGW background. Utilizing this upper limit, we derive new PMF Limits: for a scale of galactic cluster $\\lambda=1$ Mpc, the amplitude of PMF, that produced by the electroweak phase transition (EPT), has to be weaker than $B_{\\lambda} \\leq 4\\times 10^{-7}$ Gauss; for a scale of supercluster $\\lambda=100$ Mpc, the amplitude of PMF has to be weaker than $B_{\\lambda} \\leq 9\\times 10^{-11}$ Gauss. In this manner, GW observation has potential to make interesting contributions to the study of primordial magnetic field.

  10. Infrared limit in external field scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Herdegen

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering of electrons/positrons by external classical electromagnetic wave packet is considered in infrared limit. In this limit the scattering operator exists and produces physical effects, although the scattering cross-section is trivial.

  11. Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    1 Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia 6009 djh@fractalgraphics.com.au 2 Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia 6009 nja

  12. FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS ZHIHUA HU, BAOCHUN LI Abstract. Understanding the fundamental performance limits of wireless sensor networks is critical towards. Key words. Wireless sensor networks, network capacity, network lifetime. 1. Introduction. When

  13. Neural substrates of cognitive capacity limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Cognition has a severely limited capacity: Adult humans can retain only about four items “in mind”. This limitation is fundamental to human brain function: Individual capacity is highly correlated with intelligence measures ...

  14. Implementing Risk-Limiting Audits in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cast09.pdf. Philip B. Stark. Risk-limiting post-electionthe N.J. law the ?rst “risk-based statistical audit law. ”Holt bill does not limit risk. The Holt bill has a clause

  15. Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter $\\Lambda$. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure $\\Phi^4$-theory.

  16. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  17. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  18. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  19. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  20. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  1. Cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice II: Results in the unitary limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee; Thomas Schaefer

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second of two papers which investigate cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice using pionless effective field theory. In the unitary limit, where the effective range is zero and scattering length is infinite, simple scaling relations relate thermodynamic functions at different temperatures. When the second virial coefficient is properly tuned, we find that the lattice results obey these scaling relations. We compute the energy per particle, pressure, spin susceptibility, dineutron correlation function, and an upper bound for the superfluid critical temperature.

  2. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  3. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to...

  4. Clay Mathematics Proceedings Volume 12, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    Clay Mathematics Proceedings Volume 12, 2009 Renormalization in connected graded Hopf cO2008 Clay Mathemat* *ics Institute 1 #12

  5. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  6. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  7. Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

  8. Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory," said Pete Maggiore, assistant manager for environmental operations at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office. "We exceeded our goals and are on track to double both volume...

  9. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with Technical Standards, Corrective Action Requirements and Financial Responsibility for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks....

  10. ARE Update Volume 13, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels In- creases Greenhousea mini- mum volume of biofuels and requires a nationalper unit of various biofuels. For example, corn ethanol

  11. Volume 7, No.4Volume 7, No.4 2012 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Volume 7, No.4Volume 7, No.4 2012 Year in Review Special Focus: Taking Care of our Wounded Warriors Focus: Year in Review onthecover The Southwestern Division takes a look back at the year 2012 through

  12. The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity and Change, Cairo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity tendency, at least since the early 20th c., to describe Upper Egypt (hereafter as-Sa'îd) as a specific these questions and were always stressing "How unknown and unfamiliar and neglected Upper Egypt was for the State

  13. Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

  14. Limits on Primordial Black Hole evaporation with the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicenstein, J-F; Vivier, M; Herr, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected by the H.E.S.S. array between 2004 and 2012 have been used to search for photon bursts from primordial black hole explosions. Bursts were searched for in a 30 second time-window. The duration of the search window has been optimized to increase the burst signal while keeping the statistical background low. No evidence for a burst signal was found. Preliminary upper limits on the local rate of PBH explosions of $1.4\\times 10^{4} {pc}^{-3} {yr}^{-1}$ have been obtained, which improve previously published limits by almost an order of magnitude

  15. Implementation Study of Energy Conservation Recommendations in the Upper Midwest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heisinger, K. P.; Bassett, K.; Twedt, M. P.

    The South Dakota State University (SDSU) Industrial Energy Optimization Program (IEOP) and Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program perform energy audits for industrial companies in the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Each...

  16. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  17. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  18. INDIANA UNIVERSITY COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S DEGREE: UPPER LEVEL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S DEGREE: UPPER LEVEL GRADUATION790) Q: (Qualifying exam + 2 approved graduate-level courses (1, 2 above)) Qualifying exam: _______________________ Date:_____ Grade:____ R, S, TH: (Master's research project, Master's software project, University

  19. A Survey of Biological Underwater Noises Off the Coast of California and in Upper Puget Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Martin W

    1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA AND IN UPPER PUGET SOUND by Martin W Johnson iin noise conditions in the Puget Sound area. ii CONFIDENTIALin background noises in the Puget Sound area which had been

  20. Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Institute of Ecology #12;UERA BMPs Demonstation Sites Manual 2 of 2 Demonstration Sites of Best Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 iii. Best Management Practices

  1. Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia Cretaceous unit in southern Colombia named "Tetuán Limestone", have allowed the comparison between planktic foraminifera interval zones in Colombia: Ticinella primula and Biticinella breggiensis, with late

  2. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  3. Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):...

  4. Development of a Robotic Device for the Physical Training of Human Upper Extremity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Jorge Adrian

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the development of a robotic device to be used in parallel with observational learning techniques for facilitating the recovery of the upper limb in post-stroke patients. It has been shown in the existing observational...

  5. Enhanced Doppler Effect in the Upper Hybrid Resonance Microwave Backscattering Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Enhanced Doppler Effect in the Upper Hybrid Resonance Microwave Backscattering Experiment A, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St.Petersburg, Russia Observations of enhanced Doppler frequency shift effect based on this effect is proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Investigation of tokamak plasma poloidal rotation

  6. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Jitesh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due...

  7. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    evolution in the eastern Mediterranean region. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes in the MetochiaConcurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern climatic reconstructions reveal substantial changes, especially on the North African continent which

  8. Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

  9. Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishman, Paul Harold

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Geology MINERALOGICAL ANALYSIS AND URANIUM DISTRIBUTION OF THE SEDIMENTS FROM THE UPPER JACKSON FORMATION KARNES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PAUL HAROLD FISHMAN Approved... as to style and content by: Chairman o Commrttee ea o Department lf (/ ~ s Member Member December 1978 ABSTRACT Mineralogical Analysis and Uranium Distribution of the Sediments from the Upper Jackson Formation Karnes County, Texas (December 1978...

  10. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Geology TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Approved as to style and content by: R. R. Berg...

  11. Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the upper Frio sandstones, Willamar field, Willacy County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caram, Hector Luis

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEEGSITICNAL ENVIRONMENT AND ~IR CHABACZERISIICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDBKNES, WILIAMAR FIEID, WILZACY COUNTY, TEXAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial ~fillment of the reguirements for the degree of MASZER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRCINNENZ AND RESERVOIR CHARACIKRISTICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDSTONES, WI~ FIEID WILIACY ~, TEXAS A Thesis HECIOR IIJIS CARAM Approved as to style and content by: ~ R. Berg (Chair...

  12. Depositional environment of Upper Devonian gas producing sandstones, Westmoreland County, southwestern Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work, Rebecca Miller

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER DEVONIAN GAS PRODUCING SANDSTONES, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA A Thesis by REBECCA MILLER WORK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER DEVONIAN GAS PRODUCING SANDSTONES, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA A Thesis REBECCA MILLER WORK Approved as to style...

  13. Depositional environment of upper Wilcox sandstones, Northeast Thompsonville field, Jim Hogg and Webb Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Fredrick John

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, NORTHEAST THOMPSONVILLE FIELD, JIM HOGG AND WEBB COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by FREDERICK JOHN TEDFORD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, NORTHEAST THOMPSONVILLE FIELD, JIM HOGG AND WEBB COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by FREDERICK JOHN TEDFORD Approved...

  14. Upper bound on the secret key rate distillable from effective quantum correlations with imperfect detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroder, Tobias; Curty, Marcos; Luetkenhaus, Norbert [Quantum Information Theory Group, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the secret key rate that is particularly suited to analyze practical realizations of quantum key distribution protocols with imperfect devices. We consider the so-called trusted device scenario where Eve cannot modify the actual detection devices employed by Alice and Bob. The upper bound obtained is based on the available measurements results, but it includes the effect of the noise and losses present in the detectors of the legitimate users.

  15. The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I ____J - TDOC Z TA245 .7 8873 N0.1530 The Impact Of Tenure Arrangements And Crop Rotations On Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station/ Neville P. Clarke, Director/ The Texas A&M University System/ College... .. . .. . . .................. . . . . . .. . ... .. .... ... 88 PREFACE This bulletin reports economic analyses of the effects of important variables affecting the viability of rice-soybean farming operations in the Texas Upper Gulf Coast region. The study attempts to recognize many factors that affect...

  16. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  17. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  18. A coarse entropy-rigidity theorem and discrete length-volume inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinneberg, Kyle Edward

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete length-volume inequality . . . . . . . .v 3 Length-volume inequalities revisitedlength-volume inequality for cubes . . . . . . . . . . . .

  19. Direct Rendering of Deformable Volume Data Shiaofen Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Shiaofen

    Direct Rendering of Deformable Volume Data Shiaofen Fang Department of Computer and Information In this paper, we present a new deformable volume rendering algorithm. The volume deformation is modeled to directly render the deformed volume without going through the expensive volume construction process

  20. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  1. Ironmaking conference proceedings. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical presentations at this conference displayed a renewed sense of viability of the coke and ironmaking community. In addition, many of the papers show that the environmental aspects of ironmaking are being integrated into day-to-day operations rather than being thought of as separate responsibilities. This volume contains 68 papers divided into the following sections: Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace fundamental studies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace repairs/rebuilds/modernization; Process control techniques for blast furnaces; Cokemaking general; Cokemaking environmental; Coke--by-products--plant operations; Coal and coke research; Battery operations; Pelletizing; Direct reduction and smelting; and Sintering. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. Dimensional SPC for low-volume production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Chang-Ho

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To make up for the weaknesses of SPC in low-volume production, a new method to test data independence, a new plot to describe the similarity between two charts, and two modified graphical tools are proposed. In low-volume production, it is frequently hard...

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

  4. The corona and upper transition region of epsilon Eridani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -U. Ness; C. Jordan

    2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present analyses of observations of epsilon Eridani (K2 V) made with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on Chandra and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, supplemented by observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on XMM-Newton. The observed emission lines are used to find relative element abundances, to place limits on the electron densities and pressures and to determine the mean apparent emission measure distribution. As in the previous paper by Sim & Jordan (2003a), the mean emitting area as a function of the electron temperature is derived by comparisons with a theoretical emission measure distribution found from energy balance arguments. The final model has a coronal temperature of 3.4 x 10^6 K, an electron pressure of 1.3 x 10^16 cm^-3 K at T_e = 2 x 10^5 K and an area filling factor of 0.14 at 3.2 x 10^5 K. We discuss a number of issues concerning the atomic data currently available. Our analyses are based mainly on the latest version of CHIANTI (v5.2). We conclude that the Ne/O relative abundance is 0.30, larger than that recommended from solar studies, and that there is no convincing evidence for enhanced coronal abundances of elements with low first ionization potentials.

  5. Impact limiter retention using a tape joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, A.; Eakes, R.G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask employs polyurethane foam impact limiters that fit onto the ends of the cask. A foam impact limiter takes energy out of a system during a hypothetical accident condition by allowing foam crush and large deformations to occur. This, in turn, precludes high stresses or deformations from occurring to the cask. Because of the need to transmit significant amounts of heat to the environment, the BUSS cask impact limiters were designed to shield a minimum amount of the cask surface area. With this design impact limiter retention after the initial impact resulting from the 9 meter regulatory drops becomes a concern. Retention is essential to ensure the cask does not experience higher stresses during any secondary or rebound effects without impact limiters than it does during the 9 meter regulatory drop with impact limiters in place.

  6. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Div., IL (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

  7. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  8. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  9. ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    , multivariate data analysis, multimodality data, scientific visualization, seg- mentation, volume rendering 1ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis, which uses Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and a multi- dimensional histogram of the volume data

  10. Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH0), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains engineering calculations for four (4) air-side, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems (HVAC) systems, including: dual duct constant volume (DDCAV), dual duct variable volume (DDVAV), constant volume with reheat...

  11. New Limits on the Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANITA collaboration; P. Gorham; P. Allison; S. Barwick; J. Beatty; D. Besson; W. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. Clem; A. Connolly; P. Dowkontt; M. DuVernois; R. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. Learned; K. Liewer; J. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. Naudet; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. Varner; D. Walz; Y. Wang; F. Wu

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of 3 EeV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultra-high energy extensive air showers.

  12. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  13. Improved Limits on Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter using Full-Sky Fermi-GBM Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Kenny C Y; Gaskins, Jennifer M; Smith, Miles; Preece, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sterile neutrino of ~keV mass is a well motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates a X-ray line which offers a unique target for X-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neutrino decay lines; our analysis covers the energy range 10-25 keV (sterile neutrino mass 20-50 keV), which is inaccessible to X-ray and gamma-ray satellites such as Chandra, Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL. The extremely wide field of view of the GBM enables a large fraction of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be probed. After implementing careful data cuts, we obtain ~53 days of full sky observational data. We search for sterile neutrino decay lines in the energy spectrum, and find no significant signal. From this, we obtain upper limits on the sterile neutrino mixing angle as a function of mass. In the sterile neutrino mass range 25-40 keV, we improve upon previous upper limits by approximately an order of magnitude. Bett...

  14. Continuum limit of lattice QCD with staggered quarks in the quenched approximation - a critical role for the chiral extrapolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; James E. Hetrick; Craig McNeile; K. Rummukainen; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint

    1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the light quark spectrum of lattice QCD in the quenched approximation using Kogut-Susskind quarks. By combining results for different lattice spacings, several volumes and five quark masses, we are able to take the light quark mass, infinite volume, continuum limit. When we use non-linear chiral extrapolations, we find that the nucleon to rho mass ratio is 1.254 +- 0.018 +- 0.027, where the errors are statistical and systematic (within the quenched approximation), respectively. This should be compared with the experimental value of 1.22. Our results indicate that the error due to quenching is less than about 5%.

  15. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ocean through the annular gravel pack (kg) P = pressure (Pa)through the annular gravel pack (kg/s) Q R = rate of CH 4through the annular gravel pack (ST m 3 ) V R = cumulative

  16. Improved upper limits on the flavor-changing neutral current decays B -> Kl(+)l(-) and B -> K*(892)l(+)l(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched a sample of 9.6 x 10(6) B(B) over bar events for the flavor-changing neutral current decays B --> Kl(+)l(-) and B --> K*(892)l(+)l(-). We subject the latter decay to the requirement that the dilepton mass ...

  17. Combined upper limit on standard model higgs boson production at D0 in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, Ralf; /Freiburg U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 and the CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. For the first time since the LEP experiments the sensitivity for a Standard Model Higgs boson has been reached at a Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

  19. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m). As in all cases of gas hydrates (Moridis et al. , 2007;by destroying the secondary gas hydrate barrier (if such aInduced Gas Production From Class 1 Hydrate Deposits,” SPE

  20. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. EnergyRenovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume...

  1. Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Volume 2...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Volume 2 - September 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Volume 2 - September 2004 September 2004 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Nevada Test Site...

  2. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. lm021zaluzec2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ACC115 High Volume...

  3. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  4. The Chandrasekhar limit for quark stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibaji Banerjee; Sanjay K. Ghosh; Sibaji Raha

    2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chandrasekhar limit for quark stars is evaluated from simple energy balance relations, as proposed by Landau for white dwarfs or neutron stars. It has been found that the limit for quark stars depends on, in addition to the fundamental constants, the Bag constant.

  5. Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

  6. Metals in fish from the Upper Benue River and lakes Geriyo and Njuwa in northeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eromosele, C.O.; Eromosele, I.C.; Muktar, S.L.M.; Birdling, S.A. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Yola (Nigeria)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa occupy natural depressions near the upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. The lakes are flooded by the river during the rainy season spanning the months of May to September. Fishing activities on the lakes and river provide fish for consumption by the local communities. Industrial activity around the upper Benue River and the lakes is low and there is no information on other activities with the potential for polluting the Benue River as it flows from neighboring Cameroon. However, an unconfirmed report indicated high levels of lead in the upper Benue River, generally speculated as arising from biogeometrical factors. Trace elements, some of which are toxic, may accumulate in edible marine organisms to levels which may be deleterious to human health. For the upper Benue River and its associate lakes, Geriyo and Njuwa, there is yet no report of a systematic study to assess the levels of metals in fish found in these waters. This paper presents the results of a study on metal levels in fish collected from Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa and upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sykes, Jenna [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ?5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ?5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ?10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ?60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  9. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  10. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  11. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  14. Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7, Volume 1 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.0MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Summary Statistics . Summary...

  15. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables ....

  16. Variable volume architecture : expanding the boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saheba, Asheshh (Asheshh Mohit), 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into the creation of a Variable Volume Architecture is explored through a series of proposals and projects. An argument is established to develop the means and methods of achieving an architecture of transformation. ...

  17. Detonation Diffraction into a Confined Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polley, Nolan Lee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    little attention. Experimental work needs to be conducted on detonation diffraction into a confined volume to better understand how the interaction of the diffracted shock wave with a confining wall impacts the detonation diffraction process. Therefore, a...

  18. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  19. Long-time limit of correlation functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Franosch

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Auto-correlation functions in an equilibrium stochastic process are well-characterized by Bochner's theorem as Fourier transforms of a finite symmetric Borel measure. The existence of a long-time limit of these correlation functions depends on the spectral properties of the measure. Here we provide conditions applicable to a wide-class of dynamical theories guaranteeing the existence of the long-time limit. We discuss the implications in the context of the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition where a non-trivial long-time limit signals an idealized glass state.

  20. Limit of light coupling into solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naqavi, A; Ballif, C; Scharf, T; Herzig, H P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a limit for the strength of coupling light into the modes of solar cells. This limit depends on both a cell's thickness and its modal properties. For a cell with refractive index n and thickness d, we obtain a maximal coupling rate of 2c*sqrt(n^2-1)/d where c is speed of light. Our method can be used in the design of solar cells and in calculating their efficiency limits; besides, it can be applied to a broad variety of resonant phenomena and devices.

  1. Volume 68, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2010 Vol. 68 Nos. 1&2 Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 58, Nos. 1&2 Seventeenth-Century newS VOLUME 68, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2010 SCN... of the Lake University E. Joe Johnson, Clayton State University EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Jacob Schornick, Texas A&M University contents volume 68, nos. 1&2 ............................... spring-summer, 2010 John Considine, Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe...

  2. Volume 60, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2002 Vol. 60 Nos. 1&2 budleafswbudleafse Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 50, Nos. 1&2 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS VOLUME 60, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2002 SCN, an official organ of the Milton Society... Meter, Texas A&M University CONTENTS VOLUME 60, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2002 REVIEWS ?Vocation Homily, George Herbert, and the Cultural Criticism: A Review Essay? by JONATHAN NAUMAN...

  3. Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klapper, G.

    1966-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22... of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22...

  4. A preliminary study of the distribution of some copepods in upper Laguna Madre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, John C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY a a at cniiEr~ nF TExas A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOME COPEPODS IN UPPER LAGUNA MADRE John C. Henderson A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Mlny, io(R Ma/or Sub)ect: Oceanography A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOME COPEPODS IN UPPER LAGUNA MADRE A Thesis John C. Henderson Approved as to style and content by: C...

  5. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -shape. The trough in S3 (see unit 23, Plate 2) is hi. ghly fractured in the sandstone and shows considerable flowage in the shale. From the air, it is readily apparent that these folds of the upper Two Medicine are much smaller in lateral extent along strike than... Formation (mostly shale), the Virgelle Sandstone, and the Two Medi. cine Formation (mostly shale), Montana Group, Upper Cretaceous. The Virgelle Sand- stone, about 54 meters thick, lies between the shales and behaved as the most competent member...

  6. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  7. Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magesh Kumar, K.K.; Singh, Ranjeet; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is proposed and studied. In the presence of ambient magnetic field, the plasma wave present in the system produces electron density ripple (perturbation) which couples with the velocity imparted by the nonlinear ponderomotive force at twice the laser frequency producing the Raman shifted third harmonic field. The wave vector of the plasma wave provides the uncompensated momentum necessary for phase matching condition. The applied magnetic field can be adjusted to have the phase matching for the given plasma frequency. The energy conversion ratio from pump to the Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is analyzed.

  8. Enhanced Two-Photon Absorption Using Entangled States and Small Mode Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao You; S. M. Hendrickson; J. D. Franson

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the rate of two-photon absorption for frequency entangled photons in a tapered optical fiber whose diameter is comparable to the wavelength of the light. The confinement of the electric field in the transverse direction increases the intensity associated with a single photon, while the two-photon absorption rate is further enhanced by the fact that the sum of the frequencies of the two photons is on resonance with the upper atomic state, even though each photon has a relatively broad linewidth. As a result, the photons are effectively confined in all three dimensions and the two-photon absorption rate for frequency-entangled photons in a tapered fiber was found to be comparable to that for unentangled photons in a microcavity with a small mode volume.

  9. Quantum Cryptography Approaching the Classical Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weedbrook, Christian

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender’s station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as ...

  10. Heisenberg-limited metrology with information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon A. Haine; Stuart S. Szigeti; Matthias D. Lang; Carlton M. Caves

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of atom interferometers by exploiting atom-light entanglement. In this paper, we apply information recycling to an interferometer where the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. We demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of number-correlated Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  11. Can Eutrophication Influence Nitrogen vs. Phosphorus Limitation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Can Eutrophication Influence Nitrogen vs. Phosphorus Limitation? George Gregory Bates College, originating largely from septic systems and fertilizers, have caused significant eutrophication in freshwater nitrogen and phosphorus grew the highest concentration of phytoplankton, but eutrophic ponds grew a mean

  12. Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    ' & $ % Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio Anant Sahai Wireless Foundations, UCB EECS program November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Outline 1. Why cognitive radios? 2 November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Apparent spectrum allocations · Traditional

  13. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation on Curved Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, J.

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we ...

  14. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  15. Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

  16. Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data...

  17. Limits of Equivalence: Thinking Gay Male Subjectivity Outside Feminist Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galloway, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limits of Equivalence: Thinking Gay Male Subjectivityor this limit of equivalence? The problem, of course, ispaper, the limits of equivalence emerge: while all subjects

  18. PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study Mathieu Hatt1 , Ph: Robustness of functional volume determination in PET Keywords: PET uptake volume determination, robustness;2 Abstract Purpose: Current state of the art algorithms for functional uptake volume segmentation in PET

  19. Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis* Department of Computer and then rendered using an unstructured volume rendering technique. Unless a detailed refinement of the flow volume-dimensional texture mapping and an interval volume segmentation coupled with a tetrahedron projection-based renderer

  20. Size distribution of recruited alveolar volumes in airway reopening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    during the reopening process can influence the distribution of recruited alveolar volumes and, hence, gas distribution of recruited alveolar volumes that become available for gas exchange during inflation from important quantity is the amount of alveolar volume available for gas exchange. This alveolar volume

  1. Volume painting: incorporating volumetric rendering with line integral convolution (LIC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaewook

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (NPR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II.2. Volume Rendering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II.3. Line Integral Convolution (LIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 III METHODOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 III.1... INTRODUCTION In this thesis, we introduce a new Non-Photorealistic Rendering (NPR) technique, called Volume Painting. An example of Volume Painting is shown in Figure 1. Fig. 1. Volume Painting of the Implicit Geometry. During the last decade, NPR has become...

  2. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  3. Volume Rendering by Adaptive Refinement (revised January, 1989)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . 1988; Sabella 1988; Upson and Keeler 1988). The principal advantages of volume rendering over other

  4. Infrared exponents and the strong-coupling limit in lattice Landau gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Sternbeck; Lorenz von Smekal

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gluon and ghost propagators of lattice Landau gauge in the strong-coupling limit beta=0 in pure SU(2) lattice gauge theory to find evidence of the conformal infrared behavior of these propagators as predicted by a variety of functional continuum methods for asymptotically small momenta $q^2 \\ll \\Lambda_\\mathrm{QCD}^2$. In the strong-coupling limit, this same behavior is obtained for the larger values of a^2q^2 (in units of the lattice spacing a), where it is otherwise swamped by the gauge field dynamics. Deviations for a^2q^2 < 1 are well parameterized by a transverse gluon mass $\\propto 1/a$. Perhaps unexpectedly, these deviations are thus no finite-volume effect but persist in the infinite-volume limit. They furthermore depend on the definition of gauge fields on the lattice, while the asymptotic conformal behavior does not. We also comment on a misinterpretation of our results by Cucchieri and Mendes in Phys. Rev. D81 (2010) 016005.

  5. Inequality design limits in optimal aerodynamic shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, Charles Knight

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank Mr. Stan Lowy for his assistance. ABSTRACT The investigation is concerned with ways of including design con- straints in the problem of optimum aerodynamic shapes. Inequality constraints are examined in the report as one... means of describing design limits in the optimization problem. The use of inequality con- straints to consider design limits in a variational solution is illustrated with an example problem. In the example problem, the admissable profiles for a...

  6. DWPF COAL CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A paper study was completed to assess the impact on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)'s Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) acid addition and melter off-gas flammability control strategy in processing Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) to SB13 with an added Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) stream and two Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) products (Strip Effluent and Actinide Removal Stream). In all of the cases that were modeled, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted Reducing/Oxidizing (REDOX) Ratio of 0.20 Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe. There was sufficient formic acid in these combinations to reduce both the manganese and mercury present. Reduction of manganese and mercury are both necessary during Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing, however, other reducing agents such as coal and oxalate are not effective in this reduction. The next phase in this study will be experimental testing with SB10, FBSR, and both SWPF simulants to validate the assumptions in this paper study and determine whether there are any issues in processing these streams simultaneously. The paper study also evaluated a series of abnormal processing conditions to determine whether potential abnormal conditions in FBSR, SWPF or DWPF would produce melter feed that was too oxidizing or too reducing. In most of the cases that were modeled with one parameter at its extreme, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted REDOX of 0.09-0.30 (target 0.20). However, when a run was completed with both high coal and oxalate, with minimum formic acid to reduce mercury and manganese, the final REDOX was predicted to be 0.49 with sludge and FBSR product and 0.47 with sludge, FBSR product and both SWPF products which exceeds the upper REDOX limit.

  7. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume tracking methodology helped the USACE Buffalo District track soil quantity changes from projected excavation work over time and across space, providing the basis for an explanation of some of the project cost and schedule variances.

  8. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. , 1990. Origin of petrology and geochemistry of submarinerate, morphology, and petrology. Upper crustal refractione.g. , morphology, petrology, seismicity, and hydrothermal

  9. Maximal boost and energy of elementary particles as a manifestation of the limit of localizability of elementary quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japaridze, George

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss an upper bound on the boost and the energy of elementary particles. The limit is derived utilizing the core principle of relativistic quantum mechanics stating that there is a lower limit for localization of an elementary quantum system and the suggestion that when the localization scale reaches the Planck length, elementary particles are removed from observables. The limit for the boost and energy, $M_{Planck}/m$ and $M_{Planck}c^{2}\\approx\\,8.6* 10^{27}$ eV, is defined in terms of fundamental constants and the mass of elementary particle and does not involve any dynamic scale. These bounds imply that the cosmic ray flux of any flavor may stretch up to energies of order $10^{18}$ GeV and will cut off at this value.

  10. Stability limit of room air temperature of a VAV system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuba, Tadahiko; Kamimura, Kazuyuki [Yamatake-Honeywell Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Building System Div.; Kasahara, Masato; Kimbara, Akiomi; Kurosu, Shigeru [Oyama National Coll. of Technology (Japan); Murasawa, Itaru; Hashimoto, Yukihiko [Tonets Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Engineering Project Dept.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To control heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, it has been necessary to accept an analog system controlled mainly by proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) action. However, when conventional PID controllers are replaced with new digital controllers by selecting the same PID parameters as before, the control loops have often got into hunting phenomena, which result in undamped oscillations. Unstable control characteristics (such as huntings) are thought to be one of the crucial problems faced by field operators. The PID parameters must be carefully selected to avoid instabilities. In this study, a room space is simulated as a thermal system that is air-conditioned by a variable-air-volume (VAV) control system. A dynamic room model without infiltration or exfiltration, which is directly connected to a simple air-handling unit without an economizer, is developed. To explore the possible existence of huntings, a numerical system model is formulated as a bilinear system with time-delayed feedback, and a parametric analysis of the stability limit is presented. Results are given showing the stability region affected by the selection of control and system parameters. This analysis was conducted to help us tune the PID controllers for optimal HVAC control.

  11. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    TR-47 1973 Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor G.L. Curry J.C. Helm Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  12. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS Course of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors IDS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350 Financial Accounting FIN 321: Managerial Economics FIN 325: Intermediate Finance FIN 323 with a C FIN 327

  13. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR Course Grade Prerequisites/Notes BA 300 Ethical Decision Making in Business (1 unit) FIN 323: Fundamentals of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors MIS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350: Management

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  15. Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paolo

    Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation either for a base network (one without any energy conservation technique) or for one using cooperative energy conservation strategies. In this paper, we investigate the lifetime/density tradeoff under

  16. Multi-fractal thermal characteristics of the southwestern GIN sea upper layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Multi-fractal thermal characteristics of the southwestern GIN sea upper layer Peter C. Chu Naval describes a multi-fractal analysis on a high-resolution temperature dataset to obtain the nonstationarity matter Published by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/S0960-0779(03)00041-9 Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 19 (2004

  17. Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1 Darryn W. Waugh,2s. Here we apply SF6, a tracer that continues to increase in the atmosphere, as a basis for the Cant water mass transit time distributions (TTDs) calculated with SF6 are compared to those based on CFC-12

  18. But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Stephanie V. Chasteen, Rachel E. Pepper, Steven J. Pollock, Katherine K. Perkins Science Education course approach in junior-level electricity and magnetism (E&M). Almost all developed materials (i

  19. The Upper Bound of Capacity for A Concurrent-transmission-based Ad-hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    1 The Upper Bound of Capacity for A Concurrent-transmission-based Ad-hoc Network with Single National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, 30010 Taiwan Department of Communication Engineering National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, 30010 Taiwan Department of Information and Computer Engineering Chung

  20. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EE)/COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE) UPPER DIVISION HONORS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EE)/COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE) UPPER DIVISION HONORS PROGRAM Deadlines the website at http://www.honors.uconn.edu. EE/CMPE Honors Program The Electrical/Computer Engineering 4950 Electrical and Computer Engineering Design I (2 credits; Fall, Senior Year) and ECE 4099