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1

Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

J. Dimock

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

2

Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

Patrick J. Sutton

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Upper Limits on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of Omega_0<8.4e-4 in the 69-156 Hz band is ~10^5 times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan distribution in free-living microorganisms?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan distribution in free-living microorganisms? ABSTRACT distance apart) is used to try and answer the question `What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan to 230 lm while the largest cosmopolitan species was 135 lm in size. Comparison of the testate

Brown, Richard

6

A New Method for the Measurement of the Optical Volume Scattering Function in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to measure the optical volume scattering function (VSF) of seawater is presented. The VSF is a fundamental property used in the calculation of radiative transfer for applications as diverse as upper-ocean heating by solar radiation ...

Michael E. Lee; Marlon R. Lewis

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Strong Upper Limits on Sterile Neutrino Warm Dark Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sterile neutrinos are attractive dark matter candidates. Their parameter space of mass and mixing angle has not yet been fully tested despite intensive efforts that exploit their gravitational clustering properties and radiative decays. We use the limits on gamma-ray line emission from the Galactic center region obtained with the SPI spectrometer on the INTEGRAL satellite to set new constraints, which improve on the earlier bounds on mixing by more than 2 orders of magnitude, and thus strongly restrict a wide and interesting range of models.

Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Watson, Casey R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois 62522 (United States)

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Infinite Volume Limit for Correlation functions in the Dipole Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a classical lattice dipole gas with low activity in dimension $d \\geq 3$. We investigate long distance properties by a renormalization group analysis. We prove that various correlation functions have an infinite volume limit. We also get estimates on the decay of correlation functions.

Tuan Minh Le

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bÂŻb channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

Fermilab

10

Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4  

SciTech Connect

It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

Chung, Suk Bum

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DĂ? Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the DĂ?) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in pÂŻp collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

Quigg, Chris

12

Flow Analysis on a Limited Volume Chilled Water System  

SciTech Connect

LANL Currently has a limited volume chilled water system for use in a glove box, but the system needs to be updated. Before we start building our new system, a flow analysis is needed to ensure that there are no high flow rates, extreme pressures, or any other hazards involved in the system. In this project the piping system is extremely important to us because it directly affects the overall design of the entire system. The primary components necessary for the chilled water piping system are shown in the design. They include the pipes themselves (perhaps of more than one diameter), the various fitting used to connect the individual pipes to form the desired system, the flow rate control devices (valves), and the pumps that add energy to the fluid. Even the most simple pipe systems are actually quite complex when they are viewed in terms of rigorous analytical considerations. I used an 'exact' analysis and dimensional analysis considerations combined with experimental results for this project. When 'real-world' effects are important (such as viscous effects in pipe flows), it is often difficult or impossible to use only theoretical methods to obtain the desired results. A judicious combination of experimental data with theoretical considerations and dimensional analysis are needed in order to reduce risks to an acceptable level.

Zheng, Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134  

SciTech Connect

The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less than a few times 10{sup -22}.

B. Allen et al.

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

Buzatu Adrian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

IRAS-based whole-sky upper limit on Dyson Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical construct of a star purposely cloaked by a thick swarm of broken-up planetary material to better utilize all of the stellar energy. A clean Dyson Sphere identification would give a significant signature for intelligence at work. A search for Dyson Spheres has been carried out using the 250,000 source database of the IRAS infrared satellite which covered 96% of the sky. The search has used the Calgary data collection of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) to look for fits to blackbody spectra. Searches have been conducted for both pure (fully cloaked) and partial Dyson Spheres in the blackbody temperature region 100 {le} T {le} 600 K. Other stellar signatures that resemble a Dyson Sphere are reviewed. When these signatures are used to eliminate sources that mimic Dyson Spheres very few candidates remain and even these are ambiguous. Upper limits are presented for both pure and partial Dyson Spheres. The sensitivity of the LRS was enough to find solar-sized Dyson Spheres out to 300 pc, a reach that encompasses a million solar-type stars.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An upper limit on hypertriton production in collisions of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-statistic data sample of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl events recorded with HADES is used to search for a hypertriton signal. An upper production limit per centrality-triggered event of $1.04$ x $10^{-3}$ on the $3\\sigma$ level is derived. Comparing this value with the number of successfully reconstructed $\\Lambda$ hyperons allows to determine an upper limit on the ratio $N_{_{\\Lambda}^3H}/N_{\\Lambda}$, which is confronted with statistical and coalescence-type model calculations.

HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; D. Belver; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; M. Destefanis; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Miche; E. Moriničre; J. Mousa; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; L. Rehnisch; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; T. Scheib; A. Schmah; H. Schuldes; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spatarof; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; M. Wisniowski; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industry’s analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Non-Reflective Upper Boundary Condition for Limited-Height Hydrostatic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple upper boundary condition for hydrostatic, Boussinesq models is derived from a linear internal wave theory, assuming a uniform stratification and no Coriolis effects. This condition is applied in a two-dimentional nonlinear model of the ...

Philippe Bougeault

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family: Upper and Lower Limits on CKM Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 25, 2010 Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family:and experimental limits on the Higgs boson mass restrict CKMGeV lower limit on the Higgs boson mass that is especially

Chanowitz, Michael S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey I: New upper limits on radio halos and mini-halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources called radio halos, radio relics and mini-halos. We present the sample and first results from the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS)- an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS, Venturi et al. 2007, 2008). It is a systematic radio survey of galaxy clusters selected from the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray catalogs . Analysis of GMRT data at 610/ 235/ 325 MHz on 12 galaxy clusters are presented. We report the detection of a newly discovered mini-halo in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021 at 610 MHz. A small scale relic (~200 kpc) is suspected in the cluster Z348. We do not detect cluster-scale diffuse emission in 11 clusters. Robust upper limits on the detection of radio halo of size of 1 Mpc are determined. We also present upper limits on the detections of mini-halos in a sub-sample of cool-core clusters. The upper limits for radio halos and mini-halos are plotted in the radio power- X-ray luminosity plane and the correlations are discussed. Diffuse extended e...

Kale, R; Giacintucci, S; Dallacasa, D; Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Macario, G; Athreya, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Upper limits to fusion rates of isotopic hydrogen molecules in Pd  

SciTech Connect

We have calculated upper bounds for {ital p}-{ital d} and {ital d}-{ital d} fusion rates at octahedral and tetrahedral sites in saturated PdH. Our molecular potentials include Thomas-Fermi screening for two centers and realistic Pd crystal potentials. Accurate numerical techniques were used to solve for radial wave functions down to {ital r}=0. From these wave functions we find rates that are considerably enhanced over those for the free molecules, but 10--20 orders of magnitude lower than the claims of early experiments.

Alberg, M.A. (Department of Physics, Seattle University, Seattle, Washington 98122 (USA) Department of Physics, Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA)); Wilets, L. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA) Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA)); Rehr, J.J.; Mustre de Leon, J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Upper bound limit analysis model for FRP-reinforced masonry curved structures. Part II: Structural analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A homogenized full 3D limit analysis model for the evaluation of collapse loads of FRP-reinforced masonry vaults is presented. Six-noded rigid infinitely resistant wedges are used to model masonry. Three-noded rigid infinitely resistant triangles are ... Keywords: FRP-reinforcement, Homogenization, Kinematic approach, Limit analysis, Masonry, Vaults

Gabriele Milani; Enrico Milani; Antonio Tralli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Upper Limits on the Number of Small Bodies in Sedna-Like Orbits by the TAOS Project  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for occultation events by objects at distances between 100 and 1000 AU in lightcurves from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). We searched for consecutive, shallow flux reductions in the stellar lightcurves obtained by our survey between 7 February 2005 and 31 December 2006 with a total of {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup 9} three-telescope simultaneous photometric measurements. No events were detected, allowing us to set upper limits on the number density as a function of size and distance of objects in Sedna-like orbits, using simple models.

Wang, J; Lehner, M J; Zhang, Z; Bianco, F B; Alcock, C; Chen, W; Axelrod, T; Byun, Y; Coehlo, N K; Cook, K H; Dave, R; de Pater, L; Porrata, R; Kim, D; King, S; Lee, T; Lin, H; Lissauer, J J; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, S; Wen, C

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A VOLUME-LIMITED PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF 114 {gamma} DORADUS CANDIDATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have carried out a photometric survey of a complete, volume-limited sample of {gamma} Doradus candidates. The sample was extracted from the Hipparcos catalog and consists of 114 stars with colors and absolute magnitudes within the range of known {gamma} Doradus stars and that also lie within a specified volume of 266,600 pc{sup 3}. We devoted one year of observing time with our T12 0.8 m automatic photometric telescope to acquire nightly observations of the complete sample of stars. From these survey observations, we identify 37 stars with intrinsic variability of 0.002 mag or more. Of these 37 variables, 8 have already been confirmed as {gamma} Doradus stars in our earlier papers; we scheduled the remaining 29 variables on our T3 0.4 m automatic telescope to acquire more intensive observations over the next two years. As promising new {gamma} Doradus candidates were identified from the photometry, we obtained complementary spectroscopic observations of each candidate with the Kitt Peak coude feed telescope. Analysis of our new photometric and spectroscopic data reveals 15 new {gamma} Doradus variables (and confirms two others), 8 new {delta} Scuti variables (and confirms one other), and 3 new variables with unresolved periodicity. Therefore, of the 114 {gamma} Doradus candidates in our volume-limited sample, we find 25 stars that are new or previously known {gamma} Doradus variables. This results in an incidence of 22% for {gamma} Doradus variability among candidate field stars for this volume of the solar neighborhood. The corresponding space density of {gamma} Doradus stars in this volume of space is 0.094 stars per 10{sup 3} pc{sup 3} or 94 stars per 10{sup 6} pc{sup 3}. We provide an updated list of 86 bright, confirmed, {gamma} Doradus field stars.

Henry, Gregory W.; Fekel, Francis C. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Henry, Stephen M., E-mail: gregory.w.henry@gmail.com, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: smhenry@clemson.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Clemson University, O-110 Martin Hall, Box 340975, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

None

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

H.E.S.S. upper limit on the very high energy gamma-ray emission from the globular cluster 47 Tucanae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), which contains at least 23 millisecond pulsars, were performed with the H.E.S.S. telescope system. The observations lead to an upper limit of F(E>800 GeV) conversion efficiency of spin-down power to gamma-ray photons or to relativistic leptons.

Aharonian, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

31

Limiter  

SciTech Connect

A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Upper limit on the flux of photons with energies above 10^19 eV using the Telescope Array surface detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive upper limits on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10^19, 10^19.5 and 10^20 eV based on the first three years of data taken.

T. Abu-Zayyad; R. Aida; M. Allen; R. Anderson; R. Azuma; E. Barcikowski; J. W. Belz; D. R. Bergman; S. A. Blake; R. Cady; B. G. Cheon; J. Chiba; M. Chikawa; E. J. Cho; W. R. Cho; H. Fujii; T. Fujii; T. Fukuda; M. Fukushima; D. Gorbunov; W. Hanlon; K. Hayashi; Y. Hayashi; N. Hayashida; K. Hibino; K. Hiyama; K. Honda; T. Iguchi; D. Ikeda; K. Ikuta; N. Inoue; T. Ishii; R. Ishimori; D. Ivanov; S. Iwamoto; C. C. H. Jui; K. Kadota; F. Kakimoto; O. Kalashev; T. Kanbe; K. Kasahara; H. Kawai; S. Kawakami; S. Kawana; E. Kido; H. B. Kim; H. K. Kim; J. H. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. Kitamoto; S. Kitamura; Y. Kitamura; K. Kobayashi; Y. Kobayashi; Y. Kondo; K. Kuramoto; V. Kuzmin; Y. J. Kwon; J. Lan; S. I. Lim; S. Machida; K. Martens; T. Matsuda; T. Matsuura; T. Matsuyama; J. N. Matthews; M. Minamino; K. Miyata; Y. Murano; I. Myers; K. Nagasawa; S. Nagataki; T. Nakamura; S. W. Nam; T. Nonaka; S. Ogio; M. Ohnishi; H. Ohoka; K. Oki; D. Oku; T. Okuda; A. Oshima; S. Ozawa; I. H. Park; M. S. Pshirkov; D. C. Rodriguez; S. Y. Roh; G. I. Rubtsov; D. Ryu; H. Sagawa; N. Sakurai; A. L. Sampson; L. M. Scott; P. D. Shah; F. Shibata; T. Shibata; H. Shimodaira; B. K. Shin; J. I. Shin; T. Shirahama; J. D. Smith; P. Sokolsky; B. T. Stokes; S. R. Stratton; T. Stroman; S. Suzuki; Y. Takahashi; M. Takeda; A. Taketa; M. Takita; Y. Tameda; H. Tanaka; K. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; S. B. Thomas; G. B. Thomson; P. Tinyakov; I. Tkachev; H. Tokuno; T. Tomida; S. Troitsky; Y. Tsunesada; K. Tsutsumi; Y. Tsuyuguchi; Y. Uchihori; S. Udo; H. Ukai; G. Vasiloff; Y. Wada; T. Wong; M. Wood; Y. Yamakawa; R. Yamane; H. Yamaoka; K. Yamazaki; J. Yang; Y. Yoneda; S. Yoshida; H. Yoshii; X. Zhou; R. Zollinger; Z. Zundel

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with 2.1 - 5.4 fb-1 of Data  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-4.8 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 2.1-5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.70 (0.94) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.78 (0.89). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs is 163 < m{sub H} < 166 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion of 159 < m{sub H} < 168 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Collaboration, The CDF; Collaboration, the D0; Physics, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Upper limit on the gas density in the Beta-Pictoris system: On the effect of gas drag on the dust dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate in this paper the effect of gas drag on the dynamics of the dust particles in the edge-on Beta-Pictoris disc in order to derive an upper limit on the mass of gas in this system. Our study is motivated by the large uncertainties on the amount of gas in the Beta-Pictoris disc currently found in the literature. The dust particles are assumed to originate from a colliding annulus of planetesimals peaked around 100AU from the central star as proposed by Augereau et al.(2001). We consider the various gas densities that have been inferred from independent observing techniques and we discuss their impact on the dust dynamics and on the disc profile in scattered light along the midplane. We show that the observed scattered light profile of the disc cannot be properly reproduced if hydrogen gas number density at 117AU exceeds 10**4 cm**-3. This corresponds to an upper limit on the total gas mass of about 0.4 Mearth assuming the gas density profile inferred by Brandeker et al.(2004) and thus to a gas to dust mass ratio smaller than 1. Our approach therefore provides an independent diagnostic for a gas depletion in the Beta-Pictoris system relative to the dust disc. Such an approach could also be used to constrain the gas content of recently identified systems like the edge-on disc around AUmic.

P. Thebault; J. -C Augereau

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

35

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, 140 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small ({approx} 1{sigma}) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125 < m{sub H} < 155 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156 < m{sub H} < 177 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion region of 148 < m{sub H} < 180 GeV/c{sup 2}.

CDF, The; Collaborations, D0; Phenomena, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of Data  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added, additional new channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 6.7 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.56 and 0.68 the values of the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2} and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W{sup +}W{sup -}, although acceptance for decays into {tau}{sup |+} {tau}{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg {yields} H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158 < m{sub H} < 173 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Monotonic Limiters for a Second-Order Finite-Volume Advection Scheme Using Icosahedral-Hexagonal Meshes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of a recently developed (by Miura) second-order numerical advection scheme for icosahedral-hexagonal grids on the sphere is presented, and the effects of monotonic limiters that can be used with the scheme are examined. The cases ...

Rashmi Mittal; William C. Skamarock

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

TWO UPPER LIMITS ON THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT, WITH DIFFERING IMPLICATIONS: WASP-1 HAS A HIGH OBLIQUITY AND WASP-2 IS INDETERMINATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-1 and WASP-2 throughout transits of their giant planets. Our goal was to detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, the anomalous RV observed during eclipses of rotating stars, which can be used to study the obliquities of planet-hosting stars. For WASP-1, a weak signal of a prograde orbit was detected with {approx}2{sigma} confidence, and for WASP-2 no signal was detected. The resulting upper bounds on the RM amplitude have different implications for these two systems because of the contrasting transit geometries and the stellar types. Because WASP-1 is an F7V star, and such stars are typically rapid rotators, the most probable reason for the suppression of the RM effect is that the star is viewed nearly pole-on. This implies that the WASP-1 star has a high obliquity with respect to the edge-on planetary orbit. Because WASP-2 is a K1V star, and is expected to be a slow rotator, no firm conclusion can be drawn about the stellar obliquity. Our data and our analysis contradict an earlier claim that WASP-2b has a retrograde orbit, thereby revoking this system's status as an exception to the pattern that cool stars have low obliquities.

Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teruyuki [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Paul Butler, R. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Narita, Norio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sato, Bun'ei [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Enya, Keigo [Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fischer, Debra [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

High Voltage Test Apparatus for a Neutron EDM Experiment and Lower Limit on the Dielectric Strength of Liquid Helium at Large Volumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron is underway using ultracold neutrons produced and held in a bath of superfluid helium. Attaining the target sensitivity requires maintaining an electric field of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter across the experimental cell, which is nominally 7.5 cm wide and will contain about 4 liters of superfluid. The electrical properties of liquid helium are expected to be sufficient to meet the design goals, but little is known about these properties for volumes and electrode spacings appropriate to the EDM experiment. Furthermore, direct application of the necessary voltages from an external source to the experimental test cell is impractical. An apparatus to amplify voltages in the liquid helium environment and to test the electrical properties of the liquid for large volumes and electrode spacings has been constructed. The device consists of a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter liquid helium dewar. Preliminary results show the breakdown strength of normal state liquid helium is at least 90 kV/cm at these volumes, at the helium vapor pressure corresponding to 4.38 K. These fields hold for more than 11 hours with leakage currents less than 170 pA (about 20% of the maximum tolerable in the EDM experiment). The system is also found to be robust against anticipated radiation backgrounds. Preliminary results for superfluid show that fields of at least 30 kV/cm can be sustained at the volumes required for the EDM experiment, about 60% of the design goal. These results are likely limited by the low pressure that must be maintained above the superfluid bath.

J. C. Long; P. D. Barnes; J. G. Boissevain; D. J. Clark; M. D. Cooper; J. J. Gomez; S. K. Lamoreaux; R. E. Mischke; S. I. Penttila

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Estimation of subsurface temperatures in the Tattapani geothermal field, central India from limited volume of magnetotelluric data and borehole thermograms using a constructive back-propagation neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constructive back-propagation code which was designed to run as a single hidden layer, feed-forward neural network (SLFFNN) has been adapted and used to estimate subsurface temperature from a small volume of magnetotelluric (MT) derived ...

Anthony E. Akpan; Mahesh Narayanan; T. Harinarayana

46

Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

Jun Yin

2009-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tolerance Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LIMITS Y ** *** 2-SIDED NORMAL TOLERANCE LIMITS: XBAR +- K*S REFERENCE--CRC HANDBOOK, PAGES 32-35 ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Pionic Contribution to Diffuse Gamma Rays: Upper Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse gamma rays probe the highest-energy processes at the largest scales. Here we derive model-independent constraints on the hadronic contribution to the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray spectra in the energy range 50 MeV < E_gamma < 10 GeV. The hadronic component is dominated by emission from neutral pions, with a characteristic spectrum symmetric about m_{pi^0}/2. We exploit the well-defined properties of the pion decay spectrum to quantify the maximum pionic fraction of the observed gamma-ray intensity. We find that the Galactic spectrum above 30 MeV can be at most about 50% pionic. The maximum pionic contribution to the extragalactic spectrum is energy dependent; it also depends on the redshift range over which the sources are distributed, ranging from as low as about 20% for pions generated very recently, to as much as 90% if the pions are generated around redshift 10. The implications of these constraints for models of gamma-ray and neutrino emission are briefly discussed.

Tijana Prodanovic; Brian D. Fields

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h_{rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h_{rss} ~ 10^{-19} - 10^{-17} strain/rtHz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A N; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff,S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K O; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van, M; Putten; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Volume Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" ,"Daily Period",,"Containment Total" ,"Oil","Gas","Oil","Gas" "End Period","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Rate","Rate","Cumulative","Cumulative" "MM/DD/YY 00:00","(bo)","(mmcf)","(bbls)","(mmcf)","Comment" 40333,16.486,0,16.486,0,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40334,6060.70543,15.666,6077.19143,15.666,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40335,10496.19429,22.00800001,16573.38572,37.674,"Oil rate based on metered volume"

53

Upper Stage Explosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The explosion of a failed launch vehicle upper stage on 16 October created thousands of new debris which pose collision risks to hundreds of satellites operating in low Earth orbit (LEO), including the International Space Station (ISS). Fortunately, the threat will be relatively short-lived with the majority of the debris expected to reenter the atmosphere within one year. The explosion of the Proton Briz-M stage (International Designator 2012-044C, U.S. Satellite Number 38746) occurred just a day after the publication of the October 2012 issue of the Orbital Debris Quarterly News, which contained an article describing the potential for just such a breakup (ODQN, October 2012, pp. 2-3). The stage

Places Leo; Satellites Risk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

55

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

56

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

57

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

58

VOLUME 80, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 JUNE 1998 Time Delay Induced Death in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Coupled Limit Cycle Oscillators D. V. Ramana Reddy,* A. Sen, and G. L. Johnston Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, India (Received 19 December 1997) We investigate the dynamical behavior

Dodla, Ramana

59

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

60

Volume State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 22 Volume State State or Country From/To Receipts/ Imports From Deliveries/ Exports To Net a Alabama Florida .................................................................. 0 722,558 -722,558 Georgia................................................................. 0 1,352,308 -1,352,308 Gulf of Mexico....................................................... 123,132 0 123,132 Mississippi ............................................................ 2,758,595 0 2,758,595 Tennessee............................................................ 1,744 764,749 -763,005 Total..................................................................... 2,883,471 2,839,615 43,856

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heat and Buoyancy Budgets and Mixing Rates in the Upper Thermocline of the Indian and Global Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diapycnal and diathermal diffusivity values in the upper thermocline are estimated from buoyancy and heat budgets for water volumes bounded by isopycnals and isotherms, the air–sea interface, and coastline where applicable. Comprehensive analysis ...

Huai-Min Zhang; Lynne D. Talley

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

State Volume  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama...................... 111,656 2,614 114,270 4,476 5,810 18,610 Alaska ......................... 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 148,444 Arkansas..................... 214,868 161 215,029 237 474 977 California..................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 41,037 Colorado ..................... 493,748 1,249 494,997 16,891 23,420 63,411 Florida......................... 5,900 0 5,900 1,130 1,143 4,202 Illinois.......................... 578 0 578 63 64 271 Kansas........................ 825,825 2,731 828,556 30,617 41,115 120,221 Kentucky .....................

63

Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Experimental measurements and modeling prediction of flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flammability limit is a significant safety issue for industrial processes. A certain amount of flammability limit data for pure hydrocarbons are available in the literature, but for industrial applications, there are conditions including different combinations of fuels at standard and non-standard conditions, in which the flammability limit data are scarce and sometimes unavailable. This research is two-fold: (i) Performing experimental measurements to estimate the lower flammability limits and upper flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures, conducting experimental data numerical analysis to quantitatively characterize the flammability limits of these mixtures with parameters, such as component compositions, flammability properties of pure hydrocarbons, and thermo-kinetic values; (ii) Estimating flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures through CFT-V modeling prediction (calculated flame temperature at constant volume), which is based on a comprehensive consideration of energy conservation. For the experimental part, thermal detection was used in this experiment. The experimental results indicate that the experimental results fit Le Chatelier’s Law within experimental uncertainty at the lower flammability limit condition. At the upper flammability limit condition, Le Chatelier’s Law roughly fits the saturated hydrocarbon mixture data, while with mixtures that contain one or more unsaturated components, a modification of Le Chatelier’s is preferred to fit the experimental data. The easy and efficient way to modify Le Chatelier’s Law is to power the molar percentage concentrations of hydrocarbon components. For modeling prediction part, the CFT-V modeling is an extended modification of CAFT modeling at constant volume and is significantly related to the reaction vessel configuration. This modeling prediction is consistent with experimental observation and Le Chatelier’s Law at the concentrations of lower flammability limits. When the quenching effect is negligible, this model can be simplified by ignoring heat loss from the reaction vessel to the external surroundings. Specifically, when the total mole changes in chemical reactions can be neglected and the quenching effect is small, CFTV modeling can be simplified to CAFT modeling.

Zhao, Fuman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dynamical and Physical Processes Leading to Tropical Cyclone Intensification under Upper-Level Trough Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid intensification of Tropical Cyclone (TC) Dora (2007, southwest Indian Ocean) under upper-level trough forcing is investigated. TC–trough interaction is simulated using a limited-area operational numerical weather prediction model. The ...

Marie-Dominique Leroux; Matthieu Plu; David Barbary; Frank Roux; Philippe Arbogast

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Comprehensive Historical Upper-Air Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand variability in weather and climate, it is vital to address past atmospheric circulation. This need requires meteorological information not just from the surface but also at upper levels. Current global upper-level datasets ...

A. Stickler; A. N. Grant; T. Ewen; T. F. Ross; R. S. Vose; J. Comeaux; P. Bessemoulin; K. Jylhä; W. K. Adam; P. Jeannet; A. Nagurny; A. M. Sterin; R. Allan; G. P. Compo; T. Griesser; S. Brönnimann

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Process Limits on Euclid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

68

Upper Estimates for Banach Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the relationship of dominance for sequences and trees in Banach spaces. In the context of sequences, we prove that domination of weakly null sequences is a uniform property. More precisely, if $(v_i)$ is a normalized basic sequence and $X$ is a Banach space such that every normalized weakly null sequence in $X$ has a subsequence that is dominated by $(v_i)$, then there exists a uniform constant $C\\geq1$ such that every normalized weakly null sequence in $X$ has a subsequence that is $C$-dominated by $(v_i)$. We prove as well that if $V=(v_i)_{i=1}^\\infty$ satisfies some general conditions, then a Banach space $X$ with separable dual has subsequential $V$ upper tree estimates if and only if it embeds into a Banach space with a shrinking FDD which satisfies subsequential $V$ upper block estimates. We apply this theorem to Tsirelson spaces to prove that for all countable ordinals $\\alpha$ there exists a Banach space $X$ with Szlenk index at most $\\omega^{\\alpha \\omega +1}$ which is universal for all Banach spaces with Szlenk index at most $\\omega^{\\alpha\\omega}$.

Freeman, Daniel B.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

FY 2010 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site .......................................................................................................................................21

70

FY 2012 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Volume 7 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Nuclear Energy D f N l W t Di l Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 7 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 7 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ........................................................................................................... 3

71

State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID..................... 830,351 3.79 802,182 4.71 759,647 2.83 R 623,652 4.72 707,885 5.30 Calais, ME ...................... 123,521 4.50 152,486 4.47 124,991 3.49 R 115,301 R 5.85 102,292 6.44 Detroit, MI ....................... 6,171 3.82 405 9.34 1,948 3.56 2,514 5.96 1,117 6.27 Marysville, MI.................. 0 -- 0 -- 74 3.95 0 -- 303 7.80 St. Clair, MI..................... 17,198 4.45 21,747 4.54 28,441 3.19 5,202 5.84 22,853 6.50 International Falls, MN .... 3,022 2.77 617 4.85 602 3.01 0 -- 0 -- Noyes, MN...................... 469,361 3.75 448,898 4.19 402,621 3.09 R 359,801 5.04 399,298 5.77 Warroad, MN .................. 4,576 3.95 5,318 4.52

72

FY 2012 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0060 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview ...................................................................................................................................................7

73

Illustrating surfaces in volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel framework for illustrating surfaces in a volume. Surfaces are illustrated by drawing only feature lines, such as silhouettes, valleys, ridges, and surface hatching strokes, and are embedded in volume renderings. This framework ...

Xiaoru Yuan; Baoquan Chen

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

FY 2013 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Appropriation Language .......................................................................................................................................................... 5

75

FY 2011 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

76

FY 2007 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Environmental management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental management Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .........................................................................................................3 Overview................................................................................................................................................5 Defense Environmental Cleanup Appropriation Cleanup .................................................................107 Carlsbad

77

FY 2009 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site

78

FY 2008 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Strategic Overview....................................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

79

FY 2011 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Science FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

80

FY 2012 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Volume 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Performance limits of heliostat fields  

SciTech Connect

Geometric and thermodynamic arguments are used to derive upper limits on the performance of a solar energy collection system, consisting of an axisymmetric heliostat field, a solar tower, secondary optics and a black receiver. Performance limits on collected power, concentration, and work output are presented. Performance of tower systems with several secondary optics options is compared: tower-top Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC), Tailored Edge-Ray Concentrator (TERC) approximated by a cone, and Cassegrainian with ground-level CPC or Compound Elliptic Concentrator (CEC). Optimized ray tracing is used to generate the design parameters of the secondary concentrators that yield the highest optical efficiency. The results show that the tower-top Cone provides the best performance regarding both concentration and efficiency, except for very large fields. The Cassegrainian designs come in second, but become equal and even better than the Cone for large fields. The results for the Cassegrainian are sensitive to the value of the reflectivity, due to the additional reflections incurred. The choice of a CEC is better than a CPC for the terminal concentration in a Cassegrainian system, but the difference is small. The suitability of the different design options for high-temperature solar applications is discussed. The recommendations regarding optical configuration depend on field size, as well as on application-specific constraints.

Kribus, A.; Krupkin, V.; Yogev, A. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Environmental Sciences and Energy Research Dept.; Spirkl, W. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Sektion Physik

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Upper critical field of Mo-Ni heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Upper critical field and its anisotropy have been measured on two very short wavelength Mo-Ni heterostructures of different degrees of perfection, lambda = 13.8A (disordered structure) and lambda = 16.6A (layered structure). In both cases the parallel critical field has an unexpected temperature dependence, a large and temperature dependent anisotropy, and over 60% enhancement over the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. Data are fit to the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory and the spin-orbit scattering times are found to be 1.79 x 10 T s and 2 x 10 T s, respectively.

Uher, C.; Watson, W.J.; Cohn, J.L.; Schuller, I.K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Level-of-detail rendering of large-scale irregular volume datasets using particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a level-of-detail rendering technique for large-scale irregular volume datasets. It is well known that the memory bandwidth consumed by visibility sorting becomes the limiting factor when carrying out volume rendering of such datasets. ... Keywords: large-scale irregular volume, level-of-detail, volume rendering of unstructured meshes

Takuma Kawamura; Naohisa Sakamoto; Koji Koyamada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Upper Scioto Valley School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley School Valley School Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Scioto Valley School Facility Upper Scioto Valley School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Upper Scioto Valley Schools Energy Purchaser Upper Scioto Valley Schools Location McGuffey OH Coordinates 40.691542°, -83.786353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.691542,"lon":-83.786353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

87

PV Frontogenesis and Upper-Tropospheric Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-tropospheric fronts and frontogenesis are viewed from a potental vorticity (PV) perspective. The rudiments of this approach are to regard such a front as a zone of strong PV gradient on isentropic surfaces, and to treat the accompanying ...

H. C. Davies; A. M. Rossa

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Neutrally Buoyant, Upper Ocean Sediment Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have designed and deployed a neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) intended for use in the upper ocean. The aim was to minimize hydrodynamic flow interference by making a sediment trap that drifted freely with the ambient current. ...

James R. Valdes; James F. Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Balanced and Unbalanced Upper-Level Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of frontogenesis at upper levels are investigated using a hierarchy of three numerical models. They are, in order of decreasing sophistication, the anelastic (AN), the geostrophic momentum (GM), and the quasi-geostrophic (QG) ...

Michael J. Reeder; Daniel Keyser

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

About Upper Great Plains Regional Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Upper Great Plains Region carries out Western's mission in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota. We sell more than 9 billion kilowatt-hours of...

91

FY 2013 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0072 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

92

FY 2012 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 3 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

93

FY 2005 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0032 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Printed with soy ink on recycled paper National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

94

FY 2009 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

95

FY 2010 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2010 Congressional Budget

96

FY 2012 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Better Building Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities Schools and Hospitals Universities, Schools, and Hospitals Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 g y Pensions Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

97

FY 2007 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Financial Officer Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget

98

FY 2010 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Department of Energy FY 2010Congressional Budget Environmental Management/ Defense Nuclear Waste/Nuclear Waste Disposal Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

99

FY 2013 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-0076 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

100

FY 2007 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FY 2013 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Department of Energy/Science/ Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3

102

FY 2008 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

103

FY 2006 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund

104

FY 2010 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

105

Precision volume measurement system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

FY 2013 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 DOECF-0073 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery...

107

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II...

108

Production and Handling Slide 30: UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Weights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weights Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Weights A minimum volume, stated in cubic...

109

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper...

110

Upper limits on X-ray emission from two rotating radio transients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray emission from the enigmatic rotating radio transients (RRATs) offers a vital clue to understanding these objects and how they relate to the greater neutron star population. An X-ray counterpart to RRAT J1819?1458 is ...

Kaplan, D. L.

111

Upper Energy Limit of Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory in Neutral Pion Photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the availability of the new neutral pion photoproduction from the proton data from the A2 and CB-TAPS Collaborations at Mainz it is mandatory to revisit Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory (HBChPT) and address the extraction of the partial waves as well as other issues such as the value of the low-energy constants, the energy range where the calculation provides a good agreement with the data and the impact of unitarity. We find that, within the current experimental status, HBChPT with the fitted LECs gives a good agreement with the existing neutral pion photoproduction data up to $\\sim$170 MeV and that imposing unitarity does not improve this picture. Above this energy the data call for further improvement in the theory such as the explicit inclusion of the \\Delta (1232). We also find that data and multipoles can be well described up to $\\sim$185 MeV with Taylor expansions in the partial waves up to first order in pion energy.

C. Fernandez-Ramirez; A. M. Bernstein

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Detector limitations, STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

Underwood, D. G.

1998-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Combined SM Higgs Limits at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D{sup 0} on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b} have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D{sup 0}, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Krumnack, N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II April 2002 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................2 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................4

115

FY 2012 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration

116

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Windows The Windows Volume Purchase RFP to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on AddThis.com... Home About FAQs Low-E Storm Windows Request for Proposal Contacts For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers

117

ARIZONA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT OCTOBER 2005 Upper Temperature Tolerance of Loach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tolerance. Furthermore, the results of a low-cost method may be useful for identifying the range (45% protein), and 2 parts tropical fish flakes made from brine shrimp, bloodmeal, and spirulina (40 costs associated with remaining at temperatures close to the upper thermal limit for a long period

Bonar, Scott A.

118

Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

Doll, D.W.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Blend surfaces for set theoretic volume modelling systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most volume modelling systems are very limited in the complexity of the surfaces which they support. This is satisfactory for basic models of most mechanical components, since the functional surfaces are not usually complex. However, there are often ... Keywords: computer aided design, curved surfaces, ray tracing, volume modelling

Alan E. Middleditch; Kenneth H. Sears

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Limited Warranty Research In Motion Limited (“RIM”), the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Handheld Limited Warranty (Jordan) 072406 (English) (UK Version 082504) 1 Page 2. Handheld Limited Warranty (Jordan ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Performance limits of power cycles using low temperature heat sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic analysis of a Rankine cycle using R134a as the working fluid and a finite (314.5 kg/s) low temperature (100 °C) heat source shows that, for any fixed net power output, the evaporation pressure has upper and lower limits which depend ... Keywords: energy analysis, exergy analysis, finite size thermodynamics, optimisation

Mohammed Khennich; Nicolas Galanis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Limited discrepancy search revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harvey and Ginsberg's limited discrepancy search (LDS) is based on the assumption that costly heuristic mistakes are made early in the search process. Consequently, LDS repeatedly probes the state space, going against the heuristic (i.e., taking discrepancies) ... Keywords: Heuristic mistakes, limited discrepancy search, performance improvement

Patrick Prosser; Chris Unsworth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

FY 2010 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

126

FY 2008 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund

127

FY 2005 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2004 Volume 6 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0037 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

128

FY 2009 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management

129

FY 2007 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability

130

FY 2007 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

131

FY 2011 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional

132

FY 2006 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development

133

FY 2013 Volume I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget

134

FY 2006 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion

135

FY 2009 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration

136

FY 2005 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Volume 3 February 2004 Volume 3 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Legacy Management Legacy Management Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0034 Volume 3 Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution

137

FY 2007 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/

138

FY 2006 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut

139

FY 2011 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 Congressional Budget

140

FY 2006 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FY 2009 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration

142

FY 2008 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

143

FY 2010 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

144

Unsteady flow volumes  

SciTech Connect

Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

DeShong, J.A.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Upper Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to a moving hurricane is studied using historical air-sea data and a three-dimensional numerical ocean model. Sea surface temperature (SST) response is emphasized. The model has a surface mixed-layer (ML) that entrains ...

James F. Price

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

FY 2008 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/ Other Defense Activities FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page

149

FY 2006 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2006 Congressional Budget

150

FY 2006 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

151

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

152

Guidelines Volume I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 1: Electricity Supply Sector Part 2: Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Part 3: Industrial Sector Electricity Supply Sector-Page 1.iii Contents of Volume I This volume, the first of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program,

153

2001volume1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passenger Volumes Passenger Volumes Eng Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Displ Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (liters) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2cl 3.2 90 14 0 0 0 0 Acura 3.2tl 3.2 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 3.5 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 1.8 0 0 83 12 77 13 Audi A4 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 1.8 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 2.8 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 2.8 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 2.7 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 L 4.2 0 0 104 18 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 2.7 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi S4 Avant 2.7 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi S8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 325ci 2.5 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325ci Convertible 2.5 74 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325i 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325i Sport Wagon 2.5 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 325xi 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325xi Sport Wagon 2.5

154

Reduction of Statistical Power Per Event Due to Upper Lifetime Cuts in Lifetime Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cut on the maximum lifetime in a lifetime fit not only reduces the number of events, but also, in some circumstances dramatically, decreases the statistical significance of each event. The upper impact parameter cut in the hadronic B trigger at CDF, which is due to technical limitations, has the same effect. In this note we describe and quantify the consequences of such a cut on lifetime measurements. We find that even moderate upper lifetime cuts, leaving event numbers nearly unchanged, can dramatically increase the statistical uncertainty of the fit result.

Jonas Rademacker

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the results of an optical design scoping study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. ITER is an international collaboration to build a large fusion energy tokamak with a goal of demonstrating net fusion power for pulses much longer than the energy confinement time. At the time of this report, six of the ITER upper ports are planned to each to contain a camera system for recording visible and infrared light, as well as other diagnostics. the performance specifications for the temporal and spatial resolution of this system are shown in the Section II, Functional Specifications. They acknowledge a debt to Y. Corre and co-authors of the CEA Cadarache report ''ITER wide-angle viewing and thermographic and visible system''. Several of the concepts used in this design are derived from that CEA report. The infrared spatial resolution for optics of this design is diffraction-limited by the size of the entrance aperture, at lower resolution than listed in the ITER diagnostic specifications. The size of the entrance aperture is a trade-off between spatial resolution, optics size in the port, and the location of relay optics. The signal-to-noise ratio allows operation at the specified time resolutions.

Lasnier, C; Seppala, L; Morris, K; Groth, M; Fenstermacher, M; Allen, S; Synakowski, E; Ortiz, J

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Arizona Water Atlas Volume 3 Upper San Pedro Basin References and Supplemental Reading References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anderson, T.W., and G.W. Freethey, 1995, Simulation of groundwater flow in alluvial basins in south central Arizona and parts of adjacent states: USGS Professional Paper 1406-D.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

UPPER ATMOSPHERE RE-ENTRY STUDY HIGH ALTITUDE BURNUP. VOLUME II  

SciTech Connect

Methods of determining the fate of radioactive fuels in space power units burned up on re-entry into the earth's atmosphere are reviewed. Particulate characteristics experiments were derived from an analytical study on the ablation of Dlutonium fuel. This study revealed that the particulate size distribution resulting on re-entry burnup is a function of: the fuel form in use and the material velocity and atmospheric density at the time the fuel is exposed. The particulate fate experiments were derived essentially from studies of the effects of thermal and turbulent diffusion, and wind and gravity dispersion on the particulate cloud. The experiments recommended are described. (M.C.G.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Security Clearances; Limitations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. (a) In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. "(a) Definitions.-In this section: "(1) Controlled substance.-The term `controlled substance' has the meaning given that term in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802). "(2) Covered person.-The term `covered person' means- "(A) an officer or employee of a Federal agency; "(B) a member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps who is on active duty or is in an active status; and "(C) an officer or employee of a contractor of a Federal agency.

159

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

160

FY 2008 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy/ Energy Supply and Conservation FY 2008 Congressional Budget

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

FY 2010 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

162

FY 2009 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

163

FY 2007 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology

164

FY 2008 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves

165

volume.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2tl 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 0 0 83 12 77 13 Aston Martin DB-7 Vantage Coupe 72 6 0 0 0 0 Aston Martin DB-7 Vantage Volante 72 6 0 0 0 0 Audi A4 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 323ci 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 323i 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 323i Convertible 0 0 74 9 0 0 BMW 323i Touring 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 328ci 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 328i 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 528i 0 0 93 11 0 0 BMW 528i Sport Wagon 0 0 96 33 0 0 BMW 540i 0 0 93 11 0 0 BMW 540i Sport Wagon 0 0 96 33 0 0 BMW 740i, 740i Sport

166

FY 2005 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Clean Coal Technology February 2004 Volume 7 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies

167

FY 2005 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Volume 5 Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Non Non - - Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non Non - - Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund and Decommissioning Fund February 2004 Volume 5 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion

168

FY 2005 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Volume 2 February 2004 Volume 2 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Energy Security and Assurance Energy Security and Assurance Security Security Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Office of Hearings & Appeals Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Safeguards & Security Crosscut Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy

169

Viability Assessment Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Climatic Aspects of the 1993 Upper Mississippi River Basin Flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 record-breaking summer flood in the Upper Mississippi River Basin resulted from an unprecedentedly persistent heavy rain pattern. Rainfall totals for the Upper Mississippi River Basin were, by a large margin, the largest of this century ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; Stanley A. Changnon; James R. Angel

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor from UARS MLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results of upper-tropospheric water vapor obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented. MLS is less affected by clouds than infrared or visible techniques, and the UARS ...

W. G. Read; J. W. Waters; D. A. Flower; L. Froidevaux; R. F. Jarnot; D. L. Hartmann; R. S. Harwood; R. B. Rood

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Upper-Tropospheric Humidity from MLS and ECMWF Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares upper-tropospheric humidity from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data. MLS measurements are not included in the ECMWF ...

H. L. Clark; R. S. Harwood

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Marginal Sea Overflows and the Upper Ocean Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marginal sea overflows and the overlying upper ocean are coupled in the vertical by two distinct mechanisms—by an interfacial mass flux from the upper ocean to the overflow layer that accompanies entrainment and by a divergent eddy flux ...

Shinichiro Kida; Jiayan Yang; James F. Price

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Observed and Simulated Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the upper troposphere over 4.5 yr are used to assess the covariation of upper-tropospheric humidity and temperature with surface temperatures, which can be used to constrain ...

A. Gettelman; Q. Fu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Life History of Mobile Troughs in the Upper Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing evidence indicates that surface cyclogenesis is predominantly a response to the approach of a preexisting trough at upper levels. A question then arises about the origin of the upper-level predecessor. As an initial approach to this ...

Frederick Sanders

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Frontogenesis Processes in the Middle and Upper Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic issues regarding upper-level frontogenesis addressed in this paper are: (i) simulated frontogenesis influenced by the initial flow, (ii) upper-level frontogenesis as essentially a two-dimensional process, and (iii) frontal-scale positive ...

Keith M. Hines; Carlos R. Mechoso

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Volume Refinement Fairing Isosurfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an interpolating refinement method for two- and three-dimensional scalar fields defined on hexahedral grids. Iterative fairing of the underlying contours (isosurfaces) provides the function values of new grid points. Our method can be considered ... Keywords: adaptive mesh refinement, isosurfaces, subdivision, variational modeling, volume fairing

Martin Bertram

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Point-wise hierarchical reconstruction for discontinuous Galerkin and finite volume methods for solving conservation laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a new hierarchical reconstruction (HR) method [17,28] for limiting solutions of the discontinuous Galerkin and finite volume methods up to fourth order of accuracy without local characteristic decomposition for solving hyperbolic nonlinear ... Keywords: Discontinous Galerkin method, Finite volume method, Hierarchical reconstruction, Hyperbolic conservation laws, Limiter

Zhiliang Xu; Yingjie Liu; Huijing Du; Guang Lin; Chi-Wang Shu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Upper-Ocean Response to Surface Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moored observations of atmospheric variables and upper-ocean temperatures from the Long-Term Upper-Ocean Study (LOTUS) and the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) are used to examine the upper-ocean response to surface heating. ...

Craig M. Lee; Daniel L. Rudnick

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and the wave polarization angles are unknown.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; M. Boyle; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagliŕ; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; F. Clara; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; K. Das; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; M. Kelner; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; H. Kim; N. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; J. Li; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and ...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M BejgerM G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Budzy?ski, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagliŕ, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Clara, F; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Kelner, M; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; Kim, N; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marandi, A; Marchesoni, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Similarity-based fuzzy limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the concept of similarity-based fuzzy limits in metric spaces is introduced and it is shown that it is an application of limit maps of topologies on [0,1]-valued sets, introduced by Hohle and Sostak, furthermore it is observed that the ... Keywords: Fuzzy limit, Limit map, Similarity-based fuzzy limit, [0,1]-Valued topology

Gültekin Soylu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in a tokamak fusion reactor having a midplane magnetic coil on the inner wall of an evacuated toriodal chamber within which a neutral beam heated, fusing plasma is magnetically confined, a neutral beam armor shield and plasma limiter is provided on the inner wall of the toroidal chamber to shield the midplane coil from neutral beam shine-thru and plasma deposition. The armor shield/plasma limiter forms a semicircular enclosure around the midplane coil with the outer surface of the armor shield/plasma limiter shaped to match, as closely as practical, the inner limiting magnetic flux surface of the toroidally confined, indented, bean-shaped plasma. The armor shield/plasma limiter includes a plurality of semicircular graphite plates each having a pair of coupled upper and lower sections with each plate positioned in intimate contact with an adjacent plate on each side thereof so as to form a closed, planar structure around the entire outer periphery of the circular midplane coil. The upper and lower plate sections are adapted for coupling to heat sensing thermocouples and to a circulating water conduit system for cooling the armor shield/plasma limiter.The inner center portion of each graphite plate is adapted to receive and enclose a section of a circular diagnostic magnetic flux loop so as to minimize the power from the plasma confinement chamber incident upon the flux loop.

Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Hand, Jr, Samuel W. (Hopewell Township, Mercer County, NJ); Ksayian, Haig (Titusville, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Heat Pump: $150 per unit Commercial Heat Pump: $150 per three tons Water Heater: $100 Provider Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient equipment through the Energy Right

186

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

Rayner, S.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

Rayner, S.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

Nobuo Yoshida

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Estimating the Diapycnal Transport Contribution to Warm Water Volume Variations in the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in the warm water volume (WWV) of the equatorial Pacific Ocean are considered a key element of the dynamics of the El Nińo–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. WWV, a proxy for the upper-ocean heat content, is usually defined as the ...

Jaclyn N. Brown; Alexey V. Fedorov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Viability Assessment Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Simulation of Crop Yields Using ERA-40: Limits to Skill and Nonstationarity in Weather–Yield Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reanalysis data provide an excellent test bed for impacts prediction systems, because they represent an upper limit on the skill of climate models. Indian groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) yields have been simulated using the General Large-Area ...

A. J. Challinor; T. R. Wheeler; J. M. Slingo; P. Q. Craufurd; D. I. F. Grimes

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book complements Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 1. Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods glycidol Health h

193

Fault Current Limiters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fault Fault Current Limiters Superconducting & Solid-state Power Equipment Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability www.oe.energy.gov Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power What are FCLs? A fault is an unintentional short circuit, or partial short-circuit, in an electric circuit. A variety of factors such as lightning, downed power lines, or crossed power lines cause faults. During a fault, excessive current-called fault current- flows through the electrical system often resulting in a failure of one section of that system by causing a

194

Upper Peninsula Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peninsula Power Co Peninsula Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Peninsula Power Co Place Michigan Utility Id 19578 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 - Residential Seasonal Service Power Supply Service Residential A-1 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential A-2 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential Capacity Buyback Rider CP-IB

195

Understanding Nuclei in the upper sd - shell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclei in the upper-$sd$ shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A$\\simeq$ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

M. Saha Sarkar; Abhijit Bisoi; Sudatta Ray; Ritesh Kshetri; S. Sarkar

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Environmental report 1995. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Upper hybrid solitons and oscillating-two-steam instabilities  

SciTech Connect

A warm two-fluid theory of soliton formation near the upper-hybrid frequency is developed. Several forms of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation are obtained, depending on whether the electric field is completely perpendicular to the dc magnetic field or whether it has an additional small component parallel to the magnetic field. For the perpendicular case, the character of the soliton depends on its scale length, L, and on $beta$. For low $beta$, when L is less than c/$omega$/sub pe/, one finds stationary envelope and hole solitons, whereas when L is greater than c/$omega$/sub pi/ we obtain the super-Alfvenic solitons described by Kaufman and Stenflow by MHD theory. However, the case E/sub parallel/ not equal to 0 may be of more interest, since it couples the pump to the excited waves more efficiently. In the limit of linearization about an infinite wavelength pump, the nonlinear Schroedinger equations yield purely growing (oscillating-two-stream) instabilities in both cases. (auth)

Porkolab, M.; Goldman, M.V.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration...

199

Stretches of Upper Mississippi River near record-low levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As a result of last year's drought, stretches of the Upper Mississippi River have approached record lows. These low water levels have jeopardized commercial barge ...

200

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the following modules: thermal shock (thermal stress, pressurized thermal shock), brittle fracture (mechanism, minimum pressurization-temperature curves, heatup/cooldown rate limits), and plant materials (properties considered when selecting materials, fuel materials, cladding and reflectors, control materials, nuclear reactor core problems, plant material problems, atomic displacement due to irradiation, thermal and displacement spikes due to irradiation, neutron capture effect, radiation effects in organic compounds, reactor use of aluminum).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Limit on electron neutrino mass from observation of the beta decay of molecular tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the most sensitive upper limit set on the mass of the electron antineutrino. The upper limit of 9.4 eV (95% confidence level) was obtained from a study of the shape of the beta decay spectrum of free molecular tritium. Achieving such a level of sensitivity required precise determinations of all processes that modify the shape of the observed spectrum. This result is in clear disagreement with a reported value for the mass of 26(5) eV. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Wilkerson, J.F.; Bowles, T.J.; Friar, J.L.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.; Wark, D.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Knapp, D.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation  

SciTech Connect

An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Twisted mass finite volume effects  

SciTech Connect

We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Limitations on Carry Lookahead Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fan-in and fan-out limitations imposed by specific gate circuits force corresponding limits-upon the sizes of carry lookahead circuits fabricated from those gates. The relationships between those limits are derived, providing simple formulae that ... Keywords: high-speed arithmetic, Binary addition, carry lookahead

T. Rhyne

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Journal of Research Volume 43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Volume dilatometry, p. 145 Bekkedahl, Norman http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres ... nozzles with hydrocarbons and with air, p. 449 Shafer, MR; Bovey, HL ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Definition: Volume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

contained within a specified three-dimensional space.1 View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Volume is the quantity of three-dimensional space enclosed by some closed boundary,...

208

EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article, from our Health & Nutrition News department, discusses EFSA’s establishment of an upper intake level for DHA and EPA and the agency’s work on health claims. EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts a

209

Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper oceanic temporal response to tropical cyclone (TC) passage is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content based on the U.S. Navy’s Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation System ...

John A. Knaff; Mark DeMaria; Charles R. Sampson; James E. Peak; James Cummings; Wayne H. Schubert

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

High Temperature Corrosion Research in Progress: 1997: Volume 1 (A-J), Volume 2 (K-U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature oxidation and corrosion are important life-limiting factors for several critical components in thermal power systems. Research into many aspects of the problem is taking place in laboratories worldwide. This report, a survey of work in progress, updates and extends EPRI's 1994 report TR-104124, Volumes 1 and 2.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

1985-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Intercomparison tests of moored current measurements in the upper ocean  

SciTech Connect

During the August-September 1977 Mixed Layer Experiment (Mile) and the July-September 1978 Joint Air-Sea (Jasin) project, moored current measurements were made in the upper ocean with Savonius rotor and vane vector-averaging current meters (VACM), dual orthogonal propeller vector-measuring current meters (VMCM), and dual orthogonal acoustic travel-time vector-averaging current meters (ACM). Wind speeds and significant wave heights reached 20 m s/sup -1/ and 5m. The influence of mooring motion upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM measurements are described. In the mixed layer above about 30 m depth where mean currents are relatively large, the effect of a surface-following buoy upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM velocity fluctuations at frequencies less than 0.3 cph was negligible; at frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM data contained the largest amount of mooring induced contamination. Below the mixed layer at depths greater than about 75 m, a subsurface mooring should be used; however, when a surface-following buoy was used, then VMCM data better approximated the spectrum of the fluctuations than VACM data. A spar-buoy should not be used to measure currents at depths as deep as 80 m. The frequency-dependent differences between VACM and VMCM and between VACM and ACM measurements are described. At frequencies less than 0.3 cph, the differences between the VACM and ACM or the VMCM records were not significant with 95% confidence limits, were always positive, and above 80 m depth were less than 20%. At frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM-VMCM differences were about 5 times larger than the VACM-ACM differences.

Halpern, D.; Weller, R.A.; Briscoe, M.G.; Davis, R.E.; McCullough, J.R.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. González; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lück; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Márka; Z. Márka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Müller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thüring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

Valero, O.J.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Performance limits of gravity-assist heat pipes with simple wick structures  

SciTech Connect

Experiments using gravity-assist heat pipes with simple wick structures were used to establish performance limits due to entrainment of the liquid by the counterflowing vapor. A physical model is postulated which leads to a single correlation predicting entrainment limits for all data investigated. The characteristic length in the entrainment parameter is the depth of the wick structure and the model infers an upper bound on this parameter.

Prenger, F.C. Jr.; Kemme, J.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Limit Cycle and Conserved Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a potential coexists with limit cycle. Here the potential determines the final distribution of population. Our demonstration consists of three steps: We first show the existence of limit from a typical physical sciences setting: the potential is a type of Mexican hat type, with the strength of a magnetic field scale with the strength the potential gradient near the limit cycle, and the friction goes to zero faster than the potential near the limit cycle. Hence the dynamics at the limit cycle is conserved. The diffusion matrix is nevertheless finite at the limit cycle. Secondly, we construct the potential in the dynamics with limit cycle in a typical dynamical systems setting. Thirdly, we argue that such a construction can be carried out in a more general situation based on a method discovered by one of us. This method of dealing with stochastic differential equation is in general different from both Ito and Stratonovich calculus. Our result may be useful in many related applications, such as in the discussion of metastability of limit cycle and in the construction of Hopfield potential in the neural network computation.

X. -M. Zhu; L. Yin; P. Ao

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

217

FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

Offline count-limited certificates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the idea of offline count-limited certificates (or clics for short), and show how these can be implemented using minimal trusted hardware functionality already widely available today. Offline count-limited ... Keywords: authentication, offline payments, smartcards, trusted platform module (TPM)

Luis F. G. Sarmenta; Marten van Dijk; Jonathan Rhodes; Srinivas Devadas

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

K East basin sludge volume estimates for integrated water treatment system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides estimates of the volume of sludge expected from Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) processing of the fuel elements and in the fuel storage canisters in K East Basin. The original estimates were based on visual observations of fuel element condition in the basin and laboratory measurements of canister sludge density. Revision 1 revised the volume estimates of sludge from processing of the fuel elements based on additional data from evaluations of material from the KE Basin fuel subsurface examinations. A nominal Working Estimate and an upper level Working Bound is developed for the canister sludge and the fuel wash sludge components in the KE Basin.

Pearce, K.L.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effects of Penetrative Radiation on the Upper Tropical Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of penetrative radiation on the upper tropical ocean circulation have been investigated with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with attenuation depths derived from remotely sensed ocean color data. The OGCM is a reduced ...

Raghu Murtugudde; James Beauchamp; Charles R. McClain; Marlon Lewis; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Influence of an Upper Thermocline Current on Intrathermocline Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of an upper-layer current on the propagation of intermediate vortices, such as Mediterranean Water eddies, is investigated. The author discusses the advection mechanism proposed by Hogg and Stommel and shows how the ...

Y. G. Morel

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Initiation and Evolution of an Intense Upper-Level Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within confluent northwesterly flow of an intensifying baroclinic wave over North America in late October 1963, an intense frontal zone developed in 12 h near the inflection point in the middle and upper troposphere. By 24 h after its initial ...

Frederick Sanders; Lance F. Bosart; Chung-Chieng Lai

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Circulation Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Upper Ocean Density Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends a previous hydrodynamic circulation model of established, persistent upper ocean density fronts by including a thermodynamic or buoyancy equation in the integral treatment. An analysis is also conducted of the variables related ...

Richard W. Garvine

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Convectively Driven Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two experiments were performed to study the characteristics of turbulence in convective mixed layers in the upper Ocean. In the first, a diurnal convective mixed layer developed in the Bahamas under the influence of the cycle of daytime solar ...

T. J. Shay; M. C. Gregg

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Conflicting Signals of Climatic Change in the Upper Indus Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature data for seven instrumental records in the Karakoram and Hindu Kush Mountains of the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) have been analyzed for seasonal and annual trends over the period 1961–2000 and compared with neighboring mountain regions ...

H. J. Fowler; D. R. Archer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Upper Equatorial Indian Ocean. The Climatological Seasonal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatological seasonal cycle of the upper equatorial Indian Ocean is discussed. A summary of the observations is given. Near the surface and below the equatorial thermocline, the observations indicate an intense variability of the equatorial ...

Gilles Reverdin

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Radiative Processes in Upper Tropospheric Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusional mass evolution of hydrometeors in upper tropospheric clouds for various radiative conditions in the cloud and for varying ambient moisture Supply is simulated using a time dependent microphysical model. Radiation can play an ...

Douglas A. Wesley; Stephen K. Cox

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An Objective Isobaric/Isentropic Technique for Upper Air Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective meteorological analysis technique has been developed to provide both horizontal and vertical (cross-sectional) upper air analyses. The horizontal analyses are made at grid points that lie on isobaric levels in a conventional manner. ...

Robert L. Mancuso; Roy M. Endlich; L. J. Ehernberger

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Climatic Review of Summer 1983 in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The review of the climate of the summer of 1983 and associated economic impacts were collated by the state climatologists of 12 states of the Upper Midwest. Their data archives and facilities permitted relatively fast analysis of cooperative ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Upper-Layer Circulation in the South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-layer circulation is investigated by using all available historical temperature profiles combined with climatological temperature–salinity relationships in the South China Sea. Two cyclonic eddies are revealed: one is located east of ...

Tangdong Qu

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An Upper-Tropospheric Low over Texas during Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Meteorological Center 200-mb analyses are used to develop an abridged six-year climatology of the tropical upper-tropospheric trough (TUTT) over the Gulf of Mexico. The climatology reveals large intraseasonal and interannual variability ...

Mary Beth Whitfield; Steven W. Lyons

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 WASTE STREAM CODE: 01582 STREAM NAME:Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 MPC NAME:Inorganic Sludges TOTAL CURIES: 26.000 Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 Isotopes Scandium-46 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Tin-113 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Strontium-85 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Tantalum-182 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Californium-250 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Lead-212 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Americium-244 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:

235

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

236

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Squeeze: numerical-precision-optimized volume rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how to squeeze volume rendering into as few bits per operation as possible while still retaining excellent image quality. For each of the typical volume rendering pipeline stages in texture map volume rendering, ray casting and splatting ...

Ingmar Bitter; Neophytos Neophytou; Klaus Mueller; Arie E. Kaufman

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manufacturers/design firms/service providers are there in a given market, who are the top five, and what (e.g., electric vehicles and ICE equipment) might be adding significant load to the systems? · How on at the national level - especially by policy makers, national labs, and by product manufacturers. At the same time

239

An upper limit on the abundance of small trans-Neptunian objects from X-ray occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe the detection of 201 highly significant dips in the count rate of Sco X-1 from a search of some 500 ks of archival RXTE PCA data, which could be caused by TNO occultations. I show that most of these dips are ...

Jones, Tucker Anthony

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ductile Fracture Handbook: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-volume Ductile Fracture Handbook provides the structural analyst with computational methods for evaluating the integrity of flawed structures that are fabricated from ductile materials or have loads that may produce significant plasticity, specifically easy-to-use fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of problems dealing with cylinders subjected to several types of elastic-plastic loading. Volume 2 presents new solutions and significant expansion of previous solutions, typically in the ...

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ductile Fracture Handbook: Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-volume Ductile Fracture Handbook provides the structural analyst with computational methods for evaluating the integrity of flawed structures that are fabricated from ductile materials or have loads that may produce significant plasticity, specifically easy-to-use fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of problems dealing with cylinders subjected to several types of elastic-plastic loading. Volume 3 presents solutions for axial part-throughwall cracks, cracks in elbows, tees, and nozzles...

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

VOLUME I: TEXT AND APPENDICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed is the Final Reclamation Plan for American Nuclear Corporations's (ANC's) Tailings Pond #2, which also includes preliminary reclamation design for Pond #1. The final reclamation plan incorporates NRC staff comments on the preliminary plan submitted in November, 1995. Two volumes are included; the first contains the body of the report and the appendices. The second volume contains 31 large drawings. Please call me or Bob Medlock if you have any questions. Best regards, SHEPHERD MILLER, INC.

Shepherd Miller; Mr. Mark Moxley; Kent Bruxvoort P. E; Ken Hooks Nrc; Rick Chancellor Deq; Jim Voeller Avi; Bill Salisbury; For Tailings Pond

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The development of an index for the proximal upper extremity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis techniques specific to the proximal upper extremity have historically been overlooked in the field of ergonomics. This research effort provides a methodology that will allow the ergonomics practitioner to analyze a job and predict whether or not that job exposes workers to increased risk of proximal upper extremity disorders. Literature from the fields of physiology, biomechanics, and epidemiology was assimilated in order to understand the theories of pathogenesis of disorders in the rotator cuff and to identify the risk factors associated with proximal upper extremity disorders. A retrospective epidemiological study was conducted to identify job task variables that may contribute to the occurrence of proximal upper extremity disorders. Two proximal upper extremity constructs were proposed: a fatigue-based model and a compressive load-based model. The constructs incorporated lessons learned from the literature and results from the epidemiological study. Validation of the models was performed using data from the epidemiological study. It was determined that the fatigue-based model was a good predictor of proximal upper extremity disorders.

Walline, Erin Kurusz

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Volume 19: Part 2 -December 1972 C O N T E N T S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Tercd.1 3 u d P a I ~ v i r ~ ~of ttK Upper H.n;rlnr Trail Famation near Mub, UtahUNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 19: Part 2 -December 1972 C O N T E N T S Lutd F&.r d Pdmcelegy!tih Lakc as Reflutd in Ik s d i m r k : A First Reprt

Seamons, Kent E.

245

Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume Purchase to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume Purchase on Facebook...

246

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Builders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Builders to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Builders on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Builders on...

247

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Manufacturers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Manufacturers to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Manufacturers on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For...

248

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Events on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Events on Twitter Bookmark High...

249

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: News on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: News on Twitter Bookmark High...

250

NTS Volume 2 - Clean Edit.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy October 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE VOLUME II October 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT...

251

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT...

252

Limits to the power density of very large wind farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Passive fault current limiting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

254

Upper ocean processes observed by underwater gliders in the California Current System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Upper ocean thermohaline structure in thevariability in the upper ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 105 (C7),Gill, A. E. (1982), Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics, Int. Geophys.

Todd, Robert E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Metastable Gravitons and Infinite Volume Extra Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the issue of whether extra dimensions could have an infinite volume and yet reproduce the effects of observable four-dimensional gravity on a brane. There is no normalizable zero-mode graviton in this case, nevertheless correct Newton's law can be obtained by exchanging bulk gravitons. This can be interpreted as an exchange of a single {\\it metastable} 4D graviton. Such theories have remarkable phenomenological signatures since the evolution of the Universe becomes high-dimensional at very large scales. Furthermore, the bulk supersymmetry in the infinite volume limit might be preserved while being completely broken on a brane. This gives rise to a possibility of controlling the value of the bulk cosmological constant. Unfortunately, these theories have difficulties in reproducing certain predictions of Einstein's theory related to relativistic sources. This is due to the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in the propagator of a massive graviton. This suggests that all theories in which contributions to effective 4D gravity come predominantly from the bulk graviton exchange should encounter serious phenomenological difficulties.

G. Dvali; G. Gabadadze; M. Porrati

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cool Customers in the Stellar Graveyard III: Limits to Substellar Objects around nearby White Dwarfs using CFHT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from a groundbased high contrast imaging survey of thirteen nearby white dwarfs for substellar objects is presented. We place strict upper limits on the type of substellar objects present, ruling out the presence of anything larger than $\\sim$14 M$_{Jup}$ for eight of the white dwarfs at separations $>$19 AU and corresponding to primordial separations of $\\sim$3-6~AU assuming adiabatic mass loss without tidal interactions. With these results we place the first upper limit on the number of intermediate mass stars with brown dwarfs at separations $>$ 13 AU. We combine these results with previous work to place upper limits on the number of massive Jovian ($>$ 10 M$_{Jup}$) planets in orbit around white dwarfs whose progenitors spanned a mass range of 1-7 M$_{\\odot}$.

J. H. Debes; J. Ge; C. Ftaclas

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume Forecasts A document describing how growing stock (`standing') volume is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Growing stock volume forecasts Background A forecast of standing volume (or

258

Bioethanol Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioethanol Limited Bioethanol Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioethanol Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip SE1 7TJ Sector Renewable Energy Product Aims to develop a global renewable transport fuel business supplying primarily bioethanol but also biodiesel. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Renpro Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renpro Limited Renpro Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Renpro Limited Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip WC2N 4JF Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "Founded in 2005 ... newable energy." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ablamp Limited Ablamp Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Ablamp Limited Place Nanhai, Guangdong Province, China Sector Solar Product Manufacturer of energy-saving Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs, solar-powered lights, LED bulbs, auto lamps and other speciality lamps. Coordinates 23.049681°, 113.173737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":23.049681,"lon":113.173737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solfex Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solfex Limited Solfex Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Solfex Limited Address Energy Arena Bannister Hall Works Off Shop Lane, Higher Walton Preston, Lancashire PR5 4DZ Place Preston, United Kingdom Sector Solar Product Solar thermal collectors Phone number 01772 312847 Website http://www.solfex.co.uk/home.h Coordinates 53.743452°, -2.64416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.743452,"lon":-2.64416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volumes 1-16: Volume 1: Electric Generators; Volume 2: Power Transformers; Volume 3: Auxili ary System Planning; Volume 4: Wire and Cable; Volume 5: Grounding and Lightning Protection; Volume 6: Motors; Volume 7..  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Upper-Ocean Eddy Transports of Heat, Potential Vorticity, and Volume in the Northeastern North Atlantic—“Vivaldi 1991”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale eddies in the northeast North Atlantic were investigated using the SeaSoar towed CTD and ADCP data from the 1991 Vivaldi cruise. These data cover an area of 1700 km × 1500 km between 39° and 54°N and between 35° and 10°W. To maximize ...

H. Leach; S. J. Bowerman; M. E. McCulloch

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulatory and DOE requirements • To provide a historicalmeets the US/EPA and DOE requirements, which are containedin compliance with DOE requirements to limit radiation doses

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Aluminum Honeycomb Impact Limiter Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scale model testing, static-materials testing, and static and dynamic structural analyses of data on impact limiters provided data for NRC licensing of a spent-fuel transport cask. The analysis of quarter-scale drop test data is reconciled with static and dynamic structural analysis data produced using the ANSYS program.

1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

266

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Climate Simulations with an Isentropic Finite Volume Dynamical Core  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the impact of changing the vertical coordinate from a hybrid pressure to a hybrid-isentropic coordinate within the finite volume dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). Results from a 20-year climate simulation using the new model coordinate configuration are compared to control simulations produced by the Eulerian spectral and FV dynamical cores of CAM which both use a pressure-based ({sigma}-p) coordinate. The same physical parameterization package is employed in all three dynamical cores. The isentropic modeling framework significantly alters the simulated climatology and has several desirable features. The revised model produces a better representation of heat transport processes in the atmosphere leading to much improved atmospheric temperatures. We show that the isentropic model is very effective in reducing the long standing cold temperature bias in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, a deficiency shared among most climate models. The warmer upper troposphere and stratosphere seen in the isentropic model reduces the global coverage of high clouds which is in better agreement with observations. The isentropic model also shows improvements in the simulated wintertime mean sea-level pressure field in the northern hemisphere.

Chen, Chih-Chieh; Rasch, Philip J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing June 2013 i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing June 2013 i Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing #12;Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing June 2013 ii Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction to Microsoft Volume................................................................................................................................................................ 1 Keys to Understanding Microsoft Volume Licensing

Narasayya, Vivek

270

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

271

A General Circulation Model for Upper Ocean Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general circulation model (GCM) of the ocean that emphasizes the simulation of the upper ocean has been developed. This emphasis is in keeping with its future intent, that of an air-sea coupled model. The basic model is the primitive equation ...

A. Rosati; K. Miyakoda

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

ENSO Signals in Global Upper-Ocean Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-space evolution of the El Nińo-Southern Oscillation in sea surface temperature (SST) and heat storage of the upper 400 m (HS400) for the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans is investigated for 13 years (1979–1991). EOF and rotated EOF (...

Yves M. Tourre; Warren B. White

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Closed-Form Upper Bounds in Static Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical approach to automatic cost analysis consists of two phases. Given a program and some measure of cost, the analysis first produces cost relations (CRs), i.e., recursive equations which capture the cost of the program in ... Keywords: Abstract interpretation, Automatic complexity analysis, Closed-form upper bounds, Cost analysis, Programming languages, Resource analysis, Static analysis

Elvira Albert; Puri Arenas; Samir Genaim; Germán Puebla

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 5 References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hyndman. 1989. Roadside geology of Idaho. Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT. 394 pp. American Fisheries Society (AFS), Idaho Chapter. 2000. Website. http://www.fisheries.org/idaho/. Accessed November. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: an ecological treasure on the upper Snake River Plain. Rangelands

275

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish Management Jim Mende Idaho Fish and Game Kevin Meyer Idaho Fish and Game Deb Mignogno US Fish and Wildlife

276

Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.iugonet.org/en IUGONET Development of analysis software The IUGONET project - objectives Metadata DB for Upper Atmosphere on TDAS (THEMIS Data Analysis Software Suite) composed of IDL routines. The software will have capability AE index MAGAS KTB Meteor EAR MU GUI mode Loaded data list Time-range set Choice of instrument Choice

Takada, Shoji

277

Upper-Ocean Heat Balance in the Kuroshio Extension Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A horizontally two-dimensional mixed-layer model is used to study the upper-ocean heat balance in the Kuroshio Extension region (30°–40°N, 141°–175°E). Horizontal dependency is emphasized because, in addition to vertical entrainment and surface ...

Bo Qiu; Kathryn A. Kelly

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

279

Channeling and Countercurrent in the Upper Rhine Valley: Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the upper Rhine Valley, located in the southwest part of the Federal Republic of Germany, a pronounced channeling of the airflow is observed and occasionally also a countercurrent, although the valley is very flat and very broad (35 km), and ...

G. Gross; F. Wippermann

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Optimal estimation with limited measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a sequential estimation problem with two decision makers, or agents, who work as members of a team. One of the agents sits at an observation post, and makes sequential observations about the state of an underlying stochastic process ... Keywords: WSNs, limited information, networked control systems, optimal estimation, real-time control, real-time monitoring, recursive estimation, sequential estimation, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Orhan C. Imer; Tamer Basar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Information Resources to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources Information Resources Numerous publications will be available to help educate buyers, product

283

Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8,415.8 8,415.8 39,569.3 40,215.9 122,708.5 26,876.5 189,800.8 10,466.7 10,604.8 10,129.5 14,302.8 - 24,432.4 February ............................. 40,637.5 41,953.1 43,328.9 133,687.6 29,805.9 206,822.4 10,360.0 10,513.3 W 15,544.3 W 26,397.7 March .................................. 41,477.4 43,016.1 45,427.5 141,434.5 35,293.6 222,155.7 10,324.1 10,491.1 W 16,370.9 W 27,381.7 April .................................... 43,183.2 44,648.5 46,529.4 145,575.1 45,194.6 237,299.2 9,958.2 10,130.7 10,397.0 15,931.2 W 26,339.9 May ..................................... 42,591.4 44,151.1 46,198.6 146,358.6 40,692.6 233,249.8 10,265.8 10,423.0 W 16,051.1 W 26,538.5 June .................................... 43,545.0 44,890.8 46,463.3

284

Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

41,706.6 41,706.6 42,867.4 44,918.8 148,012.1 26,159.8 219,090.7 8,238.8 8,373.4 7,820.8 12,719.5 - 20,540.4 February ............................. 44,323.3 45,541.7 47,522.2 154,828.4 28,064.9 230,415.5 8,664.1 8,791.4 8,216.6 13,704.8 - 21,921.4 March .................................. 45,161.2 46,406.4 47,944.1 158,487.5 30,051.4 236,483.0 8,719.8 8,847.0 8,169.5 13,741.8 - 21,911.3 April .................................... 45,234.7 46,525.2 48,467.4 165,185.8 29,996.1 243,649.3 8,500.3 8,634.7 8,026.8 13,475.5 - 21,502.3 May ..................................... 46,557.4 47,885.5 48,698.2 167,753.3 34,002.9 250,454.5 8,220.6 8,349.1 7,599.5 13,249.1 - 20,848.6 June .................................... 48,331.3 49,633.4 47,988.2 173,529.2 36,677.0 258,194.5

285

Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9,369.5 9,369.5 40,816.0 42,057.4 126,970.8 38,559.5 207,587.7 9,892.3 10,063.7 W 15,155.9 W 25,989.9 February ............................. 41,671.7 43,092.9 43,590.9 131,633.0 37,204.6 212,428.5 9,734.0 9,906.3 W 15,477.1 W 26,553.3 March .................................. 42,994.4 44,454.9 44,713.5 134,676.4 34,540.7 213,930.7 10,003.6 10,175.2 W 15,957.5 W 27,114.8 April .................................... 39,096.0 40,526.3 44,740.8 137,255.0 44,013.8 226,009.6 9,168.0 9,330.7 W 15,984.2 W 27,056.0 May ..................................... 39,423.8 40,815.6 45,041.3 139,119.6 41,683.6 225,844.5 9,354.8 9,511.4 W 16,114.8 W 27,319.7 June .................................... 40,214.3 41,647.2 45,681.9

286

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2,109.3 - 4,980.7 April ... - 6.9 751.6 454.5 W 1,241.1 - 44.3 2,978.0 2,285.3 W 5,309.5 May ... - W 744.9 W...

287

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6.7 69.1 W 344.0 Iowa January ... W 7.2 51.5 23.9 W 10.6 5.7 241.1 W 836.0 February ... W W 53.9 30.2 W 7.0 6.6 200.0 W 836.9 March...

288

Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September ... 45,206.4 46,337.2 45,096.1 158,845.2 37,313.3 241,254.7 8,263.8 8,408.9 7,231.8 12,995.3 - 20,227.1 October ......

289

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9,369.5 40,816.0 42,057.4 126,970.8 38,559.5 207,587.7 9,892.3 10,063.7 W 15,155.9 W 25,989.9 February ... 41,671.7 43,092.9 43,590.9 131,633.0 37,204.6...

290

ASE Suppression in a Diode-Pumped Nd:YLF Regenerative Amplifier Using a Volume Bragg Grating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrument-limited suppression of out-of-band amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is demonstrated for the first time in a Nd:YLF diode-pumped regenerative amplifier using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) as a cavity mirror.

Okishev, A.V.; Dorrer, C.; Smirnov, V.I.; Glebov, L.B.; Zuegel, J.D.

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Introduction to plunger lift: applications, advantages and limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study discusses the principle of plunger lift and its possible applications. Typical applications are (1) removal of liquids from gas wells, (2) hi-ratio oil well production, (3) paraffin and hydrate control, and (4) increased efficiency of intermittent gas lift wells. Some advantages of this system are low initial cost, very little maintenance, and that there is no external source of energy required in most cases. Limitations such as mechanical conditions, gas and liquid volumes and depths also are discussed. There is a brief section concerning the various types of equipment available.

Beauregard, E.; Ferguson, P.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal properties of an upper tidal flat sediment on the Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased land use change near fragile ecosystems can affect the ecosystem energy balance leading to increased global warming. One component of surface energy balance is soil storage heat flux. In past work, a complex thermal behavior was noticed in the shrink-swell sediment of the upper Nueces Delta (upper Rincon) during summer months as it dried. Soil storage heat flux was found to first increase, then decrease, as the soil dried. It was suggested that the complex behavior was due to the relationship between thermal diffusivity and soil moisture, where thermal diffusivity increases to a local maximum before decreasing with respect to decreasing soil moisture. This study explores the observed phenomenon in a controlled laboratory environment by relating the sediment shrinkage curve to changing heat transfer properties. Due to the complicated nature of the drying-shrinking sediment, it was necessary to measure the sediment shrinkage curve and heat transfer properties in separate experiments. The shrinkage curve was found by correlating measured sample volume with gravimetric moisture content. Heat transfer properties were found using a single needle heat pulse probe. A normalized gravimetric moisture content was used as a common variable to relate the shrinkage curve and heat transfer data. Data suggests that the shrink-swell Rincon sediment portrays different behavior in drying than that which occurs for a non-shrink-swell soil. For the shrink-swell Rincon sediment, thermal conductivity is seen to increase with decreasing moisture, the suggested mechanism being increased surface area contact between particles as the shrinking sediment dries.

Cramer, Nicholas C.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

New brown dwarfs in Upper Sco using UKIDSS Galactic Cluster Survey science verification data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results from a deep (J = 18.7), wide-field (6.5 square degrees) infrared (ZYJHK) survey in the Upper Sco association conducted within the science verification phase of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey Galactic Cluster Survey (GCS). Cluster members define a sequence well separated from field stars in the (Z-J,Z) colour-magnitude diagram. We have selected a total of 164 candidates with J = 10.5-18.7 mag from the (Z-J,Z) and (Y-J,Y) diagrams. We further investigated the location of those candidates in the other colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams to weed out contaminants. The cross-correlation of the GCS catalogue with the 2MASS database confirms the membership of 116 photometric candidates down to 20 Jupiter masses as they lie within a 2 sigma circle centred on the association mean motion. The final list of cluster members contains 129 sources with masses between 0.3 and 0.007 Msun. We extracted a dozen new low-mass brown dwarfs below 20 Mjup, the limit of previous surveys in the region. Finally, we have derived the mass function in Upper Sco over the 0.3-0.01 Msun mass range, best fit by a single segment with a slope of index alpha = 0.6+/-0.1, in agreement with previous determination in open clusters.

N. Lodieu; N. C. Hambly; R. F. Jameson; S. T. Hodgkin; G. Carraro; T. R. Kendall

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

294

Upper bounds on r-mode amplitudes from observations of LMXB neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The r-mode oscillations of neutron stars can be potentially powerful probes of cold ultra-dense matter. In this paper we present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations, and their gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates, in low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) neutron stars under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. We compute results for neutron star models constructed with the APR equation of state for masses of 1.4, 2 and 2.21 M_{sun}. For the lower mass models (1.4 and 2 M_{sun}) we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1x10^{-8} to 1.5x10^{-6}. For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) sources with known quiescent spin-down rates these limits suggest that about 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the AMXP with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6640, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all the sources considered here our amplitude limits suggest that their gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21 M_{sun}) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. This can be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they are made of normal nuclear matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

Simin Mahmoodifar; Tod Strohmayer

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sludge, Salt, Liquid Sludge, Salt, Liquid WASTE STREAM CODE: 02113 STREAM NAME:Sludge, Salt, Liquid MPC NAME:Aqueous Liquids/Slurries TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Sludge, Salt, Liquid Isotopes Americium-241 Avg Concentration: 3.4967E-001 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Cadmium-113m Avg Concentration: 8.4542E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Niobium-93m Avg Concentration: 1.8159E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Protactinium-231 Avg Concentration: 7.8039E-004 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Europium-152 Avg Concentration: 7.4037E-003 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Plutonium-240 Avg Concentration: 4.4672E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:

296

Managing natural gas volume analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 1992, Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America and BMP Energy Systems began the joint development of a system for the automated verification and statistical correction of gas volume data captured at meter locations by flow computers. NGPL required a single system that would provide functionality for both chart processing and automated EFM data validation and correction. The pipeline company was looking for a vendor that would help develop a system to handle EFM data. The NGAS 4[trademark] system implemented at NGPL made the bridge from monthly to daily gas volume processing. The automated and rapid validation of flow data within the NGAS 4 system minimizes human intervention for validation and correction. NGPL has moved from reliance on paper chart processing to the EFM capability required in the evolving US gas market.

Parker, J. (Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America, Lombard, IL (United States)); Treat, R. (BMP Energy Systems, Houston, TX (United States)); Bergen, H. (BMP Energy Systems, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

298

Definition: System Operating Limit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Operating Limit Operating Limit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png System Operating Limit The value (such as MW, MVar, Amperes, Frequency or Volts) that satisfies the most limiting of the prescribed operating criteria for a specified system configuration to ensure operation within acceptable reliability criteria. System Operating Limits are based upon certain operating criteria. These include, but are not limited to: Facility Ratings (Applicable pre- and post- Contingency equipment or facility ratings), Transient Stability Ratings (Applicable pre- and post-Contingency Stability Limits), Voltage Stability Ratings (Applicable pre- and post- Contingency Voltage Stability), System Voltage Limits (Applicable pre- and post- Contingency Voltage Limits)[1] Also Known As SOL

299

Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States  

SciTech Connect

We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors.; ,

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Smooth mixed-resolution GPU volume rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a mixed-resolution volume ray-casting approach that enables more flexibility in the choice of downsampling positions and filter kernels, allows freely mixing volume bricks of different resolutions during rendering, and does not require modifying ...

Johanna Beyer; Markus Hadwiger; Torsten Möller; Laura Fritz

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Spent Fuel Background Report Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Volume II contains tables that describe DOE fuel storage facilities and the fuel contained in those facilities.

Abbott, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

New limits on the ordered moments in ?-Pu and Ga-stabilized ?-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first µSR measurements ever performed on elemental Pu, and set the most stringent upper limits to date on the magnitude of the ordered moment µord in ?-Pu and ?-stabilized Pu (alloyed with 4.3 at. % Ga). Assuming a nominal hyperfine coupling field of 1 kOe/µB we find µord ? 10 ?3 µB at T ? = 4 K. Key words: plutonium magnetism, f-electron, µSR 1.

R. H. Heffner A; G. D. Morris A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Accelerating volume rendering with texture hulls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Texture-mapping hardware has been successfully exploited for volume rendering. In this paper, we propose algorithms for texture-based volume rendering accelerated by texture hulls that avoid the transferring and compositing of empty voxels. We have developed ... Keywords: 2D texture-based volume rendering, bounding shapes, contour simplification, empty space skipping, graphics hardware, texture hulls

Wei Li; Arie Kaufman

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

On volumes of hyperbolic orbifolds ILESANMI ADEBOYE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belolipetsky. On volumes of arithmetic quotients of SO(1, n). Annali della Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa-manifold of smallest volume. Annali della Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Classe di Scienze. Serie IV, 30, 22:1157­1215, 2009. #12;On volumes of hyperbolic orbifolds 19 [10] S. Gallot, D. Hulin, and J

Wei, Guofang

305

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Project Description The proposed scope of work is divided into three Phases. Overall system requirements will be established in Phase 1, along with an evaluation of existing lifting system capability, identification of technology limitations, and a conceptual design of an overall lifting system. In developing the system components in Phase 2, component-level tests will be conducted using GE facilities. Areas of development will include high-temperature drive system materials, journal and thrust bearings, and corrosion and erosion-resistant lifting pump components. Finally, in Phase 3, the overall lab-scale lifting system will be demonstrated in a flow loop that will be constructed at GE Global Research.

306

Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes  

SciTech Connect

Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

Karig, David K [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Upper Cumberland E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Cumberland E M C Upper Cumberland E M C Place Tennessee Utility Id 19574 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial GSA 1 Commercial Commercial GSA 2 Commercial Commercial GSA 3 Commercial Industrial GSA 1 Industrial Industrial GSA 2 Industrial Industrial GSA 3 Industrial Residential Residential outdoor light(Mercury 175 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Mercury 400 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 1000 watt FL) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 250 watt FL) Lighting

308

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

309

Limited-life cartridge primers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Limited-life cartridge primers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rosen, Robert S. (San Ramon, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Green Heat Solutions Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Solutions Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Heat Solutions Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenheating Region Scotland LinkedIn...

312

Local Generation Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product UK-based biomass firm developing anaerobic digestion plants. References Local Generation Limited1 LinkedIn Connections...

313

Exorka International Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exorka International Limited is a specialist developer of low-temperature geothermal electricity generation, incorporated in England. References Exorka International Limited1...

314

Colony Mills Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mills Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Colony Mills Limited Place Lahore, Pakistan Sector Solar Product Yarn manufacturer, plans to set up solar thermal plant....

315

Greenergy Biofuels Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenergy Biofuels Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenergy Biofuels Limited Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip WC1V 7BD Sector Biofuels Product Imports,...

316

United Biofuels Private Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon United Biofuels Private Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name United Biofuels Private Limited Place Tamil Nadu, India...

317

China Innovation Investment Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovation Investment Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name China Innovation Investment Limited Place Hong Kong Sector Solar Product Hong Kong-listed alternative energy...

318

Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

319

Are there capacity limitations in symmetry perception?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980). The demonstration of capacity limitation. Cognitive1972). Visual processing capacity and attentional control.J. (1996). Goodness of CAPACITY LIMIT OF SYMMETRY PERCEPTION

Huang, L Q; Pashler, Harold; Junge, J A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wavegen.co.uk Region United Kingdom...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Prepared for 1 st Upper Midwest Regional Freight Transportation Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are here at this workshop because of a common interest in freight. We bring a wide variety of perspectives – the typically longer-range perspective of the public providers of highways; the often short-range perspective of the private sector carriers, shippers and logistics managers; and the independent perspective of university researchers. Our immediate goal is to identify critical issues in facilitating regional freight transportation in the Upper Midwest. What are the gaps in current planning, organizational and financial methods? What key infrastructure improvements are needed to make the region competitive in the twenty first century? A regional perspective is logical because most freight does not stay within the borders of an individual state. For the Upper Midwest region Figures 1 and 2 show that the proportion of all ton-miles of truck shipments that stay within a state ranges from a low of 17 % in Indiana to a high of 46 % in Michigan. The regional average is 26 % which is essential the same as the national average of 27 % (1). Because rail shipments tend to be much longer than truck shipments, the proportion of rail shipments that stay within a state are likely to be even smaller. Thus, most freight shipments are affected by conditions outside of the state of origin or destination. By working together states, carriers, shippers and other stakeholders in the Upper

Dr. Robert; L. Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Utah Kerosene Wholesale/Resale Volume by Refiners (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Kerosene Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes; Utah Kerosene Refiner Sales Volumes; Utah Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels ...

323

EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume 2 EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Volume 2: Appendices Appendix A...

324

[Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75)] | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75) Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75) Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75) More...

325

Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

NONE

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Cs/Sr Capsules Cs/Sr Capsules WASTE STREAM CODE: 02115 STREAM NAME:Cs/Sr Capsules MPC NAME:Salt Waste TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Cs/Sr Capsules Isotopes Barium-137m Avg Concentration: 2.5941E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Cesium-137 Avg Concentration: 2.7391E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Yttrium-90 Avg Concentration: 1.1840E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Strontium-90 Avg Concentration: 1.1840E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream Hanford - High Level Waste - HLW to Treatment WASTE STREAM CODE: 03857 STREAM NAME:HLW to Treatment MPC NAME:Aqueous Liquids/Slurries TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit:

330

Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

Truett, LF

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to Contacts to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources Contacts Web site and High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program contacts are provided below. Website Contact Send us your comments, report problems, and/or ask questions about

332

Primordial Magnetic Field Limits from CMB Trispectrum - Scalar Modes and Planck Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic magnetic fields are observed to be coherent on large scales and could have a primordial origin. Non-Gaussian signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are generated by primordial magnetic fields as the magnetic stresses and temperature anisotropy they induce depend quadratically on the magnetic field. We compute the CMB scalar trispectrum on large angular scales, for nearly scale-invariant magnetic fields, sourced via the Sachs-Wolfe effect. The trispectra induced by magnetic energy density and by magnetic scalar anisotropic stress are found to have typical magnitudes of approximately $10^{-29}$ and $10^{-19}$, respectively. The scalar anisotropic stress trispectrum is also calculated in the flat-sky approximation and yields a similar result. Observational limits on CMB non-Gaussianity from the Planck mission data allow us to set upper limits of $B_0 \\lesssim 0.6 $ nG on the present value of the primordial cosmic magnetic field. Considering the inflationary magnetic curvature mode in the trispectrum can further tighten the magnetic field upper limit to $B_0 \\lesssim 0.05 $ nG. These sub-nanoGauss constraints from the magnetic trispectrum are the most stringent limits so far on the strength of primordial magnetic fields, on megaparsec scales, significantly better than the limits obtained from the CMB bispectrum and the CMB power spectrum.

Pranjal Trivedi; Kandaswamy Subramanian; T. R. Seshadri

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Regression Forecasting of the Onset of the Indian Summer Monsoon with Antecedent Upper Air Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the recorded onset dates of the summer monsoon in southwestern India can be closely related functionally to the antecedent upper air conditions. The antecedent upper air conditions are represented by April mean values of the ...

Ernest C. Kung; Taher A. Sharif

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upper Midwest History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>, PhD Student, Department of History, PO Box 6023, BuildingRiver in Upper Midwest History. By McMahon, Eileen M. andRiver in Upper Midwest History. Madison, WI: University of

Karalus, Daniel E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Can Lightning Observations be Used as an Indicator of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning activity in thunderstorms is closely related to the intensity of vertical updrafts indeep convective clouds that also transport large amounts of moisture into the upper troposphere. Small changes in the amount of upper-tropospheric ...

Colin Price; Mustafa Asfur

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Global Observations of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Derived from TOVS Radiance Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a physically based method for the retrieval of upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) and upper-tropospheric column water vapor (UTCWV) based an the use of radiance data collected by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Darren L. Jackson; Ian Wittmeyer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Observational Analysis of an Upper-Level Inverted Trough during the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-level inverted troughs (IVs) associated with midlatitude breaking Rossby waves or tropical upper-troposphere troughs (TUTTs) have been identified as important contributors to the variability of rainfall in the North American monsoon (NAM) ...

Zachary O. Finch; Richard H. Johnson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Photon and graviton mass limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thermodynamic Limits of Solar Cells with Non-ideal Optical Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shockley-Queisser (S-Q) theory defines the thermodynamic upper limits for Jsc, Voc, FF, and efficiency of a solar cell. The classical calculation assumes an abrupt onset of absorption at the band-edge, perfect absorption for all energies above the bandgap, and absence of non-radiative recombination. These assumptions are never satisfied for any practical solar cell. In this paper, we explain how the S-Q limits are redefined in the presence of the non-ideal optical effects, and we provide closed-form analytical expressions for the new limits for Jsc, Voc, and FF. Remarkably, these new limits can be achieved to a very high degree, even with significantly imperfect materials.

M. Ryyan Khan; Peter Bermel; Muhammad A. Alam

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; More Documents & Publications Attachment 6 Volume V...

342

Opto-electrical characterization and X-ray mapping of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-volume cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) radiation detectors would greatly improve radiation detection capabilities and, therefore, attract extensive scientific and commercial interests. CZT crystals with volumes as large as hundreds of centimeters can be achieved today due to improvements in the crystal growth technology. However, the poor performance of large-volume CZT detectors is still a challenging problem affecting the commercialization of CZT detectors and imaging arrays. We have employed Pockels effect measurements and synchrotron X-ray mapping techniques to investigate the performance-limiting factors for large-volume CZT detectors. Experimental results with the above characterization methods reveal the non-uniform distribution of internal electric field of large-volume CZT detectors, which help us to better understand the responsible mechanism for the insufficient carrier collection in large-volume CZT detectors.

Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yao, H.W.; Kim, K.; and James, R.B.

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

A procedure for finding an improved upper bound on the number of optimal design points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing an upper bound on the number of optimal design points greatly simplifies the search for an optimal design. Caratheodory's Theorem is commonly used to identify an upper bound. However, the upper bound from Caratheodory's Theorem is relatively ... Keywords: Carathéodory's theorem, Cardinality of design, Experimental design, Nonlinear regression

Seung Won Hyun; Min Yang; Nancy Flournoy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative {ital P} wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of {minus}17{percent} beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of {minus}23{percent} in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities ({minus}15{percent}) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10{percent}. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Steck, Lee K.; Fehler, Michael C.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G. [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Lutter, William J.; Sessions, Robert [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Iowa Propane Wholesale/Resale Volume by Refiners (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Iowa Propane (Consumer Grade) Refiner Sales Volumes; Iowa Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, ...

346

Alabama Propane Wholesale/Resale Volume by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Alabama Propane (Consumer Grade) Refiner Sales Volumes; Alabama Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, ...

347

NDN, volume transmission, and self-organization in brain dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF- ORGANIZATION IN BRAINThese systems instantiate volume transmission bynonsynaptic diffusion transmission, in concert with the

Freeman, Walter J III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Link, R.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Notice of Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA, in Response to Electricity Reliability Concerns in Washington, DC: Federal Register Notice Volume 71, No. 13 - Jan. 20, 2006 Notice of Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA, in Response to Electricity Reliability Concerns in Washington, DC: Federal Register Notice Volume 71, No. 13 - Jan. 20, 2006 Docket No. EO-05-01. Pursuant to 10 CFR 1021.343, the U.S. Department of Energy is issuing this Notice to document emergency actions that it has taken, and to set forth the steps it intends to take in the future, to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the matter

350

Disassembly and defueling of the upper core support assembly  

SciTech Connect

During normal operation of the reactor plant, the upper core support assembly (UCSA) holds the fuel assemblies in a defined geometry and establishes the flow path of the reactor coolant in the reactor vessel. Sometime during the course of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident, molten core material melted through a portion of the UCSA and flowed outside the confines of the core region into normally inaccessible areas. As a result, the UCSA must now be disassembled to remove the relocated core material. The paper includes UCSA description, a discussion of equipment design basis, and a discussion of the defueling approach.

Rodabaugh, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

ATF2 Proposal Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For achieving the high luminosity required at the International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS), and to maintain the beam collision with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, it has been proposed to implement an ILC-like final focus optics in an extension of the existing extraction beamline of ATF at KEK. The ATF is considered to be the best platform for this exercise, since it provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam in a manner dedicated to the development of ILC. The two major goals for this facility, called ATF2, are: (A) Achievement of a 37 nm beam size, and (B) control of beam position down to 2 nm level. The scientific justification for the ATF2 project and its technical design have been described in Volume 1 of the ATF2 Proposal [1]. We present here Volume 2 of the ATF2 Proposal, in which we present specifics of the construction plans and the group organization to execute the research programs at ATF2. The sections in this report have been authored by relevant ATF2 subgroups within the International ATF Collaboration. The time line of the project is described in Section 2. Section 3 discuss the structure of the international collaboration. Sections 4 and 5 discuss budget considerations, which are presented as well as the design and construction tasks to be shared by the international collaboration at ATF2. Concluding remarks have been contributed by Dr. Ewan Paterson, Chair of the International Collaboration Board of the ATF collaboration.

Grishanov, B.I.; Logachev, P.; Podgorny, F.; Telnov, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Napoly, O.; Payet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Braun, H.H.; Schulte, D.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Appleby, R.; Barlow, R.; Bailey, I.; Jenner, L.; Jones, R.; Kourevlev, G.; /Cockcroft Inst.; Elsen, E.; Vogel, V.; Walker, N.; /DESY /Fermilab /Hiroshima U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Oxford U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Orsay, LAL /Valencia U. /Annecy, LAPP /LBL, Berkeley /LLNL, Livermore /University Coll. London /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /North Carolina A-T State U. /Oregon U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Queen Mary, U. of London /SLAC /Tokyo U.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

WIPP Volume I - ESH - Final 2.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 2002 ISM Volume I Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume I August 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume I Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results ........................................................................................................................................3

353

NTS Volume 1 Clean Edit.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Test Site Nevada Test Site Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy October 2002 ISM Volume I INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Volume I October 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Volume I Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................4

354

NTS Volume 2 - Clean Edit.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Test Site Nevada Test Site Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy October 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE VOLUME II October 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

355

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

356

Pantex Volume 1 - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy November 2002 ISM Volume I INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume I November 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume I Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................

357

Adaptive iterative multiscale finite volume method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method is a computationally efficient numerical method for the solution of elliptic and parabolic problems with heterogeneous coefficients. It has been shown for a wide range of test cases that the MSFV results are ... Keywords: Adaptive multiscale method, Elliptic problem, Infrequently localization improvement, Iterative multiscale finite-volume method, Iterative multiscale method, Multiphase flow, Multiscale finite-volume method, Multiscale method, Porous media

Hadi Hajibeygi; Patrick Jenny

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","62013" ,"Release...

360

TransForum Volume 13 Issue 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

glassblower Joe Gregar, the chambers are modeled after cells being used by Professor Peter Bruce's research group at University of St. Andrews, Scotland. TransForum | Volume...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Journal of Research Volume 76C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Volume 76C. ISSN: 0022-4316. Issue 1 and 2. Issue 1 and 2 January 1972. National Bureau of Standards one kilogram balance NBS no. ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

ARE Update Volume 13, Number 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels In- creases Greenhousea mini- mum volume of biofuels and requires a nationalper unit of various biofuels. For example, corn ethanol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Departmental Information Systems Engineering (Volume 1) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Departmental Information Systems Engineering (Volume 2) Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM) Audit Report: IG-0836 Energy.gov Careers & Internships...

365

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector  

SciTech Connect

A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the WIMP-proton cross-sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.

IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS  

SciTech Connect

Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

Ahsan R. Choudhuri

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Title Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1022E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Gustavsen, Arlid, Dariush K. Arasteh, Bjørn Petter Jelle, Dragan C. Curcija, and Christian Kohler Journal Journal of Building Physics Volume 32 Pagination 131-153 Call Number LBNL-1022E Abstract While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames.

368

Definition: Fault Current Limiting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limiting Limiting Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fault Current Limiting Fault current limiting can be achieved through sensors, communications, information processing, and actuators that allow the utility to use a higher degree of network coordination to reconfigure the system to prevent fault currents from exceeding damaging levels. Fault current limiting can also be achieved through the implementation of special stand alone devices known as Fault Current Limiters (FCLs) which act to automatically limit high through currents that occur during faults.[1] Related Terms fault, fault current limiter References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Functions' Temp LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. late:ISGANAttributionsmart grid,smart grid,smart grid,smart grid,

369

Definition: Fault Current Limiter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limiter Limiter Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fault Current Limiter A fault current limiter prevents current in an electrical circuit from exceeding a predetermined level by increasing the electrical impedance of that circuit before the current through the circuit exceeds that level. Fault current limiters are designed so as to minimize the impedance of the circuit under normal conditions to reduce losses, but increase the impedance of the circuit under fault conditions to limit fault current.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A Fault Current Limiter (FCL) is a device which limits the prospective fault current when a fault occurs (e.g. in a power transmission network). The term includes superconducting devices and non-superconducting devices, however some of the more simple non-superconducting devices (such

370

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

371

Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment...

372

High volume tidal or current flow harnessing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus permitting the utilization of large volumes of water in the harnessing and extracting of a portion of the power generated by the rise and fall of ocean tides, ocean currents, or flowing rivers includes the provision of a dam, and a specialized single cavity chamber of limited size as compared with the water head enclosed by the dam, and an extremely high volume gating system in which all or nearly all of the water between the high and low levels on either side of the dam is cyclically gated through the single chamber from one side of the dam to the other so as to alternately provide positive air pressure and a partial vacuum within the single chamber. In one embodiment, the specialized chamber has a barrier at the bottom which divides the bottom of the chamber in half, large ports at the bottom of the chamber to permit inflow and outflow of high volumes of water, and ganged structures having a higher total area than that of corresponding ports, in which the structures form sluice gates to selectively seal off and open different sets of ports. In another embodiment, a single chamber is used without a barrier. In this embodiment, vertical sluice gates are used which may be activated automatically by pressures acting on the sluice gates as a result of ingested and expelled water.

Gorlov, A.M.

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Book Review of Hydrogeophysics, by William Herkelrath Geofluids, Volume 6 Page 201 -May 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review of Hydrogeophysics, by William Herkelrath Geofluids, Volume 6 Page 201 - May 2006 doi century in incorporating geophysical measurements into subsurface hydrologic science. The book is based that the book is 523 pages long, it is understandable that the discussion is often limited. Many of the chapters

Hubbard, Susan

374

Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ... secondary resources decreases energy consumption; this energy advantage ...

375

High temperature superconducting fault current limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

Hull, J.R.

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

376

Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data  

SciTech Connect

We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Sethi, Shiv K. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Pandey, Kanhaiya [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ups and downs of demand limiting  

SciTech Connect

Electric power load management by limiting power demand can be used for energy conservation. Methods for affecting demand limiting, reducing peak usage in buildings, particularly usage for heating and ventilating systems, and power pricing to encourage demand limiting are discussed. (LCL)

Pannkoke, T.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase:

379

PartialVolume Bayesian Classification of Material Mixtures in MR Volume Data using Voxel Histograms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometric models and renderings from volume data. It also has the potential to make more­accurate volume.g., both muscle and fat; we compute the relative proportion of each material in the voxels. Second, we Collection Classification Model Building Volume Rendering/ Visualization Analysis ?? ?? @ @ @ R @ @ @ R

380

Partial-Volume Bayesian Classification of Material Mixtures in MR Volume Data using Voxel Histograms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometric models and renderings from volume data. It also has the potential to make more-accurate volume.g., both muscle and fat; we compute the relative proportion of each material in the voxels. Second, we visualize parts of the data, thus better controlling a volume-rendered image [Levoy, 1988], a surface model

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Long-Term, Low-Level Radwaste Volume-Reduction Strategies, Volumes 1-5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sharp increases in the cost of low-level radioactive waste disposal make volume reduction an attractive alternative for owners of nuclear power plants. This study evaluated the leading volume-reduction options and developed the powerful VRTECH computer code to assist utilities in making long-range volume-reduction selection decisions.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision  

SciTech Connect

The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

On Volume Based 3D Display Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the case of certain applications in which a need exists to visualize and interact with voluminous data sets and complex 3-D geometrical models, the conventional computer interface inhibits key human-computer interaction processes. Here, several deficiencies ... Keywords: 3-D Display, Cathode Ray Sphere, Computed Holography, Electroholography, Image Space, Static-Volume Display, Swept-Volume Display, Varifocal Display, Visualization, Volumetric Display

Barry G. Blundell

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

VOLUME COMPENSATING MEANS FOR PULSATING PUMPS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double diaphragm, two-liquid pulsating pump for remote control use, having as an improvement an apparatus for maintaining constant the volume of the liquid such as kerosene between the two diaphragms is described. Phase difficulties encountered in the operation of such pumps when the volume of the liquid is altered by changes in temperature are avoided.

Weaver, D.L.W.; MacCormack, R.S. Jr.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mexico Mexico SITE: LosAlamos PROGRAM: DP WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Albuquerque Operations Office % of Stream LosAlamos - Low Level Waste - LLW-PCB WASTE STREAM CODE: 02015 STREAM NAME:LLW-PCB MPC NAME:Soil/Debris TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 LLW -PCB Isotopes Plutonium-239 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+002 nCi/g Americium-241 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+002 nCi/g Cesium-137 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:8.6400E+002 nCi/g Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:4.8900E+002 nCi/g Plutonium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+002 nCi/g

388

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Colorado Colorado SITE: GrJuncOff PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: 11e(2) Byproduct Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Idaho Operations Office % of Stream GrJuncOff - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Soil WASTE STREAM CODE: 01091 STREAM NAME:RRM Contaminated Soil MPC NAME:Soil TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 30.000 Future Volume Avg: 0.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 RRM Contaminated Soil Isotopes Radium-226 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-234 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Thorium-230 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-235 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream GrJuncOff - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Rubble/Debris

389

Property:Volume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volume Volume Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Volume Property Type Quantity Description Any unit of volume. For example, the mean estimated reservoir volume at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States. Use this type to express a quantity of three-dimensional space. The default unit is the cubic meter (mÂł). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Cubic Meters - 1 mÂł,m3,m^3,cubic meter,cubic meters,Cubic Meter,Cubic Meters,CUBIC METERS Cubic Kilometers - 0.000000001 kmÂł,km3,km^3,cubic kilometer,cubic kilometers,cubic km,Cubic Kilometers,CUBIC KILOMETERS Cubic Miles - 0.000000000239912759 miÂł,mi3,mi^3,mileÂł,cubic mile,cubic miles,cubic mi,Cubic Miles,CUBIC MILES Cubic Feet - 35.314666721 ftÂł,ft3,ft^3,cubic feet,cubic

390

Impact Capital Partners Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Impact Capital Partners Limited Place Los Angeles, California Zip CA 90067-1509 Product Los Angeles-based, investment intermediary that designs financial solutions and innovative strategies for achieving sustained growth and intrinsic value. References Impact Capital Partners Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Impact Capital Partners Limited is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Impact Capital Partners Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Impact_Capital_Partners_Limited&oldid=346814" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

391

Bharat Electronics Limited BEL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited BEL Limited BEL Jump to: navigation, search Name Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) Place Bangalore, India Zip 560015 Sector Solar Product Major supplier of products and turnkey systems with expertise in solar products and systems, defence communication, radars & sensors, telecommunication, broadcasting equipments, e-governance networks and other components. References Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) is a company located in Bangalore, India . References ↑ "Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bharat_Electronics_Limited_BEL&oldid=342709

392

Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprises Limited Enterprises Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 2AZ Sector Carbon Product Carbon Trust Enterprises creates and invests in new, high growth, carbon reducing businesses. Typically the company focuses on use of mature technologies rather than on technology innovations. References Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Trust_Enterprises_Limited&oldid=343250"

393

Upper Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources (Redirected from Upper Marlboro, MD) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8159473°, -76.7496909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8159473,"lon":-76.7496909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in a zone of localized crustal extension between two major strike-slip faults. The Coso Wash fault, a Quaternary-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is well-imaged as a

395

Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range is an extensional domain in a releasing stepover between major dextral strike-slip faults along the southeastern margin of the Sierra Nevada Microplate. New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range image reflectors that resemble suites of structural and magmatic features exposed in many exhumed metamorphic core complexes (MCC). The Coso Wash Fault, a Holocene-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is imaged as a

396

Self-Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films Title Self-Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Modestino, Miguel A., Devproshad K. Paul, Shudipto Dishari, Stephanie A. Petrina, Frances I. Allen, Michael A. Hickner, Kunal Karan, Rachel Segalman, and Adam Z. Weber Journal Macromolecules Volume 46 Issue 3 Pagination 867 - 873 Date Published 02/2013 ISSN 0024-9297 Abstract Ion-conducting polymers are important materials for a variety of electrochemical applications. Perfluorinated ionomers, such as Nafion, are the benchmark materials for proton conduction and are widely used in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices including solar-fuel generators, chlor-alkali cells, and redox flow batteries. While the behavior of Nafion in bulk membranes (10 to 100s ?m thick) has been studied extensively, understanding its properties under thin-film confinement is limited. Elucidating the behavior of thin Nafion films is particularly important for the optimization of fuel-cell catalyst layers or vapor-operated solar-fuel generators, where a thin film of ionomer is responsible for the transport of ions to and from the active electrocatalytic centers. Using a combination of transport-property measurements and structural characterization, this work demonstrates that confinement of Nafion in thin films induced thickness-dependent proton conductivity and ionic-domain structure. Confining Nafion films to thicknesses below 50 nm on a silicon substrate results in a loss of microphase separation of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains, which drastically increases the material?s water uptake while in turn decreasing its ionic conductivity.

397

Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components of the primary migration system are the solution seams, swarms of horizontal microfractures associated with the solution seams and the tectonic fractures from which the oil is recovered. Pressure solution is manifest in the Austin Chalk as millimeter-scale solution seams and smaller microseams. The solution seams are composites formed by the superposition of the microseams in an anastomosing network. Evidence for pressure solution is the presence of truncated fossils along seams and the high concentration of insolubles within them. A significant amount of organic matter and bitumen was observed to be concentrated within the seams. Associated with the solution seams are swarms of horizontal microftactures, many of them filled with calcite. Numerous vertical, tectonic fractures are found intersecting the solution seams. Pressure solution serves to concentrate organic matter within the solution seams and oil is generated here. It is postulated that the accompanying increase in fluid volume raises the pore pressures and fractures the rock. These newly created microfractures are avenues for migration of fluids from the seams. It is likely that oil migrates from the seams into the tectonic fractures via the microftactures. Oil may also be migrating directly from the seams into the fractures along an organic network. The matrix recharges the fractures by the mechanism postulated in this study. Thus, production can be sustained at low rates even after the initial period of decline. Further studies should attempt to correlate the carbonate in the matrix with that in the microfractures, and the oil in the seams with that in the fractures.

Chanchani, Jitesh

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

Fellows, R.L. [ed.

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Trajectory fusion for three-dimensional volume reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the 3D volume reconstruction problem from depth adjacent sub-volumes acquired by a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Our goal is to align the sub-volumes by estimating a set of optimal global transformations that preserve morphological ... Keywords: 3D Volume reconstruction, Confocal laser scanning microscopy, Extrapolation, Residual minimization, Sub-volume registration, Trajectory fusion

Sang-Chul Lee; Peter Bajcsy

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A new limit on the CP violating decay KS -> 3pi0 with the KLOE experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have carried out a new direct search for the CP violating decay KS -> 3pi0 with 1.7 fb^-1 of e+e- collisions collected by the KLOE detector at the phi-factory DAFNE. We have searched for this decay in a sample of about 5.9 x 10^8 KS KL events tagging the KS by means of the KL interaction in the calorimeter and requiring six prompt photons. With respect to our previous search, the analysis has been improved by increasing of a factor four the tagged sample and by a more effective background rejection of fake KS tags and spurious clusters. We find no candidates in data and simulated background samples, while we expect 0.12 standard model events. Normalizing to the number of KS -> 2pi0 events in the same sample, we set the upper limit on BR(KS -> 3pi0 < 2.6 x 10^-8 at 90% C.L., five times lower than the previous limit. We also set the upper limit on the eta_000 parameter, |eta_000 | < 0.0088 at 90% C.L., improving by a factor two the latest direct measurement.

Babusci, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkestahl, L Caldeira; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjold, L; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kacprzak, K; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

'Dead Time' Limits Quantum Cryptography Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Not only does dead time limit the transmission rate of a message ... effects and paralyzability in high-speed quantum key distribution, New Journal of ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Renewable Fuels Limited RFL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RFL Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuels Limited (RFL) Place York, United Kingdom Zip YO19 6ET Sector Biomass Product Supplies various biomass fuels and offers...

404

Caldyne Automatics Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Caldyne Automatics Limited Place West Bengal, India Zip 700 091 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Kolkata-based power storage product manufacturer; also makes lighting...

405

ON EFFICIENTLY COMBINING LIMITED MEMORY AND TRUST ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Euclidean norm with an insignificant computational overhead compared with the cost of computing the quasi-Newton direction in line-search limited memory ...

406

Centro Renewables Holding Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developer of wind, solar and water power facilities in China, Taiwan and South Korea. References Centro Renewables Holding Limited1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

407

Emergency Management Limited Scope Performance Test Inspectors...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) Emergency Management Limited Scope Performance Test Inspectors Guide March 2008 Emergency Management Performance Test Inspectors Guide...

408

Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems. This shortcoming is especially evident with regard to trophic structure and energy flow. In this study I use natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to examine patterns of energy flow and food-chain length of large-river food webs characterized by different landscape-scale hydrologic features. Ten locations along an approximately 500 km stretch of the Upper Paran�¡ River Basin, Brazil, provided the setting for this work. Carbon derived from C3 plants and phytoplankton were the dominant energy sources across all webs, but relative contributions differed among landscape types (low-gradient river, high-gradient river, river stretches downstream of reservoirs, and reservoirs). Increases in food chain length corresponded with higher relative importance of phytoplankton derived carbon, likely due to size-structured effects of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-secondary consumer trophic link. River impoundment corresponded with decreased ecological and economic efficiency of fisheries production, an important ecosystem service provided by many tropical rivers.

Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in Germany in high altitude is several days earlier than on ground.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy of Northwestern Montana: a petroleum system approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy in the Antler foreland basin of northwestern Montana is the current focus of exploration for several petroleum companies.… (more)

Schietinger, Paul S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

413

Upper bound on the efficiency of certain nonimaging concentrators in the physical-optics model  

SciTech Connect

A simple treatment by scalar-wave theory yields upper bounds to the efficiency of nonimaging concentrators that are lower than those given by geometrical optics.

Welford, W.T.; Winston, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

In this issue: Volume 28, No. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of operations. D. Top of the ACORK showing broken-off end of drill pipe 466 m above bridge plug. E. Reentry cone Sand turbidites Volcanic ash Mud/Mudstone Silt turbidites Basalt basement Lithology Density (g/cm3 (Hemipelagic mud, thin turbidites, slides) Upper axial trench (Thick-bedded sand turbidites) Basaltic Acidic

415

Energy potential of municipal solid waste is limited  

SciTech Connect

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste has the potential for making only a limited contribution to the nation`s overall energy production. Although the current contribution of waste-derived energy production is less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation`s total energy Supply, DOE has set a goal for energy from waste at 2 percent of the total supply by 2010. The industry`s estimates show a smaller role for waste as an energy source in the future. The energy potential from waste is limited not only by the volume and energy content of the waste itself, but also by the factors affecting the use of waste disposal options, including public opposition and the availability of financing. Energy production from waste combustors and from landfill gases generates pollutants, although these are reduced through current regulations that require the use of emissions control technology and define operational criteria for the facilities. Although DOE estimates that one-third of the energy available from waste is available in the form of energy savings through the recycling of materials, the Department`s research in this area is ongoing.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons  

SciTech Connect

A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

Cervelli, Alberto

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1015325 Final Report, July 2007 Each of the ... scenarios showed significant Greenhouse Gas reductions due to PHEV fleet penetration ... ... PHEVs adoption results in significant reduction in the consumption of petroleum fuels. ' ' DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI). NEITHER EPRI, ANY MEMBER OF EPRI, ANY COSPONSOR, THE ORGANIZATION(S) BELOW, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING

418

Attachment 5, Certificate of Intent to Comply with DOE Budget Limitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 DE-PS26-02NT41430 CERTIFICATE OF INTENT TO COMPLY WITH DOE BUDGET LIMITATIONS The Applicant, , if (name of submitting college or university) selected for award under Program Solicitation No. DE-PS26-02NT41430 entitled, "Support of Advanced Fossil Resource Utilization Research by Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions" agrees that: If, following DOE's review of Volume II of the application, it is found that the proposed request for DOE funds exceeds the maximum funding limitation as set forth in the solicitation (Section 4.0), the applicant shall perform the effort within the maximum DOE funding

419

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Iowa Iowa SITE: Ames Lab PROGRAM: SC WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office % of Stream Ames Lab - Low Level Waste - Low Level Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 00275 STREAM NAME:Low Level Waste MPC NAME:Heterogeneous Debris TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Isotopes Thorium-232 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream Ames Lab - Low Level Waste - TRU Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 03941 STREAM NAME:TRU Waste MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: % of Stream Ames Lab - Low Level Waste - Low Level Waste FY 2046-2070

420

Particle transport in the scrape-off layer and its relationship to discharge density limit in Alcator C-Mod*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the divertor target and baffles. Assuming Ti Te , the con- vected power is Qconv ALCFS 5Te . The parallel heat by integrating S over the volume between that flux surface and the one tangent to the limiter Qdiv ALCFS 4 7 0 2 R2 q2 limiter T0 7/2 , 1 where ALCFS is the area of the last closed flux surface. Equa- tion 1 may

Greenwald, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

41146_R01_Volume I.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 i GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

422

41146_R01_Volume II.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOLIERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

423

Path integration for light transport in volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating the transport of light in volumes such as clouds or objects with subsurface scattering is computationally expensive. We describe an approximation to such transport using path integration. Unlike the more commonly used diffusion approximation, ...

Simon Premože; Michael Ashikhmin; Peter Shirley

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Advanced illumination techniques for GPU volume raycasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume raycasting techniques are important for both visual arts and visualization. They allow an efficient generation of visual effects and the visualization of scientific data obtained by tomography or numerical simulation. Thanks to their flexibility, ...

Markus Hadwiger; Patric Ljung; Christof Rezk Salama; Timo Ropinski

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Water Volume as Function of Temperature (Cold)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Volume as Function of Temperature (Cold) Name: Hank Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: MA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: At normal atmospheric pressure, and...

427

Variable volume architecture : expanding the boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research into the creation of a Variable Volume Architecture is explored through a series of proposals and projects. An argument is established to develop the means and methods of achieving an architecture of transformation. ...

Saheba, Asheshh (Asheshh Mohit), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Optimization Online - Multimaterial topology optimization by volume ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 14, 2013... functional by the multiphase volume constrained Cahn-Hilliard energy functional. ... The success and efficiency of the presented method are shown ... and its computational cost scales sub-linearly by the number of phases.

429

Non-linear volume photon mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel extension of the photon mapping algorithm, capable of handling both volume multiple inelastic scattering and curved light paths simultaneously. The extension is based on the Full Radiative Transfer Equation (FRTE) and Fermat's ...

Diego Gutierrez; Adolfo Munoz; Oscar Anson; Francisco J. Seron

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

Ruggieri, M.

2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

Petroleum Market Module (Volume 1), Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation Volume I - Defines the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describes its basic approach, and provides detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public.

William Brown

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Subscribe to Windows...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to Windows Volume Purchase Event News and Updates to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Subscribe to Windows Volume Purchase Event News and...

433

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix...

434

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Finite volume schemes for Boussinesq type equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions.

Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Middle East oil show: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This conference proceedings represent the second volume of a two volume set of papers dealing with oil and gas development concepts in the Middle East. It presents papers dealing with enhanced recovery techniques, methods for predicting productivity of wells, computer modeling methods for reservoirs, methods for minimizing water influx and formation damage, offshore platform designs, and advances in various geophysical logging and surveying techniques. Papers deal with both the onshore and offshore environments.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time Limits The length of participation in the graduate program is limited as follows: With a bachelor's pursuing a master's degree: 4 years With a bachelor's pursuing a PhD: 7 years With a master's pursuing a second master's degree: 2 years With a master's pursuing a PhD: 4 years With a master's pursuing a master's and PhD in a new field: 6 years Students may remain in the GRA program for up to three months after receiving their PhD. Work schedules Year-round students Students participating in the MBA program, post-baccalaureate appointments,

438

4C Offshore Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4C Offshore Limited 4C Offshore Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name 4C Offshore Limited Place Suffolk, United Kingdom Country United Kingdom Product Project planning, consulting for offshore industries (wind, oil, gas) Year founded 2009 Company Type For Profit Company Ownership Private Small Business No Affiliated Companies 4C Offshore Limited Technology Offshore Wind Phone number +44 (0)1502 509260 Website http://www.4coffshore.com/ References 4C Offshore website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. 4C Offshore Limited is a company based in Suffolk, United Kingdom. 4C Offshore is an independent marine consulting firm, that provides advice and consulting services in offshore development, particularly renewables and

439

Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time limits The length of participation in the undergraduate program is limited to a maximum of six years for students pursuing a bachelor's degree and three years for students pursuing an associate's degree. Work schedules Year-round students Students participating in some special undergraduate programs, post-baccalaureate appointments, post-master's appointments, and GRA students working on a thesis or dissertation are excluded from the 30-hour per week work restriction.

440

Definition: Stability Limit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limit Limit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stability Limit The maximum power flow possible through some particular point in the system while maintaining stability in the entire system or the part of the system to which the stability limit refers.[1] Related Terms power, system, stability References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Stability_Limit&oldid=480505" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume upper limit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Limited English Proficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Limited English Proficiency Limited English Proficiency Limited English Proficiency On August 11, 2000, President Clinton signed Executive Order 13166, "Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency." The Executive Order requires federal agencies, including the Department of Energy, to examine the programs and services they provide, to determine whether there is a need for language assistance for persons with Limited English proficiency (LEP) related to their programs and services, and to develop and implement a system to provide language assistance to LEP persons (where necessary) to ensure they have meaningful access to their programs and services. The Executive Order also requires Federal agencies, including the Department of Energy, to provide guidance to recipients of

442

Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.35744679,"lon":-156.7663995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

New petrofacies in upper Cretaceous section of southern California  

SciTech Connect

A distinctive sandstone-conglomerate petrofacies is recognized throughout the Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian-late Campanian) Chatsworth Formation in the Simi Hills. It is named the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies after the district where it was first recognized. The petrofacies is also recognized in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian and possibly early Maestrichtian) Tuna Canyon Formation of the central Santa Monica Mountains. The conglomerates in the petrofacies are composed predominantly of angular pebble-size clasts of argillite, quartz-rich rocks (orthoquartzarenite, metaorthoquartzarenite, mice quartz schist) and leucocratic plutoniate (granite-granodiorite). The conglomerate texture and composition are mirrored in the sandstone. The uniformly angular character of the conglomerate clasts and the survival of argillite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent no more than 5 mi of subaerial transport before it entered the deep marine realm. Foraminifers collected from mudstones interbedded with the conglomerates indicate upper bathyal water depth at the site of deposition. A source terrane of low to moderate relief is indicated by the absence of cobbles and boulders. Bed forms, sedimentary structures, and textural features indicate the detritus moved north from its source terrane to be deposited by turbidity currents, debris flows, and grain flows on the Chatsworth Submarine Fan. The detritus of the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies was derived from basement rocks, now largely buried beneath the Los Angeles basin, that were being eroded during the formation of the Cretaceous Los Angeles erosion surface. The detritus came from the Los Angeles arch of that surface.

Colburn, I.P.; Oliver, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Discovery of carbon monoxide in the upper atmosphere of Pluto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pluto's icy surface has changed colour and its atmosphere has swelled since its last closest approach to the Sun in 1989. The thin atmosphere is produced by evaporating ices, and so can also change rapidly, and in particular carbon monoxide should be present as an active thermostat. Here we report the discovery of gaseous CO via the 1.3mm wavelength J=2-1 rotational transition, and find that the line-centre signal is more than twice as bright as a tentative result obtained by Bockelee-Morvan et al. in 2000. Greater surface-ice evaporation over the last decade could explain this, or increased pressure could have caused the atmosphere to expand. The gas must be cold, with a narrow line-width consistent with temperatures around 50 K, as predicted for the very high atmosphere, and the line brightness implies that CO molecules extend up to approximately 3 Pluto radii above the surface. The upper atmosphere must have changed markedly over only a decade since the prior search, and more alterations could occur by the...

Greaves, J S; Friberg, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

THE FACTORS LIMITING THE UTILIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS IN SUPERHEATED STEAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New experimental data and literature data are utilized to determine the upper temperature of usefulness of zirconium alloys. Three basic engineering assumptions are used: (1) service life requirements are on the order of four years; (2) tubular fuel cladding for rod-type fuel is considered with a maximum wall thickness of 1.27 cm; and (3) heat fluxes are above 157 watts/cm/sup 2/. The interrelation of three basic factors, corrosion rate, corrosion embrittiement by hydrogen and oxygen, and strength are considered. An upper limit for an acceptable corrosion rate for a long-term service of 1 mg/dm/sup 2//day is set primarily by the effect of heat-transfer on corrosion. For the best alloys anticipated, this requirement (even without considering transient conditions) limits cladding surface temperatures to less than 540 C. Oxygen embrittiement of the alloy substrate by oxide film dissolution is not expected to be a limiting factor. Corrosion hydrogen embrittiement was studied in detail and found to limit acceptable service to cladding surface temperatures of less than 525 deg C for established experimental alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement may not be a limiting factor if alloys corrosion resistant enough to be acceptable above 600 deg C could be developed. Zirconium alloys designed for higher strength to overcome their inherent rapid loss of creep strength at temperatures above 540 deg C are expected to be more susceptible to corrosion hydrogen embrittlement. The results of this study indicate that there is good promise for developing zirconium alloys for fuel cladding application at temperatures up to 475 deg C. (auth)

Klepfer, H H; Douglass, D L

1963-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic disease along the circumference of the epidural space. Conclusions: This report provides consensus guidelines for target volume definition for spinal metastases receiving upfront SRS in common clinical situations.

Cox, Brett W., E-mail: coxb@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lovelock, Michael [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Sheehan, Jason [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Gerszten, Peter C. [Department of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chang, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, California (United States); Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Deasy, Joe [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mindea, Stefan [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); and others

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

New Jersey No 1 Distillate Wholesale/Resale Volume by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: New Jersey No. 1 Distillate Refiner Sales Volumes; New Jersey Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, ...

448

Photovoltaic systems concept study. Volume IV. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in nine sections plus appendices, separated into five separate volumes. This volume contains three sections. Separate abstracts were prepared for each section. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Scientific Papers of the Bureau of Standards Volume 22  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A weight burette for the micromeasurement of liquid volumes, S555, p ... measurement of gas volumes without gas connection to a ... Gases in Metals: ...

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

450

Business Case Slide 19: High-Volume: Casks - Program Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume: Casks - Program Focus Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - Program Focus ORNL furnace for cermet development ORNL furnace for cermet development...

451

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

452

Idaho Kerosene Wholesale/Resale Volume by Refiners (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Idaho Kerosene Refiner Sales Volumes; Idaho Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. ...

453

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. EnergyRenovations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation:...

454

Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volume 1 and Volume 2)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data.

Davidson, D.F.; Hanson, R.K

455

Variability in the Upper-Ocean Internal Wave Field at a Sargasso Sea Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 3.5 month time series records of upper-ocean current and density profiles collected in opposite seasons as part of the LOTUS (Long-Term Upper-Ocean Study) project at 34°N, 70°W indicate substantial variation in the shape of horizontal current ...

Charles C. Eriksen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Upper-Level Frontogenesis: Two Case Studies from the FRONTS 87 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes the structure of two cold fronts observed during the European experiment FRONTS 87. The selection of these two particular cases is based on the existence of well-marked upper-level features, such as strong jet streams, upper-...

Konstantinos Lagouvardos; Vassiliki Kotroni

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document  

SciTech Connect

The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A higher limit approach to homology theories.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of well-known functors such as group homology, cyclic homology of algebras can be described as limits of certain simply defined functors over categories of presentations. In this paper, we develop technique for the description of the higher limits over categories of presentations and show that certain homological functors can be described in this way. In particular, we give a description of Hochschild homology and the derived functors of tensor, symmetric and exterior powers in the sense of Dold and Puppe as higher limits.

Sergei O. Ivanov; Roman Mikhailov

459

Future fuels and engines for railroad locomotives. Volume I: summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of the potential for reducing the dependence of railroads on petroleum fuel, particularly diesel No. 2. The study takes two approaches: (1) to determine how the use of diesel No. 2 can be reduced through increased efficiency and conservation, and (2) to use fuels other than diesel No. 2 both in diesel and other types of engines. The study consists of two volumes; volume 1 is a summary and volume 2 is the technical document. The study indicates that the possible reduction in fuel usage by increasing the efficiency of the present engine is limited; it is already highly energy efficient. The use of non-petroleum fuels, particularly the oil shale distillates, offers a greater potential. A coal-fired locomotive using any one of a number of engines appears to be the best alternative to the diesel-electric locomotive with regard to life-cycle cost, fuel availability, and development risk. The adiabatic diesel is the second-rated alternative with high thermal efficiency (up to 64%) as its greatest advantage. The risks associated with the development of the adiabatic diesel, however, are higher than those for the coal-fired locomotive. The advantage of the third alternative, the fuel cell, is that it produces electricity directly from the fuel. At present, the only feasible fuel for a fuel cell locomotive is methanol. Synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, probably derived from oil shale, will be needed if present diesel-electric locomotives are used beyond 1995. Because synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are particularly suited to medium-speed diesel engines, the first commercial application of these fuels may be by the railroad industry.

Liddle, S.G.; Bonzo, B.B.; Purohit, G.P.; Stallkamp, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS 8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS Summary This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota - Western's Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 22, 2013 EIS-0408: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS

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461

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. References Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Exploration Of The Upper Hot

462

Handbook of heat and mass transfer. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume series, the work of more than 100 contributors, presents advanced topics in industrial heat and mass transfer operations and reactor design technology. Volume 2 emphasizes mass transfer and reactor design. Some of the contents discussed are: MASS TRANSFER PRINCIPLES - Effect of turbulence promoters on mass transfer. Mass transfer principles with homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Convective diffusion with reactions in a tube. Transient mass transfer onto small particles and drops. Modeling heat and mass transport in falling liquid films. Heat and mass transfer in film absorption. Multicomponent mass transfer: theory and applications. Diffusion limitation for reaction in porous catalysts. Kinetics and mechanisms of catalytic deactivation. DISTILLATION AND EXTRACTION - Generalized equations of state for process design. Mixture boiling. Estimating vapor pressure from normal boiling points of hydrocarbons. Estimating liquid and vapor molar fractions in distillation columns. Principles of multicomponent distillation. Generalized design methods for multicomponent distillation. Interfacial films in inorganic substances extraction. Liquid-liquid extraction in suspended slugs. MULTIPHASE REACTOR SYSTEMS - Reaction and mass transport in two-phase reactors. Mass transfer and kinetics in three-phase reactors. Estimating liquid film mass transfer coefficients in randomly packed columns. Designing packed tower wet scrubbers - emphasis on nitrogen oxides. Gas absorption in aerated mixers. Axial dispersion and heat transfer in gas-liquid bubble columns. Operation and design of trickle-bed reactors.

Cheremisinoff, N.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Emittance measurements on a volume H sup minus ion source  

SciTech Connect

A current of 30 mA has been extracted from a volume production H{sup {minus}} source having a toroidal discharge chamber and rotational symmetry. This is a current density of 30 mA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance measurement gave a normalized, 90% value of {epsilon} {sub N}(90%) = 0.32 {pi} mm-mrad for a 13 mA beam. The ion temperature is estimated to be 0.57 eV for this case. For 25.5 mA, {epsilon} {sub N}(90%) = 1.11 {pi} mm-mrad was measured, but the true value is most likely smaller due to a limitation in the emittance resolution. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Alessi, J.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Carnegie Wave Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Address 1 124 Stirling Highway Place North Fremantle Zip 6159 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1993 Number of employees 25 Website http://www.carnegiewave.com Region Australia LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: CETO La Reunion CETO3 Garden Island Perth Wave Energy Project PWEP This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: CETO Wave Energy Technology This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carnegie_Wave_Energy_Limited&oldid=678263

466

Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

Hall, David Kenneth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Beam limiter for thermonuclear fusion devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam limiter circumscribes the interior surface of a vacuum vessel to inhibit collisions of contained plasma and the vessel walls. The cross section of the material making up the limiter has a flatsided or slightly concave portion of increased width towards the plasma and portions of decreased width towards the interior surface of the vessel. This configuration is designed to prevent a major fraction of the material sputtered, vaporized and blistered from the limiter from reaching the plasma. It also allows adequate heat transfer from the wider to the narrower portions. The preferred materials for the beam limiter are solids of sintered, particulate materials of low atomic number with low vapor pressure and low sputtering and blistering yields.

Kaminsky, Manfred S. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Studies on the dynamics of limited filaments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study on the dynamics of filaments in the presence of a diagnostic, conductive limiter is presented. Plasma filaments are coherent structures present in many fusion devices and transport a significant amount of particles ...

Bonde, Jeffrey David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Limit order markets, liquidity, and price impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I explore various aspects of market liquidity and analyze its effect on asset prices. First, in a model of a limit order market I explain how to define liquidity and derive a price impact function. Second, ...

Rosu, Ioanid, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Definition: Interconnection Reliability Operating Limit | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Terms System Operating Limit, System, Cascading Outage, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

471

Snowfall Limit Forecasts and Hydrological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological flood forecasting in mountainous areas requires accurate partitioning between rain and snowfall to properly estimate the extent of runoff contributing areas. Here a method to make use of snowfall limit information—a standard output of ...

Cara Tobin; Andrea Rinaldo; Bettina Schaefli

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

String Scattering Amplitudes in High Energy Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very review of string scattering amplitudes in two important high energy limits: hard scattering and Regge scattering. Recent results of the symmetries in string theory by studying high energy string scattering anplitudes are showed.

Yang, Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fuzzy Limits and Fuzzy Nearness Relation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to introduce the notion of fuzzy limit within the fuzzy analysis developed in the concept of fuzzy nearness relation. The main results concern the corresponding calculus.

Martin Kalina

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Spectra Computed from a Limited Area Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining variance spectra of meteorological fields specified on limited-area grids. Spectra so obtained are compared with global spectra of the same data. An example of scale decomposition (i.e., filtering) using this ...

Ronald M. Errico

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

EU Energy Wind Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company will be concentrating initially on bringing an innovative composite wind tower to market. References EU Energy (Wind) Limited1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

476

Pressure limits of an axisymmetric torus  

SciTech Connect

In order to clarify the pressure limit of a toroidal plasma equilibrium in a three-dimensional geometry, an azimuthally symmetric toroidal plasma was considered. In a tokamak-like plasma, the net toroidal current is necessary for a finite ..beta.. plasma equilibrium. If external conductors are used to provide the rotational transform, iota, the plasma pressure is limited to ..beta.. = (iota/2..pi..)/sup 2//2A, where A is the aspect ratio.

Yoshikawa, S.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z