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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

From Finite to Infinite Volumes: Removal of Boundaries in Diffuse Wave Imaging Jorge Ripoll  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outside the volume to anywhere inside the volume and vice versa. Such transformation is not possible that removes the contribution of the boundaries on the measurements from highly scattering media, transforming]. The computation times required typically scale with a power law to the data-set size, and calculation requirements

Lorenzo, Jorge Ripoll

2

ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and volume flow measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining volume flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the volume flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Process to upgrade coal liquids by extraction prior to hydrodenitrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oxygen compounds are removed, e.g., by extraction, from a coal liquid prior to its hydrogenation. As a result, compared to hydrogenation of such a non-treated coal liquid, the rate of nitrogen removal is increased.

Schneider, Abraham (Overbrook Hills, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE); Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Scheibel, Edward G. (Media, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Methods for recovering a solvent from a fluid volume and methods of removing at least one compound from a nonpolar solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of removing a nonpolar solvent from a fluid volume that includes at least one nonpolar compound, such as a fat, an oil or a triglyceride, is provided. The method comprises contacting a fluid volume with an expanding gas to expand the nonpolar solvent and form a gas-expanded solvent. The gas-expanded solvent may have a substantially reduced density in comparison to the at least one nonpolar compound and/or a substantially reduced capacity to solubilize the nonpolar compound, causing the nonpolar compounds to separate from the gas-expanded nonpolar solvent into a separate liquid phase. The liquid phase including the at least one nonpolar compound may be separated from the gas-expanded solvent using conventional techniques. After separation of the liquid phase, at least one of the temperature and pressure may be reduced to separate the nonpolar solvent from the expanding gas such that the nonpolar solvent may be recovered and reused.

Ginosar, Daniel M.; Wendt, Daniel S.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

Compositional Policy Priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a probabilistic framework for incorporating structured inductive biases into reinforcement learning. These inductive biases arise from policy priors, probability distributions over optimal policies. ...

Wingate, David

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

A process for containment removal and waste volume reduction to remediate groundwater containing certain radionuclides, toxic metals and organics. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project to remove groundwater contaminants by an improved treatment process was performed during 1990 October--1992 March by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the United States Department of Energy, managed by Argonne National Laboratory. The goal was to generate high-quality effluent while minimizing secondary waste volume. Two effluent target levels, within an order of magnitude, or less than the US Drinking Water Limit, were set to judge the process effectiveness. The program employed mixed waste feeds containing cadmium, uranium, lead, iron, calcium, strontium-85-90, cesium-137, benzene and trichlorethylene in simulated and actual groundwater and soil leachate solutions. A combination of process steps consisting of sequential chemical conditioning, cross-flow microfiltration and dewatering by low temperature-evaporation, or filter pressing were effective for the treatment of mixed waste having diverse physico-chemical properties. A simplified single-stage version of the process was implemented to treat ground and surface waters contaminated with strontium-90 at the Chalk River Laboratories site. Effluent targets and project goals were met successfully.

Buckley, L.P.; Killey, D.R.W.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, P.C.F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90e COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION J. Wrathall, T.of coal during combustion. The process involves the additionCOAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION Lawrence Berkeley

Wrathall, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Prior Fiscal Years  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentationsSRS Responds to TrainPrior-Fiscal-Years Sign In

10

Institutional Prior Approval System (IPAS) / Organizational Prior Approval System (OPAS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institutional Prior Approval System (IPAS) / Organizational Prior Approval System (OPAS) Guidelines System (IPAS) / Organizational Prior Approval System (OPAS). This system allows BGSU to provide or Project Directors requesting actions which require IPAS/OPAS review and approval should submit the IPAS

Moore, Paul A.

11

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

12

Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes E and F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of j Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70 percent of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup -6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

Keefer, M.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Varying the prior 29 Appendix C. Quality of the posterior estimates from prior replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Varying the prior 29 Appendix C. Quality of the posterior estimates from prior replacement replacement may out-perform prior-specific training in some aspects of the quality of the estimated posterior, since the prior is known analytically, the posterior can also be estimated by prior replacement. To do

15

Minimally Informative Prior Distributions for PSA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A salient feature of Bayesian inference is its ability to incorporate information from a variety of sources into the inference model, via the prior distribution (hereafter simply “the prior”). However, over-reliance on old information can lead to priors that dominate new data. Some analysts seek to avoid this by trying to work with a minimally informative prior distribution. Another reason for choosing a minimally informative prior is to avoid the often-voiced criticism of subjectivity in the choice of prior. Minimally informative priors fall into two broad classes: 1) so-called noninformative priors, which attempt to be completely objective, in that the posterior distribution is determined as completely as possible by the observed data, the most well known example in this class being the Jeffreys prior, and 2) priors that are diffuse over the region where the likelihood function is nonnegligible, but that incorporate some information about the parameters being estimated, such as a mean value. In this paper, we compare four approaches in the second class, with respect to their practical implications for Bayesian inference in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The most commonly used such prior, the so-called constrained noninformative prior, is a special case of the maximum entropy prior. This is formulated as a conjugate distribution for the most commonly encountered aleatory models in PSA, and is correspondingly mathematically convenient; however, it has a relatively light tail and this can cause the posterior mean to be overly influenced by the prior in updates with sparse data. A more informative prior that is capable, in principle, of dealing more effectively with sparse data is a mixture of conjugate priors. A particular diffuse nonconjugate prior, the logistic-normal, is shown to behave similarly for some purposes. Finally, we review the so-called robust prior. Rather than relying on the mathematical abstraction of entropy, as does the constrained noninformative prior, the robust prior places a heavy-tailed Cauchy prior on the canonical parameter of the aleatory model.

Dana L. Kelly; Robert W. Youngblood; Kurt G. Vedros

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

Schwarz, T. and Wells, S. (1999) "Storm Water Particle Removal using Cross-Flow Filtration and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226. CONTINUOUS DEFLECTION SEPARATION OF STORMWATER PARTICULATES

Wells, Scott A.

20

Bayesian Policy Search with Policy Priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of learning to act in partially observable, continuous-state-and-action worlds where we have abstract prior knowledge about the structure of the optimal policy in the form of a distribution over ...

Wingate, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hierarchical 3D diffusion wavelet shape priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a novel representation of prior knowledge for image segmentation, using diffusion wavelets that can reflect arbitrary continuous interdependencies in shape data. The application of diffusion ...

Langs, Georg

22

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (PLA) Application Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (PLA) Application Form Advanced standing may be granted to certificate the SCS Courses for which you are seeking advanced standing. SCS Course Number Course Title PLA Basis A and/or B PLA Fee _ HST 13% Please state below the certificate program you are working towards

Sokolowski, Marla

24

Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches for Policy and Project Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Free, Prior, and...

25

STATUS OF MECHANICAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AND COOLING COILS CLOSURE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9225  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system within two of its storage tanks. The Waste on Wheels (WOW) system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2839 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. In addition, Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks and cooling coils will be isolated and filled with grout for long term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal of the remaining sludge waste within Tank 6 removed {approx} 75% of the original 25,000 gallons in August 2007. Utilizing lessons learned from Tank 6, Tank 5 Mechanical Sludge Removal completed removal of {approx} 90% of the original 125 cubic meters (33,000 gallons) of sludge material in May 2008. The successful removal of sludge material meets the requirement of approximately 19 to 28 cubic meters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. The Chemical Cleaning Process will utilize 8 wt% oxalic acid to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The flow sheet for Chemical Cleaning planned a 20:1 volume ratio of acid to sludge for the first strike with mixing provided by the submersible mixer pumps. The subsequent strikes will utilize a 13:1 volume ratio of acid to sludge with no mixing. The results of the Chemical Cleaning Process are detailed in the 'Status of Chemical Cleaning of Waste Tanks at the Savannah River Site--F Tank Farm Closure Project--Abstract 9114'. To support Tank 5 and Tank 6 cooling coil closure, cooling coil isolation and full scale cooling coil grout testing was completed to develop a strategy for grouting the horizontal and vertical cooling coils. This paper describes in detail the performance of the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and SMP operational strategies within Tank 5. In addition, it will discuss the current status of Tank 5 & 6 cooling coil isolation activities and the results from the cooling coil grout fill tests.

Jolly, R

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks.

Christensen, S. W.; Goodyear, C. P.; Kirk, B. L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

An Adaptive Kalman Filter for Removing Baseline Wandering in ECG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Adaptive Kalman Filter for Removing Baseline Wandering in ECG Signals MA Mneimneh, EE Yaz, MT misleads ECG anno- tators from accurate identification of the ECG features. Previous work that deals with baseline wandering re- moval requires the identification of the QRS complex or other ECG features prior

Povinelli, Richard J.

28

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Reactor for removing ammonia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

Luo, Weifang (Livermore, CA); Stewart, Kenneth D. (Valley Springs, CA)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

30

Arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Drum lid removal tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

Pella, Bernard M. (Martinez, GA); Smith, Philip D. (North Augusta, SC)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

KKG Group Paraffin Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

Schulte, Ralph

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Volume 1of 3 Removal Action Options Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Colorado In Compliance with Unilateral Administrative Order No. CERCLA-VIII-95-06 June 12, 1995 PlA 609 #12.1 Leaching Test PLA 610 1-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-6 2-8 2-8 2-9 2-9 2-9 2-9 2-9 2-10 2-10 2

39

Lab sets new record for waste volume removed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering |

40

acid treatment prior: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

androgen withdrawal prior: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

42

analyzing prior mammograms: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

43

ROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION USING MULTIPLE PRIOR MODELS FOR SPEECH RECONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speech recognition to enhance noisy speech. Typically, a single prior model is trained by pooling normalization (CMN), while others preprocess noisy speech using speech enhancement techniques. If noise samplesROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION USING MULTIPLE PRIOR MODELS FOR SPEECH RECONSTRUCTION Arun Narayanan

Wang, DeLiang "Leon"

44

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively purified and collected in the Mercury Purification Cell (MPC) since 2008. A significant cleaning campaign aims to bring the MPC back up to facility housekeeping standards. Two significant investigations are being undertaken to restore mercury collection. The SMECT mercury pump has been removed from the tank and will be functionally tested. Also, research is being conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory to determine the effects of antifoam addition on the behavior of mercury. These path forward items will help us better understand what is occurring in the mercury collection system and ultimately lead to an improved DWPF production rate and mercury recovery rate. (authors)

Behrouzi, Aria [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States); Zamecnik, Jack [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

A model of the VU (volume-unit) meter, with speech applications Bryce Lobdell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of the VU (volume-unit) meter, with speech applications Bryce Lobdell Jont Allen Beckman Institute, University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 (October 11, 2006) Running title: volume unit meter usage ABSTRACT The Volume Unit (VU) meter, used in speech research prior to the ad- vent of computers and modern

Allen, Jont

48

Statistical Decisions Using Likelihood Information Without Prior Probabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a decision-theoretic approach to statistical inference that satisfies the Likelihood Principle (LP) without using prior information. Unlike the Bayesian approach, which also satisfies LP, we do not ...

Giang, Phan H.; Shenoy, Prakash P.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Prior experience and its effects on audience design   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRIOR EXPERIENCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON AUDIENCE DESIGN. Abstract Objective Audience design involves tailoring utterances to suit the needs of your partner. The current experiment was interested in whether a speaker’s ...

Wilson, Kerry

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fairer Trade, Removing Gender Bias in US Import Taxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fairer Trade Removing Gender Bias in US Import Taxes LORI L. TAYLOR AND JAWAD DAR Mosbacher Institute VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 3 | 2015 There are many inequalities in US tariff policy. Products imported from certain countries enter duty free..., the US Su- preme Court refused to hear appeals from import- ers Rack Room Shoes Inc. and Forever 21 Inc., thereby blocking their attempts to challenge an earlier ruling by the Court of Internation- al Trade. The importers had argued before the Court...

Taylor, Lori L.; Dar, Jawad

51

Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

Heußer, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.heusser@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Brehm, Marcus [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ritschl, Ludwig [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustraße 31, 90451 Nürnberg (Germany)] [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustraße 31, 90451 Nürnberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Finding a Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Distribution Using Least Squares  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straight-forward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in closed form, and so an approximate beta distribution is used in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial aleatory model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that is often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

Dana Kelly; Corwin Atwood

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Finding A Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Using Least Squares  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straightforward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson \\lambda, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in the form of a standard distribution (e.g., beta, gamma), and so a beta distribution is used as an approximation in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that are often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

Dana Kelly

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Expected Behavior of Quantum Thermodynamic Machines with Prior Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate the expected behavior of a quantum model of heat engine when we have incomplete information about external macroscopic parameters, like magnetic field controlling the intrinsic energy scales of the working medium. We explicitly derive the prior probability distribution for these unknown parameters, $a_i, (i=1,2)$. Based on a few simple assumptions, the prior is found to be of the form $\\Pi(a_i) \\propto 1/a_i$. By calculating the expected values of various physical quantities related to this engine, we find that the expected behavior of the quantum model exhibits thermodynamic-like features. This leads us to a surprising proposal that incomplete information quantified as appropriate prior distribution can lead us to expect classical thermodynamic behavior in quantum models.

George Thomas; Ramandeep S. Johal

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

High SO2 Removal Efficiency Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, "High Efficiency SO2 Removal Testing", for the time period 1 January through 31 March 1997. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO2 removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The "base" project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company?s Big Bend Station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy?s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company?s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy?s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light?s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation?s (NYSEG) Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. However, additional testing is planned at the Big Bend Station. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the second quarter of calendar year 1997. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

Gary Blythe

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

Unknown

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

57

Volume Comparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface. | EMSLVisualizingwith SalicylamideVolume

58

Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 - Preparation for Reactor Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is intended to provide information about the ongoing decommissioning tasks at Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 plant, and in particular, the work being performed to prepare the reactor for removal and disposal. In 1972 Fermi 1 was shutdown and the fuel returned to the Atomic Energy Commission. By the end of 1975, a retirement plan was prepared, the bulk sodium removed, and the plant placed in a safe store condition. The plant systems were left isolated with the sodium containing systems inert with carbon dioxide in an attempt to form a carbonate layer, thus passivating the underlying reactive sodium. In 1996, Detroit Edison determined to evaluate the condition of the plant and to make recommendations in relation to the Fermi 1 future plans. At the end of 1997 approval was obtained to remove the bulk asbestos and residual alkali-metals (i.e., sodium and sodium potassium (NaK)). In 2000, full nuclear decommissioning of the plant was approved. To date, the bulk asbestos insulation has been removed, and the only NaK remaining is located in six capillary instrument tubes. The remaining sodium is contained within the reactor, two of the three primary loops, and miscellaneous removed pipes and equipment to be processed. The preferred method for removing or reacting sodium at Fermi 1 is by injecting superheated steam into a heated, nitrogen inert system. The byproducts of this reaction are caustic sodium hydroxide, hydrogen gas, and heat. The decision was made to separate the three primary loops from the reactor for better control prior to processing each loop and the reactor separately. The first loop has already been processed. The main focus is now to process the reactor to allow removal and disposal of the Class C waste prior to the anticipated June 2008 closure of the Barnwell radioactive waste disposal facility located in South Carolina. Lessons learnt are summarized and concern: the realistic schedule and adherence to the schedule, time estimates, personnel accountability, back up or fill in work, work packages, condensation control, radiological contamination control, and organization of the waste stream.

Swindle, Danny [Sargent and Lundy Engineers, LLC, 55 E. Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Brief article Prior knowledge on the illumination position  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-retinal knowledge (Rock, 1983). Recent experimental work has emphasized the study of prior knowledge and P was upside-down and consequently shadows were in the wrong place relative to the light source. The position. This explanation rests on the knowledge that the light source stays at the same location whether or not one

Mamassian, Pascal

60

updated slides: http://sideinfo.wikkii.com Rich Prior Knowledge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

updated slides: http://sideinfo.wikkii.com Rich Prior Knowledge in Learning for NLP Gregory Druck, Kuzman Ganchev, João Graça updated slides: http://sideinfo.wikkii.com 1 1 #12;updated slides: http://sideinfo.wikkii.com Goal: Build a Statistical NLP System · ` 2 2 #12;updated slides: http://sideinfo.wikkii.com Goal: Build

Taskar, Ben

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Blind source separation using spatial and temporal priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Blind source separation using spatial and temporal priors W D Addison Balliol University of Oxford A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Trinity 2009 2 #12;3 #12 for providing such fine accommodation in Oxford and to my wife for her incredible patience while this thesis

Roberts, Stephen

62

Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge Andrew F. Heckler experiments examine the effects of varying the relative concreteness of physics word problems on student performance.Previous studies have found that concrete representations benefit performance for relatively

Heckler, Andrew F.

63

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high speed look at the removal of the Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal. A project sponsored by the Recovery Act on the Savannah River Site.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Div., IL (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

LNAPL Removal from Unsaturated Porous Media using Surfactant Infiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of unsaturated column experiments was performed to evaluate light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) fate and removal during surfactant solution infiltration. Surfactant-LNAPL phase behavior tests were conducted to optimize the remedial solutions. Packed sand and site sediment columns were first processed to establish representative LNAPL smear zone under unsaturated conditions. Infiltration of low-concentration surfactant was then applied in a stepwise flush mode, with 0.3 column pore volume (PV) of solution in each flush. The influence of infiltrated surfactant solution volume and pH on LNAPL removal was assessed. A LNAPL bank was observed at the very front of the first surfactant infiltration in each column, indicating that a very low surfactant concentration is needed to reduce the LNAPL-water interfacial tension sufficiently enough to mobilize trapped LNAPL under unsaturated conditions. More LNAPL was recovered as additional steps of surfactant infiltration were applied. Up to 99% LNAPL was removed after six infiltration steps, with less than 2.0 PV of total surfactant solution application, suggesting surfactant infiltration may be an effective method for vadose zone LNAPL remediation. The influence of pH tested in this study (3.99~10.85) was insignificant because the buffering capacity of the sediment kept the pH in the column higher than the zero point charge, pHzpc, of the sediment and therefore the difference between surfactant sorption was negligible.

Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Using Prior Knowledge in the Design of Classifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE IN THE DESIGN OF CLASSIFIERS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD SHAHROKH ESFAHANI Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Edward Russell Dougherty Co-Chair of Committee, Aniruddha Datta Committee Members, Byung-Jun Yoon Ivan Ivanov Head of Department, Chanan Singh May 2014 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering Copyright 2014 Mohammad Shahrokh...

Shahrokh Esfahani, Mohammad

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Prior Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowderClimateMeadows, NewPrior Lake, Minnesota:

71

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of asbestos-abatement techniques. Phase 1. Removal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne asbestos levels were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and phase constrast microscopy (PCM) before, during, and after removal of sprayed-on acoustical plaster from the ceilings of four suburban schools. Air samples were collected at three types of sites: indoor sites with asbestos-containing material (ACM), indoor sites without ACM (indoor control), and sites outside the building (outdoor control). Bulk samples of the ACM were collected prior to the removal and analyzed by polarized light microscopy (PLM). A vigorous quality-assurance program was applied to all aspects of the study. Airborne asbestos levels were low before and after removal. Elevated, but still relatively low levels were measured outside the work area during removal. This emphasizes the need for careful containment of the work area.

Chesson, J.; Margeson, D.P.; Ogden, J.; Reichenbach, N.G.; Bauer, K.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cesium removal using crystalline silicotitanate. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 100 million gallons of radioactive waste is stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation, and Savannah River Site (SRS). Most of the radioactivity comes from {sup 137}Cs, which emits high-activity gamma radiation. The Cesium Removal System is a modular, transportable, ion-exchange system configured as a compact processing unit. Liquid tank waste flows through columns packed with solid material, called a sorbent, that selectively adsorbs cesium and allows the other materials to pass through. The sorbent is crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an engineered material with a high capacity for sorbing cesium from alkaline wastes. The Cesium Removal System was demonstrated at Oak Ridge using Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste for feed. Demonstration operations began in September 1996 and were completed during June 1997. Prior to the demonstration, a number of ion-exchange materials were evaluated at Oak Ridge with MVST waste. Also, three ion-exchange materials and three waste types were tested at Hanford. These bench-scale tests were conducted in a hot cell. Hanford's results showed that 300 times less sorbent was used by selecting Ionsiv IE-911 over organic ion-exchange resins for cesium removal. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues and lessons learned.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Conditioning of carbonaceous material prior to physical beneficiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material such as coal is conditioned by contact with a supercritical fluid prior to physical beneficiation. The solid feed material is contacted with an organic supercritical fluid such as cyclohexane or methanol at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature and pressures of 1 to 4 times the critical pressure. A minor solute fraction is extracted into critical phase and separated from the solid residuum. The residuum is then processed by physical separation such as by froth flotation or specific gravity separation to recover a substantial fraction thereof with reduced ash content. The solute in supercritical phase can be released by pressure reduction and recombined with the low-ash, carbonaceous material.

Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA); Ruether, John A. (McMurray, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Alcohol flushing for enhanced removal of coal tar from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alcohol flushing for enhancing the removal of coal tar from contaminated soils and reducing coal tar concentrations in the aqueous-phase leachate was investigated. Four soil columns were packed with relatively undisturbed coal tar contaminated soils collected from a former coal gasification site. These columns were leached with water and then flushed with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solutions. Initially, total coal tar concentrations in water leachate ranged from = 0.1 to 150 mg/L for the four columns. Coal tar concentrations in the column effluent generally increased three to five orders of magnitude during the initial IPA flush. Each column was flushed with 1-3 pore volumes of an IPA solution. Reduction of coal tar concentrations in water leachate, attributed to the alcohol flushing, was noted in three of the four columns. The total coal tar removed from the soil columns during the IPA flushes constituted from 54 to 97% of the total coal tar removed during both water leaching (240-800 pore volumes) and alcohol flushing (1-3 pore volumes). The alcohol flushing removed from 3 to 19 % of the total coal tar in the various soil columns. Results indicated that alcohol flushing can enhance the removal of coal tar from contaminated soils and can reduce the aqueous-phase coal tar concentrations in the leachate. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Hayden, N.J. [Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Van der Hoven, E.J. [Living Technologies, Inc., Burlington, VT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory met the performance objective during the continuous operational testing. Effluent hexavalent chromium analyzed by the field laboratory met the performance goal in over 90 percent of the samples. All effluent hexavalent chromium samples during the batch testing with high influent hexavalent chromium concentrations ({approx}2000 {micro}g/L) met the performance objective. Although the EC system was able to meet the performance goal, it must be noted that it was not uncommon for the system to be operated in recycle mode to achieve the performance goal. The EC unit was sometimes, but not always, capable of a single pass treatment efficiency high enough to meet the performance goal, and recycling water for multiple treatment passes was effective. An operational objective was to determine the volume and composition of the waste streams to enable proper waste designation. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) concentrations, pH, and free liquids were determined for solid material from the EC electrodes (mechanically removed scale), the filter press, and the tank bottoms for the effluent and waste collector tanks. These data met all data quality requirements. All solid-phase secondary waste streams were found to be below the TCLP limits for the toxicity characteristic, and a pH value within the limits for the corrosivity characteristic. Out of three samples, two (one of scale from the EC unit and one from filter press solids) failed the free liquid (paint filter) test, which is one of the acceptability criteria for Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The solid-phase waste generation rate was about 0.65-gallon of solid waste per 100 gallons of water treated. It is concluded that the solid-phase secondary waste generated from this technology under the conditions at the test site will meet the toxicity and corrosivity criteria for disposal. It is also concluded that with engineering and/or operational improvements, a solid-phase secondary waste could be produced that would meet the free liquid disposal requirements. The second oper

PETERSEN SW

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

77

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home content Four-Year Plan Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24 24' 35.298" N, 102...

78

Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3...

Song, Jin Kun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Libya HEU Removal Libya HEU Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

80

Canada HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Canada HEU Removal Canada HEU Removal Location Canada United States 53 47' 24.972" N, 104 35' 23.4384" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Israel HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Israel HEU Removal Israel HEU Removal Location Israel United States 30 53' 18.2328" N, 34 52' 14.178" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

82

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38 26' 50.2044" N, 40 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

83

Uzbekistan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Uzbekistan HEU Removal Uzbekistan HEU Removal Location Uzbekistan United States 42 6' 56.196" N, 63 22' 8.9076" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

84

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Four-Year Plan France HEU Removal France HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

85

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48 59' 44.1492" N, 67 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

86

Ukraine HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Ukraine HEU Removal Ukraine HEU Removal Location Ukraine United States 50 12' 24.8688" N, 25 50' 23.4384" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

87

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Four-Year Plan Chile HEU Removal Chile HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

88

Taiwan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Taiwan HEU Removal Taiwan HEU Removal Location Taiwan United States 24 35' 37.4964" N, 120 53' 36.798" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

89

Romania HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Romania HEU Removal Romania HEU Removal Location Romania United States 45 47' 1.932" N, 24 41' 50.1576" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

90

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47 11' 51.6336" N, 19 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

91

Serbia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Serbia HEU Removal Serbia HEU Removal Location Serbia United States 44 22' 45.7068" N, 20 26' 4.452" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

92

Japan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Japan HEU Removal Japan HEU Removal Location Japan United States 37 36' 59.5872" N, 140 5' 51.5616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

93

Poland HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Poland HEU Removal Poland HEU Removal Location Poland United States 53 23' 50.2872" N, 17 50' 30.4692" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

94

Italy HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Italy HEU Removal Italy HEU Removal Location Italy United States 43 41' 3.4548" N, 11 28' 11.0172" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

95

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Vietnam HEU Removal Vietnam HEU Removal Location Vietnam United States 13 12' 30.8628" N, 108 19' 30.702" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

96

Water Distribution and Removal Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes of this WD&R model (CRWMS M&O 2000b) are to quantify and evaluate the distribution and drainage of seepage water within emplacement drifts during the period of compliance for post-closure performance. The model bounds the fraction of water entering the drift that will be prevented from contacting the waste by the combined effects of engineered controls on water distribution and on water removal. For example, water can be removed during pre-closure operation by ventilation and after closure by natural drainage into the fractured rock. Engineered drains could be used, if demonstrated to be necessary and effective, to ensure that adequate drainage capacity is provided. This report provides the screening arguments for certain Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that are related to water distribution and removal in the EBS. Applicable acceptance criteria from the Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs) developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1999a; 1999b; 1999c; and 1999d) are also addressed in this document.

Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page Numbers Stain Page Numbers Acne medicine Blueberry Special 9 Wet 8 Adhesive tape Dye 8 Special 9 Butter Alcoholic beverages Dry 8 Wet 8 Oil 8 Tannin 8 Calamine lotion Asphalt Combination 8 Combination 8 Dye 8 Dye 8 Candle wax Automotive... the most gentle to the most harsh, so always stop treatments as soon as the stain has been removed. Dry Type Stains Dissolve the stain with a grease solvent. Lubricate the stain with dry spotter, coconut oil or mineral oil (sold in health food...

Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images Chenyu Wu, Ce Liu, Heung-Yueng Shum, Member, IEEE an intelligent image editing and face synthesis system that automatically removes eyeglasses from an input frontal face image. Although conventional image editing tools can be used to remove eyeglasses by pixel

Narasayya, Vivek

99

Removal of mercury from coal via a microbial pretreatment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for the removal of mercury from coal prior to combustion is disclosed. The process is based on use of microorganisms to oxidize iron, sulfur and other species binding mercury within the coal, followed by volatilization of mercury by the microorganisms. The microorganisms are from a class of iron and/or sulfur oxidizing bacteria. The process involves contacting coal with the bacteria in a batch or continuous manner. The mercury is first solubilized from the coal, followed by microbial reduction to elemental mercury, which is stripped off by sparging gas and captured by a mercury recovery unit, giving mercury-free coal. The mercury can be recovered in pure form from the sorbents via additional processing.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN); Hamilton, Choo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Method of making thermally removable epoxies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Russick, Edward M. (Rio Rancho, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solvent and water/surfactant process for removal of bitumen from tar sands contaminated with clay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for removing bitumen from a tar sand contaminated with clay. It comprises: obtaining a tar sand consisting of bitumen and clay mixed with sand; introducing the tar sand into a stripper vessel; dissolving the bitumen with a solvent, the solvent also removing the clay from the sand into a liquid medium formed with the solvent and bitumen; removing the liquid medium from the sand; and washing the sand with water to which a nonionic surface active agent has been added to remove residual bitumen from the sand, the surfactive agent comprising a linear alcohol having carbon atoms within the range on the order of about eight to fifteen carbon atoms and ethoxylate units on the carbon atoms within the range on the order of about two to eight ethoxylate units, the surfactant being present in the water in an effective amount less than about 0.5 percent by volume.

Guymon, E.P.

1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Model Parameterization, Prior Distributions, and the General Time-Reversible Model in Bayesian Phylogenetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian phylogenetic methods require the selection of prior probability distributions for all parameters of the model of evolution. These distributions allow one to incorporate prior information into a Bayesian analysis, ...

Zwickl, Derrick J.; Holder, Mark T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PET IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION USING ANATOMICAL INFORMATION THROUGH MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED PRIORS: A SCALE SPACE APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PET IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION USING ANATOMICAL INFORMATION THROUGH MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED PRIORS prior for incorpo- rating information from co-registered anatomical images into PET image reconstruction using mutual information based rigid registration. PET data are then simulated from the au

Rangarajan, Anand

104

Computer News, Volume 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

105

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

106

Volume 64, Issues 3&4 (Complete)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVENTEENTH - ENTURY EWS FALL - WINTER 2006 Vol. 64 Nos. 3&4 Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 54, Nos. 3&4 SEVENTEENTH -CENTURY NEWS VOLUME 64, Nos. 3&4 FA L L -W IN T E R , 2006 SCN , an official organ of the Milton Society of America...-WINTER , 2006 REVIEWS Char les W.A. Prior, Defining the Jacobean Church: the Politics of Religious Contr oversy, 1603-1625. Review by GRAHAM PARRY .................. 1 5 1 James D. Tracy and Marguerite Ragnow, eds., Religion and the Early Modern State: V...

Dickson, Donald

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

31320-2014-EN Member states -Service contract -Prior Information Notice -Not applicable 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OJ/S S20 29/01/2014 31320-2014-EN Member states - Service contract - Prior Information Notice - Not applicable 1/2 29/01/2014 S20 http://ted.europa.eu/TED Member states - Service contract - Prior Information/S S20 29/01/2014 31320-2014-EN Member states - Service contract - Prior Information Notice

Crowther, Paul

109

A model of the VU (volume-unit) meter, with speech applications Bryce E. Lobdell and Jont B. Allen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of the VU (volume-unit) meter, with speech applications Bryce E. Lobdell and Jont B. Allen October 2006; accepted 12 October 2006 The Volume-Unit VU meter, used in speech research prior. There are no known software implementations of this meter, which meet the 1954 ASA standard and provide

Allen, Jont

110

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

111

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Central Vein Dilatation Prior to Concomitant Port Implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implantation of subcutaneous port systems is routinely performed in patients requiring repeated long-term infusion therapy. Ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided implantation under local anesthesia is broadly established in interventional radiology and has decreased the rate of complications compared to the surgical approach. In addition, interventional radiology offers the unique possibility of simultaneous management of venous occlusion. We present a technique for recanalization of central venous occlusion and angioplasty combined with port placement in a single intervention which we performed in two patients. Surgical port placement was impossible owing to occlusion of the superior vena cava following placement of a cardiac pacemaker and occlusion of multiple central veins due to paraneoplastic coagulopathy, respectively. In both cases the affected vessel segments were dilated with balloon catheters and the port systems were placed thereafter. After successful dilatation, the venous access was secured with a 25-cm-long, 8-Fr introducer sheath, a subcutaneous pocket prepared, and the port catheter tunneled to the venipuncture site. The port catheter was introduced through the sheath with the proximal end connected to a 5-Fr catheter. This catheter was pulled through the tunnel in order to preserve the tunnel and, at the same time, allow safe removal of the long sheath over the wire. The port system functioned well in both cases. The combination of recanalization and port placement in a single intervention is a straightforward alternative for patients with central venous occlusion that can only be offered by interventional radiology.

Krombach, Gabriele A., E-mail: krombach@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Plumhans, Cedric; Goerg, Fabian; Guenther, Rolf W. [University of Technology (RWTH) Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method of making thermally removable polymeric encapsulants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a thermally-removable encapsulant by heating a mixture of at least one bis(maleimide) compound and at least one monomeric tris(furan) or tetrakis(furan) compound at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a gel and cooling the gel to form the thermally-removable encapsulant. The encapsulant can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C., preferably in a polar solvent. The encapsulant can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the encapsulant for component repair, modification or quality control.

Small, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

119

Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

120

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

122

EFFECT OF TRANSPORTING SALTSTONE SAMPLES PRIOR TO SET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Sampling and Analyses Plan provides a basis for the quantity (and configuration) of saltstone grout samples required for conducting a study directed towards correlation of the Performance Assessment (PA) related properties of field-emplaced samples and samples processed and cured in the laboratory. The testing described in the saltstone sampling and analyses plan will be addressed in phases. The initial testing (Phase I) includes collecting samples from the process room in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and transporting them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they will cure under a temperature profile that mimics the temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) and then be analyzed. SRNL has previously recommended that after the samples of fresh (uncured) saltstone are obtained from the SPF process room, they are allowed to set prior to transporting them to SRNL for curing. The concern was that if the samples are transported before they are set, the vibrations during transport may cause artificial delay of structure development which could result in preferential settling or segregation of the saltstone slurry. However, the results of this testing showed there was no clear distinction between the densities of the cylinder sections for any of the transportation scenarios tested (1 day, 1 hour, and 0 minutes set time prefer to transportation) . The bottom section of each cylinder was the densest for each transportation scenario, which indicates some settling in all the samples. Triplicate hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from each set of time and transportation scenarios indicated that those samples transported immediately after pouring had the highest hydraulic conductivity. Conversely, samples that were allowed to sit for an hour before being transported had the lowest hydraulic conductivity. However, the hydraulic conductivities of all three samples fell within an acceptable range. Based on the cured property analysis of the three samples, there is no clear conclusion about transporting the samples before they are set; however, experience with saltstone grout indicates the samples should sit and develop some structure before being transported to SRNL for curing.

Reigel, M.

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method And Apparatus For Arbitrarily Large Capacity Removable Media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus to handle multiple sets of removable media within a storage system. A first set of removable media are mounted on a set of drives. Data is accepted until the first set of removable media is filled. A second set of removable media is mounted on the drives, while the first set of removable media is removed. When the change in removable media is complete, writing of data proceeds on the second set of removable media. Data may be buffered while the change in removable media occurs. Alternatively, two sets of removable media may be mounted at the same time. When the first set of removable media is filled to a selected amount, the second set of removable media may then be used to write the data. A third set of removable media is set up or mounted for use, while the first set of removable media is removed.

Milligan, Charles A. (Golden, CO); Hughes, James P. (Lino Lakes, MN); Debiez; Jacques (Cugnaux, FR)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

129

Finite Volume Element Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Computer News, Volume 25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 25. TeX for Mac OS X. plus ssh and security issues for Macs. by Rodrigo Bañuelos. NOTE: These instructions are now ...

131

Computer News, Volume 21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

132

Computer News, Volume 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

133

Computer News, Volume 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

134

Computer News, Volume 19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

135

Computer News, Volume 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

136

Computer News, Volume 20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

137

Computer News, Volume 37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

138

Computer News, Volume 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

139

Computer News, Volume 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

140

Computer News, Volume 34  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Computer News, Volume 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 33. How I teach big calculus lectures with a tablet PC. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

142

Computer News, Volume 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

143

Computer News, Volume 38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

144

Computer News, Volume 27  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

145

Computer News, Volume 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

146

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

147

Computer News, Volume 35  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

148

Computer News, Volume 32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bañuelos

149

Computer News, Volume 39  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

150

Computer News, Volume 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

151

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 48. Prime...

152

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 48. Prime...

153

High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

154

Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - allen philippe prior Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: allen philippe prior Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Statistical Machine Translation: the basic, the novel, and the speculative Summary: Statistical Machine...

156

T-697: Google Chrome Prior to 13.0.782.107 Multiple Security...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chrome Prior to 13.0.782.107 Multiple Security Vulnerabilities Releases >> Chrome OS Beta: Channel Update Chromium Security >> Reporting Security Bugs IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High...

157

Priors in Bayesian Learning of Phonological Rules Sharon Goldwater and Mark Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Priors in Bayesian Learning of Phonological Rules Sharon Goldwater and Mark Johnson Department johnson}@brown.edu Abstract This paper describes a Bayesian procedure for un- supervised learning

Edinburgh, University of

158

anion-exchange chromatography prior: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In realistic problems, both the transformation group analysis and the principle of maximum entropy are needed to determine the prior. The distributions thus found are...

159

Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

Moore, James [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States); Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States); Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sulfur dioxide removal by enhanced electrostatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) still represents a significant technical challenge which could determine the use of certain types of fossil fuels for energy production. This paper will present the preliminary results of an innovative research project utilizing a low-cost wet electrostatic precipitator to remove sulfur dioxide. There are many aspects for gas removal in an electrostatic precipitator which are not currently being used. This project utilizes electron attachment of free electrons onto gas molecules and ozone generation to remove sulfur dioxide which is a typical flue gas pollutant. This research was conducted on a bench-scale, wet electrostatic precipitator. A direct-current negative discharge corona is used to generate the ozone in-situ. This ozone will be used to oxidize SO{sub 2} to form sulfuric acid, which is very soluble in water. However, it is believed that the primary removal mechanism is electron attachment of the free electrons from the corona which force the SO{sub 2} to go to equilibrium with the water and be removed from the gas stream. Forcing the equilibrium has been shown to achieve removal efficiencies of up to 70%. The bench scale unit has been designed to operate wet or dry, positive and negative for comparison purposes. The applied dc voltage is variable from 0 to 100 kV, the flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. Tests are conducted on a simulated flue gas stream with SO{sub 2} ranging from 0 to 4,000 ppmv. This paper presents the results of tests conducted to determine the effect of operating conditions on removal efficiency. The removal efficiency was found to vary with gas residence time, water flow rate, inlet concentration, applied power, and the use of corona pulsing.

Larkin, K.; Tseng, C.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 2. Accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF), performed by the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume II of the six-volume set presents the results of the accounting portion, including sections on accounting adjustments and company-use gas. It identifies enhancements to accounting practices that make records more accurately reflect the physical activity occurring in the system. The result is an accounting record of gas volumes received and delivered which have been adjusted for the enhancements, and exclude accounting estimates and prior period adjustments.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Law, E.; Rudshagen, C.; Yevchak, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

TESTING OF NOVEL INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS FOR THE REMOVAL OF RADIOCOBALT FROM NPP WASTE EFFLUENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New antimonysilicate (SbSi) ion exchanger is being developed for industrial use. Tentative screening tests using simulated waste liquids have indicated that this material can remove most key radionuclides such as {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in much broader pH-range than existing commercial materials. As a part of the development program, the material is being tested for the removal of {sup 60}Co from real nuclear power plant waste waters. In this context, test with small-scale laboratory columns (bed volume 0.5 mL) have been carried out using a Floor Drain water samples from Ginna NPP and Diablo Canyon NPP, USA. More than 90% of {sup 60}Co in these liquids was removable by mechanical filtration (0.45 {micro}m). SbSi columns removed more than 90% of the soluble {sup 60}Co that was left in the solutions after filtration. The tests were discontinued when about 2000 bed volumes were treated due to depletion of test liquids with no sign of column exhaustion.

Harjula, R.; Paajanen, A.; Mueller, T.; Lehto, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery. In brief, the Path Forward was developed to reconsider potential open air demolition areas; characterize to determine if any zircaloy exists, evaluate existing concrete data to determine additional characterization needs, size the new building to accommodate human machine interface and tooling, consider bucket thumb and use ofshape-charges in design, and finally to utilize complex-wide and industry explosive demolition lessons learned in the design approach. Appendix B documents these results from the team's use ofValue Engineering process tools entitled Weighted Analysis Alternative Matrix, Matrix Conclusions, Evaluation Criteria, and Alternative Advantages and Disadvantages. These results were further supported with the team's validation of parking-lot information sheets: memories (potential ideas to consider), issues/concerns, and assumptions, contained in Appendix C. Appendix C also includes the recorded workshop flipchart notes taken from the SAR Alternatives and Project Overview presentations. The SAR workshop presentations, including a 3-D graphic illustration demonstration video have been retained in the CHPRC project file, and were not included in this report due to size limitations. The workshop concluded with a round robin close-out where each member was engaged for any last minute items and meeting utility. In summary, the team felt the session was value added and looked forward to proceeding with the recommended actions and conceptual design.

HARRINGTON RA

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Part removal of 3D printed parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

Peña Doll, Mateo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

Friesen, F. QL. [Grinnell College, 1115 8th Avenue, Grinnell, IA 50112-1616

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Efficient Bayesian multivariate fMRI analysis using a sparsifying spatio-temporal prior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Bayesian multivariate fMRI analysis using a sparsifying spatio-temporal prior Marcel A Available online 1 December 2009 Keywords: Multivariate analysis Bayesian inference Expectation propagation Laplace prior is introduced as a multivariate approach to the analysis of neuroimaging data. It is shown

Edinburgh, University of

174

Prior Knowledge, Level Set Representations & Visual Grouping Mikael Rousson (mikael.rousson@siemens.com)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prior Knowledge, Level Set Representations & Visual Grouping Mikael Rousson (mikael.rousson@siemens.com) Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA Nikos Paragios (nikos plane of the prior model modulo a similarity transformation. The optimization of a statistical metric

Paragios, Nikos

175

Using Group Prior to Identify People in Consumer Images Andrew C. Gallagher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, many people annotate their images with captions such as "George and Martha in their canoe" whichUsing Group Prior to Identify People in Consumer Images Andrew C. Gallagher Carnegie Mellon this idea and describe the benefits of using a group prior for identifying people in consumer images

Chen, Tsuhan

176

2009 No part may be reproduced in any form without prior authorization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Tamper Detection 3. Comm. Protocol Security 4. Risk Mgmt. Enhancement 5. High Speed Encryption 1. Self Healing Grid without prior authorization. Goal: Optimize controls to compensate for damage or failure conditions prior authorization. Intelligent Flight Control System: Example ­ complete hydraulic failure (1997) #12

Amin, S. Massoud

177

Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

Gomes, Carla P.

178

Prior-free Mechanisms The big challenge that separates mechanism design from (non-game-theoretic) optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 6 Prior-free Mechanisms The big challenge that separates mechanism design from (non and the designer suggests that there must be a completely prior-free theory of mechanism design. Intuitively, the class of good prior-free mechanisms should be smaller than the class of good prior

Fiat, Amos

179

Foreground Removal using FastICA: A Showcase of LOFAR-EoR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a new implementation of the FastICA algorithm on simulated LOFAR EoR data with the aim of accurately removing the foregrounds and extracting the 21-cm reionization signal. We find that the method successfully removes the foregrounds with an average fitting error of 0.5 per cent and that the 2D and 3D power spectra are recovered across the frequency range. We find that for scales above several PSF scales the 21-cm variance is successfully recovered though there is evidence of noise leakage into the reconstructed foreground components. We find that this blind independent component analysis technique provides encouraging results without the danger of prior foreground assumptions.

Chapman, Emma; Harker, Geraint; Jeli?, Vibor; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Zaroubi, Saleem; Brentjens, Michiel A; de Bruyn, A G; Koopmans, L V E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The KamLAND Full-Volume Calibration System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have successfully built and operated a source deployment system for the KamLAND detector. This system was used to position radioactive sources throughout the delicate 1-kton liquid scintillator volume, while meeting stringent material cleanliness, material compatibility, and safety requirements. The calibration data obtained with this device were used to fully characterize detector position and energy reconstruction biases. As a result, the uncertainty in the size of the detector fiducial volume was reduced by a factor of two. Prior to calibration with this system, the fiducial volume was the largest source of systematic uncertainty in measuring the number of antineutrinos detected by KamLAND. This paper describes the design, operation and performance of this unique calibration system.

KamLAND Collaboration; Berger, B. E.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Decowski, M. P.; Dwyer, D. A.; Elor, G.; Frank, A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Galloway, M.; Gray, F.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Keefer, G.; Lendvai, C.; McKee, D.; O'Donnell, T.; Piepke, A.; Steiner, H. M.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Ebihara, T.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Owada, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Tamae, K.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Leonard, D. S.; Luk, K.-B.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cooking the volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooking possesses a system of units of measurement, that includes measures of volumes based on pre-metric units. This paper discusses the cooking measures and compares their features with those of the ancient Roman measures of capacity.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Computer News, Volume 29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

183

Computer News, Volume 30  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

184

Computer News, Volume 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

185

Computer News, Volume 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

186

Computer News, Volume 31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

187

Imaging using volume holograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume holograms can be thought of as self-aligned 3D stacks of diffractive elements that operate coherently on incident fields as they propagate through the structure. In this thesis, we propose, design and implement ...

Sinha, Arnab, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Process for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an improvement in a dry process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gases by the addition thereto of hydrated lime containing sugar in a coal combustion unit, wherein the flue gases result from the combustion of a coal in a combustion chamber, and the flue gases are treated in an electrostatic precipitator prior to discharge to the atmosphere the improvement comprising: passing the flue gases, after the addition of the hydrated lime is of fine particles of a specific surface of 7 to 25 square meters per gram, through a conduit towards the electrostatic precipitator; and adding an aqueous media to the flue gases in the conduit in an amount to increase the water content of the flue gases and cool the same by evaporative cooling to a temperature no lower than 20{sup 0}F. about the dew point of the gas, so as to avoid forming water droplets in the gas, so as to prevent condensation of water therefrom.

Robinson, M.W. Jr.

1989-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate. Abstract: The...

190

Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities ... Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from...

191

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

192

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review 2014: Removing Barriers, Implementing Policies and Advancing Alternative Fuels Markets in New England Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers,...

193

Evaluation of Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines Evaluation of Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of Particulate Emissions from...

194

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization...

195

In-tank processes for destruction of organic complexants and removal of selected radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report establishes the need and technical feasibility for using in-tank pretreatment processes for destruction of organic complexants and removal of {sup 90}Sr, transuranic (TRU) elements, and {sup 99}Tc from double-shell tank (DST) liquid wastes. Neither {sup 90}Sr nor {sup 99}{Tc} have to be removed from any DST solution to obtain vitrified product containing less than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criteria for Class C commercial low-level waste (LLW). To meet the NRC criterion for Class C LLW, TRU elements must be removed from liquid wastes in three (possibly five) DSTs. No {sup 90}Sr will have to be removed from any solution for the total vitrified waste from both DSTs and single-shell tanks to meet a goal of <7 MCi of radionuclides and a NRC ruling for Hanford Site Incidental Waste. Guidance from ALARA principles and the TWRS Environmental Impact Statement may dictate additional removal of radionuclides from DST supernatant liquids. Scavenging processes involving precipitation of strontium phosphate and/or hydrated iron oxide effectively remove {sup 90}Sr and/or TRU elements from actual DST wastes including complexant concentrate (CC) wastes. Destruction of organic complexants is not required for these scavenging processes to reduce the {sup 90}Sr and/or TRU element concentrations of DST waste solutions to or below the NRC criteria for Class C commercial LLW. However, substantially smaller amounts of scavenging agents would be required for removal of {sup 90}Sr and TRU elements from CC waste if organic complexants were destroyed. Low concentrations of added Sr(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} are desirable to minimize the volume of HLW glass.

Schulz, W.W.; Kupfer, M.J.; McKeon, M.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

197

Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Livermore, CA); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Heat treatment of exchangers to remove coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating the furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas containing molecular oxygen at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F (427{degrees}C) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of five thousand pounds per square inch.

Turner, J.D.

1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integrated pollutant removal: modeling and experimentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental and computational work at the Albany Research Center, USDOE is investigating an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process which removes all pollutants from flue gas, including SOX, NOX, particulates, CO2, and Hg. In combination with flue gas recirculation, heat recovery, and oxy-fuel combustion, the process produces solid, gas, and liquid waste streams. The gas exhaust stream comprises O2 and N2. Liquid streams contain H2O, SOX, NOX, and CO2. Computer modeling and low to moderate pressure experimentation are defining system chemistry with respect to SOX and H2O as well as heat and mass transfer for the IPR process.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Office of Sponsored Programs Institutional Prior Approval System (IPAS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System (IPAS) Research and training awards normally require prior sponsor approvals for certain types: TYPE OF TRANSACTION IPAS IS REQUIRED 1. Pre-award Costs Incurrence - Obligations and expenditures may

Fork, Richard

203

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior bertrand.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

INFORMATIVE STRUCTURE PRIORS: JOINT LEARNING OF DYNAMIC REGULATORY NETWORKS FROM MULTIPLE TYPES OF DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFORMATIVE STRUCTURE PRIORS: JOINT LEARNING OF DYNAMIC REGULATORY NETWORKS FROM MULTIPLE TYPES operating in three phases of the cycle as shown in Figure 2. This synthetic cell cycle consists of cell

Hartemink, Alexander

205

Clinical Symptoms and Angiographic Findings of Patients Undergoing Elective Coronary Angiography without Prior Stress Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Many patients undergo elective coronary angiography without prior stress testing, precluding an assessment of their appropriateness for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). If, however, these patients have more severe angina...

Abdallah, Mouin Sami

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Relative Evaluation of the Independent Volume Measures of Caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the construction and operation of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), three types of cavern volume measurements have been maintained. These are: (1) the calculated solution volume determined during initial construction by solution mining and any subsequent solutioning during oil transfers, (2) the calculated sonar volume determined through sonar surveys of the cavern dimensions, and (3) the direct metering of oil to determine the volume of the cavern occupied by the oil. The objective of this study is to compare these measurements to each other and determine, if possible, the uncertainties associated with a given type of measurement. Over time, each type of measurement has acquired a customary, or an industry accepted, stated uncertainty. This uncertainty is not necessarily the result of a technical analysis. Ultimately there is one definitive quantity, the oil volume measure by the oil custody transfer meters, taken by all parties to the transfer as the correct ledger amount and for which the SPR Project is accountable. However, subsequent transfers within a site may not be with meters of the same accuracy. In this study, a very simple theory of the perfect relationship is used to evaluate the correlation (deviation) of the various measures. This theory permits separation of uncertainty and bias. Each of the four SPR sites are examined, first with comparisons between the calculated solution volumes and the sonar volumes determined during construction, then with comparisons of the oil inventories and the sonar volumes obtained either by surveying through brine prior to oil filling or through the oil directly.

MUNSON,DARRELL E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 3, Appendix A: Mass burn technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Removal of Pu238 from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new anion flowsheet for use in HB-Line was tested in the lab with Reillex{trademark} HPQ for removal of Pu{sup 238} contamination from Np. Significant rejection of Pu{sup 238} was observed by washing with 6 to 12 bed volumes (BV) of reductive wash containing reduced nitric acid concentration along with both ferrous sulfamate (FS) and hydrazine. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 1500 to 2200 g Np were observed with modest losses for up-flow washing. Down-flow washing was observed to have high losses. The following are recommended conditions for removing Pu{sup 238} from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: Up-flow 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: Up-flow 6-12 BV of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS, 0.05 M hydrazine. 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: Up-flow 1-2 BV of 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (4) Elution conditions: Down-flow 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Removal of {sup 14}C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the research presented here was to identify the checmical from of {sup 14}C inirradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approimately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 ({sup 14}C), with a half-life of 5730 years.

Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Automatic Red Eye Removal for Digital Photography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Automatic Red Eye Removal for Digital Photography FRANCESCA GASPARINI DISCo, Dipartimento The red eye effect is a well known problem in photography. It is often seen in amateur shots taken with a built-in flash, but the problem is also well known to professional photographers. Red eye is the red

Schettini, Raimondo

213

Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

Brierley, Andrew

214

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or sonication, has been shown to successfully remove or prevent the formation of 50–90% of the precipitates in biofuels. Precipitates can plug filters as biodiesel is transported from one location to another, and often cannot be detected by visual inspection....

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Method of removing cesium from steam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Removal of a Permanent IVC Filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are increasingly used for prevention of life-threatening pulmonary emboli in patients who have contraindications to anticoagulation therapy. We report a case of the removal of a permanent IVC filter, which was inadvertently inserted due to an incorrect ultrasound report.

Kumar, Bangalore C. Anil [Queen's Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: anil.kumar@doctors.org.uk; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian [Ninewells Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Desiccant bed on hydrocarbon charged to and removed from underground (salt) cavern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon fluid storage system is described which consists of in operable conjunction: a cavern formed within an underground salt strata below a ground surface, the cavern comprises a lower liquid volume of saturated sodium chloride storage brine and an upper fluid volume of wet hydrocarbon storage fluid, surface fluid handling means; conduit connecting the lower storage brine and upper storage hydrocarbon fluid with the surface fluid handling means, of fluid transfer means enabling transfer of brine and hydrocarbon fluid from the surface to the cavern and from the cavern to the surface, such that brine can be added to or withdrawn from the lower brine volume and hydrocarbon fluids can be added to or withdrawn from the upper hydrocarbon fluid volume, and at least one desiccant drier means positioned at the surface in operable association with the surface fluid handling means whereby the wet hydrocarbon fluid upon withdrawal from the cavern passes through the desiccant drier means and thereby becomes dry, and dry hydrocarbon fluid intended for storage passes through the desiccant drier prior to entering the storage cavern and thereby becomes wet.

Washer, S.P.

1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

220

Viability Assessment Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HIGH LEVEL WASTE MECHANCIAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. In addition, the project is currently preparing another waste tank for MSR utilizing lessons learned from this previous operational activity. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2,840 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. The construction of these tanks was completed in 1953, and they were placed into waste storage service in 1959. The tank's primary shell is 23 meters (75 feet) in diameter, and 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height. Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. Both Tank 5 and Tank 6 received and stored F-PUREX waste during their operating service time before sludge removal was performed. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close (fill with grout) Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. Mechanical Sludge Removal, the first step in the tank closure process, will be followed by chemical cleaning. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks will be isolated and filled with grout for long-term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal operations within Tank 6 removed approximately 75% of the original 95,000 liters (25,000 gallons). This sludge material was transferred in batches to an interim storage tank to prepare for vitrification. This operation consisted of eleven (11) Submersible Mixer Pump(s) mixing campaigns and multiple intraarea transfers utilizing STPs from July 2006 to August 2007. This operation and successful removal of sludge material meets requirement of approximately 19,000 to 28,000 liters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. Removal of the last 35% of sludge was exponentially more difficult, as less and less sludge was available to mobilize and the lighter sludge particles were likely removed during the early mixing campaigns. The removal of the 72,000 liters (19,000 gallons) of sludge was challenging due to a number factors. One primary factor was the complex internal cooling coil array within Tank 6 that obstructed mixer discharge jets and impacted the Effective Cleaning Radius (ECR) of the Submersible Mixer Pumps. Minimal access locations into the tank through tank openings (risers) presented a challenge because the available options for equipment locations were very limited. Mechanical Sludge Removal activities using SMPs caused the sludge to migrate to areas of the tank that were outside of the SMP ECR. Various SMP operational strategies were used to address the challenge of moving sludge from remote areas of the tank to the transfer pump. This paper describes in detail the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and mitigative solutions to cooling coil obstructions and other challenges. The performance of the WOW system and SMP operational strategies were evaluated and the resulting lessons learned are described for application to future Mechanical Sludge Removal operations.

Jolly, R; Bruce Martin, B

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Publications Edited Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Robots with Passive Environments: Application to Force Feedback Control Ed Colgate and Neville Hogan, J. Edward Colgate Industrial Robot, 26 (5), 1999, pp 335-341 Toward Robot-Assisted VascularPublications Edited Volume Advances in Robotics, Mechatronics, and Haptic Interfaces 1993 Edited

MacIver, Malcolm A.

223

Hamiltonian and Volume Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2+1 gravity coupled to a massless scalar field has an initial singularity when the spatial slices are compact. The quantized model is used here to investigate several issues of quantum gravity. The spectrum of the volume operator is studied at the initial singularity. The energy spectrum is obtained. Dynamics of the universe is also investigated.

M. Pierri

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, A.H.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

REMOVAL OF SOLIDS FROM HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SOLUTIONS USING THE H-CANYON CENTRIFUGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the dissolution of Pu-containing materials in HB-Line, highly enriched uranium (HEU) solutions stored in Tanks 11.1 and 12.2 of H-Canyon must be transferred to provide storage space. The proposed plan is to centrifuge the solutions to remove solids which may present downstream criticality concerns or cause operational problems with the 1st Cycle solvent extraction due to the formation of stable emulsions. An evaluation of the efficiency of the H-Canyon centrifuge concluded that a sufficient amount (> 90%) of the solids in the Tank 11.1 and 12.2 solutions will be removed to prevent any problems. We based this conclusion on the particle size distribution of the solids isolated from samples of the solutions and the calculation of particle settling times in the centrifuge. The particle size distributions were calculated from images generated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean particle diameters for the distributions were 1-3 {micro}m. A significant fraction (30-50%) of the particles had diameters which were < 1 {micro}m; however, the mass of these solids is insignificant (< 1% of the total solids mass) when compared to particles with larger diameters. It is also probable that the number of submicron particles was overestimated by the software used to generate the particle distribution due to the morphology of the filter paper used to isolate the solids. The settling times calculated for the H-Canyon centrifuge showed that particles with diameters less than 1 to 0.5 {micro}m will not have sufficient time to settle. For this reason, we recommend the use of a gelatin strike to coagulate the submicron particles and facilitate their removal from the solution; although we have no experimental basis to estimate the level of improvement. Incomplete removal of particles with diameters < 1 {micro}m should not cause problems during purification of the HEU in the 1st Cycle solvent extraction. Particles with diameters > 1 {micro}m account for > 99% of the solid mass and will be efficiently removed by the centrifuge; therefore, the formation of emulsions during solvent extraction operations is not an issue. Under the current processing plan, the solutions from Tanks 11.1 and 12.2 will be transferred to the enriched uranium storage (EUS) tank following centrifugation. The solution from Tanks 11.1 and 12.2 may remain in the EUS tank for an extended time prior to purification. The effects of extended storage on the solution were not evaluated as part of this study.

Rudisill, T; Fernando Fondeur, F

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Removal of fluoride from aqueous nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods for removing fluoride from aqueous nitric acid were investigated and compared with the frequently used aluminum nitrate-calcium nitrate (Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/) chemical trap-distillation system. Zirconium oxynitrate solutions were found to be superior in preventing volatilization of fluoride during distillation of the nitric acid, producing decontamination factors (DFs) on the order of 2 x 10/sup 3/ (vs approx. 500 for the Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/ system). Several other metal nitrate systems were tested, but they were less effective. Alumina and zirconia columns proved highly effective in removing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ vapors distilled through the columns; fluoride DFs on the order of 10/sup 6/ and 10/sup 4/, respectively, were obtained. A silica gel column was very effective in adsorbing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ solutions, producing a fluoride DF of approx. 10/sup 4/.

Pruett, D.J.; Howerton, W.B.; Mailen, J.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fly ash enhanced metal removal process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.

Burdge, B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.

Burdge, B.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Topology-controlled volume rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type. Even when volume render- ing is applied to nonmedicalin graphics hardware. We render tubes between saddles and

Weber, Gunther H; Dillard, Scott E; Carr, Hamish; Pascucci, Valerio; Hamann, Bernd

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Method for the Removal of Ultrafine Particulates from an Aqueous Suspension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of separating ultra-fine particulate from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel-containing the particulate, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

Chaiko, David J.; Kopasz, John P.; Ellison, Adam J.G.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method for the removal of ultrafine particulates from an aqueous suspension  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of separating ultra-fine particulates from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel containing the particulates, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL); Kopasz, John P. (Bolingbrook, IL); Ellison, Adam J. G. (Corning, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRI’s Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

Dunn, Kerry A. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, J. Steve [Savannah River National Laboratory; Chandler, Greg T. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Iyer, Natraj C. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Hackney, B. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Leduc, Dan R. [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Statistical Ensembles with Volume Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The volume fluctuations in statistical mechanics are discussed. First, the volume fluctuations in ensembles with a fixed external pressure, the so called pressure ensembles, are considered. Second, a generalization of the pressure ensembles is suggested. Namely, the statistical ensembles with the volume fluctuating according to externally given distributions are considered. Several examples and possible applications in statistical models of hadron production are discussed.

Mark I. Gorenstein

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Algorithms for biomagnetic source imaging with prior anatomical and physiological information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation derives a new method for estimating current source amplitudes in the brain and heart from external magnetic field measurements and prior knowledge about the probable source positions and amplitudes. The minimum mean square error estimator for the linear inverse problem with statistical prior information was derived and is called the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM). OCLIM includes as special cases the Shim-Cho weighted pseudoinverse and Wiener estimators but allows more general priors and thus reduces the reconstruction error. Efficient algorithms were developed to compute the OCLIM estimate for instantaneous or time series data. The method was tested in a simulated neuromagnetic imaging problem with five simultaneously active sources on a grid of 387 possible source locations; all five sources were resolved, even though the true sources were not exactly at the modeled source positions and the true source statistics differed from the assumed statistics.

Hughett, P W [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE: IMPACT OF CAPLUG REMOVAL ON FIBERBOARD MOISTURE LEVEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two 9975 shipping packages were removed from KAC and provided to SRNL for test purposes, after both packages were found to exceed the 1 inch maximum criterion for the axial gap at the top of the package. Package 9975-01818 was found with an axial gap of 1.437 inch, and an estimated 2.5 liters of excess moisture in the lower fiberboard layers. Package 9975-02287 was found with an axial gap of 1.008 inch, and only slightly elevated moisture levels relative to typical packages. Prior data from the 9975 Surveillance Program has shown that the 9975 drum provides a degree of isolation, and will tend to preserve fiberboard moisture levels for an extended period of time. Both packages were provided to SRNL to identify whether removal of the 4 caplugs in each package would allow moisture to escape the package. Following testing with the caplugs removed for approximately 1 year, this report documents the findings from this effort. Two 9975 shipping packages removed from service in K-Area Complex (KAC) due to an excessive axial gap have been tested in SRNL to determine if caplug removal would facilitate the reduction of excess fiberboard moisture. An additional question to be answered through this testing was whether the resulting moisture loss would reduce the axial gap, reversing the effect seen during storage with excess moisture present. These packages have completed approximately 1 year in test, during which time the weight of each package has steadily decreased as a result of moisture migration out of the package. However, elevated moisture levels still remain in the packages. During this test period, the bottom fiberboard layers of package 9975-01818 (which contained the greater amount of excess moisture) experienced further compaction, and the axial gap of both packages has increased. This effort has shown that removal of the caplugs may not be a sufficient measure to rehabilitate packages with excess moisture or excess axial gaps in a timely manner. However, this measure might make a meaningful contribution in combination with other actions (to be determined). It is recommended that the caplug removal tests in SRNL be discontinued at this time.

Daugherty, W.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Viability Assessment Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Order relations and prior distributions in the estimation of multivariate normal parameters with partial data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORDER RELATIONS AND PRIOR DISTRIBU 'IONS IN 1:-IE ESTXYJiTION OF MULTIVARIATE NOPSLAL PARAI'E&iTiS NI~N PARTIAL DATA A Thesis by ABDUL MAJID HA?ZA AL-NASZR Submitt d o the Grad. nate College oi' Texas UM Univ rsity in partial fu' fillment . f... the requirement for the aegree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Statistics ORDER RELATIONS AND PRIOR DISTRIBUTIONS IJJ THE ESTI1UTION OF MULTIVARIATE NORJJAL PARtuETERS NlTH PARTIAL DATA A Thesis ( by ABDUL IJAJID HANZA AL-NASIR Approved...

Al-Nasir, Abdul Majid Hamza

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Conditional maximum-entropy method for selecting prior distributions in Bayesian statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conditional maximum-entropy method (abbreviated here as C-MaxEnt) is formulated for selecting prior probability distributions in Bayesian statistics for parameter estimation. This method is inspired by a statistical-mechanical approach to systems governed by dynamics with largely-separated time scales and is based on three key concepts: conjugate pairs of variables, dimensionless integration measures with coarse-graining factors and partial maximization of the joint entropy. The method enables one to calculate a prior purely from a likelihood in a simple way. It is shown in particular how it not only yields Jeffreys's rules but also reveals new structures hidden behind them.

Abe, Sumiyoshi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of administering a selected ergogenic aid prior to strenuous activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF ADMINISTERING A SELECTED ERGOGENIC AID PRIOR TO STRENUOUS ACTIVITY A Thesis by JACQUELINE LAMBERT Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Un1versity in partial fulf1llment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... of Department Member August 1973 111 ABSTRACT Effects of Adm1nistering a Selected Ergogenic A 1d Prior to Strenuous Act1v1ty. (August 1973) Jacqueline Lambert, B. S. E. , Abilene Chr1stian College D1rected by: Dr. Homer Toison Purpose The purpose...

Lambert, Jacqueline

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Keynote Automation 2 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements · Many of the ideas in this presentation were initially jointly developed with Doug Hoffman,as we developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos

253

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos, on its way...

256

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Czech Republic HEU Removal Location Czech Republic United States 49 35' 23.3628" N, 15 4' 23.6712" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

257

United Kingdom HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal United Kingdom HEU Removal Location United Kingdom United States 52 24' 15.1416" N, 1 34' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

258

The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

California Institute of Technology Request for Employee Clearance Prior to Termination Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Institute of Technology Date: Request for Employee Clearance Prior to Termination Date/Supervisor Name: Phone Number: Termination Date: International Scholar Services Library Lock and Key Shop P by employee. The following departments will be notified by Human Resources after the termination date: Campus

Faraon, Andrei

260

MARKOV RANDOM FIELD IMAGE PRIOR MODELS FOR MAP RECONSTRUCTION OF MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAM IMAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MARKOV RANDOM FIELD IMAGE PRIOR MODELS FOR MAP RECONSTRUCTION OF MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAM IMAGES Brian as a classical inverse imaging prob- lem, which for MEG is notoriously ill posed and requires strong sam- ple grid. The second model permits simulating an MRF over the non-uniform grid required

Wirthlin, Michael J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Construction of an Informative Hierarchical Prior Distribution: Application to Electricity Load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the wavelet transform to forecast the load curve seen as a functional-valued autoregressive Hilbertian processConstruction of an Informative Hierarchical Prior Distribution: Application to Electricity Load the methodology to a working model for the electricity load forecasting on both simulated and real datasets, where

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

Bayesian fMRI Data Analysis with Sparse Spatial Basis Function Priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian fMRI Data Analysis with Sparse Spatial Basis Function Priors Guillaume Flandin a,,1 correlation in the data. The spatial aspect of the hemodynamic response is usually taken into account indirectly, i.e. not modelled explicitly, by spatially smoothing the data with a fixed Gaussian kernel

Penny, Will

263

Number 331 July 2007 Prior ASRS research into the "Hurry-Up Syndrome"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number 331 July 2007 Prior ASRS research into the "Hurry-Up Syndrome" (the perceived or actual need-Up Syndrome is provided in ASRS Directline Issue Number 5, and is available on the ASRS web site instruments and believing the right engine was stable, shut down the APU. The engine was not fully started

264

Prior List of Eligible Inverters Valid Only Until March 31, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prior List of Eligible Inverters Valid Only Until March 31, 2005 California Energy Commission Yes NA Ballard Power Systems Corporation EPC-PV-208- 30kW Utility Interactive 208V 30kW PV Power Converter System 30000 95 No NA Ballard Power Systems Corporation EPC-PV-208- 75kW Utility Interactive 75k

265

Copyright 2011 No part may be reproduced in any form without prior authorization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS PART 1: TECHNICAL Electrons for Vehicles: Adapting the North American Grid for Electric Vehicles Bruce F. Wollenberg No part may be reproduced in any form without prior authorization. PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES (PHEV

Minnesota, University of

266

Environmental Science Minor The following prerequisites must be completed prior to application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management CEES 4114 Aquatic Chemistry or CEES 4324/5324 Environmental Biology and Ecology Plus one Environmental Science Minor The following prerequisites must be completed prior or Physics 2414 15 ­ 16 hours required to complete the minor, including: CEES 2313 Water Quality

Oklahoma, University of

267

SOURCE SEPARATION USING SPARSE DISCRETE PRIOR MODELS Radu Balan, Justinian Rosca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOURCE SEPARATION USING SPARSE DISCRETE PRIOR MODELS Radu Balan, Justinian Rosca Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East Princeton, NJ 08540 e-mail: radu.balan,justinian.rosca¡ @siemens, in their origi- nal domain, or transformed domain (e.g. frequency domain). The mixing model is either

Balan, Radu V.

268

A geodesic voting shape prior to constrain the level set evolution for the segmentation of tubular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A geodesic voting shape prior to constrain the level set evolution for the segmentation of tubular a geodesic voting method to segment tree struc- tures, such as retinal or cardiac blood vessels. Many authors have used minimal cost paths, or similarly geodesics relative to a weight potential P, to find a vessel

Cohen, Laurent

269

SemiSupervised Learning Using Prior Probabilities and EM Rebecca Bruce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the parameters of a probabil­ ity model is formulated from a small amount of tagged data via a stochastic from the tagged data via a stochastic inference process. Intuitively, the inference process starts in a larger tagged data sam­ ple from the same population. The pseudo­counts form­ ing the prior distribution

McCallum, Andrew

270

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers of brain pathologies

271

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM) Hao Gao1 , Hengyong Yu2 spectrum. Besides, the energy-dependent intensity information can be incorporated into the PRISM in terms on the generalized rank and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base

Soatto, Stefano

272

Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12 Theme session H the male phase and reproduce as females already in their first reproductive season) responds is parameterized for Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (common names: brown #12;marbled grouper or flowery cod

Heino, Mikko

273

The Articulated Scene Model: Model-less Priors for Robot Object Learning?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Articulated Scene Model: Model-less Priors for Robot Object Learning? Agnes Swadzba, Niklas to design an articu- lated scene modeling approach [1] which enables a robot to extract articulated scene / articulated scene parts Ot. The moving persons are tracked using a particle filter with a weak cylinder model

Cremers, Daniel

274

The Statistics of the Number of Neutron Collisions Prior to Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Statistics of the Number of Neutron Collisions Prior to Absorption Sara A. Pozzi* Oak Ridge that the moderator is homogeneous and account for scattering and absorption, but we do not consider thermalization of neutron slowing down to or past a given energy in a moderating medium without absorption. I. INTRODUCTION

Pázsit, Imre

275

Lessons Learned from Prior Attempts at National Security Reform The Project on National Security Reform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned from Prior Attempts at National Security Reform The Project on National Security was their solution effective? 4. What implications for present-day reformers can be drawn from this reform? Lessons learned from each chapter are summarized at the end of each section, and a synthesis of these findings

Lewis, Robert Michael

276

Blue and Gold Society Please Submit requests at least two weeks prior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue and Gold Society Please Submit requests at least two weeks prior to your event date Today: ____________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Assistance Required Number of Blue and Gold members needed: _______ Arrival Time: __: __ Departing Time: __: __ Blue and Gold Society attire: Formal (suit) Casual (rugby shirt) Other Any Additional Information

Jiang, Huiqiang

277

A Bayesian method with empirically fitted priors for the evaluation of environmental radioactivity: application to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Keywords: a priori knowledge; Bayesian statistics; CTBT; environmental1/22 A Bayesian method with empirically fitted priors for the evaluation of environmental to the effective presence of a radionuclide is still widely made on the basis of a classic hypothesis test. However

278

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Howerton, W.B.; Pruett, D.J.

1982-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ultracapacitor having residual water removed under vacuum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multilayer cell is provided that comprises two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the current collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying pores in the electrodes and separator. The mutilayer cell is electrolyzed to disassociate water within the cell to oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. A vacuum is applied to the cell substantially at the same time as the electrolyzing step, to remove the oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. The cell is then sealed to form a ultracapacitor substantially free from water.

Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); Day, James (Scotia, NY)

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Portsmouth Removal Actions | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiativesNationalNuclearRockyServicesFindings andRemedial ActionsRemoval

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

283

Lokaratna, Volume 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muthukumarswamy and his colleagues of NFSC, Chennai to support this volume to be published in their web site for a global readership. On behalf of Folklore Foundation, Odisha Bhubaneswar , I wish a Happy and prosperous new Year 2012... not create the tiger to prey upon man, but to hunt, to provide food for him […]. Magicians are, however, believed to have acquired the power to take away life at pleasure, without reference to the will of the gods, by dark and impious arts which are purely...

Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Lokaratna, Volume 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Support Center, and Chennai for his support to get this volume published in NFSC web site for the wider readership. I am also thankful to Prof. Mark Turin of Cambridge University who has been kinds enough to link the web journal of Folklore... of Nature such as cloud, sky, Tam?la trees, night and Yamun? river have been illustrated. Moreover, all these aspects are blackish by nature and very similar to the dark-bodied Krishna. It may be undoubtedly stated that the poet has consciously used...

Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

285

FY 2005 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey9Statistical6 Volume 5

286

FY 2005 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey9Statistical6 Volume 57

287

FY 2005 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey9Statistical6 Volume

288

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tailoring hydrocarbon streams for asphaltene removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oilfield production is often hindered by asphaltene precipitation which tends to fill the pores of the reservoir rocks and plug the wellbore tubing as well as the other auxiliary equipment used during crude oil recovery. Several remedies to remove these deposits have been proposed and patented but the injection of aromatic solvents such as toluene and light petroleum distillates is normally preferred. Previous studies with a number of pure aromatic hydrocarbons have shown that the solvent capacity of these molecules may be very different and that the degree of condensation plays an important role. In this regard, tetralins and naphthalenes are superior to alkylbenzenes. However, because the use of pure compounds is not economically feasible, the authors examined various industrial streams and the authors correlated their chemical composition to the solvent capacity. This work allowed the identification of the pseudo-components whose relative concentration is crucial for evaluating the solvent performances. Based on these data, the authors were able to find new products with ideal characteristics. The efficiency of one of these products was confirmed by the analysis of the data obtained when using this new solvent to remove asphaltene in damaged wells of an Italian field.

Del Bianco, A.; Stroppa, F.; Bertero, L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current activities are concerned with the removal of the halide ions associated with plutonium trifluoride (PuF{sub 3}), plutonium tetrafluoride (PuF{sub 4}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). This report discusses non-radioactive testing of small-scale and pilot-scale systems and radioactive testing of a small-scale system. Experiments focused on demonstrating the chemistry for halide removal and addressing the primary engineering questions associated with a change in the process chemistry.

Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL downstream were virtually undetectable. One year after dam removal, substrates of bars and riffles within 400 m downstream of the dam coarsened and a dominance of gravel and cobble sediments replaced previously

Tullos, Desiree

295

ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 2: Engineering design files  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: Tank farm heel flushing/pH adjustment; Grouting experiments for immobilization of tank farm heel; Savannah River high level waste tank 20 closure; Tank farm closure information; Clean closure of tank farm; Remediation issues; Remote demolition techniques; Decision concerning EIS for debris treatment facility; CERCLA/RCRA issues; Area of contamination determination; Containment building of debris treatment facility; Double containment issues; Characterization costs; Packaging and disposal options for the waste resulting from the total removal of the tank farm; Take-off calculations for the total removal of soils and structures at the tank farm; Vessel off-gas systems; Jet-grouted polymer and subsurface walls; Exposure calculations for total removal of tank farm; Recommended instrumentation during retrieval operations; High level waste tank concrete encasement evaluation; Recommended heavy equipment and sizing equipment for total removal activities; Tank buoyancy constraints; Grout and concrete formulas for tank heel solidification; Tank heel pH requirements; Tank cooling water; Evaluation of conservatism of vehicle loading on vaults; Typical vault dimensions and approximately tank and vault void volumes; Radiological concerns for temporary vessel off-gas system; Flushing calculations for tank heels; Grout lift depth analysis; Decontamination solution for waste transfer piping; Grout lift determination for filling tank and vault voids; sprung structure vendor data; Grout flow properties through a 2--4 inch pipe; Tank farm load limitations; NRC low level waste grout; Project data sheet calculations; Dose rates for tank farm closure tasks; Exposure and shielding calculations for grout lines; TFF radionuclide release rates; Documentation of the clean closure of a system with listed waste discharge; and Documentation of the ORNL method of radionuclide concentrations in tanks.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant).

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fluoride removal from water with spent catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption of fluoride from water with spent catalyst was studied. Adsorption density of fluoride decreased with increasing pH. Linear adsorption isotherm was utilized to describe the adsorption reaction. The adsorption was a first-order reaction, and the rate constant increased with decreasing surface loading. Adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst was endothermic, and the reaction rate increased slightly with increasing temperature. Fluoro-alumino complex and free fluoride ion were involved in the adsorption reaction. It is proposed that both the silica and alumina fractions of spent catalyst contribute to the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Coulombic interaction is proposed as the major driving force of the adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst.

Lai, Y.D.; Liu, J.C. [National Taiwan Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream, such as flue gas, comprising: providing a non-aqueous absorption liquid containing at least one hydrophobic amine, the liquid being incompletely miscible with water; treating the fluid stream in an absorption zone with the non-aqueous absorption liquid to transfer at least part of the sulphur oxides into the non-aqueous absorption liquid and to form a sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex; causing the non-aqueous absorption liquid to be in liquid-liquid contact with an aqueous liquid whereby at least part of the sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex is hydrolyzed to release the hydrophobic amine and sulphurous hydrolysis products, and at least part of the sulphurous hydrolysis products is transferred into the aqueous liquid; separating the aqueous liquid from the non-aqueous absorption liquid. The process mitigates absorbent degradation problems caused by sulphur dioxide and oxygen in flue gas.

Katz, Torsten; Riemann, Christian; Bartling, Karsten; Rigby, Sean Taylor; Coleman, Luke James Ivor; Lail, Marty Alan

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Apparatus for removing micronized coal from steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micronized coal is removed from coal-bearing steam by spraying stabilized petroleum oil into the steam and directing the resultant stream at a separation surface on which a coal-oil slurry is deposited and collected. Apparatus includes conduits which direct the resultant stream downward into a housing and normal to a surface on which the slurry is deposited by impact forces. In additional apparatus disclosed, the resultant stream is directed from a horizontal conduit circumferentially along the interior wall of a horizontally disposed cylindrical chamber at the top of the chamber and the coal-oil slurry deposited on the wall by centrifugal force is collected in a trough situated below a longitudinal slot at the bottom of the chamber. In both types of apparatus, after separation of the slurry the velocity of the steam is reduced to settle out remaining oil droplets and is then discharged to the atmosphere.

Vlnaty, J.

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fitting a sum of exponentials to lattice correlation functions using a non-uniform prior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excited states are extracted from lattice correlation functions using a non-uniform prior on the model parameters. Models for both a single exponential and a sum of exponentials are considered, as well as an alternate model for the orthogonalization of the correlation functions. Results from an analysis of torelon and glueball operators indicate the Bayesian methodology compares well with the usual interpretation of effective mass tables produced by a variational procedure. Applications of the methodology are discussed.

Robert W. Johnson

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE INPUT SIGNAL AND PRIOR ACTIVATION HISTORY TO THE DISCHAGE BEHAVIOR OF RAT MOTONEURONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transmitted down their own axons. The probability of spike occurrence in the postsynaptic cell depends: motoneurones, spike-evoking currents, autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) model Section ii. Cell Physiology of excitability by partial removal of sodium inactivation. Alternatively, this feature could simply reflect

Percival, Don

304

Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

Karig, David K [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Purificaiton of Lanthanides for Large Neutrino Detectors: Thorium Removal from Gadolinium Chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-loaded liquid scintillators are the detectors of choice for various neutrino experiments. Procedures have been developed to transfer metals into organic liquids by solvent extraction or direct dissolution of a metallic compound. Traces of natural radioactivity introduced into the scintillator with the metal may produce undesirable backgrounds. Measurements using a {sup 229}Th tracer indicate that the inclusion of a pH-controlled partial hydrolysis and filtration prior to the preparation of a gadolinium-loading compound can reduce thorium by a factor of {approx}100. This 'self-scavenging' procedure has the advantage that it uses only reagents encountered in the production process. Addition of non-elemental scavengers such as iron, or the use of solvent extraction or ion exchange procedures can be avoided. It also improves the optical transmission in the blue region by removing traces of iron. This purification method has potential applications to the large-scale production of other metal-loaded liquid scintillators and for the removal of traces of thorium in the industrial production of lanthanides.

Yeh, M.; Cumming, J.B.; Hans, S.; Hahn, R.L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Corrections needed for Environmental Transport Processes First Printing (Prior to 21-January-2001), Updated 21-February-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphics printing error in legend to upper figure in Figure 3.11. The first line should read "Colorado forces acting on the control volume for" to "The forces acting on the control volume surface for" Eq. 4

307

Preliminary draft research topics subject to revision prior to a solicitation being issued May 18, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2007 FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING R & D Presently, Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks the potential to reduce the component count of a stack and allow alternative, lower cost approaches to cell are fabricated at low volume, and the costs of these stacks range from $3,000 to $5,500 per kilowatt (kW) 1

308

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

Yang, Pe-Der

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ......

312

Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage removal of phenol was as high as 98.33%, with emulsion leakage of 1.25%. It was also found that the necessity of carrier for enhancing phenol removal was strongly dependent on the internal agent concentration.

Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a two- or three-stage operation to remove the metals and 0il sepcrately). ComplexationSequestration Complexation involves the formation of a complex or chelating agent....

314

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging allows the transport of nine Product Removal (PR) Cans with their Containers from the PUREX Facility to the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Boettger, J.S.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

active debris removal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rebecca Bendick a , Kevin D. Hyde b March 2013 Keywords: Debris flow Frequency Magnitude Fire Forecasting debris flow hazard is challenging Montana, University of 110 Removing...

316

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

317

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal. Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite...

319

anesthesia optimizing removal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de 7 Multiplicative Noise Removal Using Variable Splitting and Constrained Optimization CERN Preprints Summary: Multiplicative noise (also known as speckle noise) models...

320

Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

322

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

REMOVAL OF THE CALIFORNIUM SOURCES FROM THE 222-S LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document develops a proposal for removal of 2-Californium sources from the 222-S Laboratory. Included in this document are assessments of shipping packages and decay calculations.

LINSTRUM D; BAUNE HL

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

327

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The washability of lignites for clay removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Stevens, Lanning, Anderson, Jacoby, and Chornet Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the control of particulate and gas- eous indoor air pollutants. Removal of particulates uti- lizes fibrous out chemical decomposition reactions with gas-phase pollutants. Although the use of air cleaningStevens, Lanning, Anderson, Jacoby, and Chornet Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste

333

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume I: Collection Stack Air Ambient Air Rainwater Creekscollection activities Volume II section Stormwater Ambient Air; RainwaterRainwater Radiological Activity Analyte Gross alpha Location* ENV-44 Collection

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Passive shut-down heat removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved shut-down heat removal system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor of the type having a vessel for holding hot and cold pools of liquid sodium is disclosed herein. Generally, the improved system comprises a redan or barrier within the reactor vessel which allows an auxiliary heat exchanger to become immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool whenever the reactor pump fails to generate a metal-circulating pressure differential between the hot and cold pools of sodium. This redan also defines an alternative circulation path between the hot and cold pools of sodium in order to equilibrate the distribution of the decay heat from the reactor core. The invention may take the form of a redan or barrier that circumscribes the inner wall of the reactor vessel, thereby defining an annular space therebetween. In this embodiment, the bottom of the annular space communicates with the cold pool of sodium, and the auxiliary heat exchanger is placed in this annular space just above the drawn-down level that the liquid sodium assumes during normal operating conditions. Alternatively, the redan of the invention may include a pair of vertically oriented, concentrically disposed standpipes having a piston member disposed between them that operates somewhat like a pressure-sensitive valve. In both embodiments, the cessation of the pressure differential that is normally created by the reactor pump causes the auxiliary heat exchanger to be immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool. Additionally, the redan in both embodiments forms a circulation flow path between the hot and cold pools so that the decay heat from the nuclear core is uniformly distributed within the vessel.

Hundal, Rolv (Greensburg, PA); Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

Lowell, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Variational and Shape Prior-based Level Set Model for Image Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new image segmentation model based on level sets approach is presented herein. We deal with radiographic medical images where boundaries are not salient, and objects of interest have the same gray level as other structures in the image. Thus, an a priori information about the shape we look for is integrated in the level set evolution for good segmentation results. The proposed model also accounts a penalization term that forces the level set to be close to a signed distance function (SDF), which then avoids the re-initialization procedure. In addition, a variant and complete Mumford-Shah model is used in our functional; the added Hausdorff measure helps to better handle zones where boundaries are occluded or not salient. Finally, a weighted area term is added to the functional to make the level set drive rapidly to object's boundaries. The segmentation model is formulated in a variational framework, which, thanks to calculus of variations, yields to partial differential equations (PDEs) to guide the level set evolution. Results obtained on both synthetic and digital radiographs reconstruction (DRR) show that the proposed model improves on existing prior and non-prior shape based image segmentation.

Diop, El Hadji S.; Jerbi, Taha; Burdin, Valerie [Image and Information Department, Telecom Bretagne / INSERM U650, Brest (France); Ba, Sileye O. [Signal and Communications Department, Telecom Bretagne / Lab-STICC, Brest (France)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

REORIENTAO Ensino Mdio -Volume I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REORIENTAÇÃO CURRICULAR PORTUGUÊS Ensino Médio - Volume I Materiais Didáticos #12;#12;GOVERNO DO SUBSECRETARIA ADJUNTA DE PLANEJAMENTO PEDAGÓGICO Alba Rodrigues Cruz #12;#12;GOVERNO DO ESTADO DO RIO DE JANEIRO

Liu, I-Shih

340

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS SUMMARY REPORT [VOLUME 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly radioactive sludge (containing up to 300,000 curies of actinides and fission products) resulting from the storage of degraded spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in temporary containers located in the 105-K West storage basin near the Columbia River. The background, history, and known characteristics of this sludge are discussed in Section 2 of this report. There are many compelling reasons to remove this sludge from the K-Basin. These reasons are discussed in detail in Section1, and they include the following: (1) Reduce the risk to the public (from a potential release of highly radioactive material as fine respirable particles by airborne or waterborn pathways); (2) Reduce the risk overall to the Hanford worker; and (3) Reduce the risk to the environment (the K-Basin is situated above a hazardous chemical contaminant plume and hinders remediation of the plume until the sludge is removed). The DOE-RL has stated that a key DOE objective is to remove the sludge from the K-West Basin and River Corridor as soon as possible, which will reduce risks to the environment, allow for remediation of contaminated areas underlying the basins, and support closure of the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The environmental and nuclear safety risks associated with this sludge have resulted in multiple legal and regulatory remedial action decisions, plans,and commitments that are summarized in Table ES-1 and discussed in more detail in Volume 2, Section 9.

FREDERICKSON JR; ROURK RJ; HONEYMAN JO; JOHNSON ME; RAYMOND RE

2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Z I H that this material may be appropriate for treating a complex mixture of estrogenic pollutants. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water by the MIP was demonstrated using lake water spiked

Chen, Wilfred

344

Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound RVP Waiver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report, Petroleum Division #12;1 Energy Information Administration/Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound;2 Energy Information Administration/Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound Waiver provides

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

345

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

346

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

348

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

349

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Methods to estimate equipment and materials that are candidates for removal during the decontamination of fuel processing facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology presented in this report provides a model for estimating the volume and types of waste expected from the removal of equipment and other materials during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of canyon-type fuel reprocessing facilities. This methodology offers a rough estimation technique based on a comparative analysis for a similar, previously studied, reprocessing facility. This approach is especially useful as a planning tool to save time and money while preparing for final D and D. The basic methodology described here can be extended for use at other types of facilities, such as glovebox or reactor facilities.

Duncan, D.R.; Valero, O.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Hyre, R.A.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Millar, J.S.; Reddick, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Coal Cleaning Using Resonance Disintegration for Mercury and Sulfur Reduction Prior to Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal-cleaning processes have been utilized to increase the heating value of coal by extracting ash-forming minerals in the coal. These processes involve the crushing or grinding of raw coal followed by physical separation processes, taking advantage of the density difference between carbonaceous particles and mineral particles. In addition to the desired increase in the heating value of coal, a significant reduction of the sulfur content of the coal fed to a combustion unit is effected by the removal of pyrite and other sulfides found in the mineral matter. WRI is assisting PulseWave to develop an alternate, more efficient method of liberating and separating the undesirable mineral matter from the carbonaceous matter in coal. The approach is based on PulseWave's patented resonance disintegration technology that reduces that particle size of materials by application of destructive resonance, shock waves, and vortex generating forces. Illinois No.5 coal, a Wyodak coal, and a Pittsburgh No.8 coal were processed using the resonance disintegration apparatus then subjected to conventional density separations. Initial microscopic results indicate that up to 90% of the pyrite could be liberated from the coal in the machine, but limitations in the density separations reduced overall effectiveness of contaminant removal. Approximately 30-80% of the pyritic sulfur and 30-50% of the mercury was removed from the coal. The three coals (both with and without the pyritic phase separated out) were tested in WRI's 250,000 Btu/hr Combustion Test Facility, designed to replicate a coal-fired utility boiler. The flue gases were characterized for elemental, particle bound, and total mercury in addition to sulfur. The results indicated that pre-combustion cleaning could reduce a large fraction of the mercury emissions.

Andrew Lucero

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume Forecasts A document describing how growing stock (`standing') volume is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Growing stock volume forecasts Background A forecast of standing volume (or

355

Factors associated with smoking among adolescent males prior to incarceration and after release from jail: a longitudinal study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adolescents, especially upon their re-entry into communities after release from jail. The current study explores factors associated with smoking among adolescent males prior to incarceration and one year after their release from jail. Methods: We conducted a...

Ramaswamy, Megha; Faseru, Babalola; Cropsey, Karen L.; Jones, Marvia D.; Deculus, Karisa; Freudenberg, Nicholas

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

Harrison M.

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Dictionary of Upriver Halkomelem, Volume I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remote, not visible, abstract), some (indefinite):: kw. remove scorch s-th, blacken s-th with fire, heat

Galloway, Brent Douglas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area. The River Corridor is a 220-square-mile section of...

362

Reconvergent Fanout Removal Through Partial BIST Insertion Ian G. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconvergent Fanout Removal Through Partial BIST Insertion Ian G. Harris Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts at Amherst E-mail: harris@ecs.umass.edu I. ABSTRACT

Harris, Ian G.

363

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2009 Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the Sandwich Algorithm Stephen Wan stephen.wan@csiro.au Paul Thomas paul.thomas@csiro.au Tom Rowlands tom.rowlands@csiro.au #12;Copyright and Disclaimer

Thomas, Paul

365

Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An enzymatic method for removal of phenols from industrial wastewater was investigated. Phenols in an aqueous solution were removed after treatment with mushroom tyrosinase. The reduction order of substituted phenols is catechol > p-cresol > p-chlorophenol > phenol > p-methoxyphenol. In the treatment of tyrosinase alone, no precipitate was formed but a color change from colorless to dark-brown was observed. The colored products were removed by chitin and chitosan which are available abundantly as shellfish waste. In addition, the reduction rate of phenols was observed to be accelerated in the presence of chitosan. Tyrosinase, immobilized by using amino groups in the enzyme on cation exchange resins, can be used repeatedly. By treatment with immobilized tyrosinase, 100% of phenol was removed after 2 h, and the activity was reduced very little even after 10 repeat treatments.

Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Considering removing "Show Preview" button on utility rate form...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 22 April, 2013 - 13:55 Utility Rates I'm considering removing the "Show Preview" button, since it does not work (javascript...

367

Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

aromatic hydrocarbon removal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

369

acid dye removal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

370

Membrane Based intensification of ammonia removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this research was to study a novel membrane based oxygen intensification system to enhance a biological wastewater treatment process for ammonia removal. Specifically, this work is concerned with the biological nitrification process which...

Almutairi, Azel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Comparison of proton and neutron carrier removal rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Displacement damage induced carrier removal rates for proton irradiations in the energy range 10-175 MeV were compared to 1 MeV equivalent neutrons using power MOSFETs as a test vehicle. The results showed that, within experimental error, the degradation mechanisms were qualitatively similar and the ratio of proton to neutron carrier removal rates as a function of proton energy correlate with a calculation based on nonionization energy loss in silicon. For exposures under junction bias, p-type silicon was found to have a smaller carrier removal rate for both proton and neutron irradiations, whereas, for n-type silicon, junction bias had little effect on the carrier removal rate.

Pease, R.L.; Enlow, E.W.; Dinger, G.L.; Marshall, P.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

374

Removal Rate Model for Magnetorheological Finishing of Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic subaperture polishing process. The process uses a magntorheological (MR) fluid that consists of micrometer-sized, spherical, magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles, nonmagnetic polishing abrasives, water, and stabilizers. Material removal occurs when the CI and nonmagnetic polishing abrasives shear material off the surface being polished. We introduce a new MRF material removal rate model for glass. This model contains terms for the near surface mechanical properties of glass, drag force, polishing abrasive size and concentration, chemical durability of the glass, MR fluid pH, and the glass composition. We introduce quantitative chemical predictors for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, into an MRF removal rate model. We validate individual terms in our model separately and then combine all of the terms to show the whole MRF material removal model compared with experimental data. All of our experimental data were obtained using nanodiamond MR fluids and a set of six optical glasses.

DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

Which BPS baryons minimize volume?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nitrogen oxides removal by pulsed corona enhanced wet electrostatics precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) application for removal of nitrogen oxides. This wESP is designed to operate wet/dry, positive/negative, and pulsed/non-pulsed conditions. The applied pulsed voltage is varied from 0 to 60 kV at 70 Hz. Gas flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. A simulated flue gas with NO concentration up to 1,200 ppm{sub v} has been used to determine the feasibility of NO{sub x} removal in the wESP. NO has to be oxidized to N{sub 2} before any removal takes place. NO{sub x} removal efficiency increased with gas residence time, inlet NO concentration and applied corona power. In the air stream with 10 seconds gas residence time, up to 20% of 1,000 ppm NO (or 22% NO{sub x}) was removed from an air stream of 1.9x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3}/s with a water flow of 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} m{sup 3}/sec and 20 W, 70 Hz pulsed corona. Both ammonia and ozone injections improve the NO{sub x} removal for both the corona and non-corona cases. With the inclusion of NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1.3) and 25 watts corona power, NO removal efficiency was increased from 28% to 57%. The amount of in-situ ozone is not enough to be considered as a major NO{sub x} removal mechanism in this wESP. However, the additional injection of ozone improves the NO removal from 29% to 38% for both the corona and non-corona cases. When the oxygen concentration is dropped to 3% in a simulated flue gas with 12% CO{sub 2} and 800 ppm NO and 70% relative humidity at 11.5 s of gas residence time, the removal efficiency of NO is only 5%. Adding NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1) at 76 watts corona power, NO removal is increased to 13%.

Tseng, C.H.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Laboratory tests in support of the MSRE reactive gas removal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since December 1969, at which time the molten salt mixture of LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} (64.5-30.3-5.0-0.13 mol%) was transferred to fuel salt drain tanks for storage. In the late 1980s, increased radiation in one of the gas lines from the drain tank was attributed to {sup 233}UF{sub 6}. In 1994 two gas samples were withdraw (from a gas line in the Vent House connecting to the drain tanks) and analyzed. Surprisingly, 350 mm Hg of F{sub 2}, 70 mm Hg of UF{sub 6}, and smaller amounts of other gases were found in both of the samples. To remote this gas from above the drain tanks and all of the associated piping, the reactive gas removal system (RGRS) was designed. This report details the laboratory testing of the RGRS, using natural uranium, prior to its implementation at the MSRE facility. The testing was performed to ensure that the equipment functioned properly and was sufficient to perform the task while minimizing exposure to personnel. In addition, the laboratory work provided the research and development effort necessary to maximize the performance of the system. Throughout this work technicians and staff who were to be involved in RGRS operation at the MSRE site worked directly with the research staff in completing the laboratory testing phase. Consequently, at the end of the laboratory work, the personnel who were to be involved in the actual operations had acquired all of the training and experience necessary to continue with the process of reactive gas removal.

Rudolph, J.C.; Del Cul, G.D.; Caja, J.; Toth, L.M.; Williams, D.F.; Thomas, K.S.; Clark, D.E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, {open_quotes}High Efficiency SO{sub 2} Removal Testing{close_quotes}, for the time period 1 July through 30 September 1995. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The {open_quotes}base{close_quotes} project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy`s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy`s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light`s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation`s Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the fourth quarter of calendar year 1995. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

Blythe, G.

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

McSweeney, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

Martin, Kevin L. (Washburn, IL); Elliott, Dwight E. (Chillicothe, IL)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Mercury and tritium removal from DOE waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work covers the investigation of vacuum extraction as a means to remove tritiated contamination as well as the removal via sorption of dissolved mercury from contaminated oils. The radiation damage in oils from tritium causes production of hydrogen, methane, and low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. When tritium gas is present in the oil, the tritium atom is incorporated into the formed hydrocarbons. The transformer industry measures gas content/composition of transformer oils as a diagnostic tool for the transformers` condition. The analytical approach (ASTM D3612-90) used for these measurements is vacuum extraction of all gases (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, etc.) followed by analysis of the evolved gas mixture. This extraction method will be adapted to remove dissolved gases (including tritium) from the SRS vacuum pump oil. It may be necessary to heat (60{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C) the oil during vacuum extraction to remove tritiated water. A method described in the procedures is a stripper column extraction, in which a carrier gas (argon) is used to remove dissolved gases from oil that is dispersed on high surface area beads. This method appears promising for scale-up as a treatment process, and a modified process is also being used as a dewatering technique by SD Myers, Inc. (a transformer consulting company) for transformers in the field by a mobile unit. Although some mercury may be removed during the vacuum extraction, the most common technique for removing mercury from oil is by using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). SIAC is currently being used by the petroleum industry to remove mercury from hydrocarbon mixtures, but the sorbent has not been previously tested on DOE vacuum oil waste. It is anticipated that a final process will be similar to technologies used by the petroleum industry and is comparable to ion exchange operations in large column-type reactors.

Klasson, E.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Characterization of Dried and Torrefied Arundo Donax Biomass for Inorganic Species Prior to Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portland General Electric (PGE) potentially plans to replace the coal with torrefied Arundo donax for their Boardman coal-fired power plant by 2020. Since there is only a limited amount of experience with this high yield energy crop, PGE would like to characterize raw and torrefied Arundo before a test burn and therefore avoid possible ash related operational problems such as slagging, deposit formation and corrosion. This report describes the results from characterization of ground and cross-sectioned samples of Arundo with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and also includes analytical results from a short water-leaching test for concentrations of Ca, Mg, K, Na, S, and Cl in the non-leached and leached Arundo and leachates. SEM-EDS analysis of torrefied Arundo revealed that condensation of volatile components during torrefaction can result in their undesirable re-deposition on the outside surfaces in the form of amorphous or crystallized clusters with a size from a few µm’s to as large as 100 µm. A short exposure of Arundo to water resulted in an efficient removal of volatile species from the raw and torrefied Arundo, e.g., ~ 98 wt% of total K and Cl, and ~75 wt% of total S were removed from raw Arundo, and more than 90 wt% of total K and Cl, and 70 wt% of S from torrefied Arundo, suggesting that water-leaching of Arundo before combustion can be an effective pre-treatment method because high concentrations of Cl increase emissions of HCl, and in combination with K can form large amounts of KCl deposits on boiler surfaces and in combination with H2O or SO3 cause corrosion.

Matyas, Josef; Johnson, Bradley R.; Cabe, James E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

389

Tube cutter tool and method of use for coupon removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tube cutter tool is insertable into a tube for cutting a coupon from a damaged site on the exterior of the tube. Prior to using the tool, the damaged site is first located from the interior of the tube using a multi-coil pancake eddy current test probe. The damaged site is then marked. A fiber optic probe is used to monitor the subsequent cutting procedure which is performed using a hole saw mounted on the tube cutter tool. Prior to completion of the cutting procedure, a drill in the center of the hole saw is drilled into the coupon to hold it in place. 4 figs.

Nachbar, H.D.; Etten, M.P. Jr.; Kurowski, P.A.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Considerations for understanding one`s cooling system prior to reuse water implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water reuse situations are growing due to the need or desire to minimize water discharge from an industrial facility. Most of these applications are retrofits or system redesigns. Many times information is required to make decisions about the reuse application. Real-time or diagnostic studies provide improved information about the water systems. Addition of very low concentrations of a chemical tracer can provide improved information about the system. Useful and unique functions of chemical tracers are that they can provide one with the following information: system volume, quantifying previously unaccounted blowdown, holding time index, water distribution, leakage, and flowrate. These are important parameters when considering water reuse and system redesign. The chemical tracers discussed in this paper represent a significant improvement over compounds previously used in reuse applications.

Chmelovski, M.J. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Darlington tritium removal facility and station upgrading plant dynamic process simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station has been operating a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) and a D{sub 2}O station Upgrading Plant (SUP) since 1989. Both facilities were designed with a Distributed Control System (DCS) and programmable logic controllers (PLC) for process control. This control system was replaced with a DCS only, in 1998. A dynamic plant simulator was developed for the Darlington TRF (DTRF) and the SUP, as part of the computer control system replacement. The simulator was used to test the new software, required to eliminate the PLCs. The simulator is now used for operator training and testing of process control software changes prior to field installation. Dynamic simulation will be essential for the ITER isotope separation system, where the process is more dynamic than the relatively steady-state DTRF process. This paper describes the development and application of the DTRF and SUP dynamic simulator, its benefits, architecture, and the operational experience with the simulator. (authors)

Busigin, A. [NITEK USA, Inc., 6405 NW 77 PL, Parkland, FL 33067 (United States); Williams, G. I. D.; Wong, T. C. W.; Kulczynski, D.; Reid, A. [Ontario Power Generation Nuclear, Box 4000, Bowmanville, ON L1C 3Z8 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1 Released: October 23, 2006 Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1 --- All Tables in PDF (1.0 MB) CSV XLS --- All CSV and XLS files contained in a...

396

Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional Composite the statistically equivalent representative volume element (SERVE) are proposed for fiber-reinforced microstructures using a bilinear cohesive zone law. As introduced in the first article, a combination of statistical

Ghosh, Somnath

397

LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

A struggle for Cherokee community : excavating identity in post-removal North Carolina.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Cherokee Removal of 1838 was intended to remove all members of the Cherokee Nation to west of the Mississippi River. However, a small number… (more)

Greene, Lance.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Nguyen, Khanh B. (Sunnyvale, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

How Safe is Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Prior to EVAR?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To assess the outcomes of patients after bilateral internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods. Thirty-nine patients (age range 55-88 years, mean 72.5 years; 2 women) underwent IIA embolization/occlusion before EVAR. There were 28 patients with aorto-biiliac aneurysms and 6 with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms. Five patients with unilateral CIA aneurysms had previous surgical ligation of the contralateral IIA or inadvertent covering by the stent-graft of the contralateral IIA origin. Outcomes were assessed by clinical follow-up. Results. Severe ischemic complications were limited to spinal cord ischemia in 1 patient (3%) who developed paraparesis following EVAR. No other severe ischemic complications such as buttock necrosis, or bowel or bladder ischemia, occurred. Buttock and/or thigh claudication occurred in 12 patients (31%) and persisted beyond 1 year in 3 patients (9%). Sexual dysfunction occurred in 2 patients (5%). Patients who underwent simultaneous embolization had a 25% (3/12) ischemic complication rate versus 41% (11/27) in those with sequential embolization (p = 0.48). Embolization limited to the main trunk of the IIA resulted in a significantly reduced ischemic complication rate of 16% (3/19) versus 55% (11/20) of patients who had a more distal embolization of the IIA (p = 0.019, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. Severe complications after bilateral IIA embolization are uncommon. Although buttock/thigh claudication occurs in around 30% of patients soon after the procedure, this resolves in the majority after 1 year. There is no obvious benefit for sequential versus simultaneous IIA embolization in our series. Occlusion of the proximal IIA trunk is associated with reduced complications compared with occlusion of the distal IIA.

Bratby, M. J., E-mail: Robert.Morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk; Munneke, G. M.; Belli, A.-M. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Loosemore, T. M.; Loftus, I.; Thompson, M. M. [St. George's Hospital, Vascular Institute (United Kingdom); Morgan, R. A. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Prediction of oil gravity prior to drill-stem testing in Monterey Formation Reservoirs, offshore California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses empirical geochemical correlations used to predict API oil gravities prior to drill-stem testing in Monterey Formation reservoirs, offshore southern California. The primary objective was to eliminate expensive well testing by identifying intervals that contain low-gravity, nonproducible oil (usually <14[degrees] API). However, the correlations proved very successful in accurately predicting (within 4[degrees]API) oil gravities that range from 5 to 35[degrees] API throughout the offshore Santa Barbara and Santa Maria areas. The primary data are weight-percent sulfur and Rock-Eval pyrolysis of bitumen chemically extracted from reservoir rock samples. In general, reservoirs that contain higher gravity, producible oil have bitumen organic sulfur contents of less than 5 wt. %, Rock-Eval bitumen, and Rock-Eval bitumen S[sub 1]/S[sub 2] ratios greater than 1.0. These data are usually supplemented with Rock-Eval pyrolysis of the reservoir rock, where whole-rock S[sub 1]/S[sub 2] ratios greater than 0.30 usually indicate associated oil gravities greater than 14[degrees] API. This analytical mix gives a multiple approach for estimating reservoir oil gravities within proposed drill-stem test (DST) intervals. Using this approach, oil gravities of more than 50 DSTs have been accurately predicted in the offshore southern California area. The technique is also useful for reevaluating API gravities in older wells where Monterey reservoirs were not the primary target. Moreover, the technique should have application elsewhere, provided the range of oil gravities are not the result of obvious biodegradation and sufficient rock and oil samples are available to establish pertinent correlations. 34 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

Baskin, D.K. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)); Jones, R.W. (Chevron Oil Field Research Company, Encinitas, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

Kirby, Mike

404

www.water-alternatives.org Volume 3 | Issue 2 Gosnell, H. and Kelly, E.C. 2010. Peace on the river?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.water-alternatives.org Volume 3 | Issue 2 Gosnell, H. and Kelly, E.C. 2010. Peace on the river(2): 361-383 Gosnell and Kelly: Dam removal in the Klamath basin Page | 362 Peace on the River? Social of Geosciences, Oregon State University, USA; gosnellh@geo.oregonstate.edu Erin Clover Kelly Postdoctoral

Kurapov, Alexander

405

Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Removal of impurities from dry scrubbed fluoride enriched alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pot-gas from an aluminum electrolytic cell is cleaned by a dry scrubbing process using fresh alumina as a scrubbing agent. This alumina is enriched with fluorides and trace impurities in a closed loop system with the pots. The only significant removal of the impurities is due to metal tapping. An improved technique has been developed that is more effective than earlier stripper systems. The impurity-rich fine fraction (< 10 {micro}m) of the enriched alumina is partly attached to the coarser alumina. That attachment has to be broken. Selective impact milling under special moderate conditions and air classifying have shown to be a cost effective process for the removal of impurities. For iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) about 30--70% can be removed by the separation of 0.5--1% of the alumina. Full scale tests have successfully confirmed these results.

Schuh, L. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wedde, G. [ABB Environmental, Oslo (Norway)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface. 7 figs.

White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Schaich, C.R.; Foster, D. Jr.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

408

Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO[sub x] and optionally SO[sub 2] from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe[sup 2+]) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution. 26 figures.

Chang, S.G.T.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Removal of fluoride impurities from UF/sub 6/ gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of purifying a UF/sub 6/ gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF/sub 5/ in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF/sub 5/ to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF/sub 5/ is formed by the reduction of UF/sub 6/ in the presence of uv light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of uv light sources as tubes on which UF/sub 5/ is formed. 2 figures.

Beitz, J.V.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface.

White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Schaich, Charles R. (Lenoir City, TN); Foster, Jr., Don (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

MACHINE CONTEST MACHINE VOLUME WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACHINE CONTEST® MACHINE VOLUME WORKSHEET Note: Each square is 1' x 1' (0.3 m x 0.3 m) (Official the footprint of your machine NOTE: If any part of the machine falls within a square, you must count the entire: _______________ (choose one: ft2 or m2 ) STEP 3: Measure the height of your machine. NOTE: The maximum height is 8' (2.4 m

Yener, Aylin

412

Removal of pollutants from solid matrices using supercritical fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE) processes have been proposed for removing toxic and intractable organic compounds from a range of contaminated solids. These include soil remediation and the regeneration of absorbents used to treat wastewater streams such as granular activated carbon (GAC). As a separation technique for environmental control, SCFR has several distinct advantages over conventional liquid extraction methods and incineration. Most notably, the contaminant is removed from the solvent in a concentrated form via a change in pressure or temperature and can be completely separated upon expansion to atmospheric pressure. The viability of SCFE hinges on process conditions such as solvent-feed ratio and solvent recycle ratio. The necessity of recycling solvent complicates the contaminant separation step since a complete reduction to atmospheric pressure would create large recompression costs. Because of this, the pressure and temperature dependence of contaminant solubility must be understood so that operating conditions for the separation step can be defined. Fortunately, this is the most developed aspect of SCF technology. However, the mass transfer limitations to removing contaminants from solids change with solvent flow rate. This paper discusses the use of SCFE for environmental control and presents results for the removal of DDT and 2-chlorophenol from GAC. 2-chlorophenol is almost completely removed with pure CO{sub 2} at 40{degrees}C and 101 bar while only 55% of the DDT is removed at 40{degrees}C and 200 bar. These differences in regeneration efficiency cannot be understood solely in terms of solubility but point to a need for detailed studies of adsorption equilibrium and mass transfer resistances in supercritical fluid systems.

Tomasko, D.L. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Macnaughton, S.J.; Foster, N.R. [Univ. of South Wales, Kensington (Australia)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION - LABORATORY SCALE VALIDATION ON WASTE SIMULANTS TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce the additional sodium hydroxide and ease processing of aluminum bearing sludge, the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process has been invented by AREV A and demonstrated on a laboratory scale to remove alumina and regenerate/recycle sodium hydroxide prior to processing in the WTP. The method uses lithium hydroxide (LiOH) to precipitate sodium aluminate (NaAI(OH){sub 4}) as lithium hydrotalcite (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.4Al(OH){sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) while generating sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In addition, phosphate substitutes in the reaction to a high degree, also as a filterable solid. The sodium hydroxide enriched leachate is depleted in aluminum and phosphate, and is recycled to double-shell tanks (DSTs) to leach aluminum bearing sludges. This method eliminates importing sodium hydroxide to leach alumina sludge and eliminates a large fraction of the total sludge mass to be treated by the WTP. Plugging of process equipment is reduced by removal of both aluminum and phosphate in the tank wastes. Laboratory tests were conducted to verify the efficacy of the process and confirm the results of previous tests. These tests used both single-shell tank (SST) and DST simulants.

SAMS T; HAGERTY K

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

NONE

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method for removal of furfural coke from metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating ship furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas with a total pressure of less than 100 psig containing molecular oxygen. The gas being at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F. (427{degrees}C.) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of about 5000 psi.

Turner, J.D.

1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

Rana B. Gupta

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

Durham, Michael Dean (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard John (Aurora, CO); Ebner, Timothy George (Westminster, CO); Stewart, Robin Michele (Arvada, CO); Hyatt, David E. (Denver, CO); Bustard, Cynthia Jean (Littleton, CO); Sjostrom, Sharon (Denver, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Compositions and methods for removing arsenic in water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and methods and for contaminants from water are provided. The compositions comprise ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates for use in removing the contaminant from the water. Contacting water bearing the contaminant with the substrates can substantially reduce contaminant levels therein. Methods of oxidizing the contaminants in water to facilitate their removal by the ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates are also provided. The contaminants include, but are not limited to, arsenic, selenium, uranium, lead, cadmium, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium and vanadium, their oxides and soluble salts thereof.

Gadgil, Ashok Jagannth (El Cerrito, CA)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, C.E.; Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, Clay E. (Knoxville, TN); Vass, Arpad A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Methods of hydrotreating a liquid stream to remove clogging compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method includes producing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a gas stream. At least a portion of the liquid stream is provided to a hydrotreating unit. At least a portion of selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions in the liquid stream are removed to produce a hydrotreated liquid stream by hydrotreating at least a portion of the liquid stream at conditions sufficient to remove the selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions.

Minderhoud, Johannes Kornelis [Amsterdam, NL; Nelson, Richard Gene [Katy, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Ryan, Robert Charles [Houston, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

http://www.ini.cmu.edu/current/policies/prior2004.aspx INI Policies and Procedures For Students who Entered the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.ini.cmu.edu/current/policies/prior2004.aspx INI Policies and Procedures For Students who is intended to summarize the rules of the INI graduate programs. These policies are subject to change and/or modifications and do not constitute a contract. I. INI DEGREE REQUIREMENTS II. COURSE ENROLLMENT III

Tague, Patrick

428

Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) All stock must be properly secured in the lathe chuck or mounted prior to the machining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or mounted prior to the machining process taking place. Use the correct sized clamp or vise for the stockStandard Operating Procedure (SOP) ­ Lathe · All stock must be properly secured in the lathe chuck the spindle work has the cup center imbedded; tail, stock and tool rests are securely clamped

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

429

Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant, such as bullets, detonated-mine-induced soil ejecta, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), shell or turbine frag of high-fidelity material-constitutive models capa- ble of describing the behavior of fibers

Grujicic, Mica

430

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

Lumetta, G.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W 803.9 1,360.3 214.2 2,378.3 W W 172.8 133.2 - 305.9 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

432

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

W W 830.4 W W 2,295.3 W W 190.9 133.6 - 324.5 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

433

Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W 872.9 1,737.8 282.7 2,893.4 W W 132.1 117.6 - 249.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

434

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

W NA W 1,666.1 W 2,880.1 NA W 134.2 125.5 - 259.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

435

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 18 P

436

VOLUME  

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437

VOLUME  

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438

VOLUME  

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439

VOLUME  

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440

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P

442

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P8,

443

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3

444

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER318 P

445

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER318

446

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (BillionSeparation 2,37809,369.5

447

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (BillionSeparation

448

Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (BillionSeparation41,706.6 42,867.4

449

Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur ContentMwH)","RES_CONS4,369,090 4,367,318 4,367,470

450

The Annotated Mina, Volume One  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of three main characters: PrincessB, an unconvincingly well-muscled representative of the deposed ruling class; Pierce, her handsome and athletic third cousin twice removed; and Jab, his best friend from university or something. (I admit to having... There are occasions, you know, when even the most beloved of fanfiction authors is forced to admit that the world, and more particularly, fandom, can be a cold, cruel place. Take, for instance, the initial response to my recent brilliant plan to use my online...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

NOVEL PROCESS FOR REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF VAPOR-PHASE MERCURY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to investigate the use of a regenerable sorbent for removing and recovering mercury from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The process is based on the sorption of mercury by noble metals and the thermal regeneration of the sorbent, recovering the desorbed mercury in a small volume for recycling or disposal. The project was carried out in two phases, covering five years. Phase I ran from September 1995 through September 1997 and involved development and testing of sorbent materials and field tests at a pilot coal-combustor. Phase II began in January 1998 and ended September 2000. Phase II culminated with pilot-scale testing at a coal-fired power plant. The use of regenerable sorbents holds the promise of capturing mercury in a small volume, suitable for either stable disposal or recycling. Unlike single-use injected sorbents such as activated carbon, there is no impact on the quality of the fly ash. During Phase II, tests were run with a 20-acfm pilot unit on coal-combustion flue gas at a 100 lb/hr pilot combustor and a utility boiler for four months and six months respectively. These studies, and subsequent laboratory comparisons, indicated that the sorbent capacity and life were detrimentally affected by the flue gas constituents. Sorbent capacity dropped by a factor of 20 to 35 during operations in flue gas versus air. Thus, a sorbent designed to last 24 hours between recycling lasted less than one hour. The effect resulted from an interaction between SO{sub 2} and either NO{sub 2} or HCl. When SO{sub 2} was combined with either of these two gases, total breakthrough was seen within one hour in flue gas. This behavior is similar to that reported by others with carbon adsorbents (Miller et al., 1998).

Craig S. Turchi

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

452

Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

researchers conducted bench-scale experiments to verify the effectiveness of electrofiltration, few studies plant. Presedimentation basin water was used as the influent with a turbidity ranging from 12 to 37 NTU to be more effective for removal of smaller particles (

Li, Ying

453

Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Freeman, Mark C. (South Park Township, PA); Hargis, Richard A. (Canonsburg, PA); O'Dowd, William J. (Charleroi, PA)

2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

454

Removal of Heavy Metals from Industrial Effluent Using Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial development results in the generation of industrial effluents, and if untreated results in water, sediment and soil pollution. (Fakayode and Onianwa, 2002 ? Fakayode, 2005). Industrial wastes and emission contain toxic and hazardous substances, most of which are detrimental to human health (Jimena et al.,2008 ? Ogunfowokan et al.,2005 ? Rajaram et al.,2008). The key pollutants include heavy metals, chemical wastes and oil spills etc. Heavy metal resistant bacteria have significant role in bioremediation of heavy metals in wastewater. The objective of this work is to study the role of bacteria in removing the heavy metals present in the industrial effluent.Five effluent samples out of nine were selected for this study due to high content of heavy metals. The heavy metals Hg and Cu were removed by Bacillus sp. The average Hg reduction was 45 % and Cu reduction was recorded as 62%. The heavy metals Cd, As and Co were removed by Pseudomonas sp. The average Cd reduction was 56%, average As reduction was 34 % and average Co reduction was recorded as 53%. The heavy metals Cd and Cu were removed by Staphylococcus sp. The average Cd reduction was 44 % and average Cu reduction was recorded as 34 %.

Manisha N; Dinesh Sharma; Arun Kumar

455

Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures GREGG R. GITSCHLAG and BRYAN A. HERCZEG Introduction In July 1992 the total number of oil and gas production platformsI in the Gulfof. In that year 51 dead sea turtles were found on upper Texas beaches during mid-March to mid-April following

456

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Justification to remove 333 Building fire suppression system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Justification to remove the 333 Building fire suppression system is provided. The Maximum Possible Fire Loss (MPFL) is provided (approximately $800K), potential radiological and toxicological impacts from a postulated fire are discussed, Life Safety Code issues are addressed, and coordination with the Hanford Fire Department is assured.

Benecke, M.W.

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

458

Investigating the Use of Biosorbents to Remove Arsenic from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, As (III), and arsenate, As (V), from water. Batch reactors were employed to assess the percent removal, reaction kinetics, adsorption capacity, and desorption of each arsenic species onto/from biosorbents under pH buffered and non?buffered conditions...

Erapalli, Shreyas

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

459

Argonne Electrochemical Technology Program Sulfur removal from reformate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Argonne Electrochemical Technology Program Sulfur removal from reformate Xiaoping Wang, Theodore Krause, and Romesh Kumar Chemical Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies 2003 Merit Review Berkeley, CA May 19-22, 2003 #12;Argonne Electrochemical Technology

460

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Removing Redundancy and Inconsistency in Memory-Based Collaborative Filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Redundancy and Inconsistency in Memory- Based Collaborative Filtering Kai Yu Siemens AG, Corporate Technology & University of Munich, Germany kai.yu.external@mchp.siemens. de Xiaowei Xu Information Science Department University of Arkansas at Little Rock xwxu@ualr.edu Anton Schwaighofer Siemens AG

Tresp, Volker

462

Method for removal of mercury from various gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides for a method for removing elemental mercury from a fluid, the method comprising irradiating the mercury with light having a wavelength of approximately 254 nm. The method is implemented in situ at various fuel combustion locations such as power plants and municipal incinerators.

Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

463

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

Siegel, Jeffrey

464

Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

Selwyn, G.S.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Development of Silica/Vanadia/ Titania Catalysts for Removal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mercury (Hg0) from simulated coal-combustion flue gas. Experiments were carried out in fixed-bed reactorsDevelopment of Silica/Vanadia/ Titania Catalysts for Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal-Combustion the composition and microstructures of SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalysts for Hg0 oxidation in coal-combustion

Li, Ying

466

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using Membrane Contactor Processes J O S H U water resources and increased interest in wastewater reclamation for potable reuse. This interest has in the study of wastewater reuse in advanced life support systems (e.g., space missions) because

467

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser Abstract on three example applications: generating human-interpretable excuses for failure, motion planning under their failures. · In human-robot interaction, semantically meaningful explanations would help people diagnose

Indiana University

468

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser September 13 strategies. It is demonstrated on three example applications: gener- ating human-interpretable excuses, then they provide no explanation for the failure. For several applications, it would be useful for planners

Indiana University

469

Removing Systematic Errors from Rotating Shadowband Pyranometer Data Frank Vignola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Systematic Errors from Rotating Shadowband Pyranometer Data Frank Vignola Solar Radiation irradiance be- cause they do not require manual adjustment of trackers. However, a RSP requires the use of solar cell based pyranometers which underestimate diffuse irradiance by 20- 30% under clear sky

Oregon, University of

470

Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

-CONF-820664--9 DE82 018264 REMOVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IFLE COPY - CONF-820664--9 DO NOT DE82 018264 REMOVE FIELD TESTING ENERGY-SAVING HERMETICGonmmnt o yiy rrtcy ttheof. #12;FIELD TESTING ENERGY SAVING HERMETIC COMPRESSORS IN RESIDENTIAL 49509 Abstract The design of an energy saving compressor for low back pressure applications is reviewed

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

473

Reactive Phosphorus Removal from Aquaculture and Poultry Productions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Phosphorus Removal from Aquaculture and Poultry Productions Systems Using Polymeric and poultry production wastewater effluents. The sorbent used was a cross-linked polyamine (PAA,HCl) polymeric poultry and aquaculture wastewater effluents. Upon treatment, phosphorus anion concentrations were reduced

Rubloff, Gary W.

474

Apparatus for removably holding a plurality of microballoons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to the manipulation of microballoons and more particularly to an apparatus for removably holding a plurality of microballoons in order to more efficiently carry out the filling of the microballoons with a known quantity of gas.

Jorgensen, B.S.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

475

Instructions for use Removal of Oxygen and Nitrogen from Niobium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructions for use #12;------ Removal of Oxygen and Nitrogen from Niobium by External Gettering of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto University Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-01 Japan Keywords External Gettering, Purification of Niobium, Thermodynamics of Impurities, Oxygen Diffusion, Purity

Tachizawa, Kazuya

476

Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

Postma, Arlin K. (Benton City, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Apparatuses and methods for removal of ink buildup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A substrate patterning method including the steps of spraying ink on a surface of a substrate, the spraying of the ink resulting in an overspray of excess ink past an edge of the substrate; changing a temperature of the excess ink to cause a change in a viscosity of the excess ink; and removing the excess ink having the changed viscosity.

Cudzinovic, Michael; Pass, Thomas; Rogers, Rob; Sun, Ray-Hon; Sun, Sheng; Wahlstrom, Ben; Fuhrman, Dennis Jason; Altendorf, Kyle David

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

478

MAILLER et al. Removal of priority and emerging substances by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of micropollutants in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) composed by primary and biological treatmentsMAILLER et al. Removal of priority and emerging substances by biological and tertiary treatments in the case of urban areas (Heberer 2002). This implies a large understanding of wastewater treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

479

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

480

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume removed prior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

Charles Mones

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

THERMAL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR SMALL ION-EXCHANGE CESIUM REMOVAL PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-Riser Ion Exchange program focuses on the development of in-tank systems to decontaminate high level waste (HLW) salt solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Hanford Site. Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) treatment for cesium removal is a primary in-riser technology for decontamination prior to final waste immobilization in Saltstone. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed onto the ion exchange media which is packed within a flow-through column. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) is being considered as the ion exchange media for the application of this technology at both sites. A packed column loaded with media containing radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. Under normal operating conditions, process fluid flow through the column can provide adequate heat removal from the columns. However, in the unexpected event of loss of fluid flow or fluid drainage from the column, the design must be adequate to handle the thermal load to avoid unacceptable temperature excursions. Otherwise, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media or the temperature could rise above column safety limits. Data exists which indicates that performance degradation with regard to cesium removal occurs with RF at 65C. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130C. As a result, two temperature limits have been assumed for this analysis. An additional upset scenario was considered involving the loss of the supernate solution due to inadvertent fluid drainage through the column boundary. In this case, the column containing the loaded media could be completely dry. This event is expected to result in high temperatures that could damage the column or cause the RF sorbent material to undergo undesired physical changes. One objective of these calculations is to determine the range of temperatures that should be evaluated during testing with the RF media. Although, the safety temperature limit is based on the salt solution boiling point which does not apply in the air-filled case (because there is no liquid), this same limit (130C) is used as a measure for the evaluation of this condition as well. The primary objective of the present work is to develop models to simulate the thermal performance of the RF column design when the media is fully loaded with radioactive cesium and the central cooling tube is excluded. Previous analysis led to the consideration of this design simplification for RF, since the baseline column design with center cooling was developed assuming that CST media would be used for cesium removal which has a higher volumetric heat load. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column during SCIX process operations and upset conditions were conducted with a focus on SCIX implementation at Hanford. However, a feed composition and cesium loading were assumed which were known to be considerably higher than would typically be observed at Hanford. In order to evaluate the impact of this potentially highly conservative assumption, fractionally-reduced loading cases were also considered. A computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters so that the results would provide the maximum temperatures achievable under the design configurations.

Lee, S.; King, W.

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

484

Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?s Sunshine Award & Crewmember of the Year Award. Polls close on Friday, July 18. Crewmembers may vote in the official site, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/uss-southerncrossawards/. The results Will be announced at the Summit. Summit Event Venues... of our good friends in Adelaide, reacquaint myself with my ?old? mates and make friends with new ones. See you in SA. COL Bruce O?Brien Commanding Officer Newsletter Publisher http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ July / August 2008 Volume 2, Issue 4...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, of the USS Genesis. To CPT Kieran Bock and his crew, the officers and crew of the Southern Cross send their very best wishes and congratulations, and we wish them fair seas and LOTS of stars to follow. The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 1 5 USS Atlantis... will be forwarded separately to each individual member. Please forward any enquiries to the Intel Officer - ENS Ashley Walker on alwalk78@optusnet.com.au. ENS Ashley Walker Operations Intelligence Officer Welcoming New Crewmembers Savannah Clark Daniel...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Volume 4 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| Department ofEducationVirgin4, 2009InsightsVolume 4

487

Scuttlebutt Volume 1, No. 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.uss-southerncross.com/news.htm http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ ARMAGEDDON AND NEW WORLDS 5 November/December 2007 Volume 1, Issue 8 2 Vol.1 Issue 8 ScuttleButt ScuttleButt is the official bimonthly publication of the USS Southern... 5. Club 360, BioShock Operations 6. Ship?s Muster Tactical/Security 8. Armageddon by Matt Tuting 9. Region 11 Convention Listing Communications 10. The Klingon Language Institute 11. The USS Southern Cross' writing group - The Writer...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. From The Bridge 4. The Editor's Corner 5. The X/O's Desk 6. Club 360 7. In Memoriam ? Lauretta Gal 28. The Southern Cross Press Operations 5. Ship's Muster Medical 8. The Psyche Report Communications 9. Followup: Spiderwick... and Pieces 5The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 3 The X/O?s Desk Attention all Stations: Hello and welcome to my little area for voicing my ideas or opinions. Well not much to talk about this time things have been quite I know Bruce has booked his airfare...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

491

Initial studies of pretreatment methods for neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing conceptual and experimental studies for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) aimed at determining the effectiveness of various pretreatment methods for the neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge currently being stored at the Hanford Site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of such pretreatment methods is to separate the transuranic (TRU) elements and the bulk components of the waste (primarily zirconium, sodium, fluoride, and hydroxide) to a level low enough that the bulk components can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW), with only a small volume, TRU-containing fraction requiring geologic disposal. This objective is driven primarily by the large cost differential projected between LLW and geologic disposal procedures. This report contains the results of the first three years (1987, 1988, and 1989) of the program. These results were earlier reported informally in letter reports; they are here compiled in appendix form in this formal report to be more readily available to other workers and the public. The results of work done in 1990 and in following years will be reported in separate formal reports.

Swanson, J L

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Copyright! 2010!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be! reproduced!in!any!form!without!prior!authorization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!Electrical!Devices!(IEDs)!&!Programmable! Logic!Controllers!(PLCs)!are!being!extensively!used!in! substations!and!power!plants Today, digital!and!Critical!Infrastructure!Security:! Toward!Smarter!and!More!Secure! Power!and!Energy!Infrastructures Material!from!the!Electric!Power!of!this!presentation!may!be!reproduced!in!any!form without!prior!authorization. Unconventional!Threats!to!Security Connectivity Complexity #12;© 2010!No!part

Amin, S. Massoud

493

Copyright! 2010!No!part!of!this!presentation!may!be! reproduced!in!any!form!without!prior!authorization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!Grid:!Toward!stronger,! smarter,!and!more!secure!energy! infrastructure Material!from!the!Electric!Power!Research!Institute!(EPRI),!and!support!from!EPRI,!NSF,! and!ORNL!for!my!graduate!students' doctoral!research!is!gratefully!acknowledged. MN!Senate!Energy!of!this!presentation!may!be!reproduced!in!any!form without!prior!authorization. The!Energy!Crises!Taught!Us!Interdependency EconomicEconomic Security

Amin, S. Massoud

494

Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

496

Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory," said Pete Maggiore, assistant manager for environmental operations at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office. "We exceeded our goals and are on track to double both volume...

499

Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with Technical Standards, Corrective Action Requirements and Financial Responsibility for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks....

500

Volume reduction of hot cell plastic wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of radioactively-contaminated solid wastes has become a national crisis. In such circumstances, it is imperative that this waste be reduced to minimum volume and be packaged to prevent pollution of the environment. The majority of the solid waste generated at the hot cell under consideration is plastic lab ware. Cutting this waste into small pieces with a hot wire technique reduced the volume 66%. Melting the waste, although more time consuming, reduced the volume 90%. The hot wire technique can also be used to cut up damaged master slave manipulator boots, greatly reducing their disposal volume.

Dykes, F W; Henscheid, J P; Lewis, L C; Lundholm, C W; Nicklas, J H

1989-09-19T23:59:59.000Z