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1

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

2

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

4

41146_R01_Volume II.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOLIERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

5

1996 Site environmental report. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory presents Volume II, data appendix as a reference document to supplement the 1996 Site Environmental Report. Volume II contains the raw environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate many of the summary results included in the main report for both routine and nonroutine activities. This appendix includes a legend that cross-references the enclosed data tables with summary tables in the main report. The legend also provides a listing of more detailed descriptions for the station location codes used in the appendices` tables. Data presented in the tables are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The glossary found in the main report contains a listing of the SI units.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Site Environmental Report for 2012, Volume II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7170E-2012 7170E-2012 Volume II Site Environmental Report for 2012 Environment/Health/Safety Division September 2013 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily

8

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air; Soil Creeks; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer AmbientAir Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer FixedII section Stormwater Ambient Air; Rainwater Ambient Air

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Two characteristic volumes in thermal nuclear multifragmentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to the experimental determination of the space-time characteristics for the target multifragmentation in p(8.1GeV)+Au collisions. The experimental data on the fragment charge distribution and kinetic energy spectra are analyzed within the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model. It is found that the partition of hot nuclei is specified after expansion of the target spectator to a volume equal to Vt=(2.9±0.2)Vo, with Vo as the volume at normal density. However, the freezeout volume is found to be Vf=(11±3)Vo. At freezeout, all the fragments are well separated and only the Coulomb force should be taken into account. The results are in accordance with a scenario of spinodal disintegration of hot nuclei.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. V. Simonenko; P. A. Rukoyatkin; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczy?ska; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

10

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume II.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

II - Responses to Comments II - Responses to Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume II - Responses to Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS af acre-feet afy acre-feet per year APP Avian Protection Plan BA Biological Assessment Barr Barr Engineering Company BMPs Best Management Practices Btu British thermal unit CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule

11

MODE II FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF BONDED VISCOELASTIC THERMAL COMPRESSED WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODE II FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF BONDED VISCOELASTIC THERMAL COMPRESSED WOOD Andreja Kutnar* Graduate Student Department of Wood Science and Technology Biotechnical Faculty University of Ljubljana 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia Frederick A. Kamke Professor John A. Nairn Professor Department of Wood Science

Nairn, John A.

12

Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ?1?nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal analysis using proximal probes has achieved spatial resolution of 10?nm, temperature precision of 50 mK, sensitivity to heat flows of 10 pW, and the capability for thermal analysis of sub-femtogram samples.

Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume II (Part 1 of 24)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II II Public Comments September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper COMMENT RESPONSE SUPPLEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS TC-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME II PUBLIC COMMENTS Agency Comments...............................................................................................PC - 1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Region 6 (A-001) .......................................PC - 3 State of New Mexico Environment Department (A-002)............................................PC - 4 State of Texas: Office of the Governor (A-003) .....................................................PC - 6 State of Ohio: Office of the Governor (A-004).......................................................PC - 6 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (A-005)

15

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PRICE MATRIX PRICE MATRIX ATTACHMENT 5 VOLUME II SUMMARY Logistics Services A-76 Study - Service Provider Price Offer for Phase in Period, Volume III. Service Provider Name: GSA Schedule Contract Number: Expiration Date of GSA Schedule Contract: Duration Base Period: 3 Calendar Years SUMMARY FORRESTAL Term of Performance TOTAL PROPOSED COST Phase-in Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2004 $ Base Period Year One 07/01/2005 - 06/30/2006 $ Year Two 07/01/2006 - 06/30/2007 $ Period Three 07/01/2007 - 09/30/2007 $ $ Option Period Year One 10/01/2007 - 09/30/2008 $ Period Two 10/01/2008 - 09/30/2009 $ $ SUMMARY GERMANTOWN Term of Performance TOTAL PROPOSED COST Phase-in Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2004 $ Base Period Year One

16

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico - Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sandia National Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy February 2003 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES - NEW MEXICO Volume II February 2003 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES - NEW MEXICO Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................

18

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Argonne National Laboratory - East - Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Argonne National Argonne National Laboratory - East Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy May 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY - EAST Volume II May 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY - EAST Volume II Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................5

19

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lawrence Livermore Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy July 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II July 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

20

Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Volume II - Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

208-2012 208-2012 July 2012 DOE HANDBOOK Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Volume II: Operational Safety Analysis Techniques U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1208-2012 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Department of Energy (DOE) Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook was prepared under the sponsorship of the DOE Office of Health Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Corporate Safety Programs, and the Energy Facility Contractors Operating Group (EFCOG), Industrial Hygiene and Safety Sub-group of the Environmental Health and Safety Working Group. The preparers would like to gratefully acknowledge the authors whose works are referenced in this document, and the individuals who provided valuable technical insights and/or specific

22

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY VOLUME II TECHNICAL APPENDICES May 2005 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II Technical Appendices Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Appendix C - Core Function Implementation (Core Functions #1 - #4)..................................................... 1 Appendix D - Feedback and Continuous Improvement (Core Function #5) ............................................. 35 Appendix E - Essential System Functionality ............................................................................................

23

Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume II, Transition-to-Lean Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume II of this guide is a standalone reference model for assisting lean change agents and lean implementation teams in transforming the enterprise to a lean state. It is also of value to enterprise leaders and senior ...

Lean Advancement Initiative

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermal loading study for FY 1996. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to provide recommendations for Mined Geologic Disposal System requirements affected by thermal loading that will provide sufficient definition to facilitate development of design concepts and support life cycle cost determinations. The study reevaluated and/or redefined selected thermal goals used for design and are currently contained in the requirements documents or the Controlled Design Assumption Document. The study provided recommendations as to what, if any, actions (such as edge loading and limiting of the heat variability between waste packages) are needed and must be accommodated in the design. Additionally, the study provided recommendations as to what alternative thermal loads should be maintained for continued flexibility. Section 1 provides the study objective, background, scope, and organization of the report. Section 2 documents the requirements and standards to include quality assurance (QA) requirements, any requirements used or evaluated, and the inputs and assumptions considered. Section 3 provides the analysis and recommendations for the thermal goals reevaluation. Section 4 discusses the evaluation of edge loading and provides conclusions. Section 5 provides the analyses done to establish recommendations as to what requirements need to be implemented to either limit or manage the amount of heat output variability that may occur. Section 6 discusses alternate thermal loadings; Section 7 provides the study conclusions and recommendations; Section 8 provides the references, standards, and regulations; and Section 9 contains the acronym list.

NONE

1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Thermal properties of high-volume fly ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volume of concrete placed is receiving renewed interest. Concrete mixtures in which the fly ash replaces Academic Group on Concrete Technology, Universidad Auto´noma de Nuevo Leo´n, Monterrey, Nuevo Leo´n, Mexico are critical in assessing the potential energy efficiency of HVFA concrete structures, such as residential

Bentz, Dale P.

28

Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

D`Amelio, J.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008.

31

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008.

32

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume appendix on activity specifications is divided into the following: site preparation; barge loading facility; facility closeout and restoration; preparation for removal of reactor pressure vessel, internals, and neutron shield tank package; heavy lifting and hauling; barge transportation; and Hanford transportation. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC; ,

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated systems engineering approach is used for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for management of contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. Ten different systems encompassing several incineration design options are studied. All subsystems, including facilities, equipment, and methods needed for integration of each of the ten systems are identified. Typical subsystems needed for complete treatment of MLLW are incoming waste receiving and preparation (characterization, sorting, sizing, and separation), thermal treatment, air pollution control, primary and secondary stabilization, metal decontamination, metal melting, mercury recovery, lead recovery, and special waste and aqueous waste treatment. The evaluation is performed by developing a preconceptual design package and planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for each system. As part of the preconceptual design process, functional and operational requirements, flow sheets and mass balances, and conceptual equipment layouts are developed for each system. The PLCC components estimated are technology development, production facility construction, pre-operation, operation and maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning. Preconceptual design data and other technology information gathered during the study are examined and areas requiring further development, testing, and evaluation are identified and recommended. Using a qualitative method, each of the ten systems are ranked.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy and development in Central America. Volume II. country assesments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume presents a country-by-country energy assessment of six Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. For each country it includes an assessment of geographic, social, and economic aspects of energy development, an assessment of energy resources, current and projected energy use, potential strategies for energy development, and finally recommendations to USAID for the orientation of its energy development programs. Each country assessment is supplemented with a summary of energy R and D activities and a description of each country's energy-related institutions.

Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CACI: The Cesium-137 Agricultural Commodities Irradiator. Final design report: Volume 7, Safety analysis, thermal analysis, and thermal testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a complete description of the final detailed design of the Cesium-137 Agricultural Commodities Irradiator (CACI). The design was developed and successfully completed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The CACI project was initiated in April 1985 under DOE`s Byproducts Utilization Program, with the objectives of transferring food irradiation technology to the industry and thereby demonstrating a beneficial use for the 137 Cs nuclear by-product isotope. As designed, CACI will meet the intended requirements for research, development, and demonstration of irradiation processing of food. Further, as shown in the safety analyses performed during the project, the design conforms to all the safety and licensing requirements set forth for the project. The original scope of the CACI project included completion of its construction. However, the project was terminated for the convenience of the government during the final design phase in February 1986 for lack of a specific site. The CACI final design is described in eight volumes. This volume, Volume VII, describes Safety Analysis, Thermal Analysis, and Thermal Testing.

Not Available

1986-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

Computer code input for thermal hydraulic analysis of Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The input files to the P/Thermal computer code are documented for the thermal hydraulic analysis of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design analysis.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

FY 93 thermal loading systems study final report: Volume 1. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to meet the overall performance requirements for the proposed Mined Geology Disposal System at Yucca Mountain, Nevada requires the two major subsystem (natural barriers and engineered barriers) to positively contribute to containment and radionuclide isolation. In addition to the postclosure performance the proposed repository must meet preclosure requirements of safety, retrievability, and operability. Cost and schedule were also considered. The thermal loading strategy chosen may significantly affect both the postclosure and preclosure performance of the proposed repository. Although the current Site Characterization Plan reference case is 57 kilowatts (kW)/acre, other thermal loading strategies (different areal mass loadings) have been proposed which possess both advantages and disadvantages. The objectives of the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study were to (1) place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading regime that is ``too hot`` and the loading regime that is ``too cold``, to (2) ``grade`` or evaluate the performance, as a function of thermal loading, of the repository to contain high level wastes against performance criteria and to (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability. Additionally, the effort was to (4) identify important uncertainties that need to be resolved by tests and/or analyses in order to complete a performance assessment on the effects of thermal loading. The FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study was conducted from December 1, 1992 to December 30, 1993 and this final report provides the findings of the study. Volume 1 contains the Introduction; Performance requirements; Input and assumptions; Near-field thermal analysis; Far-field thermal analysis; Cost analysis; Other considerations; System analysis; Additional thermal analysis; and Conclusions and recommendations. 71 refs., 54 figs.

Saterlie, S.F.; Thomson, B.H.

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Focused Review of Emergency Management at the Kansas City Plant - Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management at the Emergency Management at the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance ISM Volume II OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ..............................................................................1 2.0 Results ......................................................................................3 3.0 Conclusions ..............................................................................5 4.0 Ratings ......................................................................................7 APPENDIX A - SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ..................9 APPENDIX B - SITE-SPECIFIC FINDINGS ............................10 APPENDIX C - EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM BASIS, PLAN, AND PROCEDURES .................................... 11 APPENDIX D - HAZARDS SURVEY AND HAZARDS

42

Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

Ruhter, W.D.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fundamental study for improvement of dewatering of fine coal/refuse. Annual report, July 1981-July 1982. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains appendices for: (1) tables; (2) figures; (3) major assumptions, equations, and solution description for one phase permeability module; (4) calculation of bond entry diameter; and (5) computer programs for theoretical permeability module. 58 figures, 14 tables.

Chiang, S.H.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.; Bayles, G.; Gala, H.; Kakwani, R.; Pien, H.L.; Rega, R.; Yetis, U.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1992. Volume 2, Energy production research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II includes: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thermal regulation of volume and porosity in lipid mesophases by coupling mobile ligands to soft membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short DNA linkers are increasingly being exploited for driving specific self-assembly of Brownian objects. DNA-functionalised colloids and nanoparticles can assemble into ordered or amorphous materials with tailored morphology. Recently, the same approach has been applied to compliant units, including emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles. The liquid structure of these substrates introduces new degrees of freedom: the tethers can diffuse and rearrange, radically changing the physics of the interactions. Unlike droplets, vesicles are extremely deformable and DNA-mediated adhesion causes significant shape adjustments. In this letter we investigate experimentally the thermal response of pairs and networks of DNA-tethered liposomes. We observe two intriguing and possibly useful collective properties: i) negative thermal expansion and ii) tuneable porosity of the liposome networks. A model providing a thorough understanding of this unexpected phenomenon is developed, explaining the emergent properties out of the interplay between the temperature-dependant tension of the bilayers and the DNA-mediated adhesive forces.

Lucia Parolini; Bortolo M. Mognetti; Jurij Kotar; Erika Eiser; Pietro Cicuta; Lorenzo Di Michele

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables.

Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-3010-94 December 1994 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume II - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE95004711 DOE-HDBK-3010-94

51

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations; however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume contains the input instructions for COBRA-SFS and an auxiliary radiation exchange factor code, RADX-1. It is intended to aid the user in becoming familiar with the capabilities and modeling conventions of the code.

Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE-HDBK-3010-94; Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3010-94 3010-94 December 1994 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume II - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE95004711 DOE-HDBK-3010-94 Page i VOLUME II: APPENDICES APPENDIX A

56

Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emisions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume II- Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ninth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I - Summary Report - provides...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - area volume ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stacey Ecott, Summary: to explore the concepts of volume and surface area of 3-dimensional (3D) objects. This interface supports... , this tangible interface provides an...

59

Higher-order finite volume methods II: Inf-sup condition and uniform local ellipticity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to study the construction of higher-order finite volume methods (FVMs) of triangle meshes. We investigate the relationship of the three theoretical notions crucial in the construction of FVMs: the uniform ellipticity ... Keywords: 65N12, 65N30, Finite volume methods, Uniform local ellipticity

Zhongying Chen, Yuesheng Xu, Yuanyuan Zhang

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 of the ``Survey of Strong Motion Earthquake Effects on Thermal Power Plants in California with Emphasis on Piping Systems`` contains Appendices which detail the detail design and seismic response of several power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes. The particular plants considered include the Ormond Beach, Long Beach and Seal Beach, Burbank, El Centro, Glendale, Humboldt Bay, Kem Valley, Pasadena and Valley power plants. Included is a typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical piping and support installations for the plants surveyed. Detailed piping support spacing data are also included.

Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems; Volume 6 Building America Best Practices Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

by by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 4, 2007 June 2007 * NREL/TP-550-41085 PNNL-16362 High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems Building America Best Practices Series Volume 6 High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems Building America Best Practices Series Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a DOE national laboratory Michael C. Baechler Theresa Gilbride, Kathi Ruiz, Heidi Steward and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a DOE national laboratory Pat M. Love June 4, 2007 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

62

GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

DOE/EIS-0458 VOLUME II: APPENDICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND FOR  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 VOLUME II: APPENDICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND FOR CONSTRUCTION AND STARTUP OF THE TOPAZ SOLAR FARM SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA US Department of Energy, Lead Agency Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 In Cooperation with US Army Corps of Engineers San Francisco District August 2011 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Public Scoping Appendix B PG&E Connected Action Appendix C Farmlands Correspondence and Analysis Appendix D Visual Simulation Methodology Appendix E Biological Resources, Including Section 7 Consultation Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation Appendix G Draft Wildfire Management Plan

64

Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota #12;PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

65

Negative Volume Thermal Expansion Via Orbital and Magnetic Orders in Ca2Ru1-xCrxO4(0  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ca2RuO4 undergoes a metal-insulator transition at TMI=357??K, followed by a well-separated transition to antiferromagnetic order at TN=110??K. Dilute Cr doping for Ru reduces the temperature of the orthorhombic distortion at TMI and induces ferromagnetic behavior at TC. The lattice volume V of Ca2Ru1-xCrxO4 (0volume expansion ?V/V?1%, which sharply contrasts the smooth temperature dependence of the few known examples of negative volume thermal expansion driven by anharmonic phonon modes. In addition, the near absence of volume thermal expansion between TC and TMI represents an Invar effect. The two phase transitions, which surprisingly mimic the classic freezing transition of water, suggest an exotic ground state driven by an extraordinary coupling between spin, orbit, and lattice degrees of freedom.

T. F. Qi, O. B. Korneta, S. Parkin, L. E. De Long, P. Schlottmann, and G. Cao

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

[National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1991. Volume 2, Energy production research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is submitted in two volumes, Volume I representing the work accomplished under Fuels Research and Volume II the work for Energy Production Research during the period July 1--Sept. 30, 1991. Topics covered include: chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience technology, resource assessment technology, microbial technology, environmental technology.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulic Experimental Program (STEP). Volume 1. Mixing in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume describes an experiment that was performed to determine the mixing characteristics of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. The objective of this project was to improve the subchannel computer code models of the reactor core. The experimental technique was isokinetic subchannel withdrawal of the entire flow from two sample subchannels. Once withdrawn, the sample fluid was condensed and its enthalpy was measured by regenerative heat exchange calorimetry. The test bundle was a 4 x 6 electrically heated array with a 50% power upset. The COBRA IIIC code was used to model the experiment and to determine the value of the thermal mixing coefficient, ..beta.., that was necessary to predict the measured results. Both single- and two-phase data were obtained over a range of PWR operating conditions. The results indicate that both single- and two-phase mixing is small. The COBRA model predicts the enthalpy data using a turbulent mixing coefficient, ..beta.. approx. = 0.002.

Barber, A.R.; Zielke, L.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

Not Available

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

Barbera, M. [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Dip. di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G.S. Vaiana, Palermo (Italy); Ayers, T. [Luxel Corporation, Friday Harbor (WA) (United States); Collura, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G.S. Vaiana, Palermo (Italy); Nasillo, G. [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Centro Grandi Apparecchiature, Palermo (Italy); Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Merate (Italy)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reducing Energy Costs in the Texas State Agencies: Conservation and Policy Options: Volume II – Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce it, their energy costs will be higher. In order to compare like agencies, the authors decided on the following three main classifications: A. Major Health Centers/Hospitals with Two Sub-Classifications 1. Those which produce their own thermal... energy C. Remaining State Agencies The logic behind the three main classifications was to be able to compare the agencies on a fairer basis. Major health centers and hospitals have 24-hour energy needs that most universities and state agencies, whose...

Turner, W. D.; O'Neal, D. L.; Murphy, W. E.; Subramanian, S. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- Volume II, August 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in July and August 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This volume discusses the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program. The results of the review of the WIPP environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs are discussed in Volume I of this report, and the combined results are discussed in a summary report. The results of this review indicate that, overall, CBFO and WTS have effectively addressed nearly all of the weaknesses identified during the May 2000 OA emergency management review. Furthermore, as a consequence of that effort, CBFO and WTS have implemented a hazardous material emergency management program that, with few exceptions, meets Departmental expectations for providing a system that protects responders, site workers, and the public in the event of an emergency at WIPP. Section 2 of this volume provides an overall discussion of the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program, including positive aspects, findings, and other items requiring management attention. Section 3 provides OA’s conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of CBFO and WTS management of the emergency management program. Section 4 presents the ratings assigned as a result of this review. Appendix A provides supplemental information, including team composition. Appendix B identifies the findings that require corrective action and follow-up. Appendices C- F detail the results of the reviews of individual emergency management program elements.

73

Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

none,

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Automotive Stirling engine Mod I design-review report. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume No. 2 of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I Design Review Report contains descriptions of the operating principles, performance requirements and design details of the auxiliaries and control systems for the MOD I Stirling engine system. These components and sub-systems have the following main functions: provide the required fuel and air flows for a well controlled combustion process, generating heat to the Stirling cycle; provide a driver acceptable method for controlling the power output of the engine; provide adequate lubrication and cooling water circulation; generate the electric energy required for engine and vehicle operation; provide a driver acceptable method for starting, stopping and monitoring the engine; and provide a guard system, that protects the engine at component or system malfunction.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Second generation heliostat development for solar central receiver systems detailed design report. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented are the design of the second generation heliostat, the development of the manufacturing plan, the method of transporting the heliostats from the factory to the installation site, heliostat installation procedures, and the maintenance routines. These plans are then cost estimated to provide inputs required to develop the installed cost of the heliostat and further, the cost of owning, operating and maintaining a collector field. This volume contains the following appendices: (1) bill of materials; (2) part drawings (subassemblies); (3) assembly drawings, heliostat; (4) trade studies; (5) system studies; (6) control software; (7) test results; (8) specification S-102: surface preparation, application, and inspection of protective coatings for carbon steel heliostat piles; and (9) specification S-101: installation of open end pipe piles. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Inspection of Emergency Management Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory- East, Volume II, May 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory – East (ANL-E) in April and May 2002. The OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight performed the inspection as a joint effort. This volume discusses the results of the review of the ANL-E emergency management program. The results of the review of the ANL-E environment, safety, and health programs are discussed in Volume I of this report, and the combined results are discussed in the summary report. This OA evaluation found an emergency management program in a state of transition resulting from the recent organizational, personnel, and programmatic changes. ANL has developed hazards assessments that generally serve as a good foundation for the emergency management program for the events that were analyzed, and in most cases the ICs and the emergency response center (ERC) team appropriately considered protective actions and took actions to mitigate the postulated event. Section 2 of this report provides an overall discussion of the results that characterize the ANL-E emergency management program elements that were evaluated. Section 3 provides OA’s conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of the program. Section 4 presents the ratings assigned as a result of this review. Appendix A provides supplemental information, including team member composition. Appendix B identifies the findings that require corrective actions and follow-up. Appendices C through F detail the results of the reviews of individual emergency management program elements.

78

Single-tube thermal and hydraulic tube support test. Volume 2. Appendixes. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report (volumes 1 and 2) was an experimental project to measure the inception and extent of dryout or liquid deficient heat transfer and chemical precipitation in presently used steam generator tube-tube support geometries and modified geometries. Since chemical precipitation or concentration may lead to corrosion, this program was planned to find the dependence of dryout and chemical precipitation on geometry, heat flux and fluid conditions. It was found that dryout depended principally on tube support geometry and heat flux. There was little dependence on flow rate, quality and pressure. It was found that certain tube support geometries could produce local dryout which in turn could permit significant chemical concentration. Chemical concentration was not found in the tube support geometries not exhibiting dryout. The interrelationship between the heat and mass transfer processes in the crevices was further demonstrated by comparing the results of an analytic model for predicting the shape of the liquid-vapor interface to the outline of a precipitate pattern resulting from chemical concentration.

Curlee, N.J. Jr.; Baum, A.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earlier studies have shown that although large quantities of agricultural residues are generated on small farms, it was difficult to economically justify use of conventional anaerobic digestion technology, such as used for sewage sludge digestion. A simple, unmixed, earthen-supported structure appeared to be capable of producing significant quantities of biogas at a cost that would make it competitive with many existing fuels. The goal of this study was to define and demonstrate a methane fermentation technology that could be practical and economically feasible on small farms. This study provides the first long term, large scale (reactor volumes of 34 m/sup 3/) parallel testing of the major theory, design, construction, and operation of a low cost approach to animal manure fermentation as compared to the more costly and complex designs. The main objectives were to define the lower limits for successful fermentor operation in terms of mixing, insulation, temperature, feed rate, and management requirements in a cold climate with both pilot scale and full scale fermentors. Over a period of four years, innovative fermentation processes for animal manures were developed from theoretical concept to successful full scale demonstration. Reactors were sized for 50 to 65 dairy animals, or for the one-family dairy size. The results show that a small farm biogas generation system that should be widely applicable and economically feasible was operated successfully for nearly two years. Although this low cost system out-performed the completely mixed unit throughout the study, perhaps the greatest advantage of this approach is its ease of modification, operation, and maintenance.

Jewell, W. J.; Dell'orto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Hayes, T. D.; Leuschner, A. P.; Sherman, D. F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Second Order Thermal and Momentum Immersed Boundary Method for Conjugate Heat Transfer in a Cartesian Finite Volume Solver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A conjugate heat transfer (CHT) immersed boundary (IB and CHTIB) method is developed for use with laminar and turbulent flows with low to moderate Reynolds numbers. The method is validated with the canonical flow of two co-annular rotating cylinders at $Re=50$ which shows second order accuracy of the $L_{2}$ and $L_{\\infty}$ error norms of the temperature field over a wide rage of solid to fluid thermal conductivities, $\\kappa_{s}/\\kappa_{f} = \\left(9-100\\right)$. To evaluate the CHTIBM with turbulent flow a fully developed, heated, turbulent channel $\\left(Re_{u_{\\tau}}=150\\text{ and } \\kappa_{s}/\\kappa_{f}=4 \\right)$ is used which shows near perfect correlation to previous direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The CHTIB method is paired with a momentum IB method (IBM), both of which use a level set field to define the wetted boundaries of the fluid/solid interfaces and are applied to the flow solver implicitly with rescaling of the difference operators of the finite volume (FV) method (FVM).

Crocker, Ryan; Desjardins, Olivier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

85

Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

none,

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Understanding Partition Coefficient, Kd, Values Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available Kd Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium (3H), and Uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air and Radiation Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-99-004B Environmental Protection August 1999 Agency UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium August 1999 A Cooperative Effort By: Office of Radiation and Indoor Air Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

87

In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

89

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

RETRAN-02: a program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow systems. Volume 1. Theory and numerics (Revision 2). [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RETRAN-02 represents a significant achievement in the development of a versatile and reliable computer program for use in best-estimate transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of LWR systems. The RETRAN-02 computer program is an extension of the RETRAN-01 program designed to provide analysis capabilities for: (1) BWR and PWR transients; (2) small-break loss-of-coolant accidents; (3) balance of plant modeling; and (4) anticipated transients without scram, while maintaining the analysis capabilities of the predecessor code. This report (the first of a four-volume computer code manual) describes the theory and numerical algorithms of the RETRAN-02 code. The three companion volumes describe the programming aspects, the programming details, and the verification and qualification performed with RETRAN.

McFadden, J.H.; Narum, R.E.; Peterson, C.E.; Noble, C.; Farman, R.F.; McClure, J.A.; Paulsen, M.P.; Richert, K.D.; Hughes, E.D.; Gose, G.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Proceedings of the 31. intersociety energy conversion engineering conference. Volume 2: Conversion technologies, electro-chemical technologies, Stirling engines, thermal management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 148 papers contained in Volume 2 are arranged topically as follows -- (A) Conversion Technologies: Superconductivity applications; Advanced cycles; Heat engines; Heat pumps; Combustion and cogeneration; Advanced nuclear reactors; Fusion Power reactors; Magnetohydrodynamics; Alkali metal thermal to electric conversion; Thermoelectrics; Thermionic conversion; Thermophotovoltaics; Advances in electric machinery; and Sorption technologies; (B) Electrochemical Technologies: Terrestrial fuel cell technology; and Batteries for terrestrial power; (C) Stirling Engines: Stirling machine analysis; Stirling machine development and testing; and Stirling component analysis and testing; (D) Thermal Management: Cryogenic heat transfer; Electronic components and power systems; Environmental control systems; Heat pipes; Numeric analysis and code verification; and Two phase heat and mass transfer. Papers within the scope of the data base have been processed separately.

Chetty, P.R.K.; Jackson, W.D.; Dicks, E.B. [eds.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Appendix B, Flow sheets and material balances: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document accompanies a full report which describes the testing and evaluation of ten different methods for incinerating mixed low-level radioactive wastes. It consists of flowsheets and diagrams of a rotary kiln, pyrolysis methods, a plasma furnace, a fixed hearth, and thermal desorption methods.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network, Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume begins with an Introduction summarizing the history, methodology and scope of the study, the project team members and the private and public groups consulted in the course of the study. The Load and Service Area Assessment follows, including: a compilation and analysis of existing statistical thermal load data from census data, industrial directories, PSE and G records and other sources; an analysis of responses to a detailed, 4-page thermal load questionnaire; data on public buildings and fuel and energy use provided by the New Jersey Dept. of Energy; and results of other customer surveys conducted by PSE and G. A discussion of institutional questions follows. The general topic of rates is then discussed, including a draft hypothetical Tariff for Thermal Services. Financial considerations are discussed including a report identifying alternative ownership/financing options for district heating systems and the tax implications of these options. Four of these options were then selected by PSE and G and a financial (cash-flow) analysis done (by the PSE and G System Planning Dept.) in comparison with a conventional heating alternative. Year-by-year cost of heat ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) was calculated and tabulated, and the various options compared.

Not Available

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II April 2002 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................2 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................4

98

Investigation of Thermal Decomposition as the Kinetic Process That Causes the Loss of Crystalline Structure in Sucrose Using a Chemical Analysis Approach (Part II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Thermal Decomposition as the Kinetic Process That Causes the Loss of Crystalline Structure in Sucrose Using a Chemical Analysis Approach (Part II) ... In the fast heating method, initial decomposition components, glucose (0.365%) and 5-HMF (0.003%), were found in the sucrose sample coincident with the onset temperature of the first endothermic peak. ... Three sample pans of sucrose were loaded in the DSC cell; one pan was placed on the sample platform, and the others were placed on the bottom of the DSC cell. ...

Joo Won Lee; Leonard C. Thomas; John Jerrell; Hao Feng; Keith R. Cadwallader; Shelly J. Schmidt

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE JY Colloque C5, supplkment au Journal de Physique II,Volume 5,juin 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cementation process has been developed in order to produce S i c coating on carbon materials. At high temperature shock resistance associated with low thermal expansion behaviour. A notable drawback consists in the limited resistance to oxidation of carbonaceous materials which react with oxygen to formvolatile

Boyer, Edmond

100

International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

Harrison M.

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1979. Volume II. Project listings and indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains summaries of FY 1979 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each contributing agency. Information elements included in the summary listings are project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in the back of this volume.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, December 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA), within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance (SSA), conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during October and November 2004. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Volume II of this report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for LLNL work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of NNSA, LSO, and contractor feedback and continuous improvement processes. Appendix E presents the results of the review of Plutonium Building essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of management of the selected focus areas.

103

West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

RETRAN-02: A program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow systems: Volume 1, Theory and numerics (Revision 4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RETRAN-02 represents a significant achievement in the development of a versatile and reliable computer program for use in best-estimate transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of light water reactor systems. The RETRAN-02 computer program is an extension of the RETRAN-01 program designed to provide analysis capabilities for (1) BWR and PWR transients, (2) small break loss of coolant accidents, (3) balance of plant modeling, and (4) anticipated transients without scram, while maintaining the analysis capabilities of the predecessor code. The RETRAN-02 computer code is constructed in a semimodular and dynamic dimensioned form where additions to the code can be easily carried out as new and improved models are developed. The NRC, at the request of a group of utilities, had Argonne National Laboratory perform a technical review of RETRAN-01 MOD003 and RETRAN-02 MOD002. This review was completed in May 1983, and the NRC issued a Safety Evaluation Report on RETRAN in September 1984. Revision 4 of the RETRAN-02 computer code manuals describes the MOD005 version of the code. This report (the first of a four-volume computer code manual) describes the theory and numerical algorithms of the RETRAN-02 code. The three companion volumes describe the programming details, the user input requirements and sample problem input and output files, and the verification and qualification performed with RETRAN. 186 refs., 75 figs., 30 tabs.

McFadden, J.H.; Narum, R.E.; Peterson, C.E.; Noble, C.; Farman, R.F.; McClure, J.A.; Paulsen, M.P.; Richert, K.D.; Hughes, E.D.; Gose, G.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during April and May 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. This volume of the report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for ANL work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of SC, ASO, and ANL feedback and continuous improvement processes and management systems. Appendix E presents the results of the review of essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of safety management of the selected focus areas.

108

Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

Harvey, C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Volume II. Final report, 1 November 1976-1 November 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-year research study on the constructive use of electric generating station waste heat in cooling effluents for fish production is presented. This volume specifically describes that part of the research conducted by Trenton State College. Water temperatures from the discharge canal of the Mercer Generating Station in New Jersey were blended with those from the Delaware River by pumps installed in strategic locations to achieve desired temperatures. The report further describes how recirculation is controlled during chlorination periods by activating and de-activating certain pumps. As a result of this procedure, plus an oxygen injection system, trout density was greatly increased. Techniques for growing and maintaining shrimp larvae and early juveniles in nursery systems are described. Harvest densities of the shellfish did not compare with those obtained for finfish.

Eble, A.F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A volume-limited sample of X-ray galaxy groups and clusters - II. X-ray cavity dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of our study of a volume-limited sample (z cooling time of less than3 Gyr. New X-ray cavities are detected in three sources. We focus on the subset of sources that have a central cooling time of less than 3 Gyr, whose active galactic nucleus (AGN) duty cycle is approximately 61 percent (30/49). This rises to over 80 percent for a central cooling time of less than 0.5 Gyr. When projection effects and central radio source detection rates are considered, the actual duty cycle is probably much higher. In addition, we show that data quality strongly affects the detection rates of X-ray cavities. After calculating the cooling luminosity and cavity powers of each source with cavities, it is evident that the bubbling process induced by the central AGN has to be, on average, continuo...

Panagoulia, E K; Sanders, J S; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume II. SPAHR introductory guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of responses, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projects are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the user of the SPAHR program the information required to operate the program when it is up and running on the computer. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment. It contains a brief description of all commands and options available in SPAHR, as well as a user-oriented description of the structure and operation of the control system and language processor.

Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

A semi-analytical model for heat and mass transfer in geothermal reservoirs to estimate fracture surface-are-to-volume ratios and thermal breakthrough using thermally-decaying and diffusing tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model was developed to conduct rapid scoping calculations of responses of thermally degrading and diffusing tracers in multi-well tracer tests in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The model is based on an existing Laplace transform inversion model for solute transport in dual-porosity media. The heat- and mass-transfer calculations are decoupled and conducted sequentially, taking advantage of the fact that heat transfer between fractures and the rock matrix is much more rapid than mass transfer and therefore mass transfer will effectively occur in a locally isothermal system (although the system will be nonisothermal along fracture flow pathways, which is accounted for by discretizing the flow pathways into multiple segments that have different temperature histories). The model takes advantage of the analogies between heat and mass transfer, solving the same governing equations with k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub w} being substituted for {phi}D{sub m} in the equation for fracture transport and k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub m} being subsituted for D{sub m} in the equation for matrix transport; where k = thermal conductivity (cal/cm-s-K), {rho} = density (g/cm{sup 3}), C{sub p} = heat capacity (at constant pressure) (cal/g-K), {phi} = matrix porosity, and D = tracer diffusion coefficient (cm{sup 2}/s), with the subscripts w and m referring to water and matrix, respectively. A significant advantage of the model is that it executes in a fraction of second on a single-CPU personal computer, making it very amenable for parameter estimation algorithms that involve repeated runs to find global minima. The combined thermal-mass transport model was used to evaluate the ability to estimate when thermal breakthrough would occur in a multi-well EGS configuration using thermally degrading tracers. Calculations were conducted to evaluate the range of values of Arrhenius parameters, A and E{sub {alpha}} (pre-exponential factor, 1/s, and activation energy, cal/mol) required to obtain interpretable responses of thermally-degrading tracers that decay according to the rate constant k{sub d} = Ae{sup -E{sub {alpha}}/RT}, where k{sub d} = decay rate constant (1/s), R = ideal gas constant (1.987 cal/mol-K), and T = absolute temperature (K). It is shown that there are relatively narrow ranges of A and E{sub {alpha}} that will result in readily interpretable tracer responses for any given combination of ambient reservoir temperature and working fluid residence time in a reservoir. The combined model was also used to simulate the responses of conservative tracers with different diffusion coefficients as a way of estimating fracture surface-area-to-volume ratios (SA/V) in multi-well EGS systems. This method takes advantage of the fact that the differences in breakthrough curves of tracers with different matrix diffusion coefficients are a function of SA/V. The model accounts for differences in diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature so that tracer responses obtained at different times can be used to obtain consistent estimates of SA/V as the reservoir cools down. Some single-well applications of this approach are simulated with a numerical model to demonstrate the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of EGS stimulations before a second well is drilled.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Pantex Plant, Technical Appendices, Volume II, February 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Pantex Plant during January and February 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. OA reports to the Director of the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, who reports directly to the Secretary of Energy. This volume of the report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for Pantex Plant work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of NNSA, PXSO, and BWXT feedback and continuous improvement processes and management systems. Appendix E presents the results of the review of essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of safety management of the selected focus areas.

115

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

Loferski, J.J. (ed.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal effects on Farley–Buneman waves at nonzero aspect and flow angles. II. Behavior near threshold  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the linear dispersion relation of Kissack et al. Phys. Plasmas 15 022901 (2008) the physical processes that define altitude behavior of marginally stable Farley–Buneman waves in the equatorial electrojet are investigated. The expressions derived for the angular frequency and growth rate are presented in such a way as to make it easy to track the dominant physical processes and to see the relation with earlier work. Two dimensionless parameters are identified that are helpful in showing the transition between altitude and wavelength domains where different thermal processes dominate. The difference in phase velocity between vertical and off-vertical transmissions (zero versus nonzero flow angles) is found to be due to Dimant–Sudan effects which are preferentially less important at higher altitudes and shorter wavelengths.

R. S. Kissack; L. M. Kagan; J.-P. St.-Maurice

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermal effects on Farley-Buneman waves at nonzero aspect and flow angles. II. Behavior near threshold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the linear dispersion relation of Kissack et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 022901 (2008), the physical processes that define altitude behavior of marginally stable Farley-Buneman waves in the equatorial electrojet are investigated. The expressions derived for the angular frequency and growth rate are presented in such a way as to make it easy to track the dominant physical processes and to see the relation with earlier work. Two dimensionless parameters are identified that are helpful in showing the transition between altitude and wavelength domains where different thermal processes dominate. The difference in phase velocity between vertical and off-vertical transmissions (zero versus nonzero flow angles) is found to be due to Dimant-Sudan effects, which are preferentially less important at higher altitudes and shorter wavelengths.

Kissack, R. S.; Kagan, L. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); St-Maurice, J.-P. [Department of Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

VOLUME 85, NUMBER 10 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 4 SEPTEMBER 2000 Thermal Roughening of a Thin Film: A New Type of Roughening Transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOLUME 85, NUMBER 10 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 4 SEPTEMBER 2000 Thermal Roughening of a Thin Film: A New Type of Roughening Transition J. B. Maxson,1 D. E. Savage,1 Feng Liu,1 R. M. Tromp,2 M roughening of thin Ge layers (one and two monolayers) deposited on Si(001) has been investigated with low

Liu, Feng

120

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand and Methods, End?UserEnergy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis Division.California Energy Commission, Electricity Analysis Division.

Wei, Max

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. II. HYDRODYNAMIC SCALING LAWS AND THERMAL ENERGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we measure physical parameters of the same set of 155 M- and X-class solar flares observed with AIA/SDO as analyzed in Paper I, by performing a differential emission measure analysis to determine the flare peak emission measure EM{sub p} , peak temperature T{sub p} , electron density n{sub p} , and thermal energy E{sub th}, in addition to the spatial scales L, areas A, and volumes V measured in Paper I. The parameter ranges for M- and X-class flares are log (EM{sub p}) = 47.0-50.5, T{sub p} = 5.0-17.8 MK, n{sub p} = 4 × 10{sup 9}-9 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –3}, and thermal energies of E{sub th} = 1.6 × 10{sup 28}-1.1 × 10{sup 32} erg. We find that these parameters obey the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law T{sub p}{sup 2}?n{sub p} L and H?T {sup 7/2} L {sup –2} during the peak time t{sub p} of the flare density n{sub p} , when energy balance between the heating rate H and the conductive and radiative loss rates is achieved for a short instant and thus enables the applicability of the RTV scaling law. The application of the RTV scaling law predicts power-law distributions for all physical parameters, which we demonstrate with numerical Monte Carlo simulations as well as with analytical calculations. A consequence of the RTV law is also that we can retrieve the size distribution of heating rates, for which we find N(H)?H {sup –1.8}, which is consistent with the magnetic flux distribution N(?)??{sup –1.85} observed by Parnell et al. and the heating flux scaling law F{sub H} ?HL?B/L of Schrijver et al.. The fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model in conjunction with the RTV scaling law reproduces the observed power-law distributions and their slopes for all geometrical and physical parameters and can be used to predict the size distributions for other flare data sets, instruments, and detection algorithms.

Aschwanden, Markus J. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimizu, Toshifumi, E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com, E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

NTS Volume 2 - Clean Edit.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada Test Site Nevada Test Site Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy October 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE VOLUME II October 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

124

I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New York, [Isin 25] E . Ising, Z. Phys. 31, 253 (1925). [d e d V o l u m e Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions andl u d e d Volume Effects i n Ising Cluster Distributions and

Breus, Dimitry E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

RETRAN-02: A program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow systems: Volume 5, Modeling guidelines: Computer code manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RETRAN is a computer code designed to perform overall system response analyses of reactor power plants. The RETRAN code uses plant geometry, initial thermal-hydraulic states, component data, control function descriptions, and physics data as input to calculate the overall plant system thermal-hydraulic response during a transient. Where additional detail is required, the overall system response calculated by RETRAN can be used as a boundary condition for the detailed analysis.

Harrison, J.F.; Farman, R.F.; Peterson, C.E.; Jensen, P.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NTS Volume 2 - Clean Edit.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada Test Site Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy October 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY...

128

Journal of Asian Electric Vehicles, Volume 8, Number 1, June 2010 Simplified Thermal Model of PM Motors in Hybrid Vehicle Applications Taking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to develop a complete and representative model of the heat processes in the electric motors. In this paper in Ansoft ePhysics soft- ware. Keywords hybrid electric vehicle, surface permanent magnet synchronous motors needs to be thor- oughly understood. The optimal design of electrical motors with solid thermal

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

129

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Enhanced oil recovery: miscible flooding; thermal methods; and process implementation. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The individual papers in this volume covering miscible flooding, thermal methods, and process implementation were indexed.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

RELAP5/MOD3 code manual. Volume 4, Models and correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5 code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I presents modeling theory and associated numerical schemes; Volume II details instructions for code application and input data preparation; Volume III presents the results of developmental assessment cases that demonstrate and verify the models used in the code; Volume IV discusses in detail RELAP5 models and correlations; Volume V presents guidelines that have evolved over the past several years through the use of the RELAP5 code; Volume VI discusses the numerical scheme used in RELAP5; and Volume VII presents a collection of independent assessment calculations.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Calibrating DOE-2 to Weather and Non-Weather-Dependent Loads for a Commercial Building: Data Processing Routines to Calibrate a DOE-2 Model, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-92-04/02 CALIBRATING DOE-2 TO WEATHER AND NON-WEATHER-DEPENDENT LOADS FOR A COMMERCIAL BUILDING, VOLUME 2: DATA PROCESSING ROUTINES TO CALIBRATE A DOE-2 MODEL Written by: John Douglas Bronson May 1992 (C) Copyright 1992 Texas Engineering... Plots 8 Temperature-Specific Humidity Carpet Plots 11 'PACKING' SITE MONITORED WEATHER DATA INTO TRY 16 APPENDIX A -- Data Processing Routines' Example Data Files and Routine Hard-copies 21 APPENDIX B -- Example Data Files and Progam Hard-copies to Pack...

Bronson, J. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Proceedings of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. Volume 4: Natural convection within a horizontal circular cylinder heated from below and cooled from above; Numerical methods for coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction; Thermal analysis in waste processing and disposal; Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems; HTD-Volume 335  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first two sections as listed in the title contain 7 papers. The third section on thermal analysis contains 18 papers arranged into the following topical areas: Thermal treatment and municipal wastes; Thermal hydraulics in hazardous and nuclear waste processing and disposal; and Waste processing. Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems contains 17 papers arranged into the following topical sections: Soot/radiation; Combustion systems; Multiphase combustion; and Flames and fires. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Pepper, D.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Douglass, R.W. [ed.] [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heinrich, J.C. [ed.] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fiscal year 1985 Department of Energy authorization (high-energy and nuclear physics). Volume II-B. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 22, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II-B of the DOE authorization hearings for fiscal year 1985 covers testimony on high-energy and nuclear physics programs. The volume opens with a continuation of Appendix I, which contains questions directed at Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece and his responses on research at several laboratories and four construction projects. The latter include general plant projects, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Transfer Line, and the University Accelerator Upgrade at the University of Washington and Yale. Two 1983 DOE/National Science Foundation reports make up Appendix II. The volume concludes with the text of the 1985 budget request for $746,105,000 and a breakdown of line item expenditures.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process development studies in coal gasification. Volume II. Reaction of aromatic compounds with steam. Final report, August 1, 1979-November 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research has been to explore and define the potential of steam reforming to produce light gases from coal-derived liquids. This was achieved through a study of the reaction of a model aromatic compound and of a coal-derived liquid with steam over an alumina supported nickel catalyst. The reaction of steam with benzene and SRC-II liquids over an alumina supported nickel catalyst has been investigated in a plug flow reactor. The primary process variables investigated were reactor pressure and temperature, contact time, and steam/carbon ratio. A proposed reaction network was also developed to explain the data obtained in this study. The effect of process variables on the conversion and product distribution when steam reforming the SRC-II coal-derived liquid was similar to that observed for benzene-steam reforming. The results indicated that a high yield of methane is favored at high pressures, low temperatures, and low steam-to-carbon ratios; and that a high yield of hydrogen is favored at low pressures and high steam-to-carbon ratios. The empirical rate equation for the benzene steam reforming reaction at 973 K, 300 psig, and a steam/carbon ratio of approximately 3 was r/sub C/sub 6/H/sub 6// = 1.92 x 10/sup -3/ P/sub C/sub 6/H/sub 6//. The activation energy was 88 KJ/mol, or 21 kcal/mol in the temperature range 748-973 K. A correlation was developed to predict product yields and hydrocarbon conversion over the range of process variables investigated. A second correlation was developed to predict the yields and conversion beyond the range of variables investigated. A reaction network for aromatic steam reforming was proposed. 87 refs., 47 figs., 3 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.

1984-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermal properties for the thermal-hydraulics analyses of the BR2 maximum nominal heat flux.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This memo describes the assumptions and references used in determining the thermal properties for the various materials used in the BR2 HEU (93% enriched in {sup 235}U) to LEU (19.75% enriched in {sup 235}U) conversion feasibility analysis. More specifically, this memo focuses on the materials contained within the pressure vessel (PV), i.e., the materials that are most relevant to the study of impact of the change of fuel from HEU to LEU. This section is regrouping all of the thermal property tables. Section 2 provides a summary of the thermal properties in form of tables while the following sections present the justification of these values. Section 3 presents a brief background on the approach used to evaluate the thermal properties of the dispersion fuel meat and specific heat capacity. Sections 4 to 7 discuss the material properties for the following materials: (i) aluminum, (ii) dispersion fuel meat (UAlx-Al and U-7Mo-Al), (iii) beryllium, and (iv) stainless steel. Section 8 discusses the impact of irradiation on material properties. Section 9 summarizes the material properties for typical operating temperatures. Appendix A elaborates on how to calculate dispersed phase's volume fraction. Appendix B shows the evolution of the BR2 maximum heat flux with burnup.

Dionne, B.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L. (Nuclear Engineering Division) [Nuclear Engineering Division

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

BODYFIT-2PE-HEM: LWR core thermal-hydraulic code using boundary-fitted coordinates and two-phase homogeneous equilibrium model. Volume 3: validation and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BODYFIT-2PE-HEM code was used to simulate several Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) types of experiments to validate its applicability and accuracy. Five simulations are reported in this volume. The first comparison was between the closed form analytical solution and the BODYFIT calculation of 3-D flows in an inifinite square array of circular tubes. Both the velocity profiles along symmetry lines and Nusselt numbers as a function of the entrance distance were given in the report. The second simulation was on the Columbia University 4 x 4 rod bundle experiment with a power skew of 2 to 1. The calculated mass flow rates and qualities for both hot and cold subchannels at the exit of the rod bundle were compared with the experimental isokinetic measurements. The third simulation was on the Babcock and Wilcox 4 x 6 rod bundle experiments with a power skew of 1.5 to 1. Again, the calculated mass flow rates and qualities for both hot and cold subchannels at the exit of the rod bundle were compared with the experimental isokinetic measurements. The fourth simulation was on the Westinghouse 4 x 5 rod bundle critical heat flux experiments and transient pressure drop tests. In this simulation, the critical heat fluxes calculated by the code with several CHF correlations were compared with the experimental measurements. Furthermore, the pressure drops, as a function of time, were compared with the experimental values for the flow rundown transients. The fifth simulation was on the GE 3 x 3 CHF experiments. Many operating conditions with different inlet temperatures, inlet velocities, and system pressures were used in the experiments. Code calculations were based on the Biasi correlation and the Columbia University correlation. Comparisons between calcuations and measurements show good agreements, demonstrating the validity and accuracy of the BODYFIT-2PE-HEM code. 14 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008. This volume is a compilation of field reports of the eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008. The field reviews focused on collecting data by reviewing nanomaterial program documents, observing activities involving nanomaterials, conducting facility walkthroughs, and interviewing personnel. The data for each site was analyzed and subject to an internal HSS quality review board. Reports were validated with site representatives and revised as appropriate to ensure factual accuracy. Closeout meetings were conducted with DOE site managers and laboratory management to discuss results. The individual sites are responsible for evaluating and addressing weaknesses identified on the field reviews.

142

Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

Topping, R.F.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Typical Commercial Building Thermal Energy Distribution Design Load Intensities (Watts per SF) Distribution System Fans Other Central System Supply Fans Cooling Tower Fan Central System Return Fans Air-Cooled Chiller Condenser Fan 0.6 Terminal Box Fans 0.5 Exhaust Fans (2) Fan-Coil Unit Fans (1) Condenser Fans 0.6 Packaged or Split System Indoor Blower 0.6 Pumps Chilled Water Pump Condenser Water Pump Heating Water Pump Note(s): Source(s): 0.1 - 0.2 0.1 - 0.2 1) Unducted units are lower than those with some ductwork. 2) Strong dependence on building type. BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II:Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table 3-1, p. 3-6. 0.3 - 1.0 0.1 - 0.3 0.1 - 0.4

145

Diploma Thesis Stochastic Investigation of the Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diploma Thesis Stochastic Investigation of the Thermal Behavior of Lithium-Ion Batteries Submitted Bibliography 55 Nomenclature 59 ii ii #12;List of Figures 1.1 Thermal runaway of a lithium-ion battery of this Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Lithium-Ion Batteries 5 2

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

146

Volume Tracking  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" ,"Daily Period",,"Containment Total" ,"Oil","Gas","Oil","Gas" "End Period","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Rate","Rate","Cumulative","Cumulative" "MM/DD/YY 00:00","(bo)","(mmcf)","(bbls)","(mmcf)","Comment" 40333,16.486,0,16.486,0,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40334,6060.70543,15.666,6077.19143,15.666,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40335,10496.19429,22.00800001,16573.38572,37.674,"Oil rate based on metered volume"

147

WIPP SEIS-II - Main Menu  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Start Here Start Here Volume III Comment Response Document Summary Supplement Volume I Volume I Chapters Supplement Volume II Volume II Appendices MAIN MENU To view a particular volume of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, click on the corresponding box. NOTE Volume III, the Comment Response Document, contains links to original comments and to DOE responses. Tips for using those links are contained in a note represented by the following icon: When you see this icon, double-click on it to read the tips. To return to this menu at any time, click on the first bookmark called "Main Menu" in every volume. To return to the "Start Here" file, which contains instructions for navigating through Acrobat Reader, click here

148

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: User`s guide and input requirements. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. Volume II contains detailed instructions for code application and input data preparation.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Units; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer Creeksresults for rainwater, creeks, stormwater, and wastewater.4-3 Creek, Rainwater, and Stormwater Sampling Locations in

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 2005 • R-6 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 16 USC §703 (Supp.Preservation Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act WATER AND ENERGYAct. 3.4.12 Migratory Bird Treaty Act The federal Migratory

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tetrachloroethene (PCE), TCE, carbon tetrachloride, andmost of which are products of PCE and TCE degradation. Theprimarily consisted of PCE (42,000 µg/L) and TCE (33,300 µg/

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

external radiation from naturally occurring radioactivity ininternal radiation from naturally occurring radioactiveRemediation Radiation emitted by naturally occurring

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment) 2 The comprehensive Environmental Monitoring Plan

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microsoft Word - Vol II-091009.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Volume II Volume II Institutional Controls Plan April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 4 Final This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Grand Junction 24-hour Monitored Security Telephone Number (877) 695-5322 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-4.0-Final Volume II-Institutional Controls Plan April 2010 Page i Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1-1

157

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Lake Charles, Louisiana. She relocated to Beau- mont in 1981 and began dating a long-time friend, Ricky Tribble. They were married in January, 1983 and their eldest son, Brandon, was born on November 2, 1983. In 1984, Ricky and Cynthia relocated to Dal...- las to open a video retail business. Their youngest son, Christopher, was born on December 2, 1985. In 1988, after much success in the video retail industry, they sold their business and settled in Gilchrist, where they currently reside. Brandon...

158

Volume II, Chapter 5 Elochoman Subbasin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.2 Fall Chinook--Elochoman Subbasin (Mill/Abernathy/Germany)....................... 5-7 5.2.3 Coho (Mill/Abernathy/Germany) ................................. 5-13 5.2.5 Chum--Elochoman Subbasin.2.7 Winter Steelhead--Elochoman Subbasin (Mill/Abernathy/Germany) .............. 5-21 5.2.8 Cutthroat Trout

159

Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Units; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer AmbientAir Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer Fixedsection Creeks Stormwater Ambient Air; Rainwater Ambient Air

Lackner, Regina E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station will be held Tuesday July 2nd starting at 4:00pm. Speakers will include Anna McClung on variety improvement, Mike Chandler on Command rates and timing, Garry McCauley on the Clearfield varieties, and MO Way on insecticide use. The evening meal... AM University will discuss their latest research findings during the field tour. Anna McClung will provide an update on the latest varieties, Gary McCauley will present information on the performance of herbicide tolerant varieties, and will discuss...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.ifoam.org National Organic Program http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture http://kerrcenter.com Texas Department of Agriculture http://www.agr.state.tx.us Seeds of Change http://store.yahoo.com/seedsofchange/index.html National Center...://www.ifoam.org National Organic Program http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture http://kerrcenter.com Texas Department of Agriculture http://www.agr.state.tx.us Seeds of Change http://store.yahoo.com/seedsofchange/index.html National Center...

162

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

innovative de- cisions that have brought more income to the corpora- tion at a time when many businesses in the rice indus- try are struggling for survival. One example is the leasing agreement with Formosa Plastics, whereby space at RBW storage facilities... for over 100 years. He is currently attend- ing Lamar University and is engaged to be married in July. His fiancée, Brianne Halling, is on full scholarship for vol- leyball at the University of Alaska. After she graduates in December the couple plans...

163

Volume II, Issue 4 your connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

us choose our direction as a community for responsible energy, water, and materials consumption ­ 2010. #12;ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LabLink is a monthly publication from Brookhaven National Lab by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science Every Day Actions You Can

164

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- mercial varieties). 6. Rogue red rice escapes. 7. Roll and flood CLEARFIELD fields after harvest to promote germination of red rice seed. 8. If red rice is present at harvest, do not ratoon as this will increase the chances of synchronous pol- lination...

165

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page SW-2 • Site Environmental Report for 2008 StormwaterPage SD-1 • Site Environmental Report for 2008 SedimentNational Laboratory Site Environmental Report for 2008

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Volume II, Issue 2 February 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of dark matter, dark energy, and the standard cosmological model. One of the tools they'll be using the properties of the mysterious dark energy and to test Einstein's theory of gravity over enor- mous distances www.lsst.org. Rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope #12;ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Lab

Johnson, Peter D.

167

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-month period. Records indicate that the 2 From the Editor... Inside This Issue Researcher in the News: Shannon Pinson ..........................3 Spotlight on Support ..........................................................6 Grower Profile: Garrett Farms....S. and abroad. Shan- non began her work on the gene-mapping population when she first arrived in Beaumont, and to date there are over 300 lines in the population stabilized at the F15 stage. The population gives researchers a way to efficiently de- termine...

168

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.128 trillion in 2003. Over the next 10 years, the US federal budget is expected to total $24.087 trillion. During this same period of time, expenditures on the Farm Bill are ex- pected to reach between $180 billion (2002 House Agriculture Committee Report...) and $275 billion (USDA FAS web site). A question often raised, is the Farm Bill money well spent, depends on ones perspective. Unlike many sectors of our economy, US agriculture provides a trade surplus estimated at $18 billion for 2002. US agriculture...

169

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................... .....................................6 Grower Profile: Hlavinka Cattle Company .......................7 Extension in the News: Rick Jahn ....................................10 Pest of the Month: Channeled Applesnail ........................12 High Yielder Tips..., not to exceed the life of the assets being financed. Owner(s) must provide at least 25% equity of total project. While interviewing Texas Cooperative Extension Agent Rick Jahn, I learned of a potential TAFA project that highlights the role of Extension...

170

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

171

41146_R01_Volume I.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 i GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

172

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microsoft Word - SRS - Em Mgt Vol II FINAL.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE Volume II February 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE AND SAVANNAH RIVER SITE Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 3 3.0 Conclusions............................................................................................................................................

174

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same m...

Saint-Hilaire, P; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Benz, Arnold O.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Volume State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 22 Volume State State or Country From/To Receipts/ Imports From Deliveries/ Exports To Net a Alabama Florida .................................................................. 0 722,558 -722,558 Georgia................................................................. 0 1,352,308 -1,352,308 Gulf of Mexico....................................................... 123,132 0 123,132 Mississippi ............................................................ 2,758,595 0 2,758,595 Tennessee............................................................ 1,744 764,749 -763,005 Total..................................................................... 2,883,471 2,839,615 43,856

176

Thermal Conductivity of High-Modulus Polymer Fibers Xiaojia Wang,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be the dominate carriers of heat. 1. INTRODUCTION Polymeric materials typically have a low thermal conductivity transfer is critical are often limited by low thermal conductivity. Here, we leverage the enormous research and low-density PE with varying fiber volume fractions.11 They reported an axial thermal conductivity

Cahill, David G.

177

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 6. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 05. 5B - double-ended cold-leg break simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.05.5B was conducted by members of the ORNL PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program on July 3, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.05.5B was designed to provide transient thermal-hydraulics data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. Reduced instrument responses are presented. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.; Schwinkendorf, K.N.

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Thermal History of the Earth with consideration of the Variable Thermal Conductivity of its Mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the data about electric conductivity...give no thermal resistance and the integral...the number of elementary cells in I cm3...of heat in an elementary volume v k cm3...inverse to the resistances:the thermal...the hydraulic resistance determining...charge,h-electric conductivity......

H. A. Lubimova

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

State Volume  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama...................... 111,656 2,614 114,270 4,476 5,810 18,610 Alaska ......................... 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 148,444 Arkansas..................... 214,868 161 215,029 237 474 977 California..................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 41,037 Colorado ..................... 493,748 1,249 494,997 16,891 23,420 63,411 Florida......................... 5,900 0 5,900 1,130 1,143 4,202 Illinois.......................... 578 0 578 63 64 271 Kansas........................ 825,825 2,731 828,556 30,617 41,115 120,221 Kentucky .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermal Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

183

Microsoft Word - Pantex Volume 2 - Technical Appendices - FINAL.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume II Technical Appendices February 2005 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume II Technical Appendices Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Appendix C - Core Function Implementation (Core Functions 1-4) ........................................................... 1 Appendix D - Feedback and Continuous Improvement (Core Function 5) ............................................... 39 Appendix E - Safety System Functionality

184

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Methane adsorption comparison of different thermal maturity kerogens in shale gas system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To determine the effect of thermal maturity on the methane sorption in shale gas system, two different thermal maturity kerogens of type II isolated from Barnett shale of Fort Worth Basin were used to...

Haiyan Hu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Assessment of Microbial Fouling in an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Press Inc., New York. 14. Hirshman...Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...Press Inc., New York. 24. Mathis...Ocean thermal energy: the biggest...Department of Energy, part II. U...Pergamon Press, New York. 28. Perrigo...

R. Paul Aftring; Barrie F. Taylor

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume II--Technical Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality January 2008-December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction is calculated to be 6 tons-NOx/day (19.2%), savings from retrofits to Federal buildings is 0.42 tons- NOx/day (1.3%), savings from furnace pilot light retrofits is 0.32 tons-NOx/day (1.0%), savings from the PUC?s Senate Bill 5 and Senate Bill 7... programs is 3.82 tons-NOx/day (12.1%), savings from SECO?s Senate Bill 5 program is 0.92 tons-NOx/day (2.9%), electricity savings from green power purchases (wind) 2008 TERP Report, Vol. II, p. 4 December 2009 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

190

Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

Newman, J. E.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3. 07. 9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 3. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 06. 6B - transient film boiling in upflow. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hyraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.06.6B. This test was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water-Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on August 29, 1980. The objective of the program was to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWR's during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.06.6B was conducted to obtain transient film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses for THTF Test 3.06.6B available. Included in the report are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

FY 2010 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site .......................................................................................................................................21

196

FY 2012 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Volume 7 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Nuclear Energy D f N l W t Di l Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 7 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 7 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ........................................................................................................... 3

197

INDEX TO VOLUME 43:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Volume 43 Index To Volume 43 INDEX TO VOLUME 43 Anderson, J...Farsi, C., K-theoretical index theorems for orbifolds...303 313 201 45 441 223 227 INDEX TO VOLUME 43 Holroyd, F...Lowen, R. and Robeys, K., Completions of produets of metrie spaees......

Index To Volume 43

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

FY 2012 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0060 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview ...................................................................................................................................................7

199

State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID..................... 830,351 3.79 802,182 4.71 759,647 2.83 R 623,652 4.72 707,885 5.30 Calais, ME ...................... 123,521 4.50 152,486 4.47 124,991 3.49 R 115,301 R 5.85 102,292 6.44 Detroit, MI ....................... 6,171 3.82 405 9.34 1,948 3.56 2,514 5.96 1,117 6.27 Marysville, MI.................. 0 -- 0 -- 74 3.95 0 -- 303 7.80 St. Clair, MI..................... 17,198 4.45 21,747 4.54 28,441 3.19 5,202 5.84 22,853 6.50 International Falls, MN .... 3,022 2.77 617 4.85 602 3.01 0 -- 0 -- Noyes, MN...................... 469,361 3.75 448,898 4.19 402,621 3.09 R 359,801 5.04 399,298 5.77 Warroad, MN .................. 4,576 3.95 5,318 4.52

200

Characterization of Thermally Degraded Energetic Materials: Mechanical and Chemical Behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of recent experiments on thermally degraded HMX and HMX/binder materials. Small-scale samples were heated confined in either constant-volume or load- controlled configurations. A main emphasis of the work reported here is developing an understanding of the complex coupling of the mechanical and chemical responses during thermal degradation.

Miller, J.C.; Renlund, A.M.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Feedback under the microscope – II. Heating, gas uplift and mixing in the nearest cluster core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......volume-averaged way would overheat the surrounding gas and is...cool and hot gas phases are in thermal communication. The emission...volume-averaged heating mechanism would overheat the surrounding gas and can...keV. By helping to get hot thermal particles into contact with......

N. Werner; A. Simionescu; E. T. Million; S. W. Allen; P. E. J. Nulsen; A. von der Linden; S. M. Hansen; H. Böhringer; E. Churazov; A. C. Fabian; W. R. Forman; C. Jones; J. S. Sanders; G. B. Taylor

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, Volume 2 8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables . National Statistics 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance PDF TXT 2 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF TXT 3 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Stocks PDF TXT . Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 4 PAD District I PDF TXT 5 Daily Average PAD District I PDF TXT 6 PAD District II PDF TXT 7 Daily Average PAD District II PDF TXT 8 PAD District III PDF TXT 9 Daily Average PAD District III PDF TXT 10 PAD District IV PDF TXT 11 Daily Average PAD District IV PDF TXT 12 PAD District V PDF TXT

204

Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures part II: Experimental comparisons and verification of methods. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported herein continued to concentrate on in situ conductivity measurements for development into an accelerated screening method for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The work reported herein was performed in two phases. In the first phase, sealed tubes were prepared with steel catalysts and mixtures of CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HFC-32/HFC-134a (zeotrope 30:70) refrigerants with oils as described in ANSI/ASHRAE Method 97-1989. In the second phase of work, modified sealed tubes, with and without steel catalysts present, were used to perform in situ conductivity measurements on mixtures of CFC-12 refrigerant with oils. The isothermal in situ conductivity measurements were compared with conventional tests, e.g., color measurements, gas chromatography, and trace metals to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Other sets of tests were performed using ramped temperature conditions from 175{degrees}C (347{degrees}F) to 205{degrees}C (401{degrees}F) to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for detecting the onset of rapid degradation in CFC-12, HCFC-22 and HFC-134a refrigerant mixtures with naphthenic oil aged with and without steel catalysts present.

Kauffman, R. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

FY 2007 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Environmental management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental management Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .........................................................................................................3 Overview................................................................................................................................................5 Defense Environmental Cleanup Appropriation Cleanup .................................................................107 Carlsbad

206

FY 2009 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site

207

FY 2008 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Strategic Overview....................................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

208

FY 2011 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Science FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

209

FY 2013 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Appropriation Language .......................................................................................................................................................... 5

210

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

211

Computer News, Volume 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

212

FY 2011 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

213

Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MERCURY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MERCURY 6:30 p.m. Fitness Center Dombard A. J. Hauck S. A. II Despinning Plus Global Contraction and the Orientation of Lobate Scarps on Mercury [#2026] We thermal models of Mercury. King S. D. A Possible Connection Between Convection in Mercury's Mantle

Rathbun, Julie A.

214

FY 2012 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Volume 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

215

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

216

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

"Sythesis of metal sulfide nanomaerials via thermal decomposition of single-source percursors"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bisdiethyldithiocarbamate (Cu(II)[S 2 CNC 4 H 10 ] 2 ). Thisreported that Cu(II)[S 2 CNC 4 H 10 ] 2 thermally decomposesof this molecule, Cu(II)[S 2 CNC 4 H 10 ] 2 , to solid Cu 2

Ilan, Jen-La Plante

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy Partitions and Evolution in a Purely Thermal Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free-free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally-deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to ne...

Fleishman, Gregory D; Gary, Dale E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

222

FY 2013 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0072 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

223

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

FY 2007 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chief Financial Officer Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget

225

FY 2010 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Department of Energy FY 2010Congressional Budget Environmental Management/ Defense Nuclear Waste/Nuclear Waste Disposal Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

226

FY 2013 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-0076 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

227

FY 2007 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents

228

FY 2013 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Department of Energy/Science/ Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3

229

FY 2008 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

230

FY 2006 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund

231

FY 2010 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

232

FY 2012 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 3 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

233

FY 2005 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0032 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Printed with soy ink on recycled paper National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

234

FY 2009 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

235

FY 2010 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2010 Congressional Budget

236

FY 2012 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Better Building Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities Schools and Hospitals Universities, Schools, and Hospitals Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 g y Pensions Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

237

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

238

Computer News, Volume 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

239

Computer News, Volume 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

240

Computer News, Volume 34  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Computer News, Volume 27  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

242

Computer News, Volume 35  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

243

Computer News, Volume 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

244

Computer News, Volume 38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

245

Computer News, Volume 21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

246

Computer News, Volume 37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

247

Computer News, Volume 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

248

Computer News, Volume 32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bañuelos

249

Computer News, Volume 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

250

Computer News, Volume 20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

251

Computer News, Volume 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

252

Computer News, Volume 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

253

Computer News, Volume 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

254

Computer News, Volume 39  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

255

Computer News, Volume 19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

256

Computer News, Volume 25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 25. TeX for Mac OS X. plus ssh and security issues for Macs. by Rodrigo Bañuelos. NOTE: These instructions are now ...

257

Proceedings of the 6. international conference on stability and handling of liquid fuels. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 1 of these proceedings contain 29 papers related to aviation fuels and long term and strategic storage. Studies investigated fuel contamination, separation processes, measurement techniques, thermal stability, compatibility with fuel system materials, oxidation reactions, and degradation during storage.

Giles, H.N. [ed.] [Deputy Assistant Secretary for Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Washington, DC (United States). Operations and Readiness Office

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Windows The Windows Volume Purchase RFP to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on AddThis.com... Home About FAQs Low-E Storm Windows Request for Proposal Contacts For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers

259

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Characterization of thermally degraded energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the damage state of a thermally degraded energetic material (EM) is a critical first step in understanding and predicting cookoff behavior. Unfortunately, the chemical and mechanical responses of heated EMs are closely coupled, especially if the EM is confined. The authors have examined several EMs in small-scale experiments (typically 200 mg) heated in both constant-volume and constant-load configurations. Fixtures were designed to minimize free volume and to contain gas pressures to several thousand psi. The authors measured mechanical forces or displacements that correlated to thermal expansion, phase transitions, material creep and gas pressurization as functions of temperature and soak time. In addition to these real-time measurements, samples were recovered for postmortem examination, usually with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. The authors present results on EMs (HMX and TATB), with binders (e.g., PBX 9501, PBX 9502, LX-14) and propellants (Al/AP/HTPB).

Renlund, A.M.; Miller, J.C.; Trott, W.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.; Baer, M.R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--Part I: effective thermal conductivity and background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier’s law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as nonlinear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coeffcient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier’s law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or suffcient.

Massoudi, Mehrdad

2006-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Calculus For Technology II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22200, Spring 2012. Calculus For Technology II ... Other Information. Emergency procedures · Exam info (A Hoffman) ...

263

FY 2012 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration

264

Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench-scale. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. The project is on schedule and on budget. Task 4, a bench-scale demonstration of the ultra-fast TSA system is complete. Rapid thermal swing of an adsorbent bed using microchannels has been successfully demonstrated and the separation of a 70% methane and 30% nitrogen was purified to 92% methane. The bench-scale demonstration unit was small relative to the system dead volume for the initial phase of experiments and a purge step was added to sweep the dead volume prior to desorbing the bed and measuring purity. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system design and cost. The selected adsorbent, granular microporous carbon from either Barnaby-Sutcliffe or Calgon, experimentally demonstrated sufficient methane capacity under differential temperature at 100 pounds per square inch gauge. Several valve options were identified, including candidates that can operate millions of cycles between refurbishment. The microchannel adsorber and desorber designs were made using internal Velocys manufacturability standards, and the associated costs are acceptable as included with the complete nitrogen rejection unit (NRU) cost projection. A system design and cost estimate was completed for the NRU section of the methane upgrading system. As integrated into the complete system, the cost is in line with the market requirement.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Microsoft Word - Vol II.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 2013 January 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 6 Final This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Legacy Management 24-hour Monitored Security Telephone Number (877) 695-5322 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-6.0-Final Volume II-Institutional Controls Plan January 2013 Page i Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................1-1

266

Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

Tuli, J.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume II (geopressure thesaurus). Second Edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. It is a compilation of terms displaying synomymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system - the system vocabulary. The function of this thesaurus is to provide a standardized vocabulary for the information storage and retrieval system to facilitate both the indexing and subject-searching processes. In indexing, a thesaurus is used to translate the natural language of the document to be indexed into the standardized system vocabulary and to place the document at the appropriate level of generality or specificity in relation to the other documents in the data base. In subject retrieval, the thesaurus is used to match the natural language used in search requests with the system vocabulary and to find the most appropriate term to represent a concept.

Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Kid's Times: Volume II, Issue 8 Sperm Whale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are named for the spermaceti oil (wax) that they produce in the spermaceti organs located in their head, and over continental slopes. While they are usu- ally found offshore, they can be found near shore where as far north and south as the edges of the polar regions to feed. Fe- males and males of all ages can

269

Assessment of the basic energy sciences program. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A list of experts reviewing the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program and their organizations are given. The assessment plan is explained; the program examined the following: quality of science being conducted in the program, quality of performers supported by the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program, and the impact of the research on mission oriented needs. The intent of the assessment is to provide an indication of general status relative to these questions for the BES divisions. The approach to the assessment is described. The sampling plan which was used as a guide in determining the sample size and selecting the sample to evaluate the research program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are discussed. Special analyses were conducted on the dispersion of reviewers' ratings, the ratings of the lower funded projects, and the amount of time the principal investigator devoted to the project. These are presented in the final appendix together with histograms for individual rating variables for each program area. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume VI, Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the following: report of remaining contractor work, predecessor/successor logic report, contractor interface report (incoming and outgoing interfaces), and activity specification Barchart plot. (DLC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

State Solar Legislative Enactments in the SSEC Region. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive compilation of all solar legislation identified through September 1980, was prepared. Here, the actual copies of the bills are presented where available by state. (MHR)

Fenner, M.F.; Bailey, B.L.; Brun, R.A. (comps.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

275

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stricker, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enhanced performance of high temperature aluminate cementitious materials incorporated with Cu powders for thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cementitious materials have been extensively developed in thermal energy storage system of solar thermal power. This paper deals with the volume heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, and compressive strength of aluminate cementitious thermal energy storage materials with the addition of metal Cu powders. The specimens were subjected to heat-treatment at 105, 350, and 900 °C, respectively. In the heating process, Cu powders gradually oxidized to Cu2O and CuO, providing a so-called mass compensation mechanism for the composite paste. Meanwhile, it indicates that volume heat capacity and thermal conductivity both increase with increasing Cu powders content and decrease with the rising temperature. The optimum thermal properties were obtained at 15 wt% Cu powders loading. In addition, Calorimetric Test, XRD, TG–DSC, and MIP are performed for characterizing the hydration rates, the phases, the mass/heat evolution, and the pore distribution, respectively.

Huiwen Yuan; Yu Shi; Chunhua Lu; Zhongzi Xu; Yaru Ni; Xianghui Lan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

STREAM II-V5: REVISION OF STREAM II-V4 TO ACCOUNT FOR THE EFFECTS OF RAINFALL EVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

STREAM II-V4 is the aqueous transport module currently used by the Savannah River Site emergency response Weather Information Display (WIND) system. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) was used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. STREAM II-V4 predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM II-V4. STREAM II-V4 has been revised to account for the effects of a storm event. The steps used in this method are: (1) generate rainfall hyetographs as a function of total rainfall in inches (or millimeters) and rainfall duration in hours; (2) generate watershed runoff flow based on the rainfall hyetographs from step 1; (3) calculate the variation of stream segment volume (cross section) as a function of flow from step 2; (4) implement the results from steps 2 and 3 into the STREAM II model. The revised model (STREAM II-V5) will find the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations.

Chen, K.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

FY 2006 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion

280

FY 2009 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FY 2005 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 Volume 3 February 2004 Volume 3 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Legacy Management Legacy Management Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0034 Volume 3 Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution

282

FY 2007 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/

283

FY 2006 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut

284

FY 2011 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 Congressional Budget

285

FY 2006 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration

286

FY 2009 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration

287

FY 2008 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

288

FY 2010 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

289

FY 2010 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

290

FY 2008 Volume 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund

291

FY 2005 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2004 Volume 6 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0037 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

292

FY 2009 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management

293

FY 2007 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability

294

FY 2007 Volume 6  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

295

FY 2011 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional

296

FY 2006 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development

297

FY 2013 Volume I  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget

298

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automotive industry optics biomedical technology environmental technology Plasma Technology Quote from: Pla-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

299

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National...

300

Volume 4 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Volume 4 Volume4.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Committee on Space, Science, and Technology Office of Science Recovery Plan Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume IV.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IV - Public Comments IV - Public Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume IV - Public Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers VOLUME CONTENTS Volume I Executive Summary Acronyms Table of Contents Chapter 1 - Introduction Chapter 2 - Proposed Project, Proposed Federal Actions, and Alternatives Chapter 3 - Affected Environment Chapter 4 - Environmental Consequences

302

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

303

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Solar Thermal Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of solar energy for desalination purposes was one of ... The process is based on the use of solar thermal energy to evaporate water, thus separating pure ... brine. In this chapter an overview of solar thermal

M.T. Chaibi; Ali M. El-Nashar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thermal Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of its title. It is not for the nuclear physicist, nor even for the neutron physicist, but for the student of solids and liquids. "Thermal ... physicist, but for the student of solids and liquids. "Thermal neutron ...

G. E. BACON

1968-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

FY 2006 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

307

Guidelines Volume I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 1: Electricity Supply Sector Part 2: Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Part 3: Industrial Sector Electricity Supply Sector-Page 1.iii Contents of Volume I This volume, the first of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program,

308

FY 2008 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/ Other Defense Activities FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page

309

FY 2006 Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2006 Congressional Budget

310

Computer News, Volume 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

311

Computer News, Volume 30  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

312

Computer News, Volume 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

313

Computer News, Volume 31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

314

Computer News, Volume 29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

315

Cooking the volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooking possesses a system of units of measurement, that includes measures of volumes based on pre-metric units. This paper discusses the cooking measures and compares their features with those of the ancient Roman measures of capacity.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

317

2001volume1.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Passenger Volumes Passenger Volumes Eng Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Displ Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (liters) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2cl 3.2 90 14 0 0 0 0 Acura 3.2tl 3.2 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 3.5 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 1.8 0 0 83 12 77 13 Audi A4 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 1.8 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 2.8 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 2.8 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 2.7 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 L 4.2 0 0 104 18 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 2.7 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi S4 Avant 2.7 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi S8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 325ci 2.5 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325ci Convertible 2.5 74 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325i 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325i Sport Wagon 2.5 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 325xi 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325xi Sport Wagon 2.5

318

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

Moreno, G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

In this paper, the composition calculation in plasma out of thermal equilibrium is discussed and we test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACTS In this paper, the composition calculation in plasma out of thermal equilibrium plasma out of thermal equilibrium. Finally we applied the formulations to Fire II reentry. 1. INTRODUCTION In a first step from the H theorem we discuss the composition obtaining in plasma out of thermal

Boyer, Edmond

322

Abstracts ii Schedule....................................................................................................................................................... iii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................88 Dark Matter & Dark Energy ...............................................................................................3 HAD II Special: Neptune after One Orbit: Reflections on the Discovery of a Planet

Ciotti, Luca

323

Exergy analysis of a rock bed thermal storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a thermodynamic procedure is presented to analyse energy and exergy balances of a rock bed thermal storage system. The thermal behaviour is described by means of a control volume that includes three subsystems: the solar collectors, the fluid distribution system and the storage chamber. Solar-to-thermal energy conversion was obtained by means of a solar collector at a fixed airflow rate. The final purpose of the method is to determine how well the thermodynamic modelling fits the real data obtained experimentally from the prototype under normal operating conditions.

J.J. Navarrete-Gonzalez; J.G. Cervantes-de Gortari; E. Torres-Reyes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

BEHAVIOUR OF A HIGHLY PRESSURISED TANK OF GHz, SUBMITTED TO A THERMAL OR MECHANICAL IMPACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000-41 BEHAVIOUR OF A HIGHLY PRESSURISED TANK OF GHz, SUBMITTED TO A THERMAL OR MECHANICAL IMPACT will significantly reduce the volume of the necessary tank(s). Whatever this pressure and whatever the volume of the tank(s), the storage System must be designed in such a way that the consequences of an accident

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Thermal Insulation in Solar Thermal Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Insulation is a device or a practice which is used in a system for minimising heat losses caused due to transfer of heat from hotter to colder regions. It is one of the cheapest methods of energy conse...

B. C. Raychaudhuri

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ii IS -3 -( Volume V.iii THE MISOSYS QUARTERLY -Spring 1991 Volume V.111  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the chip allows for a complete solid-state voice recorder. The chip device includes on chip pre-amplifiers, filters, addressing logic, and power amplifiers. Not only is solid-state memory capacity being increased memory chip, the ISD1016. In its simplest sense, connect- ing a battery, microphone, and speaker

Mann, Tim

328

Steady-State Heat Transfer in He II through Porous Superconducting Cable Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LHC program includes the study of thermal behavior of the superconducting cables wound in the dipole magnet cooled by superfluid helium (He II). Insulation of these superconducting cables forms the major ... ...

B. J. P. Baudouy; F.-P. Juster; C. Meuris…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fireball during combustion of hydrocarbon fueld releases II. Thermal radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processes of radiative heat transfer in a fireball which develops upon ignition of a cloud of hydrocarbon fuel near the Earth’s surface are simulated numerically. The emissive characteristics of combustion pr...

G. M. Makhviladze; J. P. Roberts; S. E. Yakush

330

Thermodynamics near the correlation volume  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I present and test three simple thermodynamic fluctuation rules which may in some cases hold for subsystems of infinite systems with volumes less than the correlation volume. Tests at volumes near the correlation volume are made in the two-dimensional square ferromagnetic Ising model by Monte Carlo simulation. Fluctuations into the metastable and spinodal regions are discussed. Aside from difficulties apparently resulting from the small volumes used in the simulations, the rules are found to work well.

George Ruppeiner

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

Olver, Peter

332

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Erosion At Perseverance, Western Australia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Erosion At Perseverance, Western Australia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We have applied a thermal-fluid dynamic-geochemical model to investigate the emplacement and erosional potential of Archean komatiite flows at Perseverance, Western Australia. Perseverance has been proposed as a site of large-scale thermal erosion by large-volume komatiite eruption(s), resulting in a 100-150-m-deep lava channel containing one of the world's largest komatiite-hosted Fe-Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide deposits. Using

334

FY 2007 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology

335

FY 2008 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves

336

FY 2008 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy/ Energy Supply and Conservation FY 2008 Congressional Budget

337

FY 2010 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

338

FY 2009 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

339

volume.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2tl 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 0 0 83 12 77 13 Aston Martin DB-7 Vantage Coupe 72 6 0 0 0 0 Aston Martin DB-7 Vantage Volante 72 6 0 0 0 0 Audi A4 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 323ci 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 323i 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 323i Convertible 0 0 74 9 0 0 BMW 323i Touring 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 328ci 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 328i 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 528i 0 0 93 11 0 0 BMW 528i Sport Wagon 0 0 96 33 0 0 BMW 540i 0 0 93 11 0 0 BMW 540i Sport Wagon 0 0 96 33 0 0 BMW 740i, 740i Sport

340

FY 2005 Volume 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Volume 5 Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Non Non - - Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non Non - - Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund and Decommissioning Fund February 2004 Volume 5 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FY 2005 Volume 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Volume 2 February 2004 Volume 2 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Energy Security and Assurance Energy Security and Assurance Security Security Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Office of Hearings & Appeals Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Safeguards & Security Crosscut Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy

342

FY 2005 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Clean Coal Technology February 2004 Volume 7 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies

343

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

344

Pressure Balance between Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz and at 5 and 8 GHz. From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum non-thermal pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the non-thermal plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum non-thermal pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.

D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Final Report: Thermal Conductance of Solid-Liquid Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research supported by this grant has significantly advanced fundamental understanding of the thermal conductance of solid-liquid interfaces, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanoscale composite materials. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between carbon nanotubes and a surrounding matrix of organic molecules is exceptionally small and this small value of the interface conductance limits the enhancement in thermal conductivity that can be achieved by loading a fluid or a polymer with nanotubes. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between metal nanoparticles coated with hydrophilic surfactants and water is relatively high and surprisingly independent of the details of the chemical structure of the surfactant. • We extended our experimental methods to enable studies of planar interfaces between surfactant-coated metals and water where the chemical functionalization can be varied between strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic. The thermal conductance of hydrophobic interfaces establishes an upper-limit of 0.25 nm on the thickness of the vapor-layer that is often proposed to exist at hydrophobic interfaces. • Our high-precision measurements of fluid suspensions show that the thermal conductivity of fluids is not significantly enhanced by loading with a small volume fraction of spherical nanoparticles. These experimental results directly contradict some of the anomalous results in the recent literature and also rule-out proposed mechanisms for the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids that are based on modification of the fluid thermal conductivity by the coupling of fluid motion and the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles.

Cahil, David, G.; Braun, Paul, V.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume II, Appendices (Part 1 of 11)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOEEIS-0026-S-2 This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available...

348

Thermal comfort during surgery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Industrial... Engineering THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Approved as to style and content by: airman of C it ee Head of Department Member Me er December 1978 ABSTRACT Thermal Comfort During Surgery (December 1978) David Harold...

Manning, David Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal Conductivity of Composites Under Di erent Heating Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Conductivity of Composites Under Di#11;erent Heating Scenarios H.T. Banks #3; , J.H. Hogan of composites under three di#11;erent heating scenarios: (i) a laser pulse heat source, (ii) a preheated composite sample, and (iii) a continuous heat source. 1 Introduction Adhesives such as epoxies, gels

350

Test cell modeling and optimization for FPD-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Power Demonstration, Configuration II (FPD-II), will ba a DT burning tandem mirror facility with thermal barriers, designed as the next step engineering test reactor (ETR) to follow the tandem mirror ignition test machines. Current plans call for FPD-II to be a multi-purpose device. For approximately the first half of its lifetime, it will operate as a high-Q ignition machine designed to reach or exceed engineering break-even and to demonstrate the technological feasibility of tandem mirror fusion. The second half of its operation will focus on the evaluation of candidate reactor blanket designs using a neutral beam driven test cell inserted at the midplane of the 90 m long cell. This machine called FPD-II+T, uses an insert configuration similar to that used in the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T study. The modeling and optimization of FPD-II+T are the topic of the present paper.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Index to volume 79  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...November 1987 Elmore Ranch and Superstition...Abdolrasool and James N. Brune Foam...Gfiendel, K. C. McNally, J. Lower...Giiendel, K. C. McNally, J. Lower...F., K. C. McNally, J. Lower...VOLUME 79 Haddow, James B., Abraham...The Ehnore Ranch and Superstition...

352

The Reactor engineering of the MITR-II : construction and startup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor, MITR-I, has been replaced with a light water cooled, heavy water reflected reactor called the MITR-II. The MITR-II is designed to operate at 5 thermal megawatts. The ...

Allen, G. C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECH-ANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMANTS AT HANFORD: Appendix D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heater Experiments at Hanford V O L U M E II (Appendix D) TENG-48 and for Rockwell Hanford Operations — a Department ofFACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD Volume 2 (Appendix D)

Chan, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures and the thermal transport prop- erties is a key point to design materials with preferred thermal properties with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity

Boyer, Edmond

355

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

356

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

358

Thermal Insulation of Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Thermal Insulation (Dwellings) Bill which Mr. G. Nabarro introduced into the House of Commons on ... , sponsored by members of both major political parties, extends the principle of the Thermal Insulation (Industrial Buildings) Act of July 1957 to all new dwelling houses built in the ...

1958-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

360

Thermal Recovery Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal Recovery Methods describes the basic concepts of thermal recovery and explains the injection patterns used to exploit reservoir conditions. Basic reservoir engineering is reviewed with an emphasis on changes in flow characteristics caused by temperature. The authors discuss an energy balance for steam and combustion drive, and they explain in situ reactions. Heat loss, combustion drive, and steam displacement also are examined in detail, as well as cyclic steam injection, downhole ignition, well heating, and low-temperature oxidation. Contents: Thermal processes; Formation and reservoir evaluations; Well patterns and spacing; Flow and process equations; Laboratory simulation of thermal recovery; Heat loss and transmission; Displacement and production; Equipment; Basic data for field selection; Laboratory evaluation of combustion characteristics; Thermal properties of reservoirs and fluids.

White, P.D.; Moss, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tunable thermal link  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Effects of thermocline on performance of underwater glider’s power system propelled by ocean thermal energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal glider’s changeable volume produces propelling force to power the glider’s descending and ascending through ... affect the working processes of the glider’s power system. Based on the enthalpy method,...

Hai Yang; Jie Ma

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Surface and Volume Contamination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Will there be volume contamination/activation guides as well as updated contamination guides? The only guidance being developed for volumetric contamination is a Technical Standard for accelerator facilities. However, a revised version of ANSI N13.12-1999 is expected in the future and it will be assessed to determine its acceptability for use as a pre-approved authorized limit. It is noted that ANSI N13.12-1999 is only applicable to personal property not structures.

365

PARS II FAQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

366

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

367

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

368

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

369

Theory of delayed thermal fluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory of nonradiative thermal activation involved in delayed thermal fluorescence has been developed from the viewpoint of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation.

S. H. Lin

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermally driven circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several problems connected by the theme of thermal forcing are addressed herein. The main topic is the stratification and flow field resulting from imposing a specified heat flux on a fluid that is otherwise confined to a ...

Nelken, Haim

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials — phononic crystals — might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many...

Hsu, Chung-Hao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Solar Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal energy storage systems are introduced and their importance and desired characteristics are outlined. Sensible heat storage, which is one of the most commonly used storage systems in pract...

E. Paykoç; S. Kakaç

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Neutron stars - thermal emitters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Confronting theoretical models with observations of thermal radiation emitted by neutron stars is one of the most important ways to understand the properties of both, superdense matter in the interiors of the neutron stars and dense magnetized plasmas in their outer layers. Here we review the theory of thermal emission from the surface layers of strongly magnetized neutron stars, and the main properties of the observational data. In particular, we focus on the nearby sources for which a clear thermal component has been detected, without being contaminated by other emission processes (magnetosphere, accretion, nebulae). We also discuss the applications of the modern theoretical models of the formation of spectra of strongly magnetized neutron stars to the observed thermally emitting objects.

Potekhin, A Y; Pons, J A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

Blahnik, D.E.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

378

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Lokaratna, Volume 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Support Center, and Chennai for his support to get this volume published in NFSC web site for the wider readership. I am also thankful to Prof. Mark Turin of Cambridge University who has been kinds enough to link the web journal of Folklore... of Nature such as cloud, sky, Tam?la trees, night and Yamun? river have been illustrated. Moreover, all these aspects are blackish by nature and very similar to the dark-bodied Krishna. It may be undoubtedly stated that the poet has consciously used...

Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

380

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Beatriz L´opez-Wallea,1 and analytical calculations. Key words: Micro-actuators, Thermal modelling, Electrical analogy, Thermal network 1 and MicroMechatronic Systems Department (AS2M), 24 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besan¸con, France Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

382

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

VOLUME 76, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 MAY 1996 Noise-Induced Roughening Evolution of Amorphous Si films Grown by Thermal Evaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOLUME 76, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 MAY 1996 Noise-Induced Roughening is based on noise-induced roughening which gives rise to the very interesting phenomenon of dynamic scal on the noise-induced roughening has faced serious challenges from experimental observations on molecular beam

Wang, Gwo-Ching

384

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, Vol.II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States United States Office of Emergency and EPA/540/1-89/001 Environmental Protection Remedial Responce March 1989 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Superfund Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final EPA EPA/540/1-89/001 March 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Disclaimer The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The Government may take action

385

The Effects of Varying the Correlation Volume on Strangeness Production in High Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preliminary results on strange particle production versus collision centrality are presented. STAR measurements from \\sqrts = 200 GeV heavy-ion and \\pp collisions are compared to SPS measurements. A systematic study of strange particle production is presented with the aim of establishing how the correlation volume of the produced source affects the scale of strange particle creation, including that of the multi-strange baryons. A linear increase of strangeness production with volume has been suggested by thermal models as an indication that the collision region has reached sufficient size such that small volume effects can be neglected. Analysis of preliminary results from STAR show that, using the assumption that the number of participants is linearly correlated with the volume, no such regime was obtained. This suggests that the correlation volume ''seen" by strange quarks is not merely that of the initial overlap.

Helen Caines

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

389

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal ignition combustion system adapted for use with an internal combustion engine is described comprising: (a) means for providing ignition chamber walls defining an ignition chamber, the chamber walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m/sup 0/C. and a specific heat greater than 480J/kg/sup 0/C., the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber; (b) means for maintaining the temperature of the chamber walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel; and (c) means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 3141 Decadal variability of wind-energy input to the world ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tion is emerging. Although the ocean receives a huge amount of thermal energy, it cannot convert such thermal energy into mechanical energy very effi- ciently because the ocean is heated and cooled fromDeep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 31­41 Decadal variability of wind-energy input to the world ocean

Huang, Rui Xin

394

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermalfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermal barrier coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal management of nanoelectronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-state thermoelectric on- spot cooling, requiring efficient thermoelectric materials that can be integrated with the IC are further complicated by the fact that the material's ability to conduct heat deteriorates when at the packaging level but also at the nanoscale materials and device levels. THERMAL CHALLENGES AT NANOSCALE One

399

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Influence of nano-ZrO2 on the mechanical and thermal properties of high temperature cementitious thermal energy storage materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The mechanical and thermal properties of high temperature aluminate cementitious thermal energy storage materials modified with nano-ZrO2 are investigated. The influence of nano-ZrO2 amounts on the performance, such as compressive strength, thermal conductivity, volume heat capacity, and thermal expansion coefficient, of hardened composite cement pastes were studied for future solar thermal energy materials with better performance. It is observed that before heating the pore structure and compressive strength are both optimized at the optimum nano-ZrO2 amount of 1 wt%. At the same time, thermal conductivity and volume heat capacity of the composite paste enriched with nano-ZrO2 improved after heating at 350 and 900 °C compared with that of pure paste, which is very favorable for high thermal storage materials application. XRD, TG–DSC, FTIR, and MIP were used to characterize the mineral phases, the hydration/dehydration evolution, the chemical bonding, and the pore structures of the hydration products, respectively.

Huiwen Yuan; Yu Shi; Zhongzi Xu; Chunhua Lu; Yaru Ni; Xianghui Lan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal Diffusivity and Viscosity of Suspensions of Disc Shaped Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we conduct a transient heat conduction experiment with an aqueous suspension of nanoparticle disks of Laponite JS, a sol forming grade, using laser light interferometry. The image sequence in time is used to measure thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the suspension. Imaging of the temperature distribution is facilitated by the dependence of refractive index of the suspension on temperature itself. We observe that with the addition of 4 volume % of nano-disks in water, thermal conductivity of the suspension increases by around 30%. A theoretical model for thermal conductivity of the suspension of anisotropic particles by Fricke as well as by Hamilton and Crosser explains the trend of data well. In turn, it estimates thermal conductivity of the Laponite nanoparticle itself, which is otherwise difficult to measure in a direct manner. We also measure viscosity of the nanoparticle suspension using a concentric cylinder rheometer. Measurements are seen to follow quite well, the theoretical relation for viscosity of suspensions of oblate particles that includes up to two particle interaction. This result rules out the presence of clusters of particles in the suspension. The effective viscosity and thermal diffusivity data show that the shape of the particle has a role in determining enhancement of thermophysical properties of the suspension.

Susheel S. Bhandari; K. Muralidhar; Yogesh M Joshi

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Q1 High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this Los Alamos National Laboratory...

403

Impact of Ageing on Thermal Efficiency of Solar Thermal Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today it is common practice to calculate the performance of solar thermal systems or solar collectors based on the results of a thermal performance test carried out with a new solar collector. However, for an int...

Elke Streicher; Stephan Fischer…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

405

A new mineralogical approach to predict coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregate and concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the construction allows for accurate prediction of the potential thermal change on crack development and crack width and enhances the overall design process. Siliceous gravel use results in larger crack width than does the limestone and at low temperature... increment between the contacts to the flask volume, the amount of aggregate in the flask, and the thermal characteristics of the aggregate. For measurements made below the freezing point of water, a non-reactive liquid, such as toluene, which does...

Neekhra, Siddharth

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Power Electronics Thermal Management R&D (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will investigate and develop thermal-management strategies for wide bandgap (WBG)-based power electronics systems. Research will be carried out to deal with thermal aspects at the module- and system-level. Module-level research will focus on die- and substrate-integrated cooling strategies and heat-transfer enhancement technologies. System-level research will focus on thermal-management strategies for the entire power electronics system to enable smart packaging solutions. One challenge with WBG device-based power electronics is that although losses in the form of heat may be lower, the footprint of the components is also likely to be reduced to reduce cost, weight, and volume. Combined with higher operational temperatures, this creates higher heat fluxes which much be removed from a smaller footprint, requiring advanced cooling strategies.

Waye, S.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II. Phase Equilibria II. Phase Equilibria Title Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1996 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Frank R. McLarnon, and John S. Newman Journal Journal of the Electrochemistry Society Volume 143 Issue 2 Pagination 412-417 Keywords 25 ENERGY STORAGE, 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE, ALUMINIUM OXIDES, equilibrium, performance, PHASE DIAGRAMS, PHOSPHIDES, PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM SULFIDES, SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES Abstract Equilibrium open-circuit cell voltage data from a sodium/{beta}{double_prime}-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cell utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, and 0.332 and a sodium atom fraction ranging from 0 to 0.4 were interpreted to construct ternary phase diagrams of the Na-P-S ternary system at 350 and 400 C.

409

Thermal Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal storage is needed to improve the efficiency and usefulness of solar thermal systems. The paper indicates the main storage ... which would greatly increase the practical use of solar energy — is more diffi...

H. Tabor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

411

FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

Nabben, Reinhard

412

APPENDIX II WESTFLISCHE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - APPENDIX II WESTF�LISCHE WILHELMS-UNIVERSIT�T M�NSTER Instructions for the experiment ,,Stock information about how the experiment works. Please keep general questions until the end of the introduction either 100 or 0 monetary units (MU). Due to the fact that the outcome of the event is uncertain during

Greer, Julia R.

413

Thermal and Power Challenges in High Performance Computing Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the thermal and power challenges in emerging high performance computing platforms. The advent of new sophisticated applications in highly diverse areas such as health, education, finance, entertainment, etc. is driving the platform and device requirements for future systems. The key ingredients of future platforms are vertically integrated (3D) die-stacked devices which provide the required performance characteristics with the associated form factor advantages. Two of the major challenges to the design of through silicon via (TSV) based 3D stacked technologies are (i) effective thermal management and (ii) efficient power delivery mechanisms. Some of the key challenges that are articulated in this paper include hot-spot superposition and intensification in a 3D stack, design/optimization of thermal through silicon vias (TTSVs), non-uniform power loading of multi-die stacks, efficient on-chip power delivery, minimization of electrical hotspots etc.

Venkat Natarajan; Anand Deshpande; Sudarshan Solanki; Arun Chandrasekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electric Motor Thermal Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape030bennion2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Electric Motor Thermal Management Electric Motor Thermal Management...

416

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management...

417

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

419

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' Information

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Influence of thermal motion upon the lineshape in magic-angle-spinning experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of isotropic thermal motion upon MAS NMR spectra is treated theoretically for (i) dominating inhomogeneous magnetic dipolar interaction and (ii) dominating anisotropic chemical shielding interaction. General formulas are derived which describe quantitatively the influence of thermal motion upon the shape of the central line and of the whole sideband pattern. The results of (i) are compared with those of former studies which are shown to be special cases of the general theory presented here.

D Fenzke; B.C Gerstein; H Pfeifer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

423

LSPE Interim Stowage Thermal Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-arm and thermal battery timers require operating temperatures at or above +40°F for reliable starting when·, ' LSPE Interim Stowage Thermal Constraints· Nl,;. ATM1080 PAGE 1 OF 13 DATE 15 December l97l constraints required for thermal integrity are defined. Prepared by:.:Z4·:..=..-~31!::..--.::..·~-:·::....-c

Rathbun, Julie A.

424

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

425

Thermalization through parton transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A radiative transport model is used to study kinetic equilibration during the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. The parton system is found to be able to overcome expansion and move toward thermalization via parton collisions. Scaling behaviors show up in both the pressure anisotropy and the energy density evolutions. In particular, the pressure anisotropy evolution shows an approximate alpha_s scaling when radiative processes are included. It approaches an asymptotic time evolution on a time scale of 1 to 2 fm/c. The energy density evolution shows an asymptotic time evolution that decreases slower than the ideal hydro evolution. These observations indicate that partial thermalization can be achieved and viscosity is important for the evolution during the early longitudinal expansion stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision.

Bin Zhang

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Chemical Characterization and Removal of Carbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite II - 13023  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (C-14), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates C-14 is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented last year and updated here is to identify the chemical form of C-14 in irradiated graphite and develop a practical method by which C-14 can be removed. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam{sup R}, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of C-14 precursor) and neutron-irradiated (10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s). Finer grained NBG-25 was not exposed to liquid nitrogen prior to irradiation at a neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 14} /cm{sup 2}/s. Characterization of pre- and post-irradiation graphite was conducted to determine the chemical environment and quantity of C-14 and its precursors via the use of surface sensitive characterization techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological features of graphite samples. The concentration, chemical composition, and bonding characteristics of C-14 and its precursors were determined through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis Spectroscopy (EDX). Results of post-irradiation characterization of these materials indicate a variety of surface functional groups containing carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During thermal treatment, irradiated graphite samples are heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon were performed at 900 deg. C and 1400 deg. C to evaluate the selective removal of C-14. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 volume % oxygen at temperatures 700 deg. C and 1400 deg. C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of C-14. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient C-14 removal. (authors)

Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Cleaver, James; LaBrier, Daniel; McCrory, Shilo; Smith, Tara E. [Idaho State University: 1776 Science Center Dr., Idaho Falls, ID, 83401 (United States)] [Idaho State University: 1776 Science Center Dr., Idaho Falls, ID, 83401 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

EIS-0490-Adopted-Volume2-2012.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

T012004001SCO/ DRD1327.DOC/ 050710010 T012004001SCO/ DRD1327.DOC/ 050710010 VOLUME II Boulder City/U.S. 93 Corridor Study Final Environmental Impact Statement and Section 4(f) Evaluation FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MARCH 2005 T012004001SCO/ DRD1327.DOC/ 050710010 I Contents Chapter Page 2-1 Comments Received on the Draft EIS ............................................................................. 2-1-1 2-1.1 Introduction.............................................................................................................. 2-1-1 2-1.2 Notice of Availability in Federal Register .............................................................. 2-1-1 2-1.3 Distribution of DEIS................................................................................................

428

Thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal stares for solar systems are surveyed which include: long-term water stores for solar systems; ground storage using soil as an interseasonal energy store; ground-water aquifers; pebble or rock bed storage; phase change storage; solar ponds; high temperature storage; and cold stores for solar air conditioning system. The use of mathematical models for analysis of the storage systems is considered

W.E.J. Neal

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Mahr-Federal, Inc. respectively facilitated and provided the necessary surface metrology data of the test pieces. Mr. Claude Davis of Corning, Inc. obtained the thermophysical properties of the Ultra Low Expansion Titanium Silicate glass used... as thermal expansion standard. The engineers at National Instruments provided some much-needed advice and software for programming the data acquisition system. The TAMU Physics Machine Shop provided design advice and a couple of last...

Ayers, George Harold

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

432

Interactive splatting of nonrectilinear volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes various techniques for achieving interactive direct volume rendering of nonrectilinear data sets using fast projection (splatting) methods. The use of graphics hardware, rendering approximations, parallelization and reduced resolution ...

Peter L. Williams

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fluid Volumes: The Program “FLUIDS”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes the program FLUIDS. The mathematical model underlying this program contains over 200 variables and describes control mechanisms of body fluid volumes and electrolytes as well as respirat...

Fredericus B. M. Min

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Microsoft Word - Final formatted Nano-Vol_II-Field_Reports.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

II II Compilation of Field Reports Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories August 2008 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH SPECIAL REVIEW OF WORK PRACTICES FOR NANOSCALE MATERIAL ACTIVITIES AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORIES VOLUME II COMPILATION OF FIELD REPORTS August 2008 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH SPECIAL REVIEW OF WORK PRACTICES FOR NANOSCALE MATERIAL ACTIVITIES AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORIES

435

Bionics in textiles: flexible and translucent thermal insulations for solar thermal applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...translucent thermal insulations for solar thermal applications Thomas Stegmaier...Denkendorf73770 Denkendorf, Germany Solar thermal collectors used at present consist...transparent thermal insulation|solar thermal collector| 1. Introduction...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program ..........................................................................3 2.1 Participants in the CSI-Thermal Program

437

Thermomechanical measurements on thermal microactuators.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the coupling of thermal and mechanical behaviors at small scales, a Campaign 6 project was created to investigate thermomechanical phenomena in microsystems. This report documents experimental measurements conducted under the auspices of this project. Since thermal and mechanical measurements for thermal microactuators were not available for a single microactuator design, a comprehensive suite of thermal and mechanical experimental data was taken and compiled for model validation purposes. Three thermal microactuator designs were selected and fabricated using the SUMMiT V{sup TM} process at Sandia National Laboratories. Thermal and mechanical measurements for the bent-beam polycrystalline silicon thermal microactuators are reported, including displacement, overall actuator electrical resistance, force, temperature profiles along microactuator legs in standard laboratory air pressures and reduced pressures down to 50 mTorr, resonant frequency, out-of-plane displacement, and dynamic displacement response to applied voltages.

Baker, Michael Sean; Epp, David S.; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

RHIC II Science Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

439

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

440

PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies...

442

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

443

Report on workshop on thermal property measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of thermogravimetric analysis of basalt is discussed. Heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion are specifically addressed. (CBS)

Robertson, E.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Title Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Huang, Zhuo, Michael G. Apte, and Lara A. Gundel Journal U.S. Department of Energy Journal of Undergraduate Research Volume 7 Pagination 37-42 Abstract The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25µm in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised

445

Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Comparison of Open Versus Closed Systems in Thermal Storage Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of thermal storage, by its very nature, requires a large storage vessel. Depending upon the technology employed, this can vary from as little as 1.6cuft./ton-hour, up to 15cuft./ton-hour. The result can be storage tanks with volumes...

Salbodkin, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of time magnitudes.

Frandsen, Michael W. (Helena, MT); Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

449

Thermally switchable dielectrics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume I.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume I June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers Title: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Location: Proposed Big Stone II Plant: Big Stone City, Grant County, South Dakota

451

Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I. [Central Design Bureau of Machine Building, Krasnogvardeyskaya Square 3, St. Petersburg, (Russia) 195272

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. II. MOLECULAR CLOUD ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have undertaken a survey of molecular lines in the 3 mm band toward 57 young stellar objects using the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22 m radio telescope. The target sources were young stellar objects with active outflows (extended green objects (EGOs)) newly identified from the GLIMPSE II survey. We observe a high detection rate (50%) of broad line wing emission in the HNC and CS thermal lines, which combined with the high detection rate of class I methanol masers toward these sources (reported in Paper I) further demonstrates that the GLIMPSE II EGOs are associated with outflows. The physical and kinematic characteristics derived from the 3 mm molecular lines for these newly identified EGOs are consistent with these sources being massive young stellar objects with ongoing outflow activity and rapid accretion. These findings support our previous investigations of the mid-infrared properties of these sources and their association with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, methanol masers and millimeter dust sources) presented in Paper I. The high detection rate (64%) of the hot core tracer CH{sub 3}CN reveals that the majority of these new EGOs have evolved to the hot molecular core stage. Comparison of the observed molecular column densities with predictions from hot core chemistry models reveals that the newly identified EGOs from the GLIMPSE II survey are members of the youngest hot core population, with an evolutionary time scale of the order of 10{sup 3} yr.

Chen Xi; Gan Conggui; Shen Zhiqiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He Jinhua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011, Yunnan Province (China)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A 10% increase in shaft work is directly attributable to modified thermal heat capacity Engineering HTF Specific heat yields modified power output. 27 127 227 327 427 527...

456

Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

458

REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal plasmonic interconnects in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one emerging plasmonic material, graphene can support surface plasmons at infrared and terahertz frequencies with unprecedented properties due to the strong interactions between graphene and low-frequency photons. Since graphene surface plasmons exist in the infrared and terahertz regime, they can be thermally pumped (excited) by the infrared evanescent waves emitted from an object. Here we show that thermal graphene plasmons can be efficiently excited and have monochromatic and tunable spectra, thus paving a way to harness thermal energy for graphene plasmonic devices. We further demonstrate that “thermal information communication” via graphene surface plasmons can be potentially realized by effectively harnessing thermal energy from various heat sources, e.g., the waste heat dissipated from nanoelectronic devices. These findings open up an avenue of thermal plasmonics based on graphene for different applications ranging from infrared emission control, to information processing and communication, to energy harvesting.

Baoan Liu; Yongmin Liu; Sheng Shen

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Disilane ... Thermal decomposition of disilane was investigated using time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry coupled with vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization (VUV-SPI) at a temperature range of 675?740 K and total pressure of 20?40 Torr. ... Concentrations of disilane and trisilane during thermal decomposition of disilane were quantitatively measured using the VUV-SPI method. ...

Kazumasa Yoshida; Keiji Matsumoto; Tatsuo Oguchi; Kenichi Tonokura; Mitsuo Koshi

2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii thermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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461

Thermal desorption for passive dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ Flare Tubes for Thermal Desorber . . . . . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 27 4. 5 ~ Thermal Desorber Manufactured by Century System Sample Flow from Thermal Desorber to Gas Chromatograph 29 6. Direct Injection Port for Therma1 Desorber . . . . . $2... the gas badges and. providing additional guidance in conducting the study. DEDICATZOil This thesis is cedicated to my parents and my wife, Unice, for their support during the last t', o years AHSTHACT ACKI;ODL DG~~. 'ITS D' DICATICI'. LIST OF TABL...

Liu, Wen-Chen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Thermal and electrical properties of porphyrin derivatives and their relevance for molecule interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thermal and electrical properties for two porphyrin derivatives. They determine their sublimation enthalpy in physics and chemistry.1 They are of interest because of their numerous potential applications from of the molecules at 650 K. II. MOLECULAR SUBLIMATION ENTHALPIES In order to determine the sublimation properties

463

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

464

Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

missed a convention that you know about, please drop me a line at mad00man@yahoo.com.au and I will add to our list - Matt 19The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 5 Bits & Pieces: Klingon Recipes Klingon Bloodwine Mix the following ingredients well: 2 2... missed a convention that you know about, please drop me a line at mad00man@yahoo.com.au and I will add to our list - Matt 19The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 5 Bits & Pieces: Klingon Recipes Klingon Bloodwine Mix the following ingredients well: 2 2...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

467

Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Thermally induced photon splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate thermal corrections to the non-linear QED effective action for low-energy photon interactions in a background electromagnetic field. The high-temperature expansion shows that at $T \\gg m$ the vacuum contribution is exactly cancelled to all orders in the external field except for a non-trivial two-point function contribution. The high-temperature expansion derived reveals a remarkable cancellation of infrared sensitive contributions. As a result photon-splitting in the presence of a magnetic field is suppressed in the presence of an electron-positron QED-plasma at very high temperatures. In a cold and dense plasma a similar suppression takes place. At the same time Compton scattering dominates for weak fields and the suppression is rarely important in physical situations.

Per Elmfors; Bo-Sture Skagerstam

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs thermally recoverable by steam drive which are equal to or greater than 2500 feet deep and contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range. Data were collected from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for ThermalOF THE THESIS Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energyto utilize phase change materials (PCM’s) to enhance thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

PNE WIND USA II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

475

2. Results-Fe(II) concentrations and oxidation kinetics 1. Introduction -why, where and how?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IIISMP II SMP IV a Study site - Northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea Study site - Northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea Intense solar radiation year round High dust flux, no runoff Low DOM well aerated oligotrophic waters Summer- thermal stratification Winter- deep mixing Sample is withdrawn continuously into flow cell

Einat, Aharonov

476

Mod II Stirling engine overviews  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given. 12 references.

Farrell, R.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Information Resources to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources Information Resources Numerous publications will be available to help educate buyers, product

478

Netlog, Volume 5, March 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 2007 NETL Newsletter March 2007 NETL Newsletter Microreactor Developed for Accelerated Testing of Fuel Thermal Stability helicopter Magnetic and Gas-Sensing Survey NETL researchers on the Defense Fuels Team have designed, constructed, and begun operation of a microreactor that will enable testing of the thermal stability of liquid fuel formulations. This research is in support of the Department of Defense's long-range initiative to develop a single, fully-synthetic hydrogen-rich fuel capable of powering fuel cells as well as ground vehicles, aircraft, and ships. In order for the fuel to meet the performance specifications of the end-use equipment, certain additives will be required. NETL is attempting to identify the best additives that will allow the fuel to meet equipment specifications and Department of Defense needs. During this process it is important that the additive not impart negative properties to the fuel, such as degrading its thermal stability.

479

Index to Volume 77, 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...acting as preferential flow paths within aquifer systems 4 H57 Index to Volume 77 Z169...moment tensor charac- terization of fracking events 5 ID23 Maida, Camila, see Mendon...moment tensor characteri- zation of fracking events, H. Mahardika, A. Revil...

480

Thermal analysis of cast-resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of dry-type cast-resin transformers make them suitable for residential and hospital usages. However, because of resin’s property, thermal behavior of these transformers is undesirable, so it is important to analyze their thermal behavior. In this paper temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two different approaches. A FEM-based model which uses experimental-analytical formula for air–cooling vertical ducts and a 3D finite volume based CFD model which is established in the ANSYS CFX software. In order to evaluate and compare the models, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from an 800 kVA transformer. Finally, the influences of some construction parameters and environmental conditions on temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers were discussed.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; A. Eslamian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Thermalization of isolated quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the evolution towards thermal equilibrium of an isolated quantum system is at the foundation of statistical mechanics and a subject of interest in such diverse areas as cold atom physics or the quantum mechanics of black holes. Since a pure state can never evolve into a thermal density matrix, the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) has been put forward by Deutsch and Srednicki as a way to explain this apparent thermalization, similarly to what the ergodic theorem does in classical mechanics. In this paper this hypothesis is tested numerically. First, it is observed that thermalization happens in a subspace of states (the Krylov subspace) with dimension much smaller than that of the total Hilbert space. We check numerically the validity of ETH in such a subspace, for a system of hard core bosons on a two-dimensional lattice. We then discuss how well the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian projected on the Krylov subspace represent the true eigenstates. This discussion is aided by bringing the projected Hamiltonian to the tridiagonal form and interpreting it as an Anderson localization problem for a finite one-dimensional chain. We also consider thermalization of a subsystem and argue that generation of a large entanglement entropy can lead to a thermal density matrix for the subsystem well before the whole system thermalizes. Finally, we comment on possible implications of ETH in quantum gravity.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

484

Cryogenic tests of volume-phase holographic gratings: results at 100 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from cryogenic tests of Volume-Phase Holographic(VPH) gratings at 100 K. The aims of these tests are to see whether the diffraction efficiency as a function of wavelength is significantly different at a low temperature from that at room temperature and to see how the performance of a VPH grating is affected by a number of thermal cycles. We have completed 10 cycles between room temperature and 100 $K$, and find no clear evidence that the diffraction efficiency changes with temperature or with successive thermal cycle.

Naoyuki Tamura; Graham J. Murray; Peter Luke; Colin Blackburn; David J. Robertson; Nigel A. Dipper; Ray M. Sharples; Jeremy R. Allington-Smith

2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

485

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

486

Effects of airflow infiltration on the thermal performance of internally  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of airflow infiltration on the thermal performance of internally Effects of airflow infiltration on the thermal performance of internally insulated ducts Title Effects of airflow infiltration on the thermal performance of internally insulated ducts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2000 Authors Levinson, Ronnen M., William W. Delp, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 32 Pagination 345-354 Keywords building design, Heat Island Abstract Air flowing through a supply duct infiltrates perviously faced, porous, internal duct insulation, degrading its thermal performance. Encapsulating the insulation's air-facing surface with an impervious barrier prevents infiltration, increasing the capacity of the conditioned supply air to heat or cool the space to which it is delivered. This study determined the air-speed dependence of the thermal conductivity of fiberglass insulation by measuring the inlet-to-outlet temperature drop of heated air flowing through a long, insulated flexible duct. The conductivity of a flexible duct's low-density, internal, fiberglass-blanket insulation increased with the square of the duct air speed, rising by 140% as the duct air speed increased from 0 to 15 m s-1. At air speeds recommended for branch ducts, the conductivity of such insulation would increase by 6% above its still-air value in a residential system and by 16% in a commercial system. Results partially agreed with those reported by an earlier study. Simulations indicate that encapsulating the air-stream surface of internal fiberglass duct insulation with an impervious barrier increases the effectiveness with which a duct delivers the thermal capacity of supply air by 0.15%-0.9% in typical duct systems.

487

Thermal Conductivity and Noise Attenuation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3.4 Corrosion-resistant and high-temperature filters 9 1.3.5 Acoustic Applications 9 2. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY 2.1 THERMAL RESISTANCE 2.1.1 Thermal Conductors in Series 12 2.1.2 Thermal conductors in parallel 13 2 difference RTH Thermal resistance of conductor sb Stefan's constant T4 Temperature difference K* Total

Cambridge, University of

488

Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are promising candidates as thermal vias and thermal interface materials due to their inherently high thermal; superlattices; thermal boundary resistance; thermionics; thermotunneling; thermoelectrics I. INTRODUCTIONINVITED P A P E R Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip Devices for cooling high

489

Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane to Syngas by Thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted on syngas preparation from dry reforming of methane by carbon dioxide with a DC arc plasma at atmospheric pressure. In all experiments, nitrogen gas was used as the working gas for thermal plasma to generate a high-temperature jet into a horizontal tube reactor. A mixture of methane and carbon dioxide was fed vertically into the jet. In order to obtain a higher conversion rate of methane and carbon dioxide, chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency, parametric screening studies were conducted, in which the volume ratio of carbon dioxide to methane in fed gases and the total flux of fed gases were taken into account. Results showed that carbon dioxide reforming of methane to syngas by thermal plasma exhibited a larger processing capacity, higher conversion of methane and carbon dioxide and higher chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency. In addition, thermodynamic simulation for the reforming process was conducted. Experimental data agreed well with the thermodynamic results, indicating that high thermal efficiency can be achieved with the thermal plasma reforming process.

Sun Yanpeng (???); Nie Yong (??); Wu Angshan (???); Ji Dengxiang (???); Yu Fengwen (???); Ji Jianbing (???)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

491

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

492

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

493

Mod II engine performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Automotive Stirling Engine Program (ASE) is directed at the development of a kinematic Stirling engine for automotive use. This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the NASA-Lewis Research Center (NASA-LeRC). Following proof-of-concept testing and development of promising performance values with early versions of the Stirling engine, a production-type automotive design, the Mod II engine, was developed. The design of this engine and its systems has been previously presented. Based on this design, the first engine has been built and development testing has started. Projections for this first engine build are presented in this paper. Results of initial tests are also given including identification of development items and formulation of plans for resolution of existing deficiencies.

Richey, A.E.; Huang, S.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Energy Use 3. Measuring Energy Performance 4. Performance Rating Systems 5. Energy Efficiency used from all sources in a year. British thermal unit (Btu) Generically, the amount of energy or heatEncyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605­616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

495

American Mineralogist, Volume 88, pages 624638, 2003 0003-004X/03/0004624$05.00 624  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Mineralogist, Volume 88, pages 624­638, 2003 0003-004X/03/0004­624$05.00 624 INTRODUCTION,1 AND GARY S. SOLAR2 1 Laboratory for Crustal Petrology, Department of Geology, University the regionally extensive thermal high. Peak pressures vary both along and across the strike of the Central Maine

Solar, Gary S.

496

The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume I, introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide consists of seven volumes which describe records useful for conducting health-related research at the DOE`s Rocky Flats Plant. Volume I is an introduction, and the remaining six volumes are arranged by the following categories: administrative and general, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, workplace and environmental monitoring, and employee occupational exposure and health. Volume I briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Project and provides information on the methodology used to inventory and describe the records series contained in subsequent volumes. Volume II describes records concerning administrative functions and general information. Volume III describes records series relating to the construction and routine maintenance of plant buildings and the purchase and installation of equipment. Volume IV describes records pertaining to the inventory and production of nuclear materials and weapon components. Records series include materials inventories, manufacturing specifications, engineering orders, transfer and shipment records, and War Reserve Bomb Books. Volume V describes records series pertaining to the storage, handling, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, chemical, or mixed materials produced or used at Rocky Flats. Volume VI describes records series pertaining to monitoring of the workplace and of the environment outside of buildings onsite and offsite. Volume VII describes records series pertaining to the health and occupational exposures of employees and visitors.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

Scott Hara

2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

498

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING RELIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING microstructure, and bondline thermal resistance with the tradeoffs between material systems, manufacturability of devices to heat sinks using existing commercial thermal interface materials (TIMs). The present study

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

499

Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

500

Kinematic Viscosity of Helium II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By observing the time of formation of the meniscus in a cylindrical vessel suddenly given a rotation, it has been found possible to determine, directly, the kinematic viscosity of both He I and He II. At the angular velocities used (?15 rev/sec) it appears that, for He II, all the liquid rotates rather than the normal component alone.

R. J. Donnelly; G. V. Chester; R. H. Walmsley; C. T. Lane

1956-04-01T23:59:59.000Z