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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Hinga, K.R. (ed.) ed.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume II, Appendices (Part 1 of 11)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI ChaptersII

3

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |GContract115I,I

5

Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

Trimble, V

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume I: Collection Stack Air Ambient Air Rainwater Creekscollection activities Volume II section Stormwater Ambient Air; RainwaterRainwater Radiological Activity Analyte Gross alpha Location* ENV-44 Collection

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

8

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

Denver, University of

9

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

10

HSWA Part II Permit Modification  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACMEFUTURE MOBILITY INPROCEEDINGS, R ePART

11

1996 Site environmental report. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory presents Volume II, data appendix as a reference document to supplement the 1996 Site Environmental Report. Volume II contains the raw environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate many of the summary results included in the main report for both routine and nonroutine activities. This appendix includes a legend that cross-references the enclosed data tables with summary tables in the main report. The legend also provides a listing of more detailed descriptions for the station location codes used in the appendices` tables. Data presented in the tables are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The glossary found in the main report contains a listing of the SI units.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

DOE/EH 0434 Part II: Procedures Manual (Revised 2012)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE-VPP Part II: Procedures Manual Onsite Review 15 space entry, machine guarding, lockouttagout, electrical equipment, power tools and welding) for appropriate analysis and...

15

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3 CONTENTS Three Creeks Caldera ................................................................................................................................... Scott Dean Geology of the Antelope Peak Area of the Southern .................................................................................................................. Craig D. Hall Geology of the Longlick and White Mountain Area, Southern San Francisco Mountains

Seamons, Kent E.

16

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I Preble Formation, a Cambrian Outer ..........................................................................J. Roger Olsen Geology of the Sterling Quadrangle, Sanpete County, Utah ..............................................................................James Michael Taylor Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Aertalphorograph rhowing

Seamons, Kent E.

17

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3 CONTENTS Remains of Ornithopod ...........................................................................................................................................................ames M. Stolle Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Index to volumes 21-25 of Brigham Young University Geology Studies ........................................Carol T . Smith and Nathan M. Smith Cwec

Seamons, Kent E.

18

Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype Core Elements Final Project System #12;#12;Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype Core Elements Final Center (PSERC) research project entitled "Seamless Energy Management Systems" (S-53G for 2013

19

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air; Soil Creeks; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer AmbientAir Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer FixedII section Stormwater Ambient Air; Rainwater Ambient Air

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

analysis part ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& H Schiler Page 2 Hans Peter Schwefel PHD Schwefel, Hans-Peter 6 Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

area part ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the...

22

LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIGRATION· PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS Alan Jaymay vary even though replacement fi~~d the pa~ameter value PIe N - P ;, RT I r:. fILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS. I.lan ~1ar

Jay Smith, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3 CONTENTS Studies for Students #lo, Geologic Guide to Provo Canyon and Weber Canyon, Central Wasatch Mountains, Utah ............................................................................................................................. Randy L. Chamberlain The Geology of the Drum Mountains, Millard and Juab Counties, Utah

Seamons, Kent E.

25

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I Papers presented at the 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28-29, 1978, at Brig- ham Young ............................................................................................................................Publications and Maps of the Geology Department 91 Cover The Great Basrn seen from a htgh

Seamons, Kent E.

26

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2 CONTENTS The Kinnikinic Quartzite ........................................................Robert Q. Oaks,Jr., and W . Calvin James Geology of the Sage Valley 7 W'Quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho, and Lincoln County, Wyoming ....................J ohn L. Conner Geology of the Elk Valley Quadrangle, Bear

Seamons, Kent E.

27

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4 The Fossil Vertebrates of Utah Salt Lake Gty, Utah 84102 W .E. Miller Deparlment~of Geology and Zoology Bngham Young Unrwerrrly Provo of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblln Cynthia M. Gardner Issue

Seamons, Kent E.

28

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2 CONTENTS Studies for Students ............................................................................................................................... Robert C. Ahlborn Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Sahara dune sand, X130. Photo, Univer~ityof Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham

Seamons, Kent E.

29

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2 CONTENTS Stratigraphy ...................................................................................................... Terry C. Gosney 27 Geology of the Champlin Peak Quadrangle,Juab and Millard Counties, Utah ..................................................................................................................................... David R. Keller 103 Publications and Maps of the Department of Geology 117 Cover: Rafted orjoreign

Seamons, Kent E.

30

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1 Papers reviewing geology of field trip areas, 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28 ....................................................................................................................................................... Geology of Volcanic Rocks and Mineral Deposits in the Southern Thomas Range, Utah: A Brief Summary

Seamons, Kent E.

31

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1 CONTENTS Diagenetic Aspects ................................................................................................... Steven G. Driese Geology of the Dog Valley-Red Ridge Area, Southern Pavant Mountains, Millard County .................................................................................................. Lynn C Meibos Geology of the Southwestern Quarter of the Scipio North (15-Minute) Quadrangle, Millard

Seamons, Kent E.

32

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2 CONTENTS A New Large Theropod................................................................................................................................................................ Danny J. Wyatt Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Cretaceouscoals near Castle Gate, Utab. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors

Seamons, Kent E.

33

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;P I - #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3 Conodont Biostratigraphy-meeting field trip held in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain section, Geological Society of America of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblin Cynthia M

Seamons, Kent E.

34

National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

Harrison M.

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Survey Part II. A Framework for Soil and Vegetation Dynamics Arlene Tugel, Soil Scientist Liaison to ARS, USDA-NRCS Las Cruces, NM and the Soils-ESD Advisory Group #12;What makes a site a site? Soil forming factors: climate, parent, material, biotic factors

38

AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

None

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

40

PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

Cambridge, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on management (states) (1) (2) (3) (4) (6) (5) #12;State and transition models, by definition, include soil #12;Part II. Ecological sites and state and transition models: A framework for soil and vegetation dynamics and management #12;The soil survey is the foundation of the ecological site inventory process

42

Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

Schofield, Daryl (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Abel, David (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cross Section Evaluation Group shielding benchmark compilation. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the time of the release of ENDF/B-IV in 1974, the Shielding Subcommittee had identified a series of 12 shielding data testing benchmarks (the SDT series). Most were used in the ENDF/B-IV data testing effort. A new concept and series was begun in the interim, the so-called Shielding Benchmark (SB) series. An effort was made to upgrade the SDT series as far as possible and to add new SB benchmarks. In order to be designated in the SB class, both an experiment and analysis must have been performed. The current recommended benchmark for Shielding Data Testing are listed. Until recently, the philosophy has been to include only citations to published references for shielding benchmarks. It is now our intention to provide adequate information in this volume for proper analysis of any new benchmarks added to the collection. These compilations appear in Section II, with the SB5 Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark as the first entry.

Rose, P.F.; Roussin, R.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

Xu, Xianfan

50

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume II, Transition-to-Lean Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume II of this guide is a standalone reference model for assisting lean change agents and lean implementation teams in transforming the enterprise to a lean state. It is also of value to enterprise leaders and senior ...

Lean Advancement Initiative

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

area volume ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mapping of the supernova remnant IC443 with the IRSFSIRIUS, using the two narrow-band filters tuned for the Fe II 1.257 micron and Fe II 1.644 micron lines. Covering a...

53

Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part II: The JET LHCD Cryopump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part II: The JET LHCD Cryopump

55

Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

D`Amelio, J.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Technical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 PART II OVERVIEW1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Since22 humans began taking advantage of fossil-fuel resources for energy, we have been releasing to theTechnical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 II-1 PART II OVERVIEW1 2 Energy, Industry, and Waste Fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) are used primarily for their concentration of chemical energy

57

Fast and Robust Algorithm for Compositional Modeling: Part II--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

later) we have noticed that compositional modeling of a rich-retrograde gas condensate het- erogeneous of our study, stability analysis testing in the reduced space was formulated, and its robustness- sitional modeling, stability analysis testing in the reduction method was presented.1 In this paper, Part

Firoozabadi, Abbas

58

Probabilistic Forecast Calibration Using ECMWF and GFS Ensemble Reforecasts. Part II: Precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Forecast Calibration Using ECMWF and GFS Ensemble Reforecasts. Part II: Precipitation for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, United Kingdom JEFFREY S. WHITAKER NOAA/Earth System Research As a companion to Part I, which discussed the calibration of probabilistic 2-m temperature forecasts using large

Hamill, Tom

59

Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Introduction As part of the LAKE-ICE experiment the University of Wisconsin Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction As part of the LAKE-ICE experiment the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) observed a land-breeze circulation along the western shore of Lake Michigan. During the classic structure of a density current along with gravity waves forced by the front. The University

Eloranta, Edwin W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

-Volume 20, Part 1 -January 1973 C O N T E N T S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRIGHAM YOUNG ~ UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY I:g $$ . - .::i@ STUDIES -Volume 20, Part 1 -January 1973 C O N ........................ Wm. Lac Stokes 11 Geology and Im&pasib of Im SpringsDistrict, .Iron County, Utah ............................................ Kenneth C. Bulludc 27 Oil and Gas Possibilities in Southern Nevada ............ Harold J. Bissell 65

Seamons, Kent E.

62

Unbonded Post Tensioned Concrete Slabs in Fire – Part II – Modelling Tendon Response and the Consequences of Localized Heating   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is Part II of a two part paper dealing with the current state of knowledge of the fire-safe structural design and construction of unbonded post-tensioned (UPT) flat plate concrete structures. Part I provided ...

Gales, John; Bisby, Luke; Gillie, Martin

63

Biophysical Journal Volume 84 March 2003 15911605 1591 Force Generation by Actin Polymerization II: The Elastic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biophysical Journal Volume 84 March 2003 1591­1605 1591 Force Generation by Actin Polymerization II by the polymerization of actin filaments. The propulsive force developed by the polymerization process is thought to arise from the thermal motions of the polymerizing filament tips. Recent experiments suggest

Oster, George

64

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

Carney, S. E. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sensitivity of Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity: Part I. Equilibrium State; Part II. Global Warming Scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I: The diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is one of the least known parameters in current climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio.

67

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume II (Part 1 of 24)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE WIPPForIII

68

Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall ScenarioElectricity Sector Conditions Assumed for Electricity Sector and Building

Wei, Max

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume II (geopressure thesaurus). Second Edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. It is a compilation of terms displaying synomymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system - the system vocabulary. The function of this thesaurus is to provide a standardized vocabulary for the information storage and retrieval system to facilitate both the indexing and subject-searching processes. In indexing, a thesaurus is used to translate the natural language of the document to be indexed into the standardized system vocabulary and to place the document at the appropriate level of generality or specificity in relation to the other documents in the data base. In subject retrieval, the thesaurus is used to match the natural language used in search requests with the system vocabulary and to find the most appropriate term to represent a concept.

Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical horizontal pressure gradient, wind energy transfer to the mixed layer can be more efficient in such a regime as compared to the case of an initially horizontally homogeneous ocean. However, nearly all energy is removed

Miami, University of

72

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis P August 2002 Abstract A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled the other losses. # 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Capacity fade; Sony 18650

Popov, Branko N.

73

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS. The material (made of T700 carbon /M21 epoxy prepegs) is here used as a sensor but could be also used]. The electrical resistivity of CFRP composites depends on the type and the orientation of the fiber

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

The problem of teaching object-oriented programming Part II: Environments1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The problem of teaching object-oriented programming Part II: Environments1 Michael Kölling School aspect: the importance of the environment. In short: a suitable programming environment is crucial-orientation, problems with the environment used were the most frequent and the most severe. Because of this importance

Kent, University of

75

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation S. A. GEDEON and T. W. EAGAR Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated

Eagar, Thomas W.

76

COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION Valerie K. Otero School "context." One of the fundamental features of the socio- cultural perspective is the notion that cognition theoretical perspectives of cognition where learning is viewed as the process of doing and participating

Colorado at Boulder, University of

77

PDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems -Part II: SOH Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehi- cles and renewable energy resources is battery energy storage. Advanced battery systems representPDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems - Part II: SOH Identification S sensing and actuation exists to monitor and control the internal state of these systems. As such, battery

Krstic, Miroslav

78

How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis DANIEL of vertical wind shear on the structure of warming and descent in the eye; results are compared with the no environment, time-averaged eye descent is maximized at 12­13-km height. Warming is not generally maximized

79

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron and neutron diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron Received in final form 29 September 2005 ABSTRACT Cold drawing of steel wires leads to an increase proposed that cold drawing would induce a phase transformation of the steel, possibly a martensitic

80

Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part II: Single-User Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part II: Single-User Prediction Zhe Chen, Nan Guo-user prediction of channel state is proposed to minimize the negative impact of response delays caused by hardware-SU) prediction is proposed and examined. In order to have convincing performance evaluation results, real- world

Qiu, Robert Caiming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Analytical solutions for sequentially coupled one-dimensional reactive transport problems Part II: Special cases,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical solutions for sequentially coupled one-dimensional reactive transport problems ­ Part II solutions to multi-species reactive transport equations coupled through sorption and sequential first special-case transport scenarios involving zero initial condition, identical retardation factors and zero

Clement, Prabhakar

82

Isogeometric Segmentation. Part II: On the segmentability of contractible solids with non-convex edges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method works by searching a sufficiently connected edge graph of the solid for a cycle of verticesIsogeometric Segmentation. Part II: On the segmentability of contractible solids with non a contractible boundary-represented solid into a small number of topological hexahedra. A satisfactory

JĂĽttler, Bert

83

Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation Jørgen Bauck Jensen and Sigurd of work that goes into the design of LNG processes, there is surprisingly little attention simple LNG process, namely the PRICO process. Keywords: PRICO, LNG, operation 1 Introduction The process

Skogestad, Sigurd

84

Estimating Central Equatorial Pacific SST Variability over the Past Millennium. Part II: Reconstructions and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Central Equatorial Pacific SST Variability over the Past Millennium. Part II boundary conditions. Wavelet coherence analysis reveals a robust antiphasing between solar forcing and Ni@usc.edu 1 APRIL 2013 E M I L E - G E A Y E T A L . 2329 DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00511.1 Ă? 2013 American

Wittenberg, Andrew

85

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Unified Approach (Extremes/Non-Extremes) (4) Complex Extreme Climate Design -- No longer only need for extreme value theory · Complex Extreme Events -- e. g., heat waves

Katz, Richard

86

Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part II: Experimental results and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part II: Experimental results-92322 Ch^atillon, France Abstract Measurements of CO2 emission spectra at high temperature in the 2.7 µm emission measurements using a microwave post-discharge in CO2 flow as emission source. The measurements

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Multilayer Broken Clouds. Part II: Validation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second part of our two-part paper we estimated the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations for the mean radiance that were derived in Part I. In our analysis we used the three-dimensional (3D) cloud fields provided by (i) the stochastic Boolean model, (ii) large-eddy simulation model and (iii) satellite cloud retrieval. The accuracy of the obtained equations was evaluated by comparing the ensemble-averaged radiative properties that were obtained by the numerical averaging method (reference) and the analytical averaging method (approximation). The robustness of these equations was estimated by comparing the domain-averaged radiative properties obtained by using (i) the full 3D cloud structure (reference) and (ii) the bulk cloud statistics (approximation). It was shown that the approximated equations could provide reasonable accuracy ({approx}15%) for both the ensemble-averaged and domain-averaged radiative properties.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part B, Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1. and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. Remedial action is the focus of Vol. 2, Pt. B, which has been divided into the three necessary subelements of the RA: characterization, RA, and robotics and automation. Each of these sections address general ORNL problems, which are then broken down by problem area/constituents and linked to potential remedial technologies. The diagrams also contain summary information about a technology`s status, its science and technology needs, and its implementation needs.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Site Environmental Report for 2010, Volumes 1 & 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and southern parts of LBNL. Downstream from the monitoringData Volume II section Chicken Creek— Downstream ChickenCreek downstream of routine monitoring site Creeks Chicken

Baskin, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Bottner, Harold [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tritt, Terry M. [Clemson University; Mayolett, Alex [Corning, Inc; Senawiratne, Jayantha [Corning, Inc; Smith, Charlene [Corning, Inc; Harris, Fred [ZT-Plus; Gilbert, Partricia [Marlow Industries, Inc; Sharp, J [Marlow Industries, Inc; Lo, Jason [CANMET - Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources of Canada; Keinke, Holger [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kiss, Laszlo I. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Space-qualified, abuttable packaging for LBNL p-channel CCDs, Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-qualified, abuttable packaging for LBNL p-channel CCDs, Part II R.W. Besuner1 , C. Baltay2 for 10.5 m pixel, 3.5k x 3.5k p-channel LBNL CCDs. These packages are built around a silicon carbide of 36.8mm square may be packed on a detector pitch as small as 44mm. LBNL-developed Front End

California at Berkeley, University of

95

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part II. Theory ) U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part II. Theory ) U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR A kinetic model-shielded welding. The model ac~o~nts .for changes i~ ~lloy r~covery based on the geometry of the resulting weld bead. It also dtstmgUJshes compos1t1onal dtfferences be- tween single-pass and multiple-pass weld beads

Eagar, Thomas W.

96

PULSE COMBUSTOR DESIGN QUALIFICATION TEST AND CLEAN COAL FEEDSTOCK TEST - VOLUME I AND VOLUME II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For this Cooperative Agreement, the pulse heater module is the technology envelope for an indirectly heated steam reformer. The field of use of the steam reformer pursuant to this Cooperative Agreement with DOE is for the processing of sub-bituminous coals and lignite. The main focus is the mild gasification of such coals for the generation of both fuel gas and char--for the steel industry is the main focus. An alternate market application for the substitution of metallurgical coke is also presented. This project was devoted to qualification of a 253-tube pulse heater module. This module was designed, fabricated, installed, instrumented and tested in a fluidized bed test facility. Several test campaigns were conducted. This larger heater is a 3.5 times scale-up of the previous pulse heaters that had 72 tubes each. The smaller heater has been part of previous pilot field testing of the steam reformer at New Bern, North Carolina. The project also included collection and reduction of mild gasification process data from operation of the process development unit (PDU). The operation of the PDU was aimed at conditions required to produce char (and gas) for the Northshore Steel Operations. Northshore Steel supplied the coal for the process unit tests.

Unknown

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E`s perspective on how these systems will operate.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Energy policy modeling: United States and Canadian experiences. Volume II. Integrative energy policy models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canadian Energy Policy Modeling Conference, held in North Vancouver, May 18-20, 1978, was organized to assess the state of the art in energy modeling in North America. A major aim of the conference was to determine the extent to which energy modeling had and could make a contribution to the energy-policy decision-making process. Two volumes contain revised and updated versions of the major papers presented at the conference plus edited transcripts of the panel discussions and several additional papers aimed at particular topics deemed worthy of further study. For this volume, Vol. II, a separate abstract was prepared for each of 17 papers, 2 panel discussions, and three session-introduction commentaries for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 7 abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Ziemba, W.T.; Schwartz, S.L. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Underground Energy Storage Program: 1981 annual report. Volume II. Technical summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the 1981 annual report for the Underground Energy Storage Program administered by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The two-volume document describes all of the major research funded under this program during the period March 1981 to March 1982. Volume II presents the amplified technical summaries of individual tasks and projects conducted during this reporting period. The activities of the authors reporting herein were actually broader in scope than may be reflected by the mini-reports. Readers wishing additional information on specific topics are invited to contact individual authors. The work described here represents one segment of a continuing effort to encourage development and implementation of advanced energy storage technology. The results and progress reported here rely on earlier studies and will, in turn, provide a basis for continued efforts to develop the STES and CAES technologies.

Kannberg, L.D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part II. High dose rate {sup 192}Ir sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper discussed the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources. Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the {sup 192}Ir sources were completed with several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A, Characterization, decontamination, dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

Fellows, R.L. [ed.

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - antidepressivos parte ii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

White Electrician II Gardner Rudasill Maintenance Foreman II Timothy... Mildred Mayes Landscape Maintenance Crew Leader Joshua Smith Grounds Keeper II ... Source: Behmer,...

104

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Seismic risk analysis for General Electric Plutonium Facility, Pleasanton, California. Final report, part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second of a two part study addressing the seismic risk or hazard of the special nuclear materials (SNM) facility of the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center at Pleasanton, California. The Part I companion to this report, dated July 31, 1978, presented the seismic hazard at the site that resulted from exposure to earthquakes on the Calaveras, Hayward, San Andreas and, additionally, from smaller unassociated earthquakes that could not be attributed to these specific faults. However, while this study was in progress, certain additional geologic information became available that could be interpreted in terms of the existance of a nearby fault. Although substantial geologic investigations were subsequently deployed, the existance of this postulated fault, called the Verona Fault, remained very controversial. The purpose of the Part II study was to assume the existance of such a capable fault and, under this assumption, to examine the loads that the fault could impose on the SNM facility. This report first reviews the geologic setting with a focus on specifying sufficient geologic parameters to characterize the postulated fault. The report next presents the methodology used to calculate the vibratory ground motion hazard. Because of the complexity of the fault geometry, a slightly different methodology is used here compared to the Part I report. This section ends with the results of the calculation applied to the SNM facility. Finally, the report presents the methodology and results of the rupture hazard calculation.

Not Available

1980-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

Meng, Zhiyong

112

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 59, NUMBER 8 15 OCTOBER 1973 Optical pumping of molecules II. Relaxation studies *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 59, NUMBER 8 15 OCTOBER 1973 Optical pumping of molecules II exceeds the diameter of the light beam which both pumps and samples the alignment, the relaxation. INTRODUCTION Optical pumping consists of the transfer of order from a light beam to a material sample. The op

Zare, Richard N.

113

Survey of Critical Biological Resources of Garfield County, Volume II: Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources 1313 plant communities, including wetland and riparian areas. Volume II focuses exclusively on wetland

114

UNIVERSITY 1 Volume 22, Part W u l y 1976 ........................Genesis of Western Book Cliffs Coals Robert G. Young  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cross ....Oil-impregnated Rodrs of Utah: Distribution, Geology, and Reserves Robert E. CovingtonGEOLOGY STUDIES UNIVERSITY 1 Volume 22, Part W u l y 1976 CONTENTS ........................Genesis.......................................................................... Oil-impregnated Rocks of Utah: USERDA Field Experiment to Recover Oil froni Tar Sand

Seamons, Kent E.

115

210 Biochemical Society Transactions (2012) Volume 40, part 1 PKA phosphorylation of the small heat-shock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

210 Biochemical Society Transactions (2012) Volume 40, part 1 PKA phosphorylation of the small heat The small heat-shock protein Hsp20 (heat-shock protein 20), also known as HspB6, has been shown to protect infarcts, and improved recovery of contractile performance during the reperfusion phase, compared with wild

Scott, John D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part A. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasbility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part A of Volume 3 contains the introduction and plant area conditions which include the following: (1) description of existing conditions-geology; (2) hydrology; (3) terrestrial and aquatic ecology; (4) meteorology; (5) land use existing conditions; (6) archaeology; (7) aesthetics-existing conditions; (8) acoustics; (9) existing socioeconomic conditions; and (10) resource assessment. 25 figures, 55 tables.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

Matthews, Hugh B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are connected to a fan coil unit by flexible ductwork asvariable air volume fan coil units typically used in

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume I (Part 1 of 37)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE WIPPForI

125

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume I, Chapters 1-6 (Part 1 of 7)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI Chapters

126

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI

127

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

128

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential Vorticity Perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential perturbations and propagating internal gravity waves in a horizon- tally sheared zonal flow is investigated. In the strong stratification limit, an initial vorticity perturbation weakly excites two propagating gravity

Farrell, Brian F.

130

JOINT ACOUSTIC-VIDEO FINGERPRINTING OF VEHICLES, PART II , F. Guo, A. C. Sankaranarayanan, and R. Chellappa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOINT ACOUSTIC-VIDEO FINGERPRINTING OF VEHICLES, PART II V. Cevher , F. Guo, A. C. Sankaranarayanan, and R. Chellappa Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 {volkan the wheelbase length of a vehicle using line metrology in video. We then address the vehi- cle fingerprinting

Cevher, Volkan

131

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 1 Unraveling the conundrum of river to Sedimentology, May, 2006 2 deltas is adapted to describe the response of the Fly-Strickland River system, Papua of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 3 Pleistocene-Holocene eustatic sea level rise of some 120 m

Parker, Gary

132

Electrodynamics II Exam 1. Part A (176 pts.) Closed Book Radiation and Scattering Name KSU 2006/02/21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (24) Determine the scattered electric field Esc in the radiation zone. d) (24) Averaging over incidentElectrodynamics II Exam 1. Part A (176 pts.) Closed Book Radiation and Scattering Name KSU 2006) when the sources J(r, t) and (r, t) have harmonic time dependence? 2. (12) In radiation problems

Wysin, Gary

133

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution, pressure drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by externally humidified air and hydrogen gas streams, must be present within the fuel cell to maintain 4 5 6 #12;a fuel cell blocks gas transport pathways in the catalyst layers, gas diffusion layersWater management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution

Kandlikar, Satish

134

Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emisions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume II- Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ninth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I - Summary Report - provides...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloys part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

au Journal de Physique 111,Volume 3, dkcembre 1993 Summary: Development of oxidation resistant high temperature NbTiAl alloys and intermetallics M. Allouard, Y. Bienvenu......

136

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center .IX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - PartIX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - Part I;

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A generic grid interface for parallel and adaptive scientific Part II: implementation and tests in DUNE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as the finite element, finite volume, and finite difference method as well as various gridless methods. For each, C++, finite ele- ments, finite volumes 1 Introduction Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are abundant in science and engineering. There is a large body of methods to numerically solve PDEs

Bastian, Peter

138

Advanced systems demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume II. Technical specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains all of the technical specifications relating to materials and construction of the biomass cogeneration facility in the state of Maine. (DMC)

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

SHOOP, D.S.

1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced control strategies for HVAC&R systems—An overview: Part II: Soft and fusion control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for HVAC&R is presented. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and the fusion or hybrid of hard and soft control techniques. Part I focused on hardcontrol strategies; Part II focuses on soft and fusion control and some future directions in HVA&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE ZERH Webinar: Going Green and Building Strong: Building FORTIFIED Homes Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Part 1 of this series introduced the basic concepts of building and wind interactions and how the FORTIFIED building programs can reduce property damage and loss.  In Part 2, IBHS will discuss the...

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - areas-part ii implementation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 CFR 191 COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION Summary: Report Rev 3 (DOECAO-95- 1121) 696 II-A-26 101596 EPA ReportEPA-402-R-96-010, Implementation......

148

GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix consists of two unpublished reports produced by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These two reports formed the basis for the subsequent development of the Fuel Economy Model described in Volume 1. They are included in order to document more completely the efforts undertaken to construct a comprehensive model of automobile fuel economy. The supplemental reports are as follows: Supplement 1--Documentation Attributes of Technologies to Improve Automotive Fuel Economy; Supplement 2--Analysis of the Fuel Economy Boundary for 2010 and Comparison to Prototypes.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota #12;PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

153

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion part-load behavior. Volume I. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests performed during 1980 to determine the part-load characteristics of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor for a combined-cycle power plant and to examine its behavior during load changing are discussed. Part-load operation was achieved by varying the bed temperature by amounts between 200 to 300/sup 0/F and the bed depth from between 9 and 10 ft at rates varying between 0.2 ft/min and 0.5 ft/min. The performance at part-load steady-state conditions and during transient conditions is reported with information on combustion efficiency (99% at full-load with 9 ft bed depth and 1650/sup 0/F bed temperature; 95% with 4 ft depth and 1390/sup 0/F); sulfur retention (95/sup 0/ at full load to 80% at low bed depth and low bed temperature); sulfur emissions (no definitive results); NO/sub x/ emissions (tendency for increase as bed temperature was reduced); alkali emissions (no bed temperature effect detected); and heat transfer. It was demonstrated that load can be altered in a rapid and controlled manner by changing combinations of bed depth temperature and pressure. The most important practical change was the reduction in O/sub 2/ concentration which occurred when the bed height was increased at a rapid rate. The extra energy required to reheat the incoming bed material resulted (in the most extreme case) in a temporary drop in excess air from 65% to 12%. In a full-scale plant the loss of heat from the stored bed material would be much lower and the excess air trough when increasing load would not be as pronounced. Nevertheless, it seems prudent to design full-scale plant for a full load excess air of not less than about 50% when using bed depth as a load control parameter.

Roberts, A. G.; Pillai, K. K.; Raven, P.; Wood, P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 18 P

155

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 18

156

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 180,

157

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER

158

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P H

159

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P H6

160

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P8,

162

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3

163

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER318 P

164

VOLUME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER318

165

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgram | Department of Energy DOE Appoints StephenII)

166

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

TRADE (Training Resources and Data Exchange) nontechnical training programs inventory. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a continuing effort to facilitate communications and resource exchange among the DOE contractors, the TRADE (Training Resources and Data Exchange) Committee has compiled this volume. This inventory is one of four inventories which, taken together, total almost 1400 courses and reflect the range and focus of in-house training programs being offered throughout the DOE GOCO system by approximately 50 contractors.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B permit application. Volume 8, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the tenth Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER), documenting the progress of environmental programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The most significant change affecting the WIPP facility in 1993 was the cancellation of the Test Phase. All activities pertaining to the Test Phase will now be conducted at the Idaho National Engineering laboratory. Even though the cancellation of the Test Phase was a significant change in work scope for the WIPP, there are still numerous environmental monitoring and reporting activities that must be performed as a routine part of daily operations. These activities, and the WIPP's ability to demonstrate compliance with both state and federal environmental compliance requirements, are documented in this report. This report is a compilation and summarization of environmental data collected at the WIPP site.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

PART II, Tackling Grand Challenges in Geochemistry: Q&A with Andrew Stack |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012)

171

Code of Federal Regulations Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing procedural rules to be used in applying its substantive regulations and orders relating to nuclear safety. These procedural rules are intended to be an essential part of the framework through which DOE deals with its contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers to ensure its nuclear facilities are operated in a manner that protects public and worker safety and the environment. In particular, this part sets forth the procedures to implement the provisions of the Price- Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 (PAAA) which subjects DOE contractors to potential civil and criminal penalties for violations of DOE rules, regulations and orders relating to nuclear safety (DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements).

172

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmartDepartment of Energy 2010 Federalup toDepartmentI)II)

173

Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

Not Available

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Review of "The Complete Works of John Milton: Volume II" by Laura Lunger Knoppers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

York: Oxford University Press, 2008. civ + 170 pp. + 10 illus. $135.00. Review by lara m. crowley, texas tech university. The first volume to be published in the highly anticipated Oxford edition of Milton?s works bases texts of Paradise Regain?d... might have chosen Starkey as publisher of Paradise Regain?d and Samson Agonistes for this reason. While revealing and highly suggestive, these two sections might have benefited from attention to debates regarding composition dates, an issue...

Crowley, Lara M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Portugal and United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 3. Reference reports, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical data on energy production and consumption and supporting information were obtained from US Bureau of Mines records supplemented by additional data obtained in Portugal. Geologic descriptions and analysis of known areas and of areas having possible future potential have been prepared by the US Geological Survey. Portugal lacks sufficient indigenous supplies of organic fuels to meet its energy demands, and so must import large quantities of petroleum and coal. Approximately 80% of Portugal's electric energy is produced by hydroelectric stations; thermal stations produce the other 20%. Portugal has produced no crude oil, natural gas, or condensate; no resources or reserves in these categories are listed for Portugal in the 1976 World Energy Conference report. Until the last year or so (1980), no significant onshore petroleum exploration had been done in Portugal since 1963. Production of coal in Portugal has declined steadily to the present annual yield of about 200,000 metric tons. On the basis of estimates in only three coal fields, resources of coal of all ranks in Portugal total at least 76 million (10/sup 6/) metric tons. Uranium is mined near Viseu and Guarda in the northern part of Portugal; the Nisa mine in east-central Portugal will begin producing uranium ore in 1985 after installation of a processing plant. Portugal produced 95 metric tons of uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) from ore stocks in each year from 1972 through 1974; production is assumed to have continued at the same rate since then. Geothermal energy has not been developed in mainland Portugal; however, hot springs that may have geothermal energy potential are known in the Minho district in the northwest. Geothermal energy resources exist in the Azores and a program of evaluation and exploration with technical assistance from the USGS is presently in progress there.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 17, NO. 2, MARCH/APRIL 2011 261 Green Optical Communications--Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption of the switching infrastructure is larger than the energy consumption of the trans- port consumption in optical commu- nications. Part I covers energy consumption in optical transport. Part II explores the lower bound on energy consumption in optical switches and networks, analyzes the energy

Tucker, Rod

178

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant- Volume II, August 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in July and August 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This volume discusses the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program. The results of the review of the WIPP environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs are discussed in Volume I of this report, and the combined results are discussed in a summary report. The results of this review indicate that, overall, CBFO and WTS have effectively addressed nearly all of the weaknesses identified during the May 2000 OA emergency management review. Furthermore, as a consequence of that effort, CBFO and WTS have implemented a hazardous material emergency management program that, with few exceptions, meets Departmental expectations for providing a system that protects responders, site workers, and the public in the event of an emergency at WIPP. Section 2 of this volume provides an overall discussion of the results of the review of the WIPP emergency management program, including positive aspects, findings, and other items requiring management attention. Section 3 provides OA’s conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of CBFO and WTS management of the emergency management program. Section 4 presents the ratings assigned as a result of this review. Appendix A provides supplemental information, including team composition. Appendix B identifies the findings that require corrective action and follow-up. Appendices C- F detail the results of the reviews of individual emergency management program elements.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 3, 5. 0 Radiation safety and environment; 6. 0 Physics and technology R and D needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II Tokamak. This particular volume discusses: safety and environmental requirements and design targets; accident analyses; personnel safety and maintenance exposure; effluent control; waste management and decommissioning; safety considerations in building design; and safety and environmental conclusions and recommendations. (LSP)

Lee, J.D. (ed.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

none,

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Inspection of Emergency Management Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory- East, Volume II, May 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory – East (ANL-E) in April and May 2002. The OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight performed the inspection as a joint effort. This volume discusses the results of the review of the ANL-E emergency management program. The results of the review of the ANL-E environment, safety, and health programs are discussed in Volume I of this report, and the combined results are discussed in the summary report. This OA evaluation found an emergency management program in a state of transition resulting from the recent organizational, personnel, and programmatic changes. ANL has developed hazards assessments that generally serve as a good foundation for the emergency management program for the events that were analyzed, and in most cases the ICs and the emergency response center (ERC) team appropriately considered protective actions and took actions to mitigate the postulated event. Section 2 of this report provides an overall discussion of the results that characterize the ANL-E emergency management program elements that were evaluated. Section 3 provides OA’s conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of the program. Section 4 presents the ratings assigned as a result of this review. Appendix A provides supplemental information, including team member composition. Appendix B identifies the findings that require corrective actions and follow-up. Appendices C through F detail the results of the reviews of individual emergency management program elements.

186

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Load and Demand-Side Management submodule. Volume 2, Model code listing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the documentation contains the actual source code of the LDSM submodule, and the cross reference table of its variables. The code is divided into two parts. The first part contains the main part of the source code. The second part lists the INCLUDE files referenced inside the main part of the code.

Not Available

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters ? and ?. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, ? and ?, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers ? to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing ? by about 0.07 compared to DM, with ? unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases ? by about 2 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2}, and lowers ? by about 0.14 compared to LE images. A comparison of SE and DE CEDM at 4 min postcontrast shows equivalent power law parameters in unprocessed images, and lower ? and ? by about 3 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2} and 0.50, respectively, in DE versus SE subtracted images.Conclusions: Image subtraction in both SE and DE CEDM reduces ? by over a factor of 2, while maintaining ? below that in DM. Given the equivalent ? between SE and DE unprocessed CEDM images, and the smaller anatomical noise in the DE subtracted images, the DE approach may have an advantage over SE CEDM. It will be necessary to test this potential advantage in future lesion detectability experiments, which account for realistic lesion signals. The authors' results suggest that LE images could be used in place of DM images in CEDM exam interpretation.

Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, R?zvan; Muller, Serge [GE Healthcare, 283 rue de la Miničre, Buc 78530 (France)] [GE Healthcare, 283 rue de la Miničre, Buc 78530 (France); Jong, Roberta A. [Breast Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Breast Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulin, Villejuif 94805 (France)] [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulin, Villejuif 94805 (France)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment.

None

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of line focus solar central power systems. Volume II. Systems evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation was completed to ascertain the applicability of line focus technologies to electrical power applications and to compare their performance and cost potential with point focus central receiver power systems. It was concluded that although the high temperature line focus (SRI) and fixed mirror line focus (GA) concepts duplicate the heat source characteristics and power conversion technology of the central receiver concepts these configurations do not offer a sufficient improvement in cost to warrant full scale development. The systems are, however, less complex than their point focus counterpart and should the central receiver system development falter they provide reasonable technology alternatives. The parabolic trough concept (BDM) was found to provide a low temperature technology alternative to the central receiver concept with promising performance and cost potential. Its continued development is recommended, with special emphasis on lower temperature (< 700/sup 0/F) applications. Finally, a variety of new promising line focus power system configurations were identified for a range of utility and industrial applications and recommendations were made on their implementation. This volume contains the detailed report. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Excluded Volume Effects in Polymer Solutions: II. Comparison of Experimental Results with Numerical Simulation Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of excluded volume on the coil size of dilute linear polymers was investigated by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. The radius of gyration R{sub g} was evaluated for a wide range of chain lengths at several temperatures and at the athermal condition. The theta temperature and the corresponding theta chain dimensions were established for the system, and the dependence of the size expansion factor, a{sub s} = R{sub g} /(R{sub g}){sub {theta}}, on chain length N and temperature T was examined. For long chains and at high temperatures, a{sub s} is a function of N/N{sub s}{sup 2} alone, where the length scale N{sub s}{sup 2} depends only on T. The form of this simulations-based master function compares favorably with {alpha}{sub s}(M/M{sub s}{sup 2}), an experimental master curve for linear polymers in good solvents, where M{sub s}{sup 2} depends only on polymer-solvent system. Comparisons when N{sub s}{sup 2}(T) and M{sub s}{sup 2}(system) are reduced to common units, numbers of Kuhn steps, strongly indicate that coil expansion in even the best of good solvents is small relative to that expected for truly athermal solutions. An explanation for this behavior is proposed, based on what would appear to be an inherent difference in the equation of state properties for polymeric and monomeric liquids.

Graessley, W.W.; Grest, G.S.; Hayward, R.C.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earlier studies have shown that although large quantities of agricultural residues are generated on small farms, it was difficult to economically justify use of conventional anaerobic digestion technology, such as used for sewage sludge digestion. A simple, unmixed, earthen-supported structure appeared to be capable of producing significant quantities of biogas at a cost that would make it competitive with many existing fuels. The goal of this study was to define and demonstrate a methane fermentation technology that could be practical and economically feasible on small farms. This study provides the first long term, large scale (reactor volumes of 34 m/sup 3/) parallel testing of the major theory, design, construction, and operation of a low cost approach to animal manure fermentation as compared to the more costly and complex designs. The main objectives were to define the lower limits for successful fermentor operation in terms of mixing, insulation, temperature, feed rate, and management requirements in a cold climate with both pilot scale and full scale fermentors. Over a period of four years, innovative fermentation processes for animal manures were developed from theoretical concept to successful full scale demonstration. Reactors were sized for 50 to 65 dairy animals, or for the one-family dairy size. The results show that a small farm biogas generation system that should be widely applicable and economically feasible was operated successfully for nearly two years. Although this low cost system out-performed the completely mixed unit throughout the study, perhaps the greatest advantage of this approach is its ease of modification, operation, and maintenance.

Jewell, W. J.; Dell'orto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Hayes, T. D.; Leuschner, A. P.; Sherman, D. F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR.

West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 10, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the continuation of Appendix D3, which consists of engineering drawings of engineering change orders and drawing change sheets for the WIPP underground facility.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

LIFE Materials: Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical, and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report (Volume 8 - Molten-salt Fuels) is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermo-chemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenges are not insurmountable, and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

none,

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

202

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

203

In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II structures that dominate wave momentum and energy transport. When the interior of a typical midlatitude jet and energy at jet interior critical levels. Longer waves transport momentum and energy away from the jet

Farrell, Brian F.

205

M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342351, 2009. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342 media consumption. Keywords: categorical data, visualization, multi-dimensional analysis. 1 Introduction The visualization of categorical data occurs in various fields, such as mass media and marketing research

Misue, Kazuo

206

A Study of Educational Simulations Part II Interface W. K. Adams, S. Reid, R. LeMaster, S. B. McKagan, K. K. Perkins, M. Dubson and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations for teaching and learning physic, chemistry and physical science. 2 #12;Team, 2006). This analysis on the general features of a simulation that are most important for achieving engagement and learning. HereA Study of Educational Simulations Part II ­ Interface Design W. K. Adams, S. Reid, R. LeMaster, S

Colorado at Boulder, University of

207

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

14 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 (4) Environmentally preferable and energy efficient electronics including desktop computers, laptops and monitors are at...

208

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

procurement for FEMP designated products (4) Environmentally preferable and energy efficient electronics including desktop computers, laptops and monitors are at...

209

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL

210

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Publi dans un ouvrage collectif, Guillemin H., Jorda H. et Pouchol M. (d.), La dmocratie et le march. Economie et dmocratie volume II, coll. Economie et innovation, srie Krisis, Innoval,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marché. Economie et démocratie volume II, coll. Economie et innovation, série Krisis, Innoval, L'Harmattan Démocratie volume II, L'Harmattan (Ed.) (2002) 317 - 331" #12;Publié dans un ouvrage collectif, Guillemin H. Economie et innovation, série Krisis, Innoval, L'Harmattan, pp.317-331. 2 Cette manière de définir la

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

Nuclear Facility Decommissioning and Site Remedial Actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 14. Environmental Restoration Program: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Part 2 of this report provides indexes of: Author, Corporate Affiliation, Title Word, Publication Description, Geographic Location, Subject Category, and Key Words.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, part of the permit application for the WIPP facility, presents engineering drawings and engineering change orders for the facility. (CBS)

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 2: Main report -- Part A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the, waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Robotica (2004) volume 22, pp. 599609. 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0263574704000396 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica (2004) volume 22, pp. 599­609. © 2004 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S, and manufacturability consideration. Part II on real machine design will follow in the next issue of Robotica. KEYWORDS

Kim, Jongwon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Revision of the orchid bee subgenus Euglossella (Hymenoptera: Apidae), part II: The viridis and mandibularis species groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The second and final part of a revision of the subgenus Euglossella Moure in the orchid bee genus Euglossa Latreille (Apinae: Euglossini) is presented here, redefining the species groups within it to comply with current ...

Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part II: Field Evaluation and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intent is to validate the DB FDD performance and demonstrate its applications. The first part focuses on sensitivity and robustness evaluation through controlled field emulation testing. In this paper, the technique is applied to a number of field sites...

Li, H.; Braun, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1979. Volume II. Project listings and indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains summaries of FY 1979 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each contributing agency. Information elements included in the summary listings are project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in the back of this volume.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Materials for electrochemical energy storage and conversion II -- Batteries, capacitors and fuel cells. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 496  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our energy-hungry world is increasingly relying on new methods to store and convert energy for portable electronics, as well as new, environmentally friendly modes of transportation and electrical energy generation. The availability of advanced materials is linked to the commercial success of improved power sources such as batteries, fuel cells and capacitors with higher specific energy and power, longer cycle life and rapid change/discharge rates. The papers in this symposium were heavily weighted toward lithium batteries. The proceedings volume is organized into six sections highlighting: general papers on a wide variety of rechargeable battery technologies; new approaches to modeling of Li batteries; advances in fuel-cell technology; new work on Li battery cathodes; anodes and electrolytes; and work on super-capacitors. The authors think the volume is an excellent snapshot of the current state of the art in energy storage and conversion technologies, many of which will make a significant impact on society. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

Ginley, D.S.; Doughty, D.H.; Scrosati, B.; Takamura, T.; Zhang, Z.J. [eds.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Optimal supply chain design and management over a multi-period horizon under demand uncertainty. Part II: A Lagrangean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industry, or more specifically the electric motor industry as was illustrated in part 1 (Rodriguez et al to an LP to improve solution efficiency while providing a valid lower bound. An initialization scheme-level inventory is important (bound capital). Moreover, it is critical that a spare motor can be obtained as soon

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

228

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1239 Analysis of CMOS Photodiodes--Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1239 Analysis of CMOS Photodiodes of quantum efficiency for CMOS photodiode was illustrated. In this part of the paper, the lateral photoresponse in CMOS photodiode arrays is investigated with test linear photodiode arrays and numerical device

Hornsey, Richard

229

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, December 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA), within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance (SSA), conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during October and November 2004. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Volume II of this report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for LLNL work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of NNSA, LSO, and contractor feedback and continuous improvement processes. Appendix E presents the results of the review of Plutonium Building essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of management of the selected focus areas.

230

West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume II- Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.E. December 2010 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System 2009 TERP Report, Vol. II, p. 1 December 2010 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System ENERGY SYSTEMS... Plan 1 Executive Summary The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. ? 388.003 (e...

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Claridge, D.

232

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Non-linear and quantum optics of a type II OPO containing a birefringent element Part 1: Classical operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe theoretically the main characteristics of the steady state regime of a type II Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) containing a birefringent plate. In such a device the signal and idler waves are at the same time linearly coupled by the plate and nonlinearly coupled by the $\\chi^{(2)}$ crystal. This mixed coupling allows, in some well-defined range of the control parameters, a frequency degenerate operation as well as phase locking between the signal and idler modes. We describe here a complete model taking into account all possible effects in the system, \\emph{i.e.} arbitrary rotation of the waveplate, non perfect phase matching, ring and linear cavities. This model is able to explain the detailed features of the experiments performed with this system.

Laurent Longchambon; Julien Laurat; Thomas Coudreau; Claude Fabre

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

PART II -Core Leader Competencies (what a leader does): Works to lead others; develops themselves, their subordinates and organizations to achieve mission accomplishment 1. Character: A person's moral and ethical qualities which give a leader motivation t  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PART II - Core Leader Competencies (what a leader does): Works to lead others; develops themselves or consequences 4. SELFLESS-SERVICE: Places welfare of others and Army priorities before self 6. INTEGRITY: Does that are an inherent part of an individual's total core, physical, and intellectual aspects. Attributes shape how one

Maxwell, Bruce D.

235

A Procedure for the Performance Evaluation of a New Commercial Building: Part II – Overall Methodology and Comparison of Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e., boiler) (LBNL 1993). Table 3 shows the plant model at normal oper- ation conditions for the as-built simulation. According to the © 2008, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (www.ashrae.org). Published... Transactions Vol. 114, Part 2. 394 ASHRAE Transactions 2 (LBNL 1993). In this study, the DOE-2 default efficiency was first adjusted with manufacturer’s data and then measured data to account for the actual HVAC performance at normal operation conditions...

Song, S.; Haberl, J.S.

236

Stability of the Minimizers of Least Squares with a Non-Convex Regularization. Part II: Global Behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We address estimation problems where the sought-after solution is definedas the minimizer of an objective function composed of a quadratic data-fidelity term and a regularization term. We especially focus on non-convex and possibly non-smooth regularization terms because of their ability to yield good estimates.This work is dedicated to the stability of the minimizers of such piecewise C{sup m}, with m {>=} 2, non-convex objective functions. It is composed of two parts. In the previous part of this work we considered general local minimizers. In this part we derive results on global minimizers. We show that the data domain contains an open, dense subset such that for every data point therein, the objective function has a finite number of local minimizers, and a unique global minimizer. It gives rise to a global minimizer function which is C{sup m-1} everywhere on an open and dense subset of the data domain.

Durand, S. [LAMFA UMR 6140, Universite de Picardie, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 90039 Amien Cedex (France)], E-mail: sdurand@cmla.ens-cachan.fr; Nikolova, M. [CMLA UMR 8536, ENS de Cachan, 61 av. du President Wilson, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France)], E-mail: nikolova@cmla.ens-cachan.fr

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Pre-asymptotic Error Analysis of CIP-FEM and FEM for Helmholtz Equation with High Wave Number. Part II: $hp$ version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, which is part II in a series of two, the pre-asymptotic error analysis of the continuous interior penalty finite element method (CIP-FEM) and the FEM for the Helmholtz equation in two and three dimensions is continued. While part I contained results on the linear CIP-FEM and FEM, the present part deals with approximation spaces of order $p \\ge 1$. By using a modified duality argument, pre-asymptotic error estimates are derived for both methods under the condition of $\\frac{kh}{p}\\le C_0\\big(\\frac{p}{k}\\big)^{\\frac{1}{p+1}}$, where $k$ is the wave number, $h$ is the mesh size, and $C_0$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and the penalty parameters. It is shown that the pollution errors of both methods in $H^1$-norm are $O(k^{2p+1}h^{2p})$ if $p=O(1)$ and are $O\\Big(\\frac{k}{p^2}\\big(\\frac{kh}{\\sigma p}\\big)^{2p}\\Big)$ if the exact solution $u\\in H^2(\\Om)$ which coincide with existent dispersion analyses for the FEM on Cartesian grids. Here $\\si$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and t...

Zhu, Lingxue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Compliance problems of small utility systems with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978: volume II - appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the problems of compliance with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 experienced by electric utility systems which have a total generating capacity of less than 2000 MW is presented. This volume presents the following appendices: (A) case studies (Farmington, New Mexico; Lamar, Colorado; Dover, Delaware; Wolverine Electric Cooperative, Michigan; Central Telephone and Utilities, Kansas; Sierra Pacific Power Company, Nevada; Vero Beach, Florida; Lubbock, Texas; Western Farmers Cooperative, Oklahoma; and West Texas Utilities Company, Texas); (B) contacts and responses to study; (C) joint action legislation chart; (D) Texas Municipal Power Agency case study; (E) existing generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (F) future generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (G) Federal Register Notice of April 17, 1980, and letter of inquiry to utilities; (H) small utility responses; and (I) Section 744, PIFUA. (WHK)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Sandia National Laboratories, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at DOE Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) during March and April 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. This volume of the report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for SNL work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of NNSA, SSO, and SNL feedback and continuous improvement processes and management systems. Appendix E presents the results of the review of essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of safety management of the selected focus areas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during April and May 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. This volume of the report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for ANL work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of SC, ASO, and ANL feedback and continuous improvement processes and management systems. Appendix E presents the results of the review of essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of safety management of the selected focus areas.

242

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Decontamination; robotics/automation; waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of the Technology Logic Diagrams (TLDs) for the decontamination, robotics/automation, and waste management areas.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

245

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Pantex Plant, Technical Appendices, Volume II, February 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Pantex Plant during January and February 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. OA reports to the Director of the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, who reports directly to the Secretary of Energy. This volume of the report provides four technical appendices (C through F) containing detailed results of the OA review. Appendix C provides the results of the review of the application of the core functions of ISM for Pantex Plant work activities. Appendix D presents the results of the review of NNSA, PXSO, and BWXT feedback and continuous improvement processes and management systems. Appendix E presents the results of the review of essential safety system functionality, and Appendix F presents the results of the review of safety management of the selected focus areas.

247

I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of {alpha}-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of {alpha}-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental {alpha}-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation theory is augmented to include multiple-chance emission and tested on experimental data to yield positive results.

Breus, Dimitry E.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

DOE Backup Power Working Group Best Practices Handbook for Maintenance and Operation of Engine Generators, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lubricating oil system provides a means to introduce a lubricant in the form of a film to reduce friction and wear between surfaces that bear against each other as they move.1 The oil film which is established also cools the parts by carrying generated heat away from hot surfaces, cleans and carries dirt or metal wear particles to the filter media, and helps seal the piston to the cylinder during combustion. Most systems are pressure lubricated and distribute oil under pressure to bearings, gears, and power assemblies. Lubricating oil usually reaches main, connecting rod, and camshaft bearings through drilled passages in the cylinder block and crankshaft or through piping and common manifolds.Many parts rely on oil for cooling, so if the lube oil system fails to perform its function the engine will overheat. Metal to metal surfaces not separated by a thin film of oil rapidly build up frictional heat. As the metals reach their melting point, they tend to weld together in spots or streaks. Lube oil system failures can cause significant damage to an engine in a short period of time. Proper maintenance and operation of the lubricating oil system is essential if your engine is to accomplish its mission.

Gross, R.E.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 5: Design validation assessments and lists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. The following Code Evaluation analyzes the applicable sections of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 101, Life Safety Code, 1994 Edition and the 1994 Edition of the Uniform Building Code (UBC) to the W113 Trench Enclosure. A Building Code Analysis generally establishes four primary design criteria: occupancy classification; separation requirements; egress requirements; and construction type. The UBC establishes requirements for all criteria. This analysis is limited to the Trench Enclosure Building. The General Office Building and the Retrieval Staff Change Building is not within the scope of this analysis.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the number density calculation may be necessary in the complete calculation scheme.

Vincent Descotes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Environmental Analysis and Technical Appendices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA is considering whether to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P. The project would be located about 19 kilometers (12 miles) southeast of downtown Tacoma in the Frederickson Industrial Area, Pierce County. The proposed plant would occupy about half of a 6.4-hectare (16-acre) parcel and would be consistent with the industrial character of its surroundings. The proposed site is currently undeveloped and zoned for industrial use by the county. Main environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and in comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) include: (1) potential air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contribution to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) potential health and safety impacts, such as nuisance odors, plant safety, visibility and heat-emission systems which may affect low-flying planes and potential health effects of electric and magnetic fields; and (3) potential water quality and quantity impacts, such as the amount of wastewater to be discharged, the source and amount of water required for plant operation. These and other issues are discussed in detail in the EIS. The proposed project already includes many features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on investigations performed for the EIS, no significant unavoidable adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial. The EIS is being mailed to numerous agencies, groups, and individuals (see Section 8.0). There will be a 30-day no-action period before any decisions are made and the Record of Decision is signed.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Review of "Protestant Nonconformist Texts, Volume 1: 1550 to 1700" by R. Tudor Jones, Arthur Long, and Rosemary Moore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the Glorious Revolu- tion: ?Part I: The Beginnings, 1550?1603?; ?Part II: Perseverence, 1604?1642?; ?Part III: Facets of Freedom, 1640?1660?; and ?Part IV: Persecution, 1660?1689.? The section titles clearly reflect the concerns.... In this way the entire volume reflects the concerns of the Noncon- formists themselves rather than the potentially anachronistic interests of later scholars. The book is divided into eight sections. The first four sections are chronologically arranged...

Matthews, Steven Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 2: Solid waste retrieval facilities -- Phase 1, detail design drawings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 2 provides the complete set of the Detail Design drawings along with a listing of the drawings. Once approved by WHC, these drawings will be issued and baselined for the Title 3 construction effort.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

Fellows, R.L. [ed.

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

HSWA Part II Permit Modification  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City, Kansas, this 24th day of August , 2012. Final Original signed by John J. Smith for Rebecca Weber Director Air and Waste Management Division August 24, 2012 Date...

258

Part II, General Compliance Supplement  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the page; find the Recipient Reported Data Search section 36 - Click on -Go (do not enter the name of the Agency, StateTerritory or the amount) to be taken to the -Advanced...

259

REGENTS' POLICY PART II -ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and management of the university's educational programs. The president will recommend the structure real and personal property, effective controls over all funds received or receivable and other assets by and report to the president. The position will oversee the university's educational programs, and be assisted

Pantaleone, Jim

260

Fundamental aspects of coal-water fuel droplet combustion and secondary atomization of coal-water mixtures. Volume II, final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Final Report is issued in two volumes, covering research into the combustion of Coal Water Fuels (CWF). Two separate but related tasks are discussed; Volume I contains results obtained under Task 1 - Fundamental aspects ...

Ber?, J. M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 2. Accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF), performed by the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume II of the six-volume set presents the results of the accounting portion, including sections on accounting adjustments and company-use gas. It identifies enhancements to accounting practices that make records more accurately reflect the physical activity occurring in the system. The result is an accounting record of gas volumes received and delivered which have been adjusted for the enhancements, and exclude accounting estimates and prior period adjustments.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Law, E.; Rudshagen, C.; Yevchak, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F1--F8 -- Volume 2, Part 1, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation; Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Bucholz, J.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Fraley, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | DepartmentC PART

266

PART III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012)J TOC PART III List

267

Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for automated rotating/flipping/aligning system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements with x-ray optics. Part 1: Review of LTP errorsprecise reflective X-ray optics,” Nucl. Inst. and Meth. Ameasurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for

Ali, Zulfiqar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 2: Human error probability (HEP) data; Volume 5, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data.

Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion): Volume 3, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Part B (Vol. 3) of the permit application for the WIPP facility, contains information related to the site characterization of the facility, including geology, design, rock salt evaluations, maps, drawings, and shaft excavations. (CBS)

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Part B ( Vol. 2) of the permit application for the WIPP facility, contains information related to the WIPP site on hydrology, geology, maps, and rock salt properties.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part II. Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste forms of /sup 3/H, /sup 129/I, /sup 14/C, and /sup 85/Kr separated from fuel reprocessing streams and procedures for managing them were analyzed regarding compliance with regulations. Transportation of these wastes in certain DOT-specification packagings would be permissible, but some of these packagings may not be acceptable in some disposal situations. Transportation of gaseous /sup 85/Kr in a currently certified cylinder is possible, but a fuel reprocessor may wish to ship larger quantities per package. Disposal of tritium using a package designed by a DOE contractor and shallow land burial, in accord with the regulations of 10 CFR 61, seems practicable. Although 10 CFR 61 permits shallow land burial of /sup 129/I, the concentration limit requires distribution in a volume that may seem impractical to commercial fuel reprocessors. The concentration limit of 10 CFR 61 for shallow land burial of /sup 14/C requires distribution in a lesser, although still large, volume. For both /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C, management as high-level waste offers the advantage of smaller volumes. Similar advantages may be offered by greater confinement or non-near surface concepts for disposal. The concrete waste forms developed for these nuclides may not meet technical criteria being formulated for geologic disposal. The lack of accommodation of /sup 85/Kr at disposal facilities makes storage of the gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, followed by dispersal after partial decay, seem attractive. Ocean disposal of /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C by the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency-London Ocean Dumping Convention offers advantages over shallow land burial: higher allowed concentrations, resulting in smaller volumes and fewer packages. These rules, however, thwart ocean disposal of /sup 85/Kr since gaseous forms are banned, and for solid forms, concentration limits would require distribution of radioactivity in very large volumes. 80 references.

Trevorrow, L.E.; Kolba, V.M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sustainable gasificationbiochar systems? A case-study of rice-husk gasification in Cambodia, Part II: Field trial results, carbon abatement,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II: Field trial results, carbon abatement, economic assessment and conclusions Simon Shackley a trials using the RHC, and provide an estimate of the carbon abatement and economic evaluation). The carbon abatement from the RHC addition is approximately 0.42 t CO2 tĂ?1 rice husk; including energy

Haszeldine, Stuart

275

Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

None

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume II: Detailed Savings Calculations, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed calculations for each site are shown in this Volume. For each site the ECRM description, approved loan amount, expected savings, the pre and post-retrofit energy use (electricity and gas separately), cost of energy, energy savings (in kWh...

Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microsoft Word - Vol II.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Volume II Institutional Controls Plan January 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 7 Final This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Legacy Management 24-hour...

278

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Shupe, Matthew

279

Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag - Part II: Effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydration and microstructural evolution of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents between 7 and 17% wt.% have been investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O. The formation of C(-A)-S-H and hydrotalcite was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag decreased the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite, increased the Al incorporation in the C(-A)-S-H and led to the formation of straetlingite. Increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag slowed down the early hydration and a lower compressive strength during the first days was observed. At 28 days and longer, no significant effects of slag Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content on the degree of hydration, the volume of the hydrates, the coarse porosity or on the compressive strengths were observed.

Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B., E-mail: barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch; Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part II. Effects of inorganic anions; quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9, 10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (Group I) photoreduce the quinone to AQS/sup -/ only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and N/sub 3//sup -/ (Group II) reduce AQS in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by Group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intra-radical-spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

1983-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

unknown authors

283

Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. This study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Chapter 2 will deal with kinetic theory, which is the simplest of all formalisms for studying systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the laws it obeys provide

unknown authors

285

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network, Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume begins with an Introduction summarizing the history, methodology and scope of the study, the project team members and the private and public groups consulted in the course of the study. The Load and Service Area Assessment follows, including: a compilation and analysis of existing statistical thermal load data from census data, industrial directories, PSE and G records and other sources; an analysis of responses to a detailed, 4-page thermal load questionnaire; data on public buildings and fuel and energy use provided by the New Jersey Dept. of Energy; and results of other customer surveys conducted by PSE and G. A discussion of institutional questions follows. The general topic of rates is then discussed, including a draft hypothetical Tariff for Thermal Services. Financial considerations are discussed including a report identifying alternative ownership/financing options for district heating systems and the tax implications of these options. Four of these options were then selected by PSE and G and a financial (cash-flow) analysis done (by the PSE and G System Planning Dept.) in comparison with a conventional heating alternative. Year-by-year cost of heat ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) was calculated and tabulated, and the various options compared.

Not Available

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brüser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

Topping, R.F.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Site Environmental Report for 2010, Volumes 1 & 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during collection activities Ambient Air; Rainwater; FixedLocation* Collection Date Gross alpha ENV-44 Rainwater S.I.Collection Stack Air Volume II section Volume I Section SA Ambient Air AA Rainwater

Baskin, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitehead, D.; Staple, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

Not Available

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Differential Geometry Tools for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization, Part I: Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for understanding, evaluating, and developing MDO methods; in Part I, we discuss the use of these tools and in Part II, we provide a specific application....

Bakker, Craig; Parks, Geoffrey T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coal: America's energy future. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

NONE

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics software to determine air distribution from cross-ventilation and used the resulting interior wind speeds to calculate occupant comfort and allowable outside air temperatures for cross-ventilation.

NONE

1999-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Besa: Muslims Who Saved Jews in World War II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Besa: Muslims Who Saved Jews in World War II The Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed fleeing the Nazis. His illustrated volume, Besa: Muslims Who Saved Jews in World War II, offers a haunting

Becker, Luann

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in physics Premature Higgs (2011) Cold Fusion (1989) Element X (2002) Molecular Transistors (2001) 11;1989 : Cold Fusion Pons and Fleischmann announce Cold Fusion Electrolysis of heavy water Deuterium enters palladium cathode See temperature rise Detect fusion products like Helium in water 11/1/12 12 #12;Big

Shahriar, Selim

304

MPH Program Student Writing Tutorial: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Work on title page and abstract 19 Test for Class B Complete title page and abstract 20 Complete _____________________________________ Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. 1 Work on article Bowling with Trevor and Lilly 2 Work Soccer Lunch with Mr. Smith Think about potential paper topic 4 Work Think about potential paper topic 5 Work

305

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS PART II PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as polymeric solar cells, or flexible displays, is limited by the performance of transparent flexible gas. This will include the `Ca test method' which is already set-up, and also the encapsulation of photovoltaic devices

Paxton, Anthony T.

306

Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT. 1867NOTE TO: CynthiaForm MayLiaison

307

Survey of Kansas Tort Law - Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 225 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 226 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 227 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 228 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 229 2001-2002 Hein...Online -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 230 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 231 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 232 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 233 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 234 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L...

Westerbeke, William E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

relations aspects of executive positions as found in official correspondence and documentation, as well as, formal and informal verbal communications, and it describes the major...

309

TECHNOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF AREA II HYDROGEN PRODUCTION -PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage medium for hydrogen produced by the ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plantships [16 Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL 32922-5703, ali@fsec.ucf.edu Abstract The aim of this analysis power interface, 3) Ammonia and ammonia adducts as hydrogen energy storers for fuel cell applications

310

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

Fulton, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tetrachloroethene (PCE), TCE, carbon tetrachloride, andmost of which are products of PCE and TCE degradation. Theprimarily consisted of PCE (42,000 µg/L) and TCE (33,300 µg/

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 2005 Rainwater Tritium Location* ENV-75 Collection Date2005 Rainwater Gross Alpha Location* ENV-75 Collection Date2005 Rainwater Gross Beta Location* ENV-75 Collection Date

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

external radiation from naturally occurring radioactivity ininternal radiation from naturally occurring radioactiveRemediation Radiation emitted by naturally occurring

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 2005 • R-6 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 16 USC §703 (Supp.Preservation Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act WATER AND ENERGYAct. 3.4.12 Migratory Bird Treaty Act The federal Migratory

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Units; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer Creeksresults for rainwater, creeks, stormwater, and wastewater.4-3 Creek, Rainwater, and Stormwater Sampling Locations in

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving nsls ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design 12;1-ii Part 3: Conventional Facilities NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 4. SUSTAINABLE... ;1-iv Part 3: Conventional Facilities NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 11.4...

320

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

son Bob. Jacko and his wife Nancy have 1800 acres of seed rice this year including Cocodrie, CL161, Cypress, Saber and Francis. They are also growing hybrid rice lines for RiceTec, Inc. and do contract work for Aventis (now Bayer Crop Science) and BASF... from Helena Chemical Company; chemicals from Zeneca, Novartis, Rohm&Haas, FMC, BASF and DuPont; aerial applications provided by Garrett’s Flying Service; grain transportation by T&S Transport of Alvin and Helena Chemical in East Ber- nard; crop drying...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attended the training meeting in Winnie last year, where grow- ers learned about the stewardship program required to maintain this technology. In signing the grower agree- ment with Horizon and BASF, he consented to fol- lowing the guidelines..., the active ingredient in the herbicide Newpath TM . BASF (at that time American Cyanamid) was manufacturing the imi herbicide and began work- ing with Dr. Croughan on the development of the CLEARFIELD system through a licensing agreement with LSU. The first...

322

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek Chicken Creek— Downstream Chicken Creek— UpstreamFork Strawberry Creek— Downstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek—Sample Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream Field

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, though, we must begin at the be- ginning. Rudolph J. Wintermann immi- grated to America from Germany when he was seventeen years old and settled in St. Louis, MO. He married Louise Burger and they had three sons, Rudolph T., Oscar J. and Ewald L..., and Oscar moved to Eagle Lake with his wife Adah and their 1-year old son David to man- age the Lakeside Irrigation Co. Upon arrival in Eagle Lake, Oscar found the Lakeside Irrigation Co. struggling for survival. They had only 18 miles of canals...

324

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because there were twice as many spiders and other pest-eating arthropods present in the field. The researchers concluded that “organically ma- nured, legume-based crop rotations utilizing organic fertilizers are a realistic alternative to conventional...

325

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

innovative de- cisions that have brought more income to the corpora- tion at a time when many businesses in the rice indus- try are struggling for survival. One example is the leasing agreement with Formosa Plastics, whereby space at RBW storage facilities... for over 100 years. He is currently attend- ing Lamar University and is engaged to be married in July. His fiancée, Brianne Halling, is on full scholarship for vol- leyball at the University of Alaska. After she graduates in December the couple plans...

326

Electric power annual 1995. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Volume II, Issue 4 your connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

us choose our direction as a community for responsible energy, water, and materials consumption ­ 2010. #12;ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LabLink is a monthly publication from Brookhaven National Lab by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science Every Day Actions You Can

329

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Carlsbad, New Mexico, within a remote 16-square-mile tract. The area has a very low population density. Approximately 16 permanent residents live within a 10-mile radius...

330

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Lake Charles, Louisiana. She relocated to Beau- mont in 1981 and began dating a long-time friend, Ricky Tribble. They were married in January, 1983 and their eldest son, Brandon, was born on November 2, 1983. In 1984, Ricky and Cynthia relocated to Dal...- las to open a video retail business. Their youngest son, Christopher, was born on December 2, 1985. In 1988, after much success in the video retail industry, they sold their business and settled in Gilchrist, where they currently reside. Brandon...

331

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.128 trillion in 2003. Over the next 10 years, the US federal budget is expected to total $24.087 trillion. During this same period of time, expenditures on the Farm Bill are ex- pected to reach between $180 billion (2002 House Agriculture Committee Report...) and $275 billion (USDA FAS web site). A question often raised, is the Farm Bill money well spent, depends on ones perspective. Unlike many sectors of our economy, US agriculture provides a trade surplus estimated at $18 billion for 2002. US agriculture...

332

Volume II, Chapter 5 Elochoman Subbasin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.2 Fall Chinook--Elochoman Subbasin (Mill/Abernathy/Germany)....................... 5-7 5.2.3 Coho (Mill/Abernathy/Germany) ................................. 5-13 5.2.5 Chum--Elochoman Subbasin.2.7 Winter Steelhead--Elochoman Subbasin (Mill/Abernathy/Germany) .............. 5-21 5.2.8 Cutthroat Trout

333

Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Units; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer AmbientAir Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer Fixedsection Creeks Stormwater Ambient Air; Rainwater Ambient Air

Lackner, Regina E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................... .....................................6 Grower Profile: Hlavinka Cattle Company .......................7 Extension in the News: Rick Jahn ....................................10 Pest of the Month: Channeled Applesnail ........................12 High Yielder Tips..., not to exceed the life of the assets being financed. Owner(s) must provide at least 25% equity of total project. While interviewing Texas Cooperative Extension Agent Rick Jahn, I learned of a potential TAFA project that highlights the role of Extension...

335

Nuclear Plant Feedwater Heater Handbook. Volume 1. Primer. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first part of a three volume handbook covering closed feedwater heaters for electric power generating plants. This volume is a primer to the subject of feedwater heaters and their integration into the plant. 24 refs.

Bell, R.J.; Wells, T.G. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

No-migration variance petition. Appendices A--B: Volume 2, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains Appendix A, emergency plan and Appendix B, waste analysis plan. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Emergency plan and Procedures (WP 12-9, Rev. 5, 1989) provides an organized plan of action for dealing with emergencies at the WIPP. A contingency plan is included which is in compliance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart D. The waste analysis plan provides a description of the chemical and physical characteristics of the wastes to be emplaced in the WIPP underground facility. A detailed discussion of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria and the rationale for its established units are also included.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | Department

338

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | DepartmentC

339

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | DepartmentCD

340

Home energy rating system building energy simulation test (HERS BESTEST). Volume 2, Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests reference results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) is a method for evaluating the credibility of software used by HERS to model energy use in buildings. The method provides the technical foundation for ''certification of the technical accuracy of building energy analysis tools used to determine energy efficiency ratings,'' as called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Title I, Subtitle A, Section 102, Title II, Part 6, Section 271). Certification is accomplished with a uniform set of test cases that Facilitate the comparison of a software tool with several of the best public-domain, state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs available in the United States. The HERS BESTEST work is divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the test case specifications and is a user's manual for anyone wishing to test a computer program. Volume 2 contains the reference results and suggestions for accrediting agencies on how to use and interpret the results.

Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Part II Presentations TT/kjh/06.4.10 Part II Presentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.15 Robert McGHEE MAN AJW Comparison of experimental fatigue initiation to a crystal plasticity model 4 in silicon 11.00 Olufemi FADUGBA STC BWL / SCB Creating a quantum memory system 11.15 Joshua TSANG STA JY / R

Paxton, Anthony T.

342

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 9: Oak Ridge site site team report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the input to and results of the Department of Energy (DOE) - Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) DOE Plutonium Environment, Safety and Health (ES & H) Vulnerability Assessment (VA) self-assessment performed by the Site Assessment Team (SAT) for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL or X-10) and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12) sites that are managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES). As initiated (March 15, 1994) by the Secretary of Energy, the objective of the VA is to identify and rank-order DOE-ES&H vulnerabilities associated for the purpose of decision making on the interim safe management and ultimate disposition of fissile materials. This assessment is directed at plutonium and other co-located transuranics in various forms.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing DOE Hydrogen Program, Washington, DC July ­Eliminate components, parts and process steps ­Standardize core components across products ­Standardize non-core

344

Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous brittle materials are used as filters, catalyst supports, solid oxide fuel cells and biomedical materials. However the literature on the Weibull modulus, m, versus volume fraction porosity, P, is extremely limited despite the importance of m as a gauge of mechanical reliability. In Part I of this study, m is determined for 441 sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) specimens fractured in biaxial flexure for 0.08 P 0.62. In this study, we analyze a combined data set collected from the literature that represents work from a total of 17 different research groups (including the present authors), eight different materials and more than 1560 oxide and non-oxide specimens, the m versus P plot is Ushaped with a wide band of m values for P < 0.1 (Region I) and P > 0.55 (Region III), and a narrower band of m values in the intermediate porosity region of 0.1 < P < 0.55 (Region II). The limited range of m ( 4 < m < 11) in Region II has important implications since Region II includes the P range for the majority of the applications of porous brittle materials. Part II of this study focuses on the P dependence of the mean fracture strength,< f >, and the Young s modulus E for the HA specimens tested in Part I along with literature data for other brittle materials. Both < f > and E are power law functions of the degree of densification, , where = 1 P/PG and PG is the green (unfired) porosity.

Fan, Xiaofeng [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Case, Eldon D [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Shu, Yutian [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Baumann, Melissa [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Viability Assessment Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure andPALMB i PART I

350

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure andPALMB i PART I

351

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Volume Comparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface. | EMSLVisualizingwith SalicylamideVolume

353

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risk during mid-loop operations. Main report. Volume 6. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1 which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis including internal fire and flood was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The results of the phase 2 level 2/3 study are the subject of this volume of NUREG/CR-6144, Volume 6.

Jo, J.; Lin, C.C.; Neymotin, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Which BPS baryons minimize volume?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs. (TEM)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

360

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1992. Volume 2, Energy production research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II includes: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab II - 1 It is often useful to study physical. An electric circuit illustrates how energy can be transformed within a system, transferred to different parts it is the electric charge that transports the energy from one place in the system to another

Minnesota, University of

370

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume II--Technical Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality January 2008-December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs is 3.82 tons-NOx/day (12.1%), savings from SECO?s Senate Bill 5 program is 0.92 tons-NOx/day (2.9%), electricity savings from green power purchases (wind) 2008 TERP Report, Vol. II, p. 4 December 2009 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A... reduction from code-compliant residential and commercial construction is calculated to be 8.32 tons-NOx/day (15.9%), savings from retrofits to Federal buildings will be 0.81 tons-NOx/day (1.6%), savings from furnace pilot light retrofits will be 0.32 tons...

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

371

Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

MACHINE CONTEST MACHINE VOLUME WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACHINE CONTEST® MACHINE VOLUME WORKSHEET Note: Each square is 1' x 1' (0.3 m x 0.3 m) (Official the footprint of your machine NOTE: If any part of the machine falls within a square, you must count the entire: _______________ (choose one: ft2 or m2 ) STEP 3: Measure the height of your machine. NOTE: The maximum height is 8' (2.4 m

Yener, Aylin

373

Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

Ruggieri, M.

2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

No-migration variance petition. Volume 3, Revision 1: Appendix B, Attachments A through D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume III contains the following attachments: TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms (Appendix 2.10.12 of TRUPACT-II safety analysis report); and chemical compatibility analyses for waste forms across all sites.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 5 of Volume IV, discusses: Corrective maintenance procedures; Calibration procedures; Surveillance procedures; Equipment changeover procedures; Decontamination procedures; Recovery procedures; and Cable schedule.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II ­ IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

Taylor, Jerry

378

Nuclear Plant Feedwater Heater Handbook. Volume 3. Operation and maintenance guidelines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the third part of a three-volume handbook covering closed feedwater heaters for nuclear electric power generating plants. This third volume covers the operation and maintenance of closed feedwater heaters. 11 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

Bell, R.J.; Hardy, C.D. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

Pauer, Ron

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PART A7: PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS X. Introduction 75 XI. Remote diagnostics 75 1. Optical spectroscopy 2 and rotational excitation IV. Heavy particle collisions 142 V. Gas phase kinetics 143 PART B5: PLASMA DIAGNOSTICSPlasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE I. What is a plasma? 1 II. Plasma

Chen, Francis F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Engineering Economy Outline IE 305-Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Economy Outline IE 305-Part 2 Stephen B. Vardeman ISU Fall 2013 Stephen B. Vardeman (ISU) Engineering Economy Outline Fall 2013 1 / 52 #12;Kinds of Production Costs Costs incurred). Stephen B. Vardeman (ISU) Engineering Economy Outline Fall 2013 2 / 52 #12;Costs and Production Volume

Vardeman, Stephen B.

382

analysis techniques part: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Handbook of Numerical Analysis. Volume V. Techniques of Scientific Computing. (Part 2)....

383

Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic waste by comparing the costs of reduction of the waste with the savings possible in transportation and disposal of the waste. The report develops a general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings, establishes an initial set of cost data, and develops conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled newly generated, and retrievably stored DOE transuranic waste. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal, and transportation savings with volume reduction and the volume reduction techniques and savings.

Brown, C.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Computer News, Volume 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

386

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

387

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

NONE

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing! Prof. Shreyes Melkote, Manufacturing Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology Photovoltaics (PV) will be part of the energy mix volume PV manufacturing, therefore to reduce manufacturing cost and accelerate PV use. ! q Silicon wafer

Das, Suman

391

Analysis of concentrating PV-T systems for the commercial/industrial sector. Volume II. PV-T state-of-the-art survey and site/application pair selection and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a project to develop feasibility assessments, design procedures, and reference designs for total energy systems that could use actively cooled concentrating photovoltaic collectors, a survey was conducted to provide an overview of available photovoltaic-thermal (PV-T) technology. General issues associated with the design and installation of a PV-T system are identified. Electrical and thermal efficiencies for the line-focus Fresnel, the linear parabolic trough, and the point-focus Fresnel collectors are specified as a function of operating temperature, ambient temperature, and insolation. For current PV-T technologies, the line-focus Fresnel collector proved to have the highest thermal and electrical efficiencies, lowest array cost, and lowest land area requirement. But a separate feasibility analysis involving 11 site/application pairs showed that for most applications, the cost of the photovoltaic portion of a PV-T system is not recovered through the displacement of an electrical load, and use of a thermal-only system to displace the thermal load would be a more economical alternative. PV-T systems are not feasible for applications that have a small thermal load, a large steam requirement, or a high load return temperature. SAND82-7157/3 identifies the technical issues involved in designing a photovoltaic-thermal system and provides guidance for resolving such issues. Detailed PV-T system designs for three selected applications and the results of a trade-off study for these applications are presented in SAND82-7157/4. A summary of the major results of this entire study and conclusions concerning PV-T systems and applications is presented in SAND82-7157/1.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Site Environmental Report for 2012, Volumes 1& 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive summary of the environmental program activities at LBNL for the calendar year 2012. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that include an overview of LBNL, a discussion of its Environmental Management System (EMS), the status of environmental programs, summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities, and quality assurance (QA) measures. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

Pauer, Ron; Baskin, David; Bauters, Tim; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Horst, Blair; Jelinski, John; Lackner, Ginny; Philliber, Jeff; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Wehle, Petra; Xu, Suying; None

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

[National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1991. Volume 2, Energy production research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is submitted in two volumes, Volume I representing the work accomplished under Fuels Research and Volume II the work for Energy Production Research during the period July 1--Sept. 30, 1991. Topics covered include: chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience technology, resource assessment technology, microbial technology, environmental technology.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

395

Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

Brookhaven National Laboratory

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

OPTI 500E-Photonic Communications Engineering II E Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

397

OPTI 500F-Photonic Communications Engineering II F Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

398

OPTI 500D-Photonic Communications Engineering II D Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

399

VOLUMF -31, PART 1 BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y O U N G VOLUMF -31, PART 1 #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES VOLUME 31.PART 1 CONTENTS .................................................................. Ralph E.Lambert Geology of the Mount Ellen Quadrangle. Henry Mountains. Garfield County. Utah near White Horse Pass. Elko County. Nevada ............Stephen M Smith Geology of the Steele Butte

Seamons, Kent E.

400

Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

O`Toole, T.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part II: Transmission Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. The tool analyzes and displays the impacts of uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation on: (1) congestion, (2)voltage and transient stability margins, and (3)voltage reductions and reactive power margins. The impacts are analyzed in the base case and under user-specified contingencies.A prototype of the tool has been developed and implemented in software.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Americium/Curium Vitrification Pilot Tests - Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. These highly radioactive and valuable isotopes have been stored in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of this solution will allow the material to be more safely stored until it is transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation for use in research and medical applications. A previous paper described operation results from the Am-Cm Melter 2A pilot system, a full-scale non-radioactive pilot facility. This paper presents the results from continued testing in the Pilot Facility and also describes efforts taken to look at alternative vitrification process operations and flowsheets designed to address the problems observed during melter 2A pilot testing.

Marra, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baich, M.A.; Fellinger, A.P.; Hardy, B.J.; Herman, D.T.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, C.B.; Miller, D.H.; Snyder, T. K.; Stone, M.E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Theoretical Foundations of Spatially-Variant Mathematical Morphology Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to represent a function by a set or an equivalent class of sets: the umbra approach and the threshold sets approach. The umbra approach, which was introduced by Sternberg [3], relies on the fact that the points the umbra approach has a nice geometrical interpretation of the morphological gray- level operations

Schonfeld, Dan

404

A Brief History of the Chemistry Department -Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geniuses during the great #12;A brief history, continued porn poge I the world, among them -Barcelona

Kounaves, Samuel P.

405

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

406

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

407

AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF GRASP PART II: APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Glover, 1989, 1990; Glover and Laguna, 1997), genetic algorithms (Goldberg, 1989), variable neighbor

Resende, Mauricio G. C.

408

QER Public Meeting: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy will convene a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. The purpose of the meeting is to examine energy infrastructure constraints in New England and regional approaches to addressing them

409

Current Estate Planning Topics - Marital Deduction Pitfalls: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article addresses the deduction for marital transfers under the United States estate tax. This is by far the most important deduction under the estate tax, and loss of the deduction can be very damaging to families. ...

Dickinson, Martin B. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Centralized Authorization Using a Direct Service, Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Authorization is the process of deciding if entity X is allowed to have access to resource Y. Determining the identity of X is the job of the authentication process. One task of authorization in computer networks is to define and determine which user has access to which computers in the network. On Linux, the tendency exists to create a local account for each single user who should be allowed to logon to a computer. This is typically the case because a user not only needs login privileges to a computer but also additional resources like a home directory to actually do some work. Creating a local account on every computer takes care of all this. The problem with this approach is that these local accounts can be inconsistent with each other. The same user name could have a different user ID and/or group ID on different computers. Even more problematic is when two different accounts share the same user ID and group ID on different computers: User joe on computer1 could have user ID 1234 and group ID 56 and user jane on computer2 could have the same user ID 1234 and group ID 56. This is a big security risk in case shared resources like NFS are used. These two different accounts are the same for an NFS server so that these users can wipe out each other's files. The solution to this inconsistency problem is to have only one central, authoritative data source for this kind of information and a means of providing all your computers with access to this central source. This is what a ''Directory Service'' is. The two directory services most widely used for centralizing authorization data are the Network Information Service (NIS, formerly known as Yellow Pages or YP) and Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).

Wachsmann, A

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Realistic Industrial Scale Energy Optimization: Part II - Analytic Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as distillation path optimization, reaction path optimization and heat exchange optimization. These techniques are being supported by other workers in the area of efficiency measurement, availability analysis and exergy analysis which will serve to guide... and exergy analysis are all examples of targeting tech niques. They are all effective at describing where your process lies in the efficiency domain but do not really help you in telling you where you should be going. These techniques are being discussed...

Kleinschrodt, F. J., III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~"-' ,m . I 'f'-~I I ,/:? :RIlNG SET r -t j IS) iO" 1C. ~ETNR(LSIZEt>ClIISS)/ '.I~RllNG LJ.J 8DGO Ot\\ YS ~~:\\ j3 1 :in ~ill particular a batch lng OD aEriv~l phenomenon r by

Jay Smith, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

apartment hunting, I discuss things to look for that might help keep your energy bills low. When you think about it, energy bills can, in effect, increase your rent each month....

414

Department of Materials MS Part II Course Handbook 201011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicon imaging devices AIK / GM Helen DUGDALE MAN Understanding crack growth in nuclear reactors SL ............................................................................................................. 22 Lab Books

Paxton, Anthony T.

415

WIPP SEIS-II - Summary (Part 1 of 4)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE

416

Young People's Day in Court: Part II 29 April 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ocean and Arctic drilling, long-wall coal mining, hydro-fracking ­ all practices that will become more invasive

Hansen, James E.

417

Electromagnetic scattering from grassland Part II: Measurement and modeling results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-InvestigatoronmanyprojectssponsoredbyNASA,JPL,ARO,ONR,ARL, and GM all related in one way or the other to microwave and millimeter wave radar remote sensing. He has published many book chapters and more than 80 papers in refereed journals on electromagnetic scattering, random media modeling, microwave measurement...LecturerAwardfromtheGerman Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Technology. FawwazT.Ulaby(M’68–SM’74–F’80)receivedthe B.S.degreeinphysicsfromtheAmericanUniversity of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1964, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D.degreesinelectricalengineeringfromtheUni- versity...

Stiles, James Marion; Ulaby, F. T.; Sarabandi, K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Part II: Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's ImpactAppendix Al Statement of Work for Evergreen,B

419

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev next >researchNew Construction - August

420

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev next >researchNew Construction -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev next >researchNew Construction -New

422

Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. The technology has previously been developed for astronautical applications. The report is organized in four volumes, each focused as much as possible on the needs of a particular audience. Volume 1 contains Part A, the Executive Summary. This Executive Summary describes the accomplishments of the Program in brief, but assumes the reader's familiarity with the thermionic process and the technical issues associated with the Program. For this reason, Volume 1 also contains Part B, a minimally technical overview of the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program. Volume 2 (Part C) concentrates on the progress made in developing and fabricating the ''current generation'' of chemical vapor deposited hot shell thermionic converters and is addressed to those primarily concerned with today's capabilities in terrestrial thermionic technology. Volume 3 (Part D) contains the results of systems studies of primary interest to those involved in identifying and evaluating applications for thermionics. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Kansas Journal of Sociology, Volume 2, Number 4 (Fall, 1966): Back Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are available on a yearly-volume basis. The current volume is Vol. III, beginning with Spring, 1967. Past volumes are avail able at $4.00 per volume, and aJ.so by issue at $1.00 per issue. When subscribing, please speoify volume desired.... -----~~-~~--------~--~-~~-~-----~----- THE~~SASJOUftllAL OF SOCIOLOGY The Department of Sociology, Fraser Hall . The University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas 66044 Please enter my SUbscription to tee KANSAS JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY for _ years . (four issues) at $4.00 per year. II Vol. I (1965...

1966-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management J¨org Meyer, E. Wes Bethel). This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Office of Environmental of California. ii #12;Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management Joerg Meyer, E. Wes

425

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

426

Finite Volume Element Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

427

Computer News, Volume 25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 25. TeX for Mac OS X. plus ssh and security issues for Macs. by Rodrigo Bańuelos. NOTE: These instructions are now ...

428

Computer News, Volume 21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

429

Computer News, Volume 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

430

Computer News, Volume 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

431

Computer News, Volume 19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

432

Computer News, Volume 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

433

Computer News, Volume 20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

434

Computer News, Volume 37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

435

Computer News, Volume 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

436

Computer News, Volume 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

437

Computer News, Volume 34  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version

438

Computer News, Volume 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 33. How I teach big calculus lectures with a tablet PC. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

439

Computer News, Volume 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

440

Computer News, Volume 38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Computer News, Volume 27  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

442

Computer News, Volume 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

443

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

444

Computer News, Volume 35  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

445

Computer News, Volume 32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bańuelos

446

Computer News, Volume 39  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

447

Computer News, Volume 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

448

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 48. Prime...

449

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 48. Prime...

450

Part removal of 3D printed parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

Peńa Doll, Mateo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

NONE

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessor-blinded phase ii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSEQUENCES OF FERTILITY TREATMENTS Summary: of IVF and ICSI: a price-elasticity of demand assessment 25 Part II 35 Chapter 4 Assessing long... within many health...

453

STREAM II-V5: REVISION OF STREAM II-V4 TO ACCOUNT FOR THE EFFECTS OF RAINFALL EVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

STREAM II-V4 is the aqueous transport module currently used by the Savannah River Site emergency response Weather Information Display (WIND) system. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) was used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. STREAM II-V4 predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM II-V4. STREAM II-V4 has been revised to account for the effects of a storm event. The steps used in this method are: (1) generate rainfall hyetographs as a function of total rainfall in inches (or millimeters) and rainfall duration in hours; (2) generate watershed runoff flow based on the rainfall hyetographs from step 1; (3) calculate the variation of stream segment volume (cross section) as a function of flow from step 2; (4) implement the results from steps 2 and 3 into the STREAM II model. The revised model (STREAM II-V5) will find the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations.

Chen, K.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9˘/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87˘/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

455

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Kid's Times: Volume II, Issue 8 Sperm Whale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are named for the spermaceti oil (wax) that they produce in the spermaceti organs located in their head, and over continental slopes. While they are usu- ally found offshore, they can be found near shore where as far north and south as the edges of the polar regions to feed. Fe- males and males of all ages can

457

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

Manohar Motwani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

General Feed Forward Architectures: Volume II: Software Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples 11 List Of Tables 13 I Software 15 1 Useful Utility Functions: 17 1.1 Source Files February 7, 2010 Written 1992 - 1998 #12;2 #12;Contents Table Of Contents 7 List Of Figures 9 List Of Code.c: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.2 The Header File utility

Peterson, James K

460

Assessment of the basic energy sciences program. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A list of experts reviewing the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program and their organizations are given. The assessment plan is explained; the program examined the following: quality of science being conducted in the program, quality of performers supported by the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program, and the impact of the research on mission oriented needs. The intent of the assessment is to provide an indication of general status relative to these questions for the BES divisions. The approach to the assessment is described. The sampling plan which was used as a guide in determining the sample size and selecting the sample to evaluate the research program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are discussed. Special analyses were conducted on the dispersion of reviewers' ratings, the ratings of the lower funded projects, and the amount of time the principal investigator devoted to the project. These are presented in the final appendix together with histograms for individual rating variables for each program area. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

nuclear facility SARs, quality assurance requirements, the ANL nuclear facility conduct of operations manuals, and quality assurance plans. Contrary to these requirements...

462

assessment volume ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the America Competes Act of 2007, the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy or ARPA-E, is an agency within the Department of Energy (DOE) that funds the development and...

463

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories - August 2008 Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory Approaches to Safe Nanotechnology...

464

analysis volume ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P; Konig, M; Kuhlmann, S; Marriner, J; Pain, R; Regnault, N; Balland, C; Bassett, B A; Brown, P J; Campbell, H; Carlberg, R G; Cellier-Holzem, F; Cinabro, D; Conley, A;...

465

Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Volume II - Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear GuideReportVictor Kane About

467

BBF RFC 106: A Standard Type IIS Syntax for Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we define a standard syntax for assembling standard parts for expression in plant cells, extensible to all other eukaryotes. Variations of the Type IIS mediated cloning method known as Golden Gate Cloning, most notably ...

Rutten, Virginia

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

Matlab-II: Computing, Programming and Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis 10 min break Part II Graphing Programming Q & A #12;Matlab I: Basic Concepts Everything A = logm(B) expm(A) = B #12;Matlab Computation Compound Matrix Expressions · Created by the user o fromMatlab-II: Computing, Programming and Data Analysis Division of Statistics and Scientific

Mankoff, Jennifer

469

Part I: SST for NWP Part II: Decadal Strategic Plan for USGCRP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Subcommittee on Global Climate Research (SGCR) also U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) National for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) 3-7 October 2011, Saint Petersburg, Russia #12;3 Hurricanes form only in oceanic Coordination Office USGCRP (Brief) History ·National Climate Program Act of 1978 ·Presidential initiative

Maryland at College Park, University of

470

Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

Moore, James [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States); Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States); Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cooking the volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooking possesses a system of units of measurement, that includes measures of volumes based on pre-metric units. This paper discusses the cooking measures and compares their features with those of the ancient Roman measures of capacity.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Computer News, Volume 29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

474

Computer News, Volume 30  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

475

Computer News, Volume 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

476

Computer News, Volume 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

477

Computer News, Volume 31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

478

Imaging using volume holograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume holograms can be thought of as self-aligned 3D stacks of diffractive elements that operate coherently on incident fields as they propagate through the structure. In this thesis, we propose, design and implement ...

Sinha, Arnab, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Topaz II preliminary safety assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Haskin, E. (Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Institute for Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volume ii part" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

483

ii IS -3 -( Volume V.iii THE MISOSYS QUARTERLY -Spring 1991 Volume V.111  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the chip allows for a complete solid-state voice recorder. The chip device includes on chip pre-amplifiers, filters, addressing logic, and power amplifiers. Not only is solid-state memory capacity being increased memory chip, the ISD1016. In its simplest sense, connect- ing a battery, microphone, and speaker

Mann, Tim

484

Economic evaluation of closure CAP barrier materials Volume I and Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study prepared by the Site Geotechnical Services (SGS) and Environmental Restoration (ER) departments of the WSRC evaluates a generic closure cover system for a hazardous waste site, using 10 different surface areas, ranging from 0.1 acre to 80 acres, and 12 barrier materials. This study presents a revision to the previous study (Rev. 0) published in June 1993, under the same title. The objective of this study was to revise the previous study by incorporating four additional site sizes into the evaluation process and identifying the most cost-effective barrier material for a given closure cover system at the SRS.

Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

Howes, H; Perley, R

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the advantage of offering smooth animations, while spatial compression can handle volumes of larger dimensions.

Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fout, Nathaniel [UC DAVIS; Ma, Kwan - Liu [UC DAVIS

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

489

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

Hua, Jing

490

Microsoft Word - Vol II.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Volume II

491

Frank Schumann Embodied cognitive science: is it part of cognitive science?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frank Schumann Embodied cognitive science: is it part of cognitive science? Analysis within a philosophy of science background PICS Publications of the Institute of Cognitive Science Volume 3-2004 #12;ISSN: 1610-5389 Series title: PICS Publications of the Institute of Cognitive Science Volume: 3

Kallenrode, May-Britt

492

Publications Edited Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Robots with Passive Environments: Application to Force Feedback Control Ed Colgate and Neville Hogan, J. Edward Colgate Industrial Robot, 26 (5), 1999, pp 335-341 Toward Robot-Assisted VascularPublications Edited Volume Advances in Robotics, Mechatronics, and Haptic Interfaces 1993 Edited

MacIver, Malcolm A.

493

Hamiltonian and Volume Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2+1 gravity coupled to a massless scalar field has an initial singularity when the spatial slices are compact. The quantized model is used here to investigate several issues of quantum gravity. The spectrum of the volume operator is studied at the initial singularity. The energy spectrum is obtained. Dynamics of the universe is also investigated.

M. Pierri

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

494

_PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL toRockyDECEMBER|About UsVolume

495

PART I - SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | DepartmentCDH

496

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | DepartmentCDH109

497

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |

498

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |G Contract No.

499

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |G Contract No.D

500

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |G Contract No.DE