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1

ORIGINAL PAPER El Chichon volcano, April 4, 1982: volcanic cloud history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER El Chicho´n volcano, April 4, 1982: volcanic cloud history and fine ash fallout of distal fallout samples collected soon after eruption. Although, about half of the mass of silicate from the volcano are mostly \\62 lm in diameter. The most plausible expla- nation for rapid fallout

Rose, William I.

2

GIS-based method for the environmental vulnerability assessment to volcanic ashfall at Etna Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of environment to ashfall was evaluated aiming at defining the vulnerability in the areas surrounding Mt. Etna volcano, Sicily. The two utilized scenarios assume different thickness of ashfall, over distances comparable with those covered ... Keywords: Corine land cover, Environmental vulnerability, GIS, Volcanic risk

Silvia Rapicetta; Vittorio Zanon

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Long-Range Forecast Trajectories of Volcanic Ash from Redoubt Ash from Redoubt Volcano Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redoubt Volcano in Alaska began a series of eruptions on 14 December 1989. Volcanic ash was often reported to reach heights where, as it moved with the upper-level flow, it could affect aircraft operations thousands of km from the eruption. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder; Glenn D. Rolph

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

SciTech Connect

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Detection and analysis of the volcanic clouds associated with the 18 and 28 August 2000 eruptions of Miyakejima volcano, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two significant eruptions occurred at Miyakejima volcano on 18 and 28 August 2000 and were detected by multiple satellite sensors. For both eruptions, the cloud can be observed with high confidence for 2 days. Using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), ...

E. B. Mccarthy; G. J. S. Bluth; I. M. Watson; A. Tupper

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active...

9

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

10

Pattern recognition of volcanic tremor data on Mt. Etna (Italy) with KKAnalysis-A software program for unsupervised classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous seismic monitoring plays a key role in the surveillance of the Mt. Etna volcano. Besides earthquakes, which often herald eruptive episodes, the persistent background signal, known as volcanic tremor, provides important information on the volcano ... Keywords: Cluster analysis, Fuzzy C-means, K-means, Self-organizing map, Volcano monitoring, Volcano seismology

A. Messina; H. Langer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part I: Most Important Bands and Implications for Future GOES Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are analyzed for volcanic ash signals using principal component image analysis. Target volcanoes included Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Quality-Driven Volcanic Earthquake Detection Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcano monitoring is of great interest to public safety and scientific explorations. However, traditional volcanic instrumentation such as broadband seismometers are expensive, power-hungry, bulky, and difficult to install. Wireless sensor networks ...

Rui Tan; Guoliang Xing; Jinzhu Chen; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Remote monitoring of volcanic gases using passive Fourier transform spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic gases provide important insights on the internal workings of volcanoes and changes in their composition and total flux can warn of impending changes in a volcano`s eruptive state. In addition, volcanoes are important contributors to the earth`s atmosphere, and understanding this volcanic contribution is crucial for unraveling the effect of anthropogenic gases on the global climate. Studies of volcanic gases have long relied upon direct in situ sampling, which requires volcanologists to work on-site within a volcanic crater. In recent years, spectroscopic techniques have increasingly been employed to obtain information on volcanic gases from greater distances and thus at reduced risk. These techniques have included UV correlation spectroscopy (Cospec) for SO{sub 2} monitoring, the most widely-used technique, and infrared spectroscopy in a variety of configurations, both open- and closed-path. Francis et al. have demonstrated good results using the sun as the IR source. This solar occultation technique is quite useful, but puts rather strong restrictions on the location of instrument and is thus best suited to more accessible volcanoes. In order to maximize the flexibility and range of FTIR measurements at volcanoes, work over the last few years has emphasized techniques which utilize the strong radiance contrast between the volcanic gas plume and the sky. The authors have successfully employed these techniques at several volcanoes, including the White Island and Ruapehu volcanoes in New Zealand, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, and Mt. Etna in Italy. But Popocatepetl (5452 m), the recently re-awakened volcano 70 km southeast of downtown Mexico City, has provided perhaps the best examples to date of the usefulness of these techniques.

Love, S.P.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.; Schmidt, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Siebe, C.; Delgado, H. [Univ. Nactional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Applications Of The Vlf Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The very low-frequency (VLF) induction method has found exceptional utility in studying various volcanic processes of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii because: (1) significant anomalies result exclusively from ionically conductive magma or still-hot intrusions (> 800°C) and the attendant electrolytically conductive hot groundwater; (2) basalt flows forming the bulk of Kilauea have very high resistivities at shallow depths that result in low geologic noise levels and relatively deep depths of

15

40Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ruapehu Volcano, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ruapehu Volcano, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We have determined precise eruption ages for andesites from Ruapehu volcano in the Tongariro Volcanic Centre of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) using 40Ar/39Ar furnace step-heating of separated groundmass concentrates. The plateau ages indicate several eruptive pulses near 200, 134, 45, 22 and <15 ka and, based on our and previous field mapping confirm the lavas of the Te Herenga Formation as the oldest exposed part of the

16

A 3D Magnetic Structure Of Izu-Oshima Volcano And Their Changes After The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetic Structure Of Izu-Oshima Volcano And Their Changes After The Magnetic Structure Of Izu-Oshima Volcano And Their Changes After The Eruption In 1986 As Estimated From Repeated Airborne Magnetic Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A 3D Magnetic Structure Of Izu-Oshima Volcano And Their Changes After The Eruption In 1986 As Estimated From Repeated Airborne Magnetic Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3D magnetic inversion method using a conjugate gradient method (CG method) was developed for constructing 3D magnetization models of a volcanic edifice and applied to aeromagnetic anomalies of Izu-Oshima Volcano surveyed in 1986 and in 1997. The calculated results of the 1986 data show that the volcanic edifice of Izu-Oshima Volcano has a mean magnetization intensity ranging from 10.4 to 12.1 A/m. The derived 3D

17

Experiences from near-real-time satellite-based volcano monitoring in Central America: case studies at Fuego, Guatemala  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, remote sensing has been used increasingly in the study of active volcanoes and their associated hazards. Ground-based remote sensing techniques, such as those aimed at the analysis of volcanic gases or fumarole temperatures, are ...

P. W. Webley; M. J. Wooster; W. Strauch; J. A. Saballos; K. Dill; P. Stephenson; J. Stephenson; R. Escobar Wolf; O. Matias

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fusion-based volcanic earthquake detection and timing in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcano monitoring is of great interest to public safety and scientific explorations. However, traditional volcanic instrumentation such as broadband seismometers are expensive, power hungry, bulky, and difficult to install. Wireless sensor networks ... Keywords: Volcano monitoring, data fusion, earthquake detection, wireless sensor network

Rui Tan; Guoliang Xing; Jinzhu Chen; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of mud volcanism, mechanisms of formation, types of eruptions and their relationship to the hydrocarbon systems provides important information about subsurface conditions and geological processes within the South Caspian Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each determined mud volcano is constructed. Analysis of different parameters from this database shows that there is a high concentration of mud volcanoes at the southern part of the study area. It is coincides with the distribution of the subsurface structures within the basin. Mud volcanoes with low relief (several tens of meters) are mainly concentrated in the northeast. Conversely, mud volcanoes with large vertical relief (greater than 200 m) are clustered in the southwest part of the basin. Mud volcano development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud flows reveals to the actual activity of the mud volcanoes and it gives valuable information about possible mechanism of mud volcanism within the South Caspian Basin. Previous studies of the onshore mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan and the results from current work conclude that mud volcano formation within the South Caspian Basin is mainly controlled by tectonic forces and overpressured sediments. Mud volcano activity is not always related to the Maykop organic reach shale succession. It can occur at shallow depths by pressure breakthrough from any stratigraphic zone.

Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A system is proposed for the monitoring of changes in the underground structure of an active volcano over time by applying a transient electromagnetic method. The monitoring system is named ACTIVE, which stands for Array of Controlled Transient-electromagnetics for Imaging Volcano Edifice. The system consists of a transmitter dipole used to generate a controlled transient electromagnetic (EM) field and an array of receivers used to measure the vertical component of the transient magnetic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Implementation and validation of a meteorological dispersion model applied on volcanic gas emission for studies of environmental impact.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model FLEXPART-WRF was implemented to model dispersion of volcanic gas emitted from the three volcanoes Popocatpetl in Mexico (lat: 19.02, lon: (more)

Landgren, Oskar A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Volcanoes and Climate Effects of Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTENTS 8.1 Importance of volcanoes, natural aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols 341 8.2 Major scientific questions and hypotheses 342 8.2.1 Stratospheric volcanic aerosols and climate 342 8.2.1.1 Source gases for stratospheric aerosols 342 8.2.1.2 Explosiveness and plume history during individual eruptions 343 8.2.1.3 Frequency of eruptions, tectonic setting, rock/ash vs. SO 2 343 8.2.1.4 Gas-to-particle conversion and removal mechanisms 343 8.2.1.5 Radiative properties and climatic effects of stratospheric aerosols 345 8.2.1.6 Needed satellite and in situ measurements 347 8.2.1.6.1 Global observations of stratospheric aerosol optical properties 347 8.2.1.6.2 Lidar measurements of aerosols 347 8.2.2 Volcanic aerosols and stratospheric ozone depletion 349 8.2.3 Climatic effects of t

Hartmann And Mouginis-Mark; Volcanoes; D. L. Hartmann; P. Mouginis-mark; G. J. Bluth; J. A. Coakley; J. Crisp; R. E. Dickinson; P. W. Francis; J. E. Hansen; P. V. Hobbs; B. L. Isacks; Y. J. Kaufman; M. D. King; W. I. Rose; S. Self; L. D. Travis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are (1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, (3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and (4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found through the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GES N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and its deepens with distance from the summit.

Fitterman, D.V.; Stanley, W.D.; Bisdorf, R.J.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

New Model of Earth's Interior Reveals Clues to Hotspot Volcanoes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Model of New Model of Earth's Interior Reveals Clues to Hotspot Volcanoes New Model of Earth's Interior Reveals Clues to Hotspot Volcanoes October 29, 2013 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Geosciences, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov volcanic-hotspots1.jpg This 3D view of the top 1,000 kilometers of Earth's mantle beneath the central Pacific shows the relationship between seismically-slow "plumes" and channels imaged in the UC Berkeley study. Green cones on the ocean floor mark islands associated with "hotspot" volcanoes, such as Hawaii and Tahiti. (Image courtesy of Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, UC Berkeley) Using supercomputers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), scientists have detected

25

Overview of the structure and geothermal potential of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Evidence from a broad range of geological and geophysical investigations of Newberry Volcano in centeral Oregon suggests the presence of a small magma body beneath the summit caldera. Drilling has encountered temperatures indicative of a hydrothermal system above the hypothesized magma body. On the basis of hydrothermal mineralogy the temperature of the hydrothermal system is at or near its maximum value, indicating that the hydrothermal system is young. Basaltic underplating is postulated to replenish the magma body. The results of interdisciplinary studies at Newberry Volcano document that young, silicic volcanism in the Cascade Range can have geothermal potential. These results should be applied with caution to the rest of the Cascade Range because of the strong influence of Basin and Range extensional tectonics on Newberry Volcano's style of volcanism.

Fitterman, D.V.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydrothermal system at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent geological and geophysical studies at Newberry Volcano have been incorporated into conceptual and numerical models of a magma-based hydrothermal system. Numerical simulations begin with emplacement of a small magma body, the presumed source of silicic eruptions at Newberry that began about 10,000 B.P., into a thermal regime representing 100,000 years of cooling of a large underlying intrusion. Simulated flow patterns and thermal histories for three sets of hypothetical permeability values are compatible with data from four geothermal drill holes on the volcano. Meteoric recharge cools the caldera-fill deposits, but thermal water moving up a central conduit representing a permeable volcanic vent produces temperatures close to those observed in drill holes within the caldera. Meteoric recharge from the caldera moves down the flanks and creates a near-isothermal zone that extends several hundred meters below the water table, producing temperature profiles similar to those observed in drill holes on the flanks. The temperatures observed in drill holes on the flanks are not influenced by the postulated Holocene magma body. The elevated temperature gradients measured in the lower portions of these holes may be related to the cumulative effect of older intrusions. The models also indicate that meteoric recharge to the deep hydrothermal system probably originates within or near the caldera. Relatively low fluid velocities at depth suggest that at least a significant fraction of the thermal fluid may be very old.

Sammel, E.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Paleomagnetism of the Quaternary Cerro Prieto, Crater Elegante, and Salton Buttes volcanic domes in the northern part of the Gulf of California rhombochasm  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deviating thermomagnetic directions in volcanics representing the second and fifth or sixth pulse of volcanism suggest that the Cerro Prieto volcano originated about 110,000 years B.P. and continued to be active intermittently until about 10,000 years ago.

de Boer, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range  

SciTech Connect

Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Resuspension of Relic Volcanic Ash and Dust from Katmai: Still an Aviation Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest winds were strong enough to continuously resuspend relic volcanic ash from the Katmai volcano cluster and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on 2021 September 2003. The ash cloud reached over 1600 m and extended over 230 km into the ...

David Hadley; Gary L. Hufford; James J. Simpson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 1st crater of Naka-dake, Aso volcano, is one of the most active craters in Japan, and known to have a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the

32

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

33

Shield Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Shield Volcano Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Shield Volcano Dictionary.png Shield Volcano: A dome shaped volcano with gently sloping sides and a broad base characteristic of relatively low viscosity, basaltic lava eruptions. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas: Mountainous Horst and Graben Shield Volcano Flat Lava Dome Stratovolcano Cinder Cone Caldera Depression Resurgent Dome Complex Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical shield

34

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

35

Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

Eichelberger, J.C.

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Real-time volcanic earthquake localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: in-network distributed processing, multi-tier sensor network architecture, sensor networks, volcano monitoring

Geoffrey Werner-Allen; Patrick Swieskowski; Matt Welsh

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

SIMULATION OF THE ICELAND VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF APRIL 2010 USING THE ENSEMBLE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010 disrupted transportation in Europe which ultimately affected travel plans for many on a global basis. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) is responsible for providing guidance to the aviation industry of the transport of volcanic ash clouds. There are nine such centers located globally, and the London branch (headed by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, or UKMet) was responsible for modeling the Iceland volcano. The guidance provided by the VAAC created some controversy due to the burdensome travel restrictions and uncertainty involved in the prediction of ash transport. The Iceland volcanic eruption provides a useful exercise of the European ENSEMBLE program, coordinated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy. ENSEMBLE, a decision support system for emergency response, uses transport model results from a variety of countries in an effort to better understand the uncertainty involved with a given accident scenario. Model results in the form of airborne concentration and surface deposition are required from each member of the ensemble in a prescribed format that may then be uploaded to a website for manipulation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the lone regular United States participant throughout the 10-year existence of ENSEMBLE. For the Iceland volcano, four separate source term estimates have been provided to ENSEMBLE participants. This paper focuses only on one of those source terms. The SRNL results in relation to other modeling agency results along with useful information obtained using an ensemble of transport results will be discussed.

Buckley, R.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springson Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are...

40

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Crustal structure of east central Oregon: relation between Newberry Volcano and regional crustal structure  

SciTech Connect

A 180-km-long seismic refraction transect from the eastern High Cascades, across Newberry Volcano, to the eastern High Lava Plains is used to investigate the subvolcanic crustal and upper mantle velocity structure there. Near-surface volcanic flows and sedimentary debris (1.6--4.7 km/s), ranging from 3 to 5 km in thickness, overlie subvolcanic Basin and Range structures. East and west of Newberry Volcano, the subvolcanic basement (5.6 km/s) has been downwarped, producing 5-km-deep basins. The midcrust (8- to 28-km depth) is characterized by velocities ranging from 6.1 to 6.5 km/s and varies laterally in thicknesses. The lowercrust is characterized by an unusually high velocity (about 7.4 km/s), and its geometry mirrors the subvolcanic basement geometry. The Moho is located at a depth of 37 km and represents a transition to an upper mantle velocity of 8.1 km/s. The shallow subsurface (1.2 km) beneath Newberry Volcano is characterized by high-velocity (5.6 km/s, versus 4.1 km/s for the surrounding area) intrusions and appears to be located on a basement high. Beneath the seismic fraction array at Newberry Volcano, an absence of low-velocity anomalies suggests that large silicic magma chambers do not exist in the upper crust, but apparent high attenuation of the seismic wave field may be consistent with either partial melts in small volumes, elevated crustal temperatures, and/or poor geophone-recording site coupling. The east central Oregon velocity structure is nearly identical to that of the northwestern Nevada Basin and Range and the Modoc Plateau of northeastern California, and variations in the deep crustal structure about Newberry Volcano are consistent with tectonism involving crustal underplating, melting, and extension.

Catchings, R.D.; Mooney, W.D.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

SMALL-VOLUME BASALTIC VOLCANOES: ERUPTIVE PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES, AND POST-ERUPTIVE GEOMORPHIC EVOLUTION IN CRATER FLAT (PLEISTOCENE), SOUTHERN NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Five Pleistocene basaltic volcanoes in Crater Flat (southern Nevada) demonstrate the complexity of eruption processes associated with small-volume basalts and the effects of initial emplacement characteristics on post-eruptive geomorphic evolution of the volcanic surfaces. The volcanoes record eruptive processes in their pyroclastic facies ranging from ''classical'' Strombolian mechanisms to, potentially, violent Strombolian mechanisms. Cone growth was accompanied, and sometimes disrupted, by effusion of lavas from the bases of cones. Pyroclastic cones were built upon a gently southward-sloping surface and were prone to failure of their down-slope (southern) flanks. Early lavas flowed primarily southward and, at Red and Black Cone volcanoes, carried abundant rafts of cone material on the tops of the flows. These resulting early lava fields eventually built platforms such that later flows erupted from the eastern (at Red Cone) and northern (at Black Cone) bases of the cones. Three major surface features--scoria cones, lava fields with abundant rafts of pyroclastic material, and lava fields with little or no pyroclastic material--experienced different post-eruptive surficial processes. Contrary to previous interpretations, we argue that the Pleistocene Crater Flat volcanoes are monogenetic, each having formed in a single eruptive episode lasting months to a few years, and with all eruptive products having emanated from the area of the volcanoes main cones rather than from scattered vents. Geochemical variations within the volcanoes must be interpreted within a monogenetic framework, which implies preservation of magma source heterogeneities through ascent and eruption of the magmas.

G.A. Valentine; F.V. Perry; D. Krier; G.N. Keating; R.E. Kelley; A.H. Cogbill

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Magnetic structure of Loihi Seamount, an active hotspot volcano in the Hawaiian Island chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of geophysical techniques to image the interiors of active volcanoes can provide a better understanding of their structure and plumbing. The need for such information is especially critical for undersea volcanoes, whose environment makes them difficult to investigate. Because undersea volcanoes are made up of highly magnetic basaltic rock, it is possible to use variations in the magnetic field to explore the internal structure of such edifices. This study combines magnetic survey data from 12 research cruises to make a magnetic anomaly map of volcanically active Loihi, located in the Hawaiian Island chain. NRM intensities and susceptibility measurements were measured from recovered rock samples and suggest that magnetic properties of Loihi are widely varied (NRM intensities range from 1-157 A/m and susceptibilities from 1.26 x 10-3 to 3.62 x 10-2 S.I.). The average NRM intensity is 26 A/m. The size and strength of magnetic source bodies were determined by using various modeling techniques. A strongly magnetized shield can explain most of the anomaly with a large nonmagnetic zone inside, beneath the summit. Prominent magnetic highs are located along Loihi's north and south rift zone dikes and modeling solutions suggest strongly magnetized source bodies in these areas as well as a thin, magnetic layer atop the nonmagnetic zone. The strong magnetic anomalies found along the volcano's rift zones cannot be readily attributed to recent lava flows at the surface. Instead, the source bodies must continue several kilometers in depth to give reasonable magnetization values and are interpreted as dike intrusions. Nonmagnetic anomalies at the summit and south of the summit suggest the presence of a magma system. The model solution suggests Loihi is an inhomogeneously magnetized seamount with highly magnetic dike intrusions along the rift zones with a nonmagnetic body at its center overlain with a magnetic layer.

Lamarche, Amy J.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan A Petroleum Research, Oslo Research Park, 0349 Oslo, Norway c Geology Institute Azerbaijan, Husein Avenue 29A, Baku, Azerbaijan d Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow 119992, Russia e

Mazzini, Adriano

45

Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Volcanoes and ENSO over the Past Millennium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The controversial claim that El Nio events might be partially caused by radiative forcing due to volcanic aerosols is reassessed. Building on the work of Mann et al., estimates of volcanic forcing over the past millennium and a climate model of ...

Julien Emile-Geay; Richard Seager; Mark A. Cane; Edward R. Cook; Gerald H. Haug

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Summary of recent volcanic activity - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 6, 1985 ... (Aleutian Islands) on December 10. The cloud was probably mainly steam with only minor amounts of ash. The volcano has been steaming...

48

Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Newberry, Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7--0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data.

Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

50

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Property:VolcanicAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:VolcanicAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name VolcanicAge Property Type String Description Describes the time of the most recent volcanism by epoch, era, or period per available data. Subproperties This property has the following 7 subproperties: E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area Pages using the property "VolcanicAge" Showing 19 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + No volcanism + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + No volcanism +

53

Volcanic Contributions to the Stratospheric Sulfate Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have detected the transport of volcanic sulfate through the tropical tropopause. This is particularly noteworthy because the source volcanic eruption was only of modest intensity and, therefore, not normally thought to be of stratospheric ...

Ronald W. Fegley; Howard T. Ellis; J. L. Heffter

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Using seafloor geodesy to monitor volcanic collapse on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accommodat- ing subsidence in the summit caldera (Lipman etshow the amount of subsidence (in meters) measured theremagnitude seaward slip and subsidence on the south ?ank as

Phillips, Kathleen A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Mud volcanism: Processes and implications Mud volcanoes: generalities and proposed mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source rocks are the Jurassic ?re and Spekk Formations, the latter being the time the reservoirs are also in direct contact with mature, organic-rich source rocks. The minimum horizontal stress., 1995. Petroleum geochemistry of the Haltenbanken, Norwegian continental shelf. In: Cubitt, J

Manga, Michael

56

An evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro Volcano area of Guatemala  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiometric ages indicate that the Tecuamburro Volcano and three adjacent lava domes grew during the last 38,300 years, and that a 360-m-wide phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, was formed near the base of these domes about 2900 years ago. Laguna Ixpaco is located within the Chupadero crater, from which pyroxene pumice deposits were erupted 38,300 years ago. Thus, the likelihood is great for a partly molten or solid-but-still-hot near-surface intrusion beneath the area. Fumaroles and hot springs issue locally from the Tecuamburro volcanic complex and near Laguna Ixpaco. Analyses of gas and fluid samples from these and other nearby thermal manifestations yield chemical-geothermometer temperatures of about 150{degree} to 300{degree}C, with the highest temperatures at Ixpaco. The existence of a commercial-grade geothermal reservoir beneath the Ixpaco area seems likely. 84 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs.

Heiken, G.; Duffield, W. (eds.)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Volcanology and volcanic activity with a primary focus on potential hazard impacts for the Hawaii geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography reviews published references about potential volcanic hazards on the Island of Hawaii that are pertinent to drilling and operating geothermal wells. The first two sections of this annotated bibliography list the most important publications that describe eruptions of Kilauea volcano, with special emphasis on activity in and near the designated geothermal subzones. References about historic eruptions from Mauna Loa`s northeast rift zone, as well as the most recent activity on the southern flank of dormant Mauna Kea, adjacent to the Humu`ula Saddle are described. The last section of this annotated bibliography lists the most important publications that describe and analyze deformations of the surface of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Moore, R.B. [Federal Center, Denver, CO (United States); Delaney, P.T. [2255 North Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kauahikaua, J.P. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Results of geothermal gradient core hole TCB-1, Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site, Guatemala, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical field studies conducted in 1988 and 1989 at the Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site in Guatemala indicated that there is a substantial shallow heat source beneath the area of youngest volcanism. To obtain information on subsurface temperatures and temperature gradients, stratigraphy, hydrothermal alteration, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids, a geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to 808 m low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro volcano Complex, 300 km south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, dated at 2,910 years. Gases from acid-sulfate springs near Laguna Ixpaco consistently yield maximum estimated subsurface temperatures of 250--300{degrees}C. The temperature versus depth curve from TCB-1 does not show isothermal conditions and the calculated thermal gradients from 500--800 m is 230{degrees}C/km. Bottom hole temperature is 238{degrees}C. Calculated heat flow values are nearly 9 heat flow units (HFU). The integration of results from the TCB-1 gradient core hole with results from field studies provides strong evidence that the Tecuamburro area holds great promise for containing a commercial geothermal resource.

Adams, A.I.; Chipera, S.; Counce, D.; Gardner, J.; Goff, S.; Goff, F.; Heiken, G.; Laughlin, A.W.; Musgrave, J.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Aycinena, S.; Martinelli, L. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O.; Revolorio, M.; Roldan, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion); D

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Songliao basin form a major part of the basin fill and are the important petroleum reservoir rocks volcanic rocks could be derived from metasomatized enriched MORB-like sources, but the Cretaceous rhyolites: geochemistry, Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes, Mesozoic, volcanic rock, Songliao basin plate in Mesozoic (e.g., Zhao et al

Svensen, Henrik

60

Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Dictionary.png Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes: A kind of hot spring or fumarole with limited water causing a bubbling pool with a consistency of mud or clay. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Mudpot in Yellowstone National Park(reference: nps.gov) Mudpots and mud pools are actually hot springs or fumaroles with limited amounts of water but a lot of clay from surrounding rock and soil causing a boiling slurry. Not to be confused with mud volcanoes, which are the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) Revealed By Geophysical And Geochemical Approaches- Implications For General Fluid Flow Models On Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) Revealed By Geophysical And Geochemical Approaches- Implications For General Fluid Flow Models On Volcanoes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: On March 15th 2007 a paroxysmal explosion occurred at the Stromboli volcano. This event generated a large amount of products, mostly lithic blocks, some of which impacted the ground as far as down to 200 m a.s.l., about 1.5 km far away from the active vents. Two days after the

62

Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

Crowe, B.M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. In: Geological and Nuclear Sciences. World Geothermal Congress 2005; 20050424; Antalya, Turkey. New Zealand:...

64

Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

65

Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

66

A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A...

67

EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Summary This EA evaluates the...

68

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique...

69

A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to:...

70

New results on the resistivity structure of Merapi Volcano (Indonesia), derived from 3D restricted inversion of long-offset transient electromagnetic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, J. Geophys. Res. ,below 100 and 10 at Newberry Volcano (Oregon) (Fitterman etfound in boreholes at Newberry Volcano (Oregon), where the

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan, L.; Hordt, Andreas; Scholl, Carsten; Tezkan, Bulent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Airborne Volcanic Ash Forecast Area Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of aircraft flight safety operations, daily comparisons between modeled, hypothetical, volcanic ash plumes calculated with meteorological forecasts and analyses were made over a 1.5-yr period. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian ...

Barbara J. B. Stunder; Jerome L. Heffter; Roland R. Draxler

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Operational Implications of Airborne Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic ash clouds pose a real threat to aircraft safety. The ash is abrasive and capable of causing serious damage to aircraft engines, control surfaces, windshields, and landing lights. In addition, ash can clog the pitotstatic systems, which ...

Gary L. Hufford; Leonard J. Salinas; James J. Simpson; Elliott G. Barske; David C. Pieri

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geochemistry of a volcanic hydrothermal system at Mount Spurr, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Spurr is an ice and snow-covered andesitic volcano located at the northern extent of the Aleutian arc in south central Alaska. Previous workers have (more)

Garchar, Laura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Quest for Clouds and Volcanoes  

SciTech Connect

Elementary students are using the internet to experience virtual field trips to learn about areas that they are not able to experience in person. This poster presentation describes a virtual field trip taken by Mendoza Elementary School, Las Vegas, Nevada classes during the summer of 2003. The authors, who are DataStreme Learning Implementation Team members, drove from Las Vegas to Seattle for the annual DataStreme Summer Workshop. During the trip and in Seattle, the authors communicated through the internet with classrooms in Las Vegas. Weather information, pictures, and pertinent information about Seattle or the enroute area were sent to the classes each day. The students then compared the weather in Las Vegas with the weather and clouds from the communication. Fourth grade students were studying about volcanoes and were excited to hear about, and see pictures of, Mt. Shasta, Mt. Lassen, Mt. St. Helen and Mt. Rainier during the virtual field trip. Classes were able to track the route taken on a map during the virtual field trip.

Blink, F D; Blink, J A

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fast track article: Design of smart sensing components for volcano monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a volcano monitoring application, various geophysical and geochemical sensors generate continuous high-fidelity data, and there is a compelling need for real-time raw data for volcano eruption prediction research. It requires the network to support ... Keywords: Situation awareness, Time synchronization, Volcano monitoring, Wireless sensor network

Mingsen Xu; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang; Yang Peng; Behrooz Shirazi; Richard Lahusen; Aaron Kiely; Nina Peterson; Andy Ma; Lohith Anusuya-Rangappa; Michael Miceli; Devin McBride

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia) U. Wegler,1 of the edifice of Merapi volcano (Java, Indonesia) before its eruption in 1998 by analyzing multiply scattered eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09303, doi:10.1029/2006GL025928. 1

Snieder, Roel

77

Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,, H. Svensen a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,, H. Svensen a , G Subroto 42, 12710, Jakarta Indonesia Received 20 March 2007; received in revised form 12 June 2007 in Indonesia. The location of the mud volcano close to magmatic volcanoes results in a high background

Manga, Michael

78

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Controlled-source electromagnetic soundings were found to be substantially more successful in the southwest rift than either the Schlumberger or the self-potential studies. This was largely due to the ability of time-domain methods to penetrate high-resistivity surface layers and thus to define lower-resistivity sections at depth. The results of this sounding study, which was conducted at elevations ranging from 75 to 497 m a.s.l., generally indicated moderate- to lowresistivity (6 - 7 ohm.m) sections to depths of 1 km on the lower rift zone and higher resistivities (12-16

79

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Isotopic compositions were determined for hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and siderite from core samples of the Newberry 2 drill hole, Oregon. The Δ15O values for these minerals decrease with increasing temperatures. The values indicate that these hydrothermal minerals precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with water currently present in the reservoirs. The Δ18O values of quartz and calcite from the andesite and basalt flows (700-932 m) have isotopic values which require that the equilibrated water Δ18O values increase slightly (- 11.3 to -9.2‰) with

80

Definition: Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes A kind of hot spring or fumarole with limited water causing a bubbling pool with a consistency of mud or clay. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A mudpot - or mud pool - is a sort of acidic hot spring, or fumarole, with limited water. It usually takes the form of a pool of bubbling mud. The acid and microorganisms decompose surrounding rock into clay and mud. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Mudpots,_Mud_Pools,_or_Mud_Volcanoes&oldid=684824" Category:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ratios of 87Sr/86Sr were determined in twenty-seven basaltic rocks from Newberry. These ratios range from 0.70330 to 0.70414; most fall between 0.7035 and 0.7038. Covariance of Al2O3/FeO* ratio, TiO2 content, and Th content with 87Sr/86Sr suggests that some isotopic ratios reflect shallow crustal contamination, but the data also suggest that two mantle sources, a prominent one at 0.7036 and a less-prominent one at 0.7033 or less, are represented. The hypothesis of crustal contamination is supported

82

Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstrations Project Type / Topic 2 EGS Demonstration Project Description The project will demonstrate EGS power generation from the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area ("Newberry"). Four deep, high temperature, very low permeability, production-size wells have been completed at Newberry, including two currently owned by Davenport. The Newberry project site exemplifies unparalleled EGS potential in the United States, with a large, high-temperature, conductive thermal anomaly yielding wells with permeability orders of magnitude less than conventional hydrothermal wells.

83

Fidelity and yield in a volcano monitoring sensor network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a science-centric evaluation of a 19-day sensor network deployment at Reventador, an active volcano in Ecuador. Each of the 16 sensors continuously sampled seismic and acoustic data at 100 Hz. Nodes used an event-detection algorithm to trigger ...

Geoff Werner-Allen; Konrad Lorincz; Jeff Johnson; Jonathan Lees; Matt Welsh

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Search for shallow magma accumulations at Augustine Volcano  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A search was made for shallow magma accumulations beneath Augustine Volcano using primarily three geophysical techniques: (1) temperature and heat flow measurements, (2) active and passive seismic refraction, and (3) three-dimensional modeling of aeromagnetic data. With these studies it was hoped to gain insight into the interval structure of Augustine Volcano, to delineate, if possible, the size and shape of near surface magma bodies and to assess the potential of the volcano as a natural laboratory for hot rock and magma geothermal energy research. Augustine was chosen because it is a very young and very active volcano with several historic eruptions in 1812, 1883, 1935, 1964/64. One of the main targets for the geophysical studies was a summit lava dome of about 0.05 km/sup 3/ volume, extruded in 1963/64 and suspected to still contain considerable residual heat, perhaps be still partially molten years after its intrusion. Five months after the field work in 1975 this dome was exploded in January 1976. One month later, a hot (about 650 to 800/sup 0/C) viscous dome was intruded into the January summit crater.

Kienle, J.; Lalla, D.J.; Pearson, C.F.; Barrett, S.A.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Deploying a Wireless Sensor Network on an Active Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Augmenting heavy and power-hungry data collection equipment with lighter, smaller wireless sensor network nodes leads to faster, larger deployments. Arrays comprising dozens of wireless sensor nodes are now possible, allowing scientific studies that ... Keywords: wireless sensor networks, sensor network applications, sensor network nodes, volcano research

Geoffrey Werner-Allen; Konrad Lorincz; Matt Welsh; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.  

SciTech Connect

A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the medium volcanism region (group 3) showed relatively moderate mapping estimation uncertainty. Areas of high uncertainty provide locations where additional site characterization resources can be spent most effectively. The new data collected can be added to the existing database to perform future regionalized mapping and reduce the uncertainty level of the existing estimations.

Balasingam, Pirahas (University of Arizona); Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hydrothermal alteration in Oregon's Newberry Volcano No. 2: fluid chemistry and secondary-mineral distribution  

SciTech Connect

Newberry 2 was drilled in the caldera floor of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, by the US Geological Survey during 1979-81. The maximum temperature measured was 265C at the bottom of the hole, 932 m below the surface. Rocks recovered fr9om the drill hole are divided into three intervals on the basis of hydrothermal alteration and mineral deposition: (1) 0-290 m consists of unaltered, largely glassy volcanic material, with present temperatures ranging from 20 to 40C; (2) 290-700 m consists of permeable tuff layers, tuff breccia units, and brecciated and fractured rhyodacitic to dacitic lava flows, with temperatures ranging from 40 to 100C; (3) 700-932 m consists of impermeable andesitic to basaltic lava flows that generally show little effect of alteration, interlayered with permeable hydrothermally altered flow breccia, with temperatures gradually increasing from 100 at 700 m to 265C at 932 m. Hydrothermal alteration throughout the system is controlled by rock permeability, temperature, composition of geothermal fluids, and composition and crystallinity of host rocks. Rock alteration consists mainly of replacement of glass by clay minerals and, locally, zeolites, partial replacement of plagioclase phenocrysts by calcite +/- epidote +/- illite, and whole-rock leaching adjacent to fluids channels. Open-space deposition of hydrothermal minerals in fractures, vesicles, and interbreccia pore space is far more abundant than replacement. A cooling shallow convection system in the upper 700 m is indicated by the occurrence of hydrothermal minerals that were deposited in a slightly higher temperature environment than presently exists. Below 700 m, the heat flow is conductive, and fluid flow is controlled by horizontal lava flows. Homogenization temperatures of secondary quartz fluid inclusions were as high as 370C.

Keith, T.E.C.; Mariner, R.H.; Bargar, K.E.; Evans, W.C.; Presser, T.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sensor networks for high-resolution monitoring of volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed and deployed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcn Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The ...

Matt Welsh; Geoff Werner-Allen; Konrad Lorincz; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis Of Multiple Scattering At Vesuvius Volcano, Italy, Using Data Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scattering At Vesuvius Volcano, Italy, Using Data Of Scattering At Vesuvius Volcano, Italy, Using Data Of The Tomoves Active Seismic Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Multiple Scattering At Vesuvius Volcano, Italy, Using Data Of The Tomoves Active Seismic Experiment Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Data from the TomoVes active seismic experiment are used to study scattering effects in the shallow heterogeneous structure of Vesuvius volcano. Seismograms from shots located on the volcano itself are characterised by spindle-like envelopes, small or missing P-onsets, missing S-onsets, and long codas. Seismograms from shots in the surroundings of the volcano, on the contrary, show clear and impulsive P- and S-onsets and short codas. The different shapes of the envelopes can be explained by

90

A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano, A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library == A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiThesis/Dissertation == Author Catherine King Skokan Organization Colorado School of Mines Published Publisher Not Provided, 1974 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation [[Citation::Catherine King Skokan. 1974. A Time-Domain Electromagnetic Survey of the East Rift Zone Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii []. [ (!) ]: Colorado School of Mines.]] Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Time-Domain_Electromagnetic_Survey_of_the_East_Rift_Zone_Kilauea_Volcano,_Hawaii&oldid=682585"

91

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii [Internet]. 2012. USGS. [cited 06/26/2013]. Available from: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/summary/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Summary_of_Pu_u_O_o_-_Kupaianaha_Eruption,_Kilauea_Volcano,_Hawaii&oldid=682513" Categories: References Uncited References

92

Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to:...

93

A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric...

94

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic National Park Geothermal Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related

95

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

96

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to:...

97

New results on the resistivity structure of Merapi Volcano(Indonesia), derived from 3D restricted inversion of long-offsettransient electromagnetic data  

SciTech Connect

Three long-offset transient electromagnetic (LOTEM) surveyswerecarried out at the active volcano Merapi in Central Java (Indonesia)during the years 1998, 2000, and 2001. The measurements focused on thegeneral resistivity structure of the volcanic edifice at depths of 0.5-2km and the further investigation of a southside anomaly. The measurementswere insufficient for a full 3D inversion scheme, which could enable theimaging of finely discretized resistivity distributions. Therefore, astable, damped least-squares joint-inversion approach is used to optimize3D models with a limited number of parameters. The mode ls feature therealistic simulation of topography, a layered background structure, andadditional coarse 3D blocks representing conductivity anomalies.Twenty-eight LOTEM transients, comprising both horizontal and verticalcomponents of the magnetic induction time derivative, were analyzed. Inview of the few unknowns, we were able to achieve reasonable data fits.The inversion results indicate an upwelling conductor below the summit,suggesting hydrothermal activity in the central volcanic complex. Ashallow conductor due to a magma-filled chamber, at depths down to 1 kmbelow the summit, suggested by earlier seismic studies, is not indicatedby the inversion results. In conjunction with an anomalous-density model,derived from arecent gravity study, our inversion results provideinformation about the southern geological structure resulting from amajor sector collapse during the Middle Merapi period. The density modelallows to assess a porosity range andthus an estimated vertical salinityprofile to explain the high conductivities on a larger scale, extendingbeyond the foothills of Merapi.

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan, L.; Hordt, Andreas; Scholl,Carsten; Tezkan, Bulent

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

99

Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii- Evidence For The Distribution Of Magma Below Kilauea'S East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

100

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions and increased the international consensus to improve volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low volcanic ash ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mechanisms Linking Volcanic Aerosols to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of the climate system to volcanic aerosol forcing in the third climate configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (HadCM3). The main test case was based on the 1880s when there were several volcanic eruptions,...

Alan M. Iwi; Leon Hermanson; Keith Haines; Rowan T. Sutton

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Supercomputer modeling of volcanic eruption dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our specific goals are to: (1) provide a set of models based on well-defined assumptions about initial and boundary conditions to constrain interpretations of observations of active volcanic eruptions--including movies of flow front velocities, satellite observations of temperature in plumes vs. time, and still photographs of the dimensions of erupting plumes and flows on Earth and other planets; (2) to examine the influence of subsurface conditions on exit plane conditions and plume characteristics, and to compare the models of subsurface fluid flow with seismic constraints where possible; (3) to relate equations-of-state for magma-gas mixtures to flow dynamics; (4) to examine, in some detail, the interaction of the flowing fluid with the conduit walls and ground topography through boundary layer theory so that field observations of erosion and deposition can be related to fluid processes; and (5) to test the applicability of existing two-phase flow codes for problems related to the generation of volcanic long-period seismic signals; (6) to extend our understanding and simulation capability to problems associated with emplacement of fragmental ejecta from large meteorite impacts.

Kieffer, S.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Woo, Mahn-Ling [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Dictionary.png Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

105

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Tremor(Question) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Tremor(Question) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Despite several episodes of ground deformation and intense seismic activity starting in 1978, the Long Valley, California, volcanic area has not produced clearly recognized volcanic tremor. Instead, a variety of atypical microearthquakes have been recorded during these episodes, including events dominated by low-frequency (long-period) or mixed high and low-frequency (hybrid) signals. During a 1997 episode, a number of unusual microearthquakes occurred within a temporary 40-station

106

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Abstract Some of the earliest volcanic rocks attributed to the Yellowstone hotspot erupted from the McDermitt caldera and related volcanic centers in northwestern Nevada at 17-15 Ma. At that time, extensional faulting was ongoing to the south in central Nevada, leading some to suggest that the nascent hotspot caused or facilitated middle Miocene Basin and Range extension. Regional geologic relationships indicate that the total magnitude of extension in northwestern Nevada is low compared to the amount

107

A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In this study, we propose a numerical modeling technique which restores the gravity anomaly of tectonic origin and identifies the gravity low of caldera origin. The identification is performed just by comparing the restored gravity anomalies with the observed gravity anomalies, thus we

108

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A better understanding of active volcanic areas in the United States through electromagnetic geophysical studies received foundation from the many surveys done for geothermal exploration in the 1970's. Investigations by governmental, industrial, and academic agencies include (but are not limited to) mapping of the Cascades. Long Valley/Mono area, the Jemez volcanic field, Yellowstone Park, and an area in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity,

109

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone National Park Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over Yellowstone National Park (YNP) show contrasting patterns reflecting differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene, Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup, a series of mostly altered, andesitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks partially exposed in mountains on the eastern margin of YNP, produces high-amplitude, positive magnetic

110

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Stratigraphy and textural characteristics of the 198283 tephra of Galunggung volcano (Indonesia): implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stratigraphy and textural characteristics of the 1982­83 tephra of Galunggung volcano (Indonesia Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract The Galunggung volcano in western Java (Indonesia) was the site activity, and consequently the corresponding increase in explosivity. Author Keywords: Indonesia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

113

Lahars Deposits Architecture and Volume in the C. Lengkong Valley at Semeru volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Lahars Deposits Architecture and Volume in the C. Lengkong Valley at Semeru volcano, Indonesia. Université Paris 1 ­ Sorbonne & Univ. Gadjah Mada (Indonesia) Laboratoire de Géographie Physique CNRS UMR Lahars at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, are an ongoing phenomenon that rapidly transports large amount

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library : Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiInfo Graphic/Map/Chart Authors Frank A. Trusdell and Richard B. Moore Published U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Frank A. Trusdell,Richard B. Moore. Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. []. Place of publication not provided. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 2006. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/2614/downloads/pdf/2614map_508.pdf.

115

Survey of Potential Geothermal Exploration Sites at Newberry Volcano Deschutes County, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect

The study summarizes the current data, generates some new data, and recommends further steps which should be taken to investigate the electrical power production potential of Newberry volcano. The objective was to concentrate on data from the developable flanks of the volcano. All previous data on the geology, hydrology, and geophysics were summarized. A soil-mercury survey focused on the flanks of the volcano was conducted. Samples from 1000 km/sup 2/ of the volcano were analyzed for mercury content. All this information was utilized to evaluate (1) the likelihood of future discovery of electrical-quality geothermal fluids on the flanks, and (2) the most cost-effective means of improving the quality of available power generation estimates for the volcano. 37 figures.

Priest, George R.; Vogt, Beverly F.; Black, Gerald L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement a multi-step combination that is believed to have not been used before. This includes: identifying the geometry and the electrical resistivity associated with the pluton; locating areas of fluid movement in and around the pluton; measuring heat associated with the pluton; and looking for geochemical indications for degassing of circulating geothermal fluid. This approach applies gravity and MT surveys, although at much higher density than typically used in exploration. The plan involves using innovative patent pending, 3-D seismic geophone measurement tools developed by HiPoint Reservoir, LLC, that have not previously been used in geothermal exploration. The project also includes strategies for detecting deep degassing of geothermal fluid and using special flux measurement equipment at the temperature gradient well sites to sample for CO2 outgassing. Secondary mineral samples collected from the temperature gradient well core will be analyzed for stable carbon, oxygen and sulfur isotopes at the Southern Methodist University geochemical laboratory. X-R diffraction analyses will be used to characterize the thermal history of the cored rock. The final step will use temperature gradient data to map out the thermal characteristics across the pluton. The resulting model will be used to identify hot areas associated with the pluton that has fluid moving through fractures. One additional innovation designed into this program is multiple-use of temperature gradient drilling. The upper portion of the wells will be used for the 3-D seismic array. CO2 flux measurements will be employed during drilling of these holes, and the completed wells will provide the very valuable temperature profiles.

118

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

119

Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morgan, Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Paul Morgan, Wendell Duffield, John Sass, Tracey Felger (2003) Searching For An Electrical-Grade Geothermal Resource In Northern Arizona To Help Geopower The West Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_San_Francisco_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Morgan,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510822" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

120

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Miocene volcanic complex of the Takashibiyama Formation consists largely of subalkali, subaqueous basalt to andesite lavas and andesite to dacite subaqueous volcaniclastic flow deposits. Most of subaqueous lavas are moderately to intensely brecciated with rugged rough surfaces and ramp structures similar to subaerial block lava. Volcaniclastic flow deposits commonly include basalt to andesite lava fragments and/or pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal

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121

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity (Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15_15 km) are reliably

122

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Juan Volcanic Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

123

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

124

An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The expert system approach enables geochemical evidence to be integrated with geological, petrological and mineralogical evidence in identifying the eruptive setting of ancient volcanic rocks. This paper explains the development of ESCORT, an Expert System for Characterization of Rock Types. ESCORT uses as its knowledge base a set of dispersion matrices derived from a geochemical data bank of some 8000 immobile element analyses, together with tables of magma-type membership probabilities based

125

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References

126

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

127

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lassen Volcanic National Park Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

128

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km^3 of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km^3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and

129

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

130

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion...

131

Seasonally Modulated Tropical Drought Induced by Volcanic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major volcanic events with a high loading of stratospheric aerosol have long been known to cause cooling, but their impact on precipitation has only recently been emphasized, especially as an analog for potential geoengineering of climate. Here, ...

Renu Joseph; Ning Zeng

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Major Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: A Critical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines whether major volcanic eruptions of the past century have had a significant impact on surface land and ocean temperatures surface pressure and precipitation. Both multieruption composites and individual eruption time series ...

Clifford F. Mass; David A. Portman

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Effect of Explosive Tropical Volcanism on ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the response of El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) to massive volcanic eruptions in a suite of coupled general circulation model (CGCM) simulations utilizing the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3). The authors ...

Shayne McGregor; Axel Timmermann

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Deploying a wireless sensor network on an active volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augmenting heavy and power-hungry data collection equipment with lighter, smaller wireless sensor network nodes leads to faster,larger deployments. Arrays comprising dozens of wireless sensor nodes are now possible,allowing scientific studies that arent feasible with traditional instrumentation. Designing sensor networks to support volcanic studies requires addressing the high data rates and high data fidelity these studies demand. The authors sensor-network application for volcanic data collection relies on triggered event detection and reliable data retrieval to meet bandwidth and data-quality demands. Wireless sensor networks in which numerous resource-limited nodes are linked via low-bandwidth wireless radios have been the focus of intense research during the past few years. Since their conception, theyve excited a range of scientific communities because of their potential to facilitate data acquisition and scientific studies. Collaborations between computer scientists and other domain scientists have produced networks that can record data at a scale and resolution not previously possible. Taking this progress one step further, wireless sensor networks can potentially advance the pursuit of geophysical studies of volcanic activity. Two years ago, our team of computer scientists at Harvard University began collaborating with volcanologists at the University of North Carolina, the University of New Hampshire, and the Instituto

Konrad Lorincz; Matt Welsh; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Numerical Model For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano, For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano, Colombia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Model For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano, Colombia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a two-dimensional model for dilute pyroclastic flow dynamics that uses the compressible Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the Diffusion-Convection equation to take into account sedimentation. The model is applied to one of the slopes of Galeras Volcano to show: (1) the temperature evolution with the time; (2) dynamic pressure change; and (3) particle concentration along the computer domain from the eruption to the impact with a topographic barrier located more than 16 km

137

EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, 7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to create an Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Demonstration Project involving new technology, techniques, and advanced monitoring protocols for the purpose of testing the feasibility and viability of EGS for renewable energy production. BLM is the lead agency for this EA and DOE is a cooperating agency. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download April 5, 2012 EA-1897: Finding of No Significant Impact AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon April 5, 2012 EA-1897: Final Environmental Assessment

138

Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From Seismic And Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From Seismic And Gravity Data Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Two seismic refraction surveys were carried out in 1976 and 1977 on the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano as part of an exploratory program for geothermal resources. The short traverse seismic refraction survey of January 1976 delineated the upper surface structure of the east rift, revealing velocities of 2.5 km/s under the Kalapana line and 3.1 km/s under the Leilani line beneath a surface layer of low, but variable velocity. This survey was not successful in determining the depth of the

139

Geoelectric Studies on the East Rift, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Island | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoelectric Studies on the East Rift, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Island Geoelectric Studies on the East Rift, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Island Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geoelectric Studies on the East Rift, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Island Abstract Three geophysical research organizations, working together under the auspices of the Hawaii Geothermal Project, have used several electrical and electromagnetic exploration techniques on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii to assess its geothermal resources. This volume contains four papers detailing their methods and conclusions. Keller et al. of the Colorado School of Mines used the dipole mapping and time-domain EM sounding techniques to define low resistivity areas around the summit and flanks of Kilauea. Kauahikaua and Klein of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics then detailed the East Rift

140

Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Based On  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Based On Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Based On Drill Core From Soh 1 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Based On Drill Core From Soh 1 Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Deep drilling has allowed for the first time an examination of most of the shield stage of a Hawaiian volcano when it is centered over the hotspot and most of its volume is produced. We determined the lithologies, ages, geochemical characteristics and accumulation rates of rocks from the continuously cored, ~1.7 km deep Scientific Observation Hole (SOH) 1, which was drilled into Kilauea's East Rift Zone. The uppermost ~750 m of this hole contain relatively unaltered subaerially quenched lavas; the lower

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Activities of 238U decay series radioisotopes have been determined for both postcaldera basalts erupted between 1849 and 1974 and genetically related young precaldera dacites from Batur volcano, Bali, Sunda arc. All rocks possess (230Th/238U) = 1 within 2 sigma error indicating that little, if any, fractionation between Th and U occurred during their genesis, or in their source regions, within approximately the last 350 ka. Both the basaltic and the dacitic rocks possess (230Th/232U) ~

142

Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii Abstract Deuterium (D) content of groundwater and precipitation, and tritium content of selected groundwater samples are used to infer flow paths for ground water in the Kilauea volcano area. The spatial distribution of calculated recharge elevations and residence times for groundwater samples tends to support the idea that Kilauea's rift zones comprise leaky boundaries within the regional groundwater flow system, partly isolating the groundwater in the area bounded by the rift zones and the Pacific Ocean. The south wesr

143

Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (9) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A borehole has been drilled to a depth of 1262 m (4141 ft) beneath the summit of Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii. The purpose was to test predictions made from surface-based geophysical surveys and seek evidence of a hydrothermal system over a known magma body. Nearly all rocks penetrated by the borehole are olivine basalt, with minor amounts of olivine diabase, picrite diabase and olivine-poor basalt. While the rocks are petrographically uniform, their physical properties vary widely from

144

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springson Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understandprocesses that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water,and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower

145

Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands, began erupting in May-June 2003. A series of subplinian explosive eruptions of andesite magma began at the Eastern Crater in the eastern part of the summit caldera on the evening of 10 May. Brown tephra was sent mainly westward by strong winds. Small-scale pyroclastic surges were discharged eastward outside the caldera in late May. An andesite lava dome that had once filled the inner crater was fragmented by phreatomagmatic explosions in the middle of June.

146

Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Based On Drill Core From Soh 1 Jump to: navigation,...

147

The upper crustal P-wave velocity structure of Newberry volcano, Central Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The upper-crustal seismic-velocity structure of Newberry volcano, central Oregon, is imaged using P-wave travel time tomography. The inversion combines a densely-spaced seismic line collected (more)

Beachly, Matthew William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Upper Crustal P-wave Velocity Structure of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The upper-crustal seismic-velocity structure of Newberry volcano, central Oregon, is imaged using P-wave travel time tomography. The inversion combines a densely-spaced seismic line collected in (more)

Beachly, Matthew William, 1986-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nues ardentes of 22 November 1994 at Merapi volcano, Java, Indonesia E.K Abdurachmanab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuées ardentes of 22 November 1994 at Merapi volcano, Java, Indonesia E.K Abdurachmanab J Volcanological Survey of Indonesia, Jl. Diponegoro 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia c Centre de Recherches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

Assembling Dacite in a Continental Subduction Zone: A Case Study of Tauhara Volcano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Tauhara is the largest dacitic volcanic complex of onshore New Zealand and comprises seven subaerial domes and associated lava and pyroclastic flows, with a (more)

Tutt, Chelsea May

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a complex of dikes containing solidified magma from past volcanic eruptions that provide energy for the hydrothermal processes associated with the rift zone. Analysis of gravity...

152

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Arizona Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

153

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

154

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

155

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

Spectral properties and reflectance curves of the revealed volcanic rocks in Syria using radiometric measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aimed at studying the spectral reflectance intensity of different exposed volcanic rocks in Syria, and drawing their curves by radiometer measurements. In order to reach this goal, we have studied different kinds of volcanic rocks related ...

M. Rukieh; A. M. Al-Kafri; A. W. Khalaf

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions about and increased the international consensus toward improving volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Quaternary volcano-lacustrine patterns and palaeobotanical data in southern Armenia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caucasus has been strongly influenced by Plio-Quaternary volcanic and tectonic events and Pleistocene Caucasus were influenced by tectono-volcanic events, lake level changes and glacialeinterglacial of early prehistoric human occupation in Georgia (Dmanisi) around 1.81 Ma (Gabunia et al., * Corresponding

Utrecht, Universiteit

159

Scoria Cone Construction Mechanism, Lathrop Wells Volcano, Southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Scoria cones are commonly assumed to have been constructed by the accumulation of ballistically-ejected clasts from discrete and relatively coarse-grained Strombolian bursts and subsequent avalanching such that the cone slopes are at or near the angle of repose for loose scoria. The cone at the hawaiitic Lathrop Wells volcano, southern Nevada, contains deposits that are consistent with the above processes during early cone-building phases; these early deposits are composed mainly of coarse lapilli and fluidal bombs and are partially welded, indicating relatively little cooling during flight. However, the bulk of the cone is comprised of relatively fine-grained (ash and lapilli), planar beds with no welding, even within a few tens of meters of the vent. This facies is consistent with deposition by direct fallout from sustained eruption columns of relatively well-fragmented material, primarily mantling cone slopes and with a lesser degree of avalanching than is commonly assumed. A laterally extensive fallout deposit (up to 20 km from the vent) is inferred to have formed contemporaneously with these later cone deposits. This additional mechanism for construction of scoria cones may also be important at other locations, particularly where the magmas are relatively high in volatile content and where conditions promote the formation of abundant microlites in the rising mafic magma.

G. Valentine; D. Krier; F. Perry; G. Heiken

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Predicting Tephra Dispersion with a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model and a Particle Fall Model: Application to Cerro Negro Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of volcanic ash (tephra) fallout are increasingly used to assess volcanic hazards in advance of eruptions and in nearreal time. These models often approximate the wind field using simplistic assumptions of the atmosphere that do not ...

Marc A. Byrne; Arlene G. Laing; Charles Connor

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online xxx Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano Faulting volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May 2006 on the Java Island

Podladchikov, Yuri

162

Observations of SO2 production and transport from Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka using the MODerate resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer (MODIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, is one of the most active volcanoes in the North Pacific (NOPAC) region and erupts violently on average every 6 months. We report the SO2 cloud mass, emission and transport rates for the eruption of Bezymianny ...

C. S. Kearney; K. Dean; V. J. Realmuto; I. M. Watson; J. Dehn; F. Prata

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Measuring Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) Emissions in October, 2010 Catastrophic Eruption from Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volcano in Java, Indonesia with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) José A. Morales-Collazo Geology This paper discusses sulfur dioxide (SO2) cloud emissions from Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia during, Indonesia. In October 26th , 2010, a catastrophic eruption was reported from Merapi causing nearly 386

Gilbes, Fernando

164

Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Dictionary.png Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Sedimentary-hosted volcanic-related resources are special in that the

165

Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii- Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii- Evidence For The Distribution Of Magma Below Kilauea'S East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii- Evidence For The Distribution Of Magma Below Kilauea'S East Rift Zone Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The pattern of b-value of the frequency-magnitude relation, or mean magnitude, varies little in the Kaoiki-Hilea area of Hawaii, and the b-values are normal, with b=0.8 in the top 10 km and somewhat lower values below that depth. We interpret the Kaoiki-Hilea area as relatively stable, normal Hawaiian crust. In contrast, the b-values beneath Kilauea's South

166

3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed density model of Mt. Etna and its surrounding areas has been evaluated using a 3-D inversion of the gravimetric data acquired in the 1980's. Several high-density and low-density bodies are found, penetrating from shallow depths as far down as 12 km bsl. A positive correlation (in terms of location, extent, density, and velocity) is established between several anomalies of the density model and features identified in previously published seismic tomographies. A prominent high-density body extending down to 7 km bsl is recognized in the southern

167

Direct-Current Resistivity At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Direct-Current Resistivity At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles.

168

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

169

Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

Htun, K.M.

1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effects of the El Chichn Volcanic Cloud on Solar Radiation Received at Fairbanks, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed insulation measurements have been carried out in Fairbanks for the last four years. Beginning on 15 November 1982, these measurements showed substantial changes, believed to be due to the dust cloud of El Chichn. The volcano, situated ...

Gerd Wendler

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Monitoring rapid temporal changes in a volcano with coda wave interferometry, Geophys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Multiplyscattered waves typically dominate the late part of the seismic coda in local earthquake seismograms. Small medium changes that have no detectable influence on the first arrivals are amplified by multiple scattering and may thus be readily observed in the coda. We exploit this idea using Coda Wave Interferometry to monitor temporal changes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica. Erebus is one of the few volcanoes on Earth with a longlived convecting lava lake. Large exsolved gas bubbles generate impulsive Strombolian explosions that provide a repeating seismic source of seismic energy propagating through the strongly scattering geology of the volcano. We examined these signals during a particularly active eruptive twomonth period between December, 1999 and February, 2000. Early seismograms are highly reproducible throughout this period. During the first month this is also the case for the coda. Approximately midway through this period, however, the seismic coda decorrelates rapidly over a period of several days. This indicates a rapid change in the scattering properties of the volcano, likely reflecting subtle changes in the nearsummit magma/conduit system that would not be discernible using direct or singlescattered seismic wave

Er Grt; Roel Snieder; Richard C. Aster; Philip R. Kyle

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Three-dimensional P velocity structure of the crust below Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Utilizing teleseismic P residuals, we have detected a column of high P velocity material extending from within 10 km of the surface below the summit of Newberry Volcano, Oregon to midcrustal depths near 25 km. We interpret this column to be the expression of a swarm of predominantly subsolidus gabbroic sills and dikes which were intruded as the volcano was built. The high P velocities observed below the volcano severely limit the size of magma chambers which could presently exist in the crust below Newberry Volcano. Those possible include a few percent of partial melt distributed through large volumes of a mafic intrusion zone in the midcrust; a few smaller, higher melt fraction zones in the midcrust with dimensions less than 6 km and whose aggregate volume is only a few percent of enclosing volumes of 200 km/sup 3/; small magma bodies with dimensions of a few kilometers located within the upper 10 km of the crust; or a mafic, crystal-rich magma of arbitrary dimensions located in the upper few km. The low P velocities detected in the upper 4 km beneath the center of the summit caldera may be partially caused by a magma chamber in the second of these catagories.

Stauber, D.A.; Green, S.M.; Iyer, H.M.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mountain Breathing Revisitedthe Hyperventilation of a Volcano Cinder Cone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 23 hours of fresh to strong winds in December 1975, air flowed rapidly and continuously out of a drill hole in the top of the summit cone of Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii. Measurements made during this outflow indicate that the air entered the ...

Alfred H. Woodcock

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mount Hood volcano: phase zero study. Final report, January 1, 1977--June 30 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A base of earth science data was developed for an area centered on Mt. Hood Volcano as the first step in a systematic geothermal resource assessment. A comprehensive technical plan for the assessment was developed and is also described. A preliminary bibliography is included.

Hull, D.A.

1977-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

176

IESID: Automatic system for monitoring ground deformation on the Deception Island volcano (Antarctica)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When establishing the relative distance between two GNSS-GPS stations with sub-centimeter accuracy, it is necessary to have auxiliary data, some of which can only be collected some time after the moment of measurement. However, for monitoring highly-active ... Keywords: Antarctica, GNSS-GPS satellite geodesy, Volcano monitoring

Luis Miguel Peci; Manuel Berrocoso; RaL PEz; Alberto FernNdez-Ros; AmS De Gil

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mud volcano response to the 4 April 2010 El MayorCucapah earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.e.258 Wister fault) along the eastern edge of the Salton Sea, an area dominated by mud volcanoes and259 for irrigation and geothermal plants [Lachenbruch et al., 1985; Lynch and49 Hudnut, 2008].50 Seismically been partially successful in the areas north of the Salton Sea, but less63 effective to the south

Manga, Michael

178

A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The onset of volcanism in the Neapolitan area and the tensile tectonics of the Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain have been related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Basin, which may have resulted in horizontal asthenosphere flows giving rise, in turn, to crustal distension, local mantle upwellings and ensuing volcanism. Geological and structural data were taken into consideration: the existence of a shallow crust-mantle discontinuity in the Neapolitan area, the onset of volcanism in a

179

A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At Rakiraki in northeastern Viti Levu, the Pliocene Ba Volcanic Group comprises gently dipping, pyroxene-phyric basaltic lavas, including pillow lava, and texturally diverse volcanic breccia interbedded with conglomerate and sandstone. Three main facies associations have been identified: (1) The primary volcanic facies association includes massive basalt (flows and sills), pillow lava and related in-situ breccia (pillow-fragment breccia, autobreccia, in-situ hyaloclastite, peperite).

180

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park_Area_(Janik_%26_Mclaren,_2010)&oldid=425654"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

182

Prospecting for Hydrothermal Vents Using Moored Current and Temperature Data: Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal and inertial currents and profuse hydrothermal discharge at recently erupted Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, cause relatively large and rapid temperature (T) changes in the near-bottom water column. Measurements show short-term T ...

J. W. Lavelle; M. A. Wetzler; E. T. Baker; R. W. Embley

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Waterproofing and Strengthening Volcanic Tuff in Waste Repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste repositories from surface trenches and shafts at Los Alamos to drilled tunnels at Yucca Mountain are being built in volcanic Tuff, a soft compacted material that is permeable to water and air. US Department of Energy documents on repository design identify the primary design goal of 'preventing water from reaching the waste canisters, dissolving the canisters and carrying the radioactive waste particles away from the repository'. Designers expect to achieve this by use of multiple barriers along with careful placement of the repository both well above the water table and well above the ground level in a mountain. Though repositories are located in areas that have a historically dry climate to minimize the impact of rainfall infiltration, global warming phenomena may have the potential to alter regional climate patterns - potentially leading to higher infiltration rates. Conventional methods of sealing fractures within volcanic tuff may not be sufficiently robust or long lived to isolate a repository shaft from water for the required duration. A new grouting technology based on molten wax shows significant promise for producing the kind of long term sealing performance required. Molten wax is capable of permeating a significant distance through volcanic tuff, as well as sealing fractures by permeation that is thermally dependent instead of chemically or time dependent. The wax wicks into and saturates tuff even if no fractures are present, but penetrates and fills only the heated area. Heated portions of the rock fill like a vessel. The taffy-like wax has been shown to waterproof the tuff, and significantly increase its resistance to fracture. This wax was used in 2004 for grouting of buried radioactive beryllium waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, chiefly to stop the water based corrosion reactions of the waste. The thermoplastic material contains no water and does not dry out or change with age. Recent studies indicate that this kind of wax material may be inherently resistant to bio-degradation. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Recent Mafic Eruptions at Newberry Volcano and in the Central Oregon Cascades: Physical Volcanology and Implications for Hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mafic eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanic activity in central Oregon throughout the Holocene. These eruptions have produced cinder cones, extensive lava flows, (more)

McKay, Daniele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

Pontbriand, Claire Willis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Advances in the remote sensing of volcanic activity and hazards, with special consideration to applications in developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of remote sensing for studies of volcanic activity and hazards have developed rapidly in the past 40 years. This has facilitated the observation of volcanic processes, such as ground deformation and thermal emission changes, lava flows, ...

G. G. J. Ernst; M. Kervyn; R. M. Teeuw

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Interpretation of Accurate UV Polarization Lidar Measurements: Application to Volcanic Ash Number Concentration Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, accurate UV polarization measurements are performed on a volcanic ash cloud after long-range transport at Lyon, France (45.76N, 4.83E). The volcanic particles are released from the mid-April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull ...

A. Miffre; G. David; B. Thomas; M. Abou Chacra; P. Rairoux

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Haleakala Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one self-potential profile and one controlled-source electromagnetic sounding. The geochemical data collected included a reconnaissance soil mercury and

189

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the level of maturation of the Fruitland Formation coals, and time-dependet temperature models, based on heat-flow data in the San Juan region, to further investigate both the thermal history of the region and the nature of the influence of the San Juan volcanic field thermal source on the thermal

190

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Oxygen isotopes. References Peter B. Larson, Hugh P. Taylor Jr (1986) An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_San_Juan_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Larson_%26_Jr,_1986)&oldid=687474" Categories: Exploration Activities

191

A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A region of crustal extension, the Azores Plateau contains excellent examples of submarine volcanic edifices constructed over a wide range of ocean depths along the Pico Ridge. Using bathymetric data and Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric development of a submarine ridge. Our analysis and interpretation of the measurement and

192

Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Water samples were collected during nitrogen-stimulated flow tests in 1978, but no information was provided on sampling conditions. The well was flowed again for the last time in 1982, but the flow test lasted only 1 h (Thompson, 1985). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

193

Core hole drilling and the ''rain current'' phenomenon at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Two core holes have been completed on the flanks of Newberry Volcano, Oregon. Core hole Geo N-1 has a heat flow of 180 mW m/sup -2/, reflecting subsurface temperatures, sufficient for commerical exploitation of geothermally generated electricity. GEO N-3, which has a heat flow of 86 mW m/sup -2/, is less encouraging. We emphasize the ''rain curtain'' effect with the hope that a detailed discussion of this phenomenon at two distinct localities will lead to a better understanding of the physical processes in operation. Cole hole GEO N-1 was cored to a depth of 1387 m at a site located 9.3 km south of the center of the volcano. Core hole GEO N-3 was cored to a depth of 1220 m at a site located 12.6 km north of the center of the volcano. Both core holes penetrated interbedded pyroclastic lava flows and lithic tuffs ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite, basaltic andesite being the most common rock type. Potassium-argon age dates range up to 2 Ma. Caving and sloughing were encountered in both core holes at depths near the regional water table. Both core holes penetrate three distinct thermal regimes. The uppermost regime is isothemal at mean air temperature down to about 900-1000 m (the rain curtain).

Swanberg, C.A.; Walkey, W.C.; Combs, J.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone Authors H.M. Bibby, G.F. Risk, T.G. Caldwell and S.L. Bennie Conference World Geothermal Congress 2005; Antalya, Turkey; 2005/04/24 Published ?, 2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone Citation H.M. Bibby,G.F. Risk,T.G. Caldwell,S.L. Bennie. 2005. Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from

196

The epidemiology and etiology of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. National Park Service has recognized visitor health and safety as an important component of protected area management. Despite this recognition, research investigating visitor health and safety issues in national parks is lacking. In order to improve the understanding of the factors contributing to visitor injuries, the purpose of this study was to: 1) identify the distribution of injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 2) examine the relationship between visitor factors and the severity of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 3) examine the relationship between environmental factors and the severity of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and 4) determine the effectiveness of sign placement and indirect supervision on controlling visitor injuries in the park. Data for this study consisted of 5,947 incident reports recorded in Hawaii Volcanoes between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2002. The results found that even though 26% of the injuries in the park occur in frontcountry regions, 53% of all visitor injuries took place at the Eruption Site. As well, 130 of the 268 (49%) fatalities occurred on roadway environments and 1,179 of the 1,698 (69%) severe injuries occurred at the Eruption Site. Logistic regression analysis used to examine the relationship between visitor factors and injury severity in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park found that female visitors, visitors wearing minimal footwear and clothing, and visitors carrying no flashlight and minimal drinking water are factors significantly associated with fatal injuries. Visitors wearing minimal footwear and clothing, visitors carrying no flashlight and minimal drinking water, visitors entering restricted areas, visitors with pre-existing health conditions, and visitors aged 50-59 years of age are factors significantly associated with severe injuries. Logistic regression analysis found no built environment factor to be significantly associated with visitor fatalities or severe injuries. However, darkness and rugged terrain were significantly associated with visitor fatalities. Chi-square tests of independence found the combined treatment of sign placement and indirect supervision to have no effect on reducing the frequency and severity of visitor injuries at the Eruption Site.

Heggie, Travis Wade

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects Professor Gerta Keller Princeton University Presentation: WC13FEB2014_GKeller.pptx The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether one, or several large bolide impacts, the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) or a combination of the two were the primary mechanisms driving the environmental changes that are universally regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Recent years have seen a revolution in our understanding of interplanetary

198

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward  

SciTech Connect

The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Intracaldera volcanism and sedimentation-Creede caldera, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the Creede caldera, Colorado, many of the answers to its postcaldera volcanic and sedimentary history lie within the sequence of tuffaceous clastic sedimentary rocks and tuffs known as the Creede Formation. The Creede Formation and its interbedded ash deposits were sampled by research coreholes Creede 1 and 2, drilled during the fall of 1991. In an earlier study of the Creede Formation, based on surface outcrops and shallow mining company coreholes, Heiken and Krier (1987) concluded that the process of caldera structural resurgence was rapid and that a caldera lake had developed in an annulus (``moat``) located between the resurgent dome and caldera wall. So far we have a picture of intracaldera activity consisting of intermittent hydrovoleanic eruptions within a caldera lake for the lower third of the Creede Formation, and both magmatic and hydrovolcanic ash eruptions throughout the top two-thirds. Most of the ash deposits interbedded with the moat sedimentary rocks are extremely fine-grained. Ash fallout into the moat lake and unconsolidated ash eroded from caldera walls and the slopes of the resurgent dome were deposited over stream delta distributaries within relatively shallow water in the northwestern moat, and in deeper waters of the northern moat, where the caldera was intersected by a graben. Interbedded with ash beds and tuffaceous siltstones are coarse-grained turbidites from adjacent steep slopes and travertine from fissure ridges adjacent to the moat. Sedimentation rates and provenance for clastic sediments are linked to the frequent volcanic activity in and near the caldera; nearly all of the Creede Formation sedimentary rocks are tuffaceous.

Heiken, G.; Krier, D.; Snow, M.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McCormick, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration in non-volcanic areas must above all rely on geophysical techniques to identify the reservoir, as it is unable to resort to volcanological methodologies. A brief description is therefore given of the contribution that can be obtained from certain types of geophysical prospectings. Author(s): Raffaello Nannini Published: Geothermics, 1986 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Aerial Photography (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986)

203

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

204

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

205

Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Both fluid and gas isotopic analysis. References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

206

Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log profiles made 10

207

Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The volcanic rocks investigated in a cross-section between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Nicaragua - with the exception of Recent and some Pleistocene lavas - are incipiently to strongly altered. Alteration patterns on different scales can be discerned in the Tertiary sequences: (i) a regional burial diagenesis or very low-grade burial metamorphism at the low-temperature end of the zeolite facies (mordenite subfacies) with an inferred thermal gradient of < 50°C/km, grading into (ii) a geothermal

208

Climate Studies with a Multilayer Energy Balance Model. Part III: Climatic Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and climatic effects of stratospheric volcanic aerosols are studied with a multilayer energy balance model. The results show that the latitudinal distribution of aerosols has a significant effect on climate sensitivity. When ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Li Peng; Albert Arking

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

On Numerical Simulation of the Global Distribution of Sulfate Aerosol Produced by a Large Volcanic Eruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the earth's atmosphere and have a relatively big influence on potential fluctuations of the atmospheric variables on both subclimatic and climatic scales. The objective of ...

J. A. Pudykiewicz; A. P. Dastoor

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Inside Volcanic Clouds: Remote Sensing of Ash Plumes Using Microwave Weather Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical and dynamical features of volcanic tephra due to Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions can be quantitatively monitored by using ground-based microwave weather radars. The methodological rationale and unique potential of this remote-sensing ...

Frank S. Marzano; Errico Picciotti; Mario Montopoli; Gianfranco Vulpiani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effects of the Mount St. Helens Volcanic Cloud on Turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and meteorological measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were ...

Edward Ryznar; Michael R. Weber; Thomas S. Hallaron

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

Suckale, Jenny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Volcanic and Solar Forcing of Climate Change during the Preindustrial Era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate response to variability in volcanic aerosols and solar irradiance, the primary forcings during the preindustrial era, is examined in a stratosphere-resolving general circulation model. The best agreement with historical and proxy data ...

Drew T. Shindell; Gavin A. Schmidt; Ron L. Miller; Michael E. Mann

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effect of Volcanic Eruptions on the Vertical Temperature Profile in Radiosonde Data and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both observed and modeled upper-air temperature profiles show the tropospheric cooling and tropical stratospheric warming effects from the three major volcanic eruptions since 1960. Detailed comparisons of vertical profiles of Radiosonde ...

Melissa Free; John Lanzante

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effects of the El Chichon Volcanic Cloud on Direct and Diffuse Solar Irradiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct normal and diffuse solar irradiances and 500 nm aerosol optical depths measured at the University of Michigan departed far from normal on 26 October 1982, when it is concluded that the main stratospheric cloud from the El Chichon volcanic ...

C. Bruce Baker; William R. Kuhn; Edward Ryznar

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Impact of Strong Tropical Volcanic Eruptions on ENSO Simulated in a Coupled GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of strong tropical volcanic eruptions (SVEs) on the El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) and its phase dependency is investigated using a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). This paper investigates the response of ENSO to an ...

Masamichi Ohba; Hideo Shiogama; Tokuta Yokohata; Masahiro Watanabe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Satellite Measurement of Sea Surface Temperature in the Presence of Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation studies have shown that volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere, such as those produced by the eruption of El Chichn, significantly affect satellite measurements in the three AVHRR thermal window channels centered at 3.7, 11 and 12 ?m. ...

Charles Walton

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Polarization Lidar and Synoptic Analyses of an Unusual Volcanic Aerosol Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over an unusually brief three-day period in early August 1989, spectacular twilight effects indicative of a stratospheric volcanic cloud were seen at Salt Lake City, Utah. Concurrent polarization lidar observations detected an aerosol layer at ...

Kenneth Sassen; John D. Horel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Response of Summer Precipitation over Eastern China to Large Volcanic Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the effects of large volcanic eruptions on regional climate so far have focused mostly on temperature responses. Previous studies using proxy data suggested that coherent droughts over eastern China are associated with explosive low-...

Youbing Peng; Caiming Shen; Wei-Chyung Wang; Ying Xu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Global Relationships among the Earth's Radiation Budget, Cloudiness, Volcanic Aerosols, and Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of Cess are extended to consider global relationships among the earth's radiation budget (including solar insulation and changes in optically active gass), cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature. ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; H. Lee Kyle; Douglas Hoyt

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Three-dimensional p-velocity structure of the summit caldera of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional high-resolution seismic study of the summit caldera of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, was conducted by the US Geological Survey using an adaptation of the method applied by Mercessian et al. (1984). Preliminary interpretation of the traveltime residuals reveals a ring of high P-velocity material coinciding with the inner ring fault system of the caldera in the upper 2 km. A zone of lower P velocities extends deeper than 2 km in the center of the caldera. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Stauber, D.A.; Iyer, N.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Dawson, P.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Investigation of the conductivity distribution in the vicinity of a cascade volcano  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetotelluric and telluric data were acquired in the vicinity of Mount Hood Oregon as part of a multidisciplinary exploration program to evaluate the geothermal potential of this stratocone volcano. Eleven field components were acquired simultaneously over the frequency band of 50. to .001 hertz. These data consisted of one five component magnetotelluric base site, two sets of two component remote electric field measurements and one set of remote horizontal magnetic field measurements. The data were recorded digitally in the field and processed later using the remote electric and magnetic signals to obtain unbiased tensor impedance and geomagnetic transfer function (tipper) estimates.

Mozley, E.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Errors in the Determination of the Solar Constant by the Langley Method Due to the Presence of Volcanic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy in the determination or the solar constant by means of the Langley method is strongly influenced by the spatial inhomogeneities of the atmospheric aerosol. Volcanos frequently inject aerosol into the upper troposphere and lower ...

Richard M. Schotland; James E. Hartman

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. (1986) Dissolved carbon dioxide in basaltic glasses:on degassing of carbon dioxide from Kilauea volcano.versus anthropogenic carbon dioxide. EOS. 92, 201202.

Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Retrieval of volcanic ash and ice cloud physical properties together with gas concentration from IASI measurements using the AVL model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation and tracking of volcanic aerosols are important for preventing possible aviation hazards and determining the influence of aerosols on climate. The useful information primary includes the concentration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

229

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios in gases of thirty hot springs and geothermal wells and of five natural gas wells in the western United States show no relationship to regional conductive heat flow, but do show a correlation with magma-based thermal activity and reservoir fluid temperature (or total convective heat discharge). Gases from high-T (> 200°C) reservoirs have 3He/4He > 2 _ the atmospheric value, with high He

230

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

231

Volcanic forcing improves Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model scaling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model (AOGCM) simulations of the twentieth century climate, which account for anthropogenic and natural forcings, make it possible to study the origin of long-term temperature correlations found in the observed records. We study ensemble experiments performed with the NCAR PCM for 10 different historical scenarios, including no forcings, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol, ozone, solar, volcanic forcing and various combinations, such as it natural, anthropogenic and all forcings. We compare the scaling exponents characterizing the long-term correlations of the observed and simulated model data for 16 representative land stations and 16 sites in the Atlantic Ocean for these scenarios. We find that inclusion of volcanic forcing in the AOGCM considerably improves the PCM scaling behavior. The scenarios containing volcanic forcing are able to reproduce quite well the observed scaling exponents for the land with exponents around 0.65 independent of the station dista...

Vyushin, D; Havlin, S; Bunde, A; Brenner, S; Vyushin, Dmitry; Zhidkov, Igor; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Brenner, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

New gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New gamma-ray observatory begins operations New gamma-ray observatory begins operations New gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory has begun formal operations at its site in Mexico. August 21, 2013 The HAWC Observatory taken in August 2013 from the summit of Sierra Negra. The image has been digitally altered to show HAWC as it will appear when construction is complete in 2014. The 111 Cherenkov detectors currently installed (100 Cherenkov detectors in operation) are colored white and located in the upper right quadrant of the array. The HAWC Observatory taken in August 2013 from the summit of Sierra Negra. The image has been digitally altered to show HAWC as it will appear when construction is complete in 2014. The 111 Cherenkov detectors currently

233

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

Wehrli, Bernhard

234

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

235

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

236

Influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the Asian monsoon region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the Asian monsoon region K. J. Anchukaitis,1 B. M throughout much of monsoon Asia. Here, we use long and wellvalidated proxy reconstructions of Asian droughts on the climate of the Asian monsoon region, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22703, doi:10.1029/ 2010GL044843. 1

Smith, Frederick

237

Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume, Clifton, Karachi 75600, Pakistan A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 28 October

Clift, Peter

239

A Daytime Complement to the Reverse Absorption Technique for Improved Automated Detection of Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated volcanic cloud detection algorithm that utilizes four spectral channels (0.65, 3.75, 11, and 12 ?m) that are common among several satellite-based instruments is presented. The new algorithm is physically based and globally applicable ...

Michael J. Pavolonis; Wayne F. Feltz; Andrew K. Heidinger; Gregory M. Gallina

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

GCM Simulations of Volcanic Aerosol Forcing. Part I: Climate Changes Induced by Steady-State Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Climate Model II to simulate the response of the climate system to a spatially and temporally constant forcing by volcanic aerosols having an optical depth of 0.15. The climatic ...

James B. Pollack; David Rind; Andrew Lacis; James E. Hansen; Makiko Sato; Reto Ruedy

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Diffusion in the Lower Stratosphere as Determined from Lidar Measurements of Volcanic Aerosol Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar measurements of the stratospheric aerosol layer from the Fuego volcanic eruption in 1974 are analyzed to yield estimates of effective vertical mixing coefficients Kz. The data at 19N latitude give Kz=6.6102 cm2 s?1 for the altitude range ...

Ellis E. Remsperg

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comments on ``Failures in detecting volcanic ash from a satellite-based technique''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of active vol- canism (pp. 45­64). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union. Davies, M. A., & Rose, W. I inter- national symposium on volcanic ash and aviation safety, Seattle, WA. Washington, DC: US GPO. US, causing severe restrictions to air traffic for many hours. This cloud was tracked without any split-window

Bluth, Gregg

243

Factors Influencing Volcanic Ash Dispersal from the 1995 and 1996 Eruptions of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prediction of the dispersal of volcanic ash from events such as the Ruapehu eruptions of 1995 and 1996 is important, not only for civil-defense authorities who need to warn people in downwind areas, but for airline companies that have to ...

Richard Turner; Tony Hurst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

Fleskes, Joe

245

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala geothermal gradient core hole drilling, operations, and preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to a depth of 700+ m at the Tecuamburro geothermal site, Guatemala during February and March, 1990. The core hole is located low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro Volcano complex. Preliminary analysis of cores (>98% core recovery) indicates that the hydrothermal system may be centered in the 4-km-diameter Chupadero Crater, which has been proposed as the source of pyroxene pumice deposits in the Tecuamburro area. TCB-1 is located 300 m south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco; the core hole penetrates the thin edge of a tuff ring surrounding Ixpaco and zones of hydrothermal brecciation within the upper 150 m may be related to the phreatic blast, dated at 2,910 {sup 14}C years. At the time of this writing, the unequilibrated temperature at a depth of 570m was 180{degree}C. Data on fracturing, permeability, hydrothermal alteration, and temperature will be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Goff, S.; Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Gardner, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Duffield, W. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (USA)); Martinelli, L.; Aycinena, S. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Volcanic Eruptions, Large-Scale Modes in the Northern Hemisphere, and the El NioSouthern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author analyzes the impact of 13 major stratospheric aerosol producing volcanic eruptions since 1870 on the large-scale variability modes of sea level pressure in the Northern Hemisphere winter. The paper focuses on the Arctic Oscillation (AO)...

Bo Christiansen

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Airborne Asian dust: case study of long-range transport and implications for the detection of volcanic ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a) 11- ? m image of the Aleutians and (b) corresponding T 4are for TOMS data over the Aleutian Islands (Figs. 9c,d). Ae.g. , the Kuril/Kamchatka/Aleutian volcanic chains, the

Simpson, James J; Hufford, G L; Servranckx, R; Berg, J; Pieri, D

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The 56 December 1991 FIRE IFO II Jet Stream Cirrus Case Study: Possible Influences of Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 56 December 1992 Project FIRE IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols ...

Kenneth Sassen; David O'C. Starr; Gerald G. Mace; Michael R. Poellot; S.H. Melfi; Wynn L. Eberhard; James D. Spinhirne; E.W. Eloranta; Donald E. Hagen; John Hallett

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Volcanic Ash Transport from Mount Asama to the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Influenced by Large-Scale Local Wind Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eruption of the Mount Asama volcano on 16 September 2004 produced an ash cloud and led to ashfall in the Tokyo metropolitan area that lies on the Kanto Plain. Satellite images showed the ash cloud drifting toward the south in the morning but ...

Nobumitsu Tsunematsu; Tomohiro Nagai; Toshiyuki Murayama; Ahoro Adachi; Yasuhiro Murayama

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

253

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

254

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A reconnaissance survey of Hg° was designed to model the 1912 Novarupta vent structure and delineate zones of near-surface high heat

255

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

Crowe, B.; Morley, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wells, S. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murrell, M.; Poths, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Abstract Masaya volcano (560 m a.s.l.), Nicaragua, re-sumed its degassing activity in mid-1993 with the con-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) to characterise the dispersion of the gas emissions around the volcano, (2) to investigate the influence dispersion of the gas plume by the north-easterly trade winds over a 80­85° sector, which is equivalent). These observations suggest that the terrain topog- raphy strongly influences gas dispersion in the Masaya area

Mucci, Alfonso

260

State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of tectonism and volcanism on a radioactive waste repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most estimates of the time required for safe isolation of radioactive wastes from the biosphere range from 100,000 to 1,000,000 years. For such long time spans, it is necessary to assess the potential effects of geologic processes such as volcanism and tectonic activity on the integrity of geologic repositories. Predictions of geologic phenomena can be based on probabilistic models, which assume a random distribution of events. The necessary historic and geologic records are rarely available to provide an adequate data base for such predictions. The observed distribution of volcanic and tectonic activity is not random, and appears to be controlled by extremely complex deterministic processes. The advent of global plate tectonic theory in the past two decades has been a giant step toward understanding these processes. At each potential repository site, volcanic and tectonic processes should be evaluated to provide the most thorough possible understanding of those deterministic processes. Based on this knowledge, judgements will have to be made as to whether or not the volcanic and tectonic processes pose unacceptable risk to the integrity of the repository. This report describes the potential hazards associated with volcanism and tectonism, and the means for evaluating these processes.

Not Available

1980-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Cutting Costs by Locating High Production Wells: A Test of the Volcano seismic Approach to Finding ''Blind'' Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the summer of 2000, Duke University and the Kenyan power generation company, KenGen, conducted a microearthquake monitoring experiment at Longonot volcano in Kenya. Longonot is one of several major late Quaternary trachyte volcanoes in the Kenya Rift. They study was aimed at developing seismic methods for locating buried hydrothermal areas in the Rift on the basis of their microearthquake activity and wave propagation effects. A comparison of microearthquake records from 4.5 Hz, 2 Hz, and broadband seismometers revealed strong high-frequency site and wave-propagation effects. The lower frequency seismometers were needed to detect and record individual phases. Two-dozen 3-component 2- Hz L22 seismographs and PASSCAL loggers were then distributed around Longonot. Recordings from this network located one seismically active area on Longonot's southwest flank. The events from this area were emergent, shallow (<3 km), small (M<1), and spatially restricted. Evidently, the hydrothermal system in this area is not currently very extensive or active. To establish the nature of the site effects, the data were analyzed using three spectral techniques that reduce source effects. The data were also compared to a simple forward model. The results show that, in certain frequency ranges, the technique of dividing the horizontal motion by the vertical motion (H/V) to remove the source fails because of non-uniform vertical amplification. Outside these frequencies, the three methods resolve the same, dominant, harmonic frequencies at a given site. In a few cases, the spectra can be fit with forward models containing low velocity surface layers. The analysis suggests that the emergent, low frequency character of the microearthquake signals is due to attenuation and scattering in the near surface ash deposits.

Eylon Shalev; Peter E. Malin; Wendy McCausland

2002-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Earthquake Swarm Activity Beneath the Tokaanu-Waihi Geothermal System, Lake Taupo, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hypocenters of 4 earthquake swarms (total of 54 events), recorded with a local network between 1986 April and 1987 January, occur within upper crustal rocks of the deeper Tokaanu-Waihi geothermal reservoir; all the events had a magnitude M{sub L} {le} 3.2. Most foci are aligned along two NW-trending basement fault structures along which young rhyodacitic extrusions can be found. The swarm activity has been interpreted in terms of injections into basement fractures of magma from deeper chambers (dyke injection swarm activity).

Hochstein, M.P.; Sherburn, S.; Tikku, J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Occurrence of Pyrrhotite in the Ngawha Geothermal System, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ngawha geothermal system is low in all sulfide minerals, but in comparison to systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone it contains more widely distributed pyrrhotite which is currently depositing, mainly in fractures. This reflects the high proportion of vapor in the Ngawha system. Pyrrhotite is most common in the upper part of the reservoir and lower part of the aquitard. The Ngawha pyrrhotite is of monoclinic and monoclinic + hexagonal structure.

Cox, M.E.; Browne, P.R.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Origin of High-Enthalpy Geothermal of Non-Volcanic Environment---As a Case Study of Yangbajing Geothermal Field at Qinghai-Tibet Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among global high-enthalpy geothermal resources, geothermal fields within Tibet are located in non-volcanic environment only. Results of the PTt(pressure-temperature-time) trajectory calculation of the Plateau uplifting gave a comparatively satisfactory ...

Jin Shenghai; Yao Zujin; Yin Miying

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluation of Surface Temperature and Emissivity Derived from ASTER Data: A Case Study Using Ground-Based Measurements at a Volcanic Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity (LSE) derived from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data were evaluated in a low spectral contrast volcanic site at an altitude of 2000 m on the island of ...

frica Barreto; Manuel Arbelo; Pedro A. Hernndez-Leal; Laia Nez-Casillas; Mara Mira; Csar Coll

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3. 0 Myr old in Arizona, New Mexico and the Trans-Pecos Area of West Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This map is one of a series of maps designed for hot dry rock geothermal assessment in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Pecos area of west Texas. The 3.0 m.y. cutoff age was selected because original heat has probably largely dissipated in older rocks. The location of volcanic centers is more important to geothermal resource assessment than the location of their associated volcanic rocks; however, ages have been determined for numerous flows far from their source. Therefore, the distribution of all volcanic rocks less than or equal to 3.0 m.y. old, for which there is at least one determined age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978).

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solid modeling techniques to build 3D finite element models of volcanic systems: An example from the Rabaul Caldera system, Papua New Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating the deformation of active volcanoes is challenging due to inherent mechanical complexities associated with heterogeneous distributions of rheologic properties and irregular geometries associated with the topography and bathymetry. From geologic ... Keywords: 3D geometry, Deformation, Finite Elements Models, Rabaul Caldera

Erika Ronchin, Timothy Masterlark, Joan Mart Molist, Steve Saunders, Wei Tao

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Nye, C.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of fractures in volcanic cores from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County, southern Nevada, was the location of 828 announced underground nuclear tests, conducted between 1951 and 1992. Approximately one-third of these tests were detonated near or below the water table. An unavoidable consequence of these testing activities was introducing radionuclides into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. Groundwater flows beneath the NTS almost exclusively through interconnected natural fractures in carbonate and volcanic rocks. Information about these fractures is necessary to determine hydrologic parameters for future Corrective Action Unit (CAU)-specific flow and transport models which will be used to support risk assessment calculations for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Underground Test Area (UGTA) remedial investigation. Fracture data are critical in reducing the uncertainty of the predictive capabilities of CAU-specific models because of their usefulness in generating hydraulic conductivity values and dispersion characteristics used in transport modeling. Specifically, fracture aperture and density (spacing) are needed to calculate the permeability anisotropy of the formations. Fracture mineralogy information is used qualitatively to evaluate diffusion and radionuclide retardation potential in transport modeling. All these data can best be collected through examination of core samples.

Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Prothro, L.B.; Roberson, K.E. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

Priest, G.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

From model conception to verification and validation, a global approach to multiphase Navier-Stoke models with an emphasis on volcanic explosive phenomenology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale volcanic eruptions are hazardous events that cannot be described by detailed and accurate in situ measurement: hence, little to no real-time data exists to rigorously validate current computer models of these events. In addition, such phenomenology involves highly complex, nonlinear, and unsteady physical behaviors upon many spatial and time scales. As a result, volcanic explosive phenomenology is poorly understood in terms of its physics, and inadequately constrained in terms of initial, boundary, and inflow conditions. Nevertheless, code verification and validation become even more critical because more and more volcanologists use numerical data for assessment and mitigation of volcanic hazards. In this report, we evaluate the process of model and code development in the context of geophysical multiphase flows. We describe: (1) the conception of a theoretical, multiphase, Navier-Stokes model, (2) its implementation into a numerical code, (3) the verification of the code, and (4) the validation of such a model within the context of turbulent and underexpanded jet physics. Within the validation framework, we suggest focusing on the key physics that control the volcanic cloudsnamely, momentum-driven supersonic jet and buoyancy-driven turbulent plume. For instance, we propose to compare numerical results against a set of simple and well-constrained analog experiments, which uniquely and unambiguously represent each of the key-phenomenology. Key

Dartevelle, Sebastian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and when equilibrium is reached between the gas and liquid phases Natural silicate melts often contain two.3. Dynamics of reversible gas-driven eruptions through a fluid medium Because buoyancy plays an important roleEnergetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Y. Zhang* Department of Geological Sciences

Zhang, Youxue

276

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses, and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. The work accomplished during Year 1 of this ongoing program is described in the present report. A brief overview of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is given. The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature, and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures. Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter. Finally, plans for future work are outlined.

Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Stevens, J.L.; Luu, L. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Location, age, and rock type of volcanic rocks younger than 5 million years in Arizona and New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the assessment of the Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy potential of Arizona and New Mexico, a compilation of the locations and ages of volcanic rocks less than 5 Myr was made. The locations of those rocks less than 3 Myr are shown on a map of the region. Because the compiled information has many uses in addition to geothermal exploration, the entire compilation is presented as a tabulation. The table is organized first by state and secondly by latitude and longitude within each state. Rock type, age and error, method of dating, and original reference are also given. The K-Ar dates have not been recalculated using the most recent decay constants for /sup 40/K. A few references gave only verbal descriptions of sample location; these locations were converted to approximate latitude and longitude.

Aldrich, M.J. Jr.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Briefing package for the Yucca Flat pre-emptive review, including overview, UZ model, SZ volcanics model and summary and conclusions sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much progress has been made in the last several years in modeling radionuclide transport from tests conducted both in the unsaturated zone and saturated volcanic rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada. The presentations to the DOE NNSA pre-emptive review panel contained herein document the progress to date, and discuss preliminary conclusions regarding the present and future extents of contamination resulting from past nuclear tests. The presentations also discuss possible strategies for addressing uncertainty in the model results.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keating, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evidence for a tektosilicate structure and dominance of Fe(III) over Fe(II) in silicic volcanic glasses of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

More than 400 individual analyses have been obtained by electron microprobe for silicic glasses in 58 samples of tuff and lava from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These samples comprise a wide range in chemical and petrographic types, including calc-alkaline and peralkaline rock types, and include most of the volcanic units of the NTS. Locations and brief petrographic descriptions are given for representative samples.

Warren, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

WoldeGabriel, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Case Study of Wide Diameter Casing for Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Three wells have been drilled in the central resistivity area of a geothermal field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Using a well bore simulator, WELL SIM V3.0, reservoir conditions and well characteristics are evaluated to determine the increase in output by increasing production casing diameters from either 8-5/8 inches OD or 9-5/8 inches OD to 13-3/8 inches OD. Increases in well drilling costs are determined to provide a commentary on the economics. While open hole size is effectively doubled, well costs increase by 10% and, in this study, output increases by an average of 18%.

King, T.R.; Freeston, D.H.; Winmill, R.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Upper mantle structure under western Saudi Arabia from Rayleigh wave tomography and the origin of Cenozoic uplift and volcanism on the Arabian Shield  

SciTech Connect

The shear velocity structure of the shallow upper mantle beneath the Arabian Shield has been modeled by inverting new Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements between 45 and 140 s together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocity measurement between 10 and 45 s. For measuring phase velocities, we applied a modified array method that minimizes the distortion of raypaths by lateral heterogeneity. The new shear velocity model shows a broad low velocity region in the lithospheric mantle across the Shield and a low velocity region at depths {ge} 150 km localized along the Red Sea coast and Makkah-Madinah-Nafud (MMN) volcanic line. The velocity reduction in the upper mantle corresponds to a temperature anomaly of {approx}250-330 K. These finding, in particular the region of continuous low velocities along the Red Sea and MMN volcanic line, do not support interpretations for the origin of the Cenozoic plateau uplift and volcanism on the Shield invoking two separate plumes. When combined with images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the southern part of the Arabian Shield, body wave tomographic models, a S-wave polarization analysis, and SKS splitting results, our new model supports an interpretation invoking a thermal upwelling of warm mantle rock originating in the lower mantle under Africa that crosses through the transition zone beneath Ethiopia and moves to the north and northwest under the eastern margin of the Red Sea and the Arabian Shield. In this interpretation, the difference in mean elevation between the Platform and Shield can be attributed to isostatic uplift caused by heating of the lithospheric mantle under the Shield, with significantly higher region along the Red Sea possibly resulting from a combination of lithosphere thinning and dynamic uplift.

Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

WATCH WHO KNEW? ON YAHOO! NEWS: Related Searches: national institute of neurological disorders and stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.StockPickTrading.com Top Stories sponsored links Featured TRENDING NOW: iceland volcano iran cristiano ronaldo china volcanic ashSearch All News News Search Health Video Weight Loss Sexual Health Medications/Drugs Parenting

Rogers, John A.

284

Radiative Forcing of the Stratosphere by SO2 Gas, Silicate Ash, and H2SO4 Aerosols Shortly after the 1982 Eruptions of El Chichn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1982 eruptions of the El Chichn volcano injected large quantities of sulfur dioxide gas and silicate ash into the stratosphere. Several studies have shown that the long-lived sulfuric acid aerosols derived from these volcanic effluents ...

M. F. Gerstell; Joy Crisp; David Crisp

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3. 0 m. y. old in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Peco area of West Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This map is one of a series of maps designed for hot dry rock geothermal assessment in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Peco area of the west Texas. The 3.0 m.y. cutoff age was selected because original heat has probably largely dissipated in older rocks. The location of volcanic centers is more important to geothermal resource assessment than the location of their associated volcanic rocks; however, ages have been determined for numerous flows far from their source. Therefore, the distribution of all volcanic rocks less than or equal to 3.0 m.y. old, for which there is at least one determined age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages were obtained from the original literature in all cases except for McKee and others (1974), Silberman and others (1976), Ulrich and McKee (1976), and Wolfe and McKee (1976). The abstract by McKee and others (1974) lists only the ages of various rocks they dated, so locations were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). The dates of Silberman and others (1976), Ulrich and McKee (1976), and Wolfe and McKee (1976) are taken from written communications cited by Luedke and Smith (1978); therefore, both references are shown on the map for those ages.

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

S. Planke H. Svensen M. Hovland D. A. Banks B. Jamtveit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in active mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan Received: 7 February 2003 / Accepted: 2 September 2003 / Published online: 23 October 2003 ? Springer-Verlag 2003 Abstract Mud volcanic eruptions in Azerbaijan nor- mally active mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan and geochemical analysis of seep waters from two of these. Mud

Banks, David

287

12008 Tribal Leadership Summit Universit y of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Shiveluch in Kamchatka and Cleveland in the Aleutian Islands. Non-eruptive activity was common throughout our simulation period at a number of volcanoes in Iceland, Kamchatka, and the Aleutian Islands-troposphere. The volcanic influence arises primarily from the Aleutian Islands and Kamchatka, where non-eruptive volcanism

Kaminsky, Werner

288

Siderophile metal fallout to Greenland from the 1991 winter eruption of Hekla (Iceland) and during the global atmospheric perturbation of Pinatubo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Siderophile metal fallout to Greenland from the 1991 winter eruption of Hekla (Iceland) and during layers. However, volcanic and anthropogenic fallouts have the potential to perturb their characteristic originated from the fallout to Greenland of volcanic ash emitted by the nearby Hekla volcano (Iceland

Howat, Ian M.

289

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Integrated Model For The Temporal Evolution Of Andesites And Rhyolites  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Temporal Evolution Of Andesites And Rhyolites Model For The Temporal Evolution Of Andesites And Rhyolites And Crustal Development In New Zealand'S North Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Model For The Temporal Evolution Of Andesites And Rhyolites And Crustal Development In New Zealand'S North Island Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) is the southern expression of the Tonga-Kermadec subduction system within the continental crust of New Zealand's North Island. It is a region of rapid extension and high heat flow containing one of the most productive, frequently active rhyolitic magmatic systems on Earth. Rhyolites make up >80% of the total erupted material with rhyolitic magmatism being prevalent from the earliest stages

291

Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(SP), CO2 soil diffuse degassing and soil temperature surveys. This complementary data set revealed the presence of an anomalous conductive body, probably related to a shallow...

293

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Field Information Development Area: Number of Production Wells: Number of Injection Wells: Number of Replacement Wells: Average Temperature of Geofluid: Sanyal...

294

PALEOMAGNETIC DATING OF THE CERRO PRIETO VOLCANO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1973, Very short period geomagnetic excursion about 18,000and HcElhinny , M. of a geomagnetic excursion 30,000 years Bof the Laschamp geomagnetic polarity event: Earth Plan. Sci.

Boer, Jelle De

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Volcanoes in Virginia!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dr. Elizabeth Baedke Johnson - James Madison University January 24, 2012 The recent earthquake may have you wondering what other surprises Virginia's geology may hold. Could there...

296

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres, Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres, Northwestern Spitsbergen- Volcanology And Tectonic Significance Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Primitive Alkali Basaltic Stratovolcano And Associated Eruptive Centres, Northwestern Spitsbergen- Volcanology And Tectonic Significance Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Three Quaternary volcanic centres (Sverrefjell, Sigurdfjell and Halvdanpiggen) in northwestern Spitsbergen formed by off-ridge alkali basaltic volcanism associated with nearby ocean-floor spreading and subsequent tectonism. The Sverrefjell volcano is a unique stratovolcano constructed of primitive alkali basaltic pyroclastics with subordinate lavas. About 15-20 vol.% of this volcanic (and the other centres) comprises

298

An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Eburru volcanic complex is located in the central portion of the Kenya Rift. It belongs to the complex of volcanoes - Suswa, Longonot, Olkaria, Eburru, and Menengai - that. form the Kenya Dome. These volcanoes are geothermal fields, and Olkaria is the site for the first geothermal power plant commissioned in 1981 in the East African Rift System (EARS).

299

Interpretation of long-offset transient electromagnetic data from Mount Merapi, Indonesia, using a three-dimensional optimization approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of Newberry volcano, Oregon, J. Geophys. Res. ,volcanoes, for example Newberry volcano [Fitterman et al. ,

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan L.; Hordt, Andreas; Tezkan, Bulent

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lightweight Structural Concrete Incorporating Volcanic Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

303

Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the precipitates suggest changes in fluid chemistry unique to the dissolution behavior of each basalt sample reacted with CO2-saturated water. The Karoo basalt from South Africa appeared the least reactive, with very limited mineralization occurring during the testing with CO2-saturated water. The relative reactivity of different basalt samples were unexpectedly different in the experiments conducted using aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures versus those reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 mixtures. For example, the Karoo basalt was highly reactive in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S, as evident by small nodules of carbonate coating the basalt grains after 181 days of testing. However the most reactive basalt in CO2-H2O, Newark Basin, formed limited amounts of carbonate precipitates in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixture. Basalt reactivity in CO2-H2O mixtures appears to be controlled by the composition of the glassy mesostasis, which is the most reactive component in the basalt rock. With the addition of H2S to the CO2-H2O system, basalt reactivity appears to be controlled by precipitation of coatings of insoluble Fe sulfides.

Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository  

SciTech Connect

The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Here we present the helium and carbon isotope results from the initial study of a fluid chemistry-monitoring program started in the summer of 2001 near the South Sister volcano in central Oregon. The Separation Creek area which is several miles due west of the volcano is the locus of

306

A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The viability of boiling as a mechanism for meso- to epithermal ore formation has been tested in the Milos volcano, Aegean Island Arc, by investigating rates of deposition and composition of scale, and by drawing an analogy between the results and actual field occurrences on the island. Milos offers ideal conditions for such testing: it consists of predominantly felsic volcanic rocks with numerous late-stage hydrovolcanic

307

Definition: Cinder Cone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cinder Cone Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cinder Cone Cinder cones, also known as scoria or spatter cones, are a relatively simple type of volcano consisting of a steep conical pile of volcanic ash and tephra. They exhibit a lower profile than stratovolcanoes (usually rising no more than a thousand feet above the surrounding topography), and typically have a bowl-shaped depression at their summits. They form primarily from the eruption of pyroclastic ejecta and are commonly encountered on the flanks of stratovolcanoes, shield volcanoes, and calderas.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Scoria Cones, Spatter Cones References ↑ John Watson. Principal Types of Volcanoes [Internet]. 2011. U.S.

308

Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Multichannel seismic reflection, sonobuoy, gravity and magnetics data collected over the submarine length of the 75 km long Puna Ridge, Hawaii, resolve the internal structure of the active rift zone. Laterally continuous reflections are imaged deep beneath the axis of the East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea Volcano. We interpret these reflections as a layer of abyssal sediments lying beneath the volcanic edifice of Kilauea. Early

309

Inversion of Newberry Volcano high-resolution traveltime residuals  

SciTech Connect

Inversion of the 1984 traveltime data from the array at Newberry Crater was accomplished using a variant of the method presented by Aki and others (1973). Five-hundred-sixty-five traveltime observations for Pg and a deeper reflection, weighted by their variance estimates, were included in the inversion. Azimuths from receiver-to-source range from 80 to 280. The initial-velocity model for the inversion has four layers. The top layer, starting at the surface and extending to an elevation of 1300 meters above sea level, had a P-velocity of 2.5 km/s. There are three layers below this one, each 1500-m thick, with P-velocities of 4.0, 4.6, and 5.2 km/s. The predominant feature in the inversion result in the upper two layers (surface to 200-m below sea level), is the ring of high velocities coincident with the caldera ring-fracture system. This high-velocity ring is up to 11% faster than the average for these two layers. In these layers velocities are a few percent slower than average in the center of the caldera and range from 5 to 10% slower outside the caldera to the south, east, and north. In the third layer (-200 to 1700 m elevation), the magnitude of the high-velocity anomaly around the ring-fracture system is reduced, but the bin in the center of the caldera is nearly 9% slower than the layer average.

Stauber, D.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Atmospheric 210 Po anomaly as a precursor of volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this is appropriate for all the waste sited at the moment. Spent412 fuel and plutonium may not actually need disposal. Whilst burning plutonium in PRISM could reduce the424 quantity of plutonium by 50%, the requirement for plutonium to provided in425 the form of a metal confers some additional challenges, when compared to426

Huh, Chih-An

311

Testing EQ3/6 and GEMBOCHS using fluid-mineral equilibria in the wairakei geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability of the EQ3 and EQ6 geochemical modeling codes and the GEMBOCHS thermodynamic data bases to simulate geochemical changes in the post-emplacement environment at the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository is being tested using observed mineral-fluid relations in the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand. In this report, comparisons between observed equilibria and simulations of field relations in the Wairakei geothermal system are used to test the codes and data bases in high temperature systems. Analysis of trends in water and gas chemistries and well discharge characteristics with time were used to identify a set of representative water and gas analyses from zones producing at about 250{degrees}C. The most common vein minerals at this temperature are: wairakite, adularia, epidote, quartz, albite, chlorite, calcite, prehnite, and pyrite. Calculations were carried out using version 7.2a R134 of EQ3 and version 7.2a R130 of EQ6 and the SUPCRT and COM subsets of the R24 version of GEMBOCHS. Thermodynamic data bases using different data for Al aqueous species were sued to identify the data set which produced the best matches between observed and calculated equilibria. The simulations described in this paper suggest that EQ6 can be used to identify facies of minerals that will be stable in various environments, but can not be used to predict the exact phase assemblage that is in equilibrium with a given water.

Bruton, C.J.

1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Role of Boron-Chloride and Noble Gas Isotope Ratios in TVZ Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater containing noble gases, at air saturated water concentrations, mixes with hot fluids of mantle origin at depth, is extended to include the effect of interaction of the ascending fluid with both solid and gaseous phases of basement (or other) rocks en route to the surface. It is demonstrated that this interaction is responsible for most of the CO{sub 2} in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal systems. It is proposed that the modeling of this interaction might be accomplished by techniques similar to those used for the understanding of the oxygen isotope shift found in geothermal systems. The water rock interaction experiments of Ellis and Mahon (1964, 1967) provides some data on the kinetic rates for B and Cl dissolution from rocks likely to be encountered in the geothermal system, but further information on the behavior of B may be needed. If these problems can be overcome this modeling technique has promise for the estimation of the recharge of geothermal systems and hence the sustainability of these systems.

Hulston, J.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Concentration system performance degradation in the aftermath of Mount Pinatubo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major volcanic eruptions occur every few years, but most have little effect on solar radiation or climate. However, in the last ten years two volcanoes have decreased solar radiation and influenced weather at a level that might be expected at the frequency of about once a century. The Mexican volcano El Chichon and the Philippine volcano Mount Pinatubo put 6 and 20 million metric tons of SO{sub 2} in the stratosphere, respectively. SO{sub 2} is converted into H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which mixes with water to produce aerosol. Since there is no weather in the stratosphere and the aerosol is small, these aerosol particles remain suspended until coagulation and sedimentation bring them to the troposphere where they are removed by normal wet and dry deposition processes. The extinction in the direct solar irradiance from El Chichon was found to peak during the winter of 1983 at about 11% for northern, mid latitudes. Mount Pinatubo`s peak extinction during 1992 was about 15%. Data from four northern, mid-latitude sites are examined to compare the direct consequences of the volcano`s eruption on the performance of concentrating solar energy systems and the indirect effects that may be associated with Mount Pinatubo`s perturbation of the weather.

Michalsky, J.J.; Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center; Ineichen, P. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Groupe de Physique Appliquee

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Eruptive and Geomorphic Processes at the Lathrop Wells Scoria Cone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {approx}80 ka Lathrop Wells volcano (southern Nevada, U.S.A.) preserves evidence for a range of explosive processes and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic deposits and lava fields in a small-volume basaltic center. Early cone building by Strombolian bursts was accompanied by development of a fan-like lava field reaching {approx}800 m distance from the cone, built upon a gently sloping surface. Lava flows carried rafts of cone deposits, which provide indirect evidence for cone facies in lieu of direct exposures in the active quarry. Subsequent activity was of a violent Strombolian nature, with many episodes of sustained eruption columns up to a few km in height. These deposited layers of scoria lapilli and ash in different directions depending upon wind direction at the time of a given episode, reaching up to {approx}20 km from the vent, and also produced the bulk of the scoria cone. Lava effusion migrated from south to north around the eastern base of the cone as accumulation of lavas successively reversed the topography at the base of the cone. Late lavas were emplaced during violent Strombolian activity and continued for some time after explosive eruptions had waned. Volumes of the eruptive products are: fallout--0.07 km{sup 3}, scoria cone--0.02 km{sup 3}, and lavas--0.03 km{sup 3}. Shallow-derived xenolith concentrations suggest an upper bound on average conduit diameter of {approx}21 m in the uppermost 335 m beneath the volcano. The volcano was constructed over a period of at least seven months with cone building occurring only during part of that time, based upon analogy with historical eruptions. Post-eruptive geomorphic evolution varied for the three main surface types that were produced by volcanic activity: (1) scoria cone, (2) low relief surfaces (including lavas) with abundant pyroclastic material, and (3) lavas with little pyroclastic material. The role of these different initial textures must be accounted for in estimating relative ages of volcanic surfaces, and failure to account for this resulted in previous erroneous interpretation that the volcano is polycyclic (eruptions separated by 1,000s-10,000s of years). Lathrop Wells volcano provides an example of the wide range of eruptive processes that can occur with little change in major element composition; the variation in explosive and effusive processes, including their simultaneous occurrence, must result entirely from fluid dynamic, crystallization, and degassing processes in the ascending multiphase magma. The volcano also provides key analog information regarding processes that are important for volcanic risk assessment at the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, {approx}18 km north of the volcano.

G. Valentine; D.J. Krier; F.V. Perry; G. Heiken

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

Lessons Learned from Natural and Industrial Analogues for Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Deep Geological Formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volcano hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon, US Geologicalhttp://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/Newberry/Hazards/OFR97-

Benson, Sally M.; Hepple, Robert; Apps, John; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Lippmann, Marcelo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comment on Origin of Groundwater Discharge at Fall River Springs  

SciTech Connect

I'm writing at the request of the Pit River Tribe to offer my professional opinion as a geochemist regarding the origin of groundwater discharge at the Fall River Springs, Shasta Co., California. In 1997, I conducted a study of the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes in northern California, in collaboration with one of my colleagues. This work was published as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report (Davisson and Rose, 1997). The Fall River Springs emerge from the distal end of the Giant Crater Lava Field, a laterally extensive basalt flow that stretches from the southern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano southward for a distance of 40 km. Both Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava Field have virtually no surface water drainages. Precipitation that falls in these areas is inferred to seep into fractures in the rock, where it is carried down gradient under the force of gravity. Mean annual precipitation rates on Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava field are adequate to account for the {approx}1200 ft{sup 3}/sec discharge of the Fall River Springs. To evaluate the origin of the springs using geochemical methods, water samples were collected from the Fall River Springs and the Medicine Lake highlands and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. The isotope ratios measured for a groundwater sample are diagnostic of the average composition of the precipitation from which the water was derived. The isotope ratios of rain and snow also vary systematically with elevation, such that groundwater derived from recharge at higher elevations can be distinguished from that which originated at lower elevations. The stable isotope data for the Fall River Springs are consistent with groundwater recharge on the Medicine Lake Volcano and adjacent lava field. Mass balance calculations suggest that approximately half of the Fall River Springs flow is derived from the volcanic edifice. Rose and Davisson (1996) showed that the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes commonly contain dissolved CO{sub 2} that originated from the volcanoes. This volcanic CO{sub 2} component is readily identified from carbon-14 measurements of the water. Carbon-14 analyses of the Fall River samples indicate that at least 27% of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the springs was derived from a volcanic CO{sub 2} source. Such a large volcanic CO{sub 2} flux requires that the groundwater supplying flow to the Fall River Springs must originate from a volcano where magma degassing is actively occurring. Given the hydrogeologic configuration of the Fall River aquifer system, it appears that the Medicine Lake Volcano is the only likely source of the volcanic CO{sub 2}. These data independently confirm the Medicine Lake highlands as a significant recharge source for the Fall River Springs. Moreover, these data indicate that groundwater recharge occurring on Medicine Lake Volcano must interact with a CO{sub 2} volatile phase derived from the geothermal system beneath the volcano. The lack of hot springs on Medicine Lake Volcano suggests that the geothermal system underlying the volcano is relatively tightly sealed. Nevertheless, it is probable that the geothermal fluid originates from precipitation falling on the volcanic edifice. This is the same water that supplies an important fraction of the Fall River Spring discharge. The source of the geothermal fluid can be evaluated using stable isotopes. The oxygen isotope signature of the geothermal fluid may have been modified by high temperature oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding rock, but the hydrogen isotope signature should still be diagnostic of the origin of the fluid. Although the geothermal system appears to be largely decoupled from the shallow groundwater system that supplies the Fall River Springs, it is uncertain what impact the development of the geothermal system as an energy resource would have on groundwater circulation patterns on the volcano. Given the importance of the Fall River Springs as a water resource for the

Rose, T

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comment on Origin of Groundwater Discharge at Fall River Springs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I'm writing at the request of the Pit River Tribe to offer my professional opinion as a geochemist regarding the origin of groundwater discharge at the Fall River Springs, Shasta Co., California. In 1997, I conducted a study of the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes in northern California, in collaboration with one of my colleagues. This work was published as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report (Davisson and Rose, 1997). The Fall River Springs emerge from the distal end of the Giant Crater Lava Field, a laterally extensive basalt flow that stretches from the southern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano southward for a distance of 40 km. Both Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava Field have virtually no surface water drainages. Precipitation that falls in these areas is inferred to seep into fractures in the rock, where it is carried down gradient under the force of gravity. Mean annual precipitation rates on Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava field are adequate to account for the {approx}1200 ft{sup 3}/sec discharge of the Fall River Springs. To evaluate the origin of the springs using geochemical methods, water samples were collected from the Fall River Springs and the Medicine Lake highlands and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. The isotope ratios measured for a groundwater sample are diagnostic of the average composition of the precipitation from which the water was derived. The isotope ratios of rain and snow also vary systematically with elevation, such that groundwater derived from recharge at higher elevations can be distinguished from that which originated at lower elevations. The stable isotope data for the Fall River Springs are consistent with groundwater recharge on the Medicine Lake Volcano and adjacent lava field. Mass balance calculations suggest that approximately half of the Fall River Springs flow is derived from the volcanic edifice. Rose and Davisson (1996) showed that the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes commonly contain dissolved CO{sub 2} that originated from the volcanoes. This volcanic CO{sub 2} component is readily identified from carbon-14 measurements of the water. Carbon-14 analyses of the Fall River samples indicate that at least 27% of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the springs was derived from a volcanic CO{sub 2} source. Such a large volcanic CO{sub 2} flux requires that the groundwater supplying flow to the Fall River Springs must originate from a volcano where magma degassing is actively occurring. Given the hydrogeologic configuration of the Fall River aquifer system, it appears that the Medicine Lake Volcano is the only likely source of the volcanic CO{sub 2}. These data independently confirm the Medicine Lake highlands as a significant recharge source for the Fall River Springs. Moreover, these data indicate that groundwater recharge occurring on Medicine Lake Volcano must interact with a CO{sub 2} volatile phase derived from the geothermal system beneath the volcano. The lack of hot springs on Medicine Lake Volcano suggests that the geothermal system underlying the volcano is relatively tightly sealed. Nevertheless, it is probable that the geothermal fluid originates from precipitation falling on the volcanic edifice. This is the same water that supplies an important fraction of the Fall River Spring discharge. The source of the geothermal fluid can be evaluated using stable isotopes. The oxygen isotope signature of the geothermal fluid may have been modified by high temperature oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding rock, but the hydrogen isotope signature should still be diagnostic of the origin of the fluid. Although the geothermal system appears to be largely decoupled from the shallow groundwater system that supplies the Fall River Springs, it is uncertain what impact the development of the geothermal system as an energy resource would have on groundwater circulation patterns on the volcano. Given the importance of the Fall River Springs as a water resource for the

Rose, T

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

322

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (6) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Arizona Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

323

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

324

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1982). Evidence based on measurements of S and Cl in erupted rocks, glass inclusions, gas samples, and atmospheric samples collected for both Mount St. Helens and Fuego...

325

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl concentrations. The last sample taken...

326

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a particular geothermal reservoir. Author(s): J. A. Welhan, R. J. Poredai, W. Rison, H. Craig Published: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1988 Document Number:...

327

Petrological and rheological controls on volcanism to terrestrial planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through experimental petrology and geodynamic modeling, processes of melting under thick lithospheres on the Earth and the moon are investigated. Phase equilibrium experiments were carried out on Apollo 14B and 15C picritic ...

Elkins Tanton, Linda Tarbox, 1965-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

329

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

330

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

331

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity, magnetic, and seismic, as well as electromagnetic methods have all been used in an...

332

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

333

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a plume of degassed reservoir liquid that flows southward to emerge at Growler and Morgan Hot Springs. The second cell originates SSE to SE of Lassen Peak and flows southeastward...

334

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

magnetic lows. This implies that fractures localize the hot springs. Magnetic gradient trends reflect the mapped Basin and Range structural trends of north and northwest, as well...

335

Nuclear dynamics consequence analysis of SNF disposed in volcanic tuff  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository. The analyses investigated criticality potential, criticality excursion consequences, and the probability frequency for nuclear criticality. Key findings include: expected number of fissions per excursion range from 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 20}, repeated rate of criticalities range from 3 to 30 per year, and the probability frequency for criticality initiators (based on rough-order-of-magnitude calculations) is 7{times}10{sup {minus}7}. Overall results indicate that criticality consequences are a minor contribution to the biological hazards caused by the disposal of spent nuclear material.

Sanchez, L.C.; Cochrane, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rath, J.S. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Taylor, L.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effects of Recent Environmental Changes on Global Seismicity and Volcanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A covariation of recent global environmental changes and seismicity on Earth is demonstrated. Presently, rising concern about anthropogenic activities and their consequences on the cryosphere and environment have always overlooked changes related ...

Evgeny A. Podolskiy

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waves (MAW) caused by air flow over topography; while man-made sources include nuclear tests, supersonic aircraft, power plants,

Matoza, Robin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Search for magnetic monopoles in polar volcanic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside the Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analysed. No monopoles were found and a 90% confidence level upper limit of $9.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$/gram is set on the monopole density in the search samples.

K. Bendtz; D. Milstead; H. -P. Hchler; A. M. Hirt; P. Mermod; P. Michael; T. Sloan; C. Tegner; S. B. Thorarinsson

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mud eruptions, and red hot glows on the crater wall. Temporal variations in the geomagnetic field observed around the craters of Naka-dake also indicate that thermal...

340

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

lava fragments andor pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal features to debris flow and turbidite deposits. Subaqueous block lavas and minor pillow lavas form...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by various geophysical anomalies that are evidently related to an active hot-water geothermal system. This system apparently is heated by a reservoir of silicic magma...

342

K-Ar dating of young volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potassium-Argon (K-Ar) age dates were determined for forty-two young geologic samples by the Laboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Department of Geosciences, in the period February 1, 1986 to June 30, 1989. Under the terms of Department of Energy Grant No. FG07-86ID12622, The University of Arizona was to provide state-of-the-art K-Ar age dating services, including sample preparation, analytical procedures, and computations, for forty-two young geologic samples submitted by DOE geothermal researchers. We billed only for forty samples. Age dates were determined for geologic samples from five regions with geothermal potential: the Cascade Mountains (Oregon); the Cascade Mountains (Washington); Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean; Cerro Prieto, Mexico; and Las Azufres, Mexico. The ages determined varied from 5.92 m.a. to 0.62 m.a. The integration of K-Ar dates with geologic data and the interpretation in terms of geologic and geothermal significance has been reported separately by the various DOE geothermal researchers. Table 1 presents a detailed listing of all samples dated, general sample location, researcher, researcher's organization, rock type, age, and probable error (1 standard deviation). Additional details regarding the geologic samples may be obtained from the respective geothermal researcher. 1 tab.

Damon, P.E.; Shafiqullah, M.

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

1.0 Introduction Voluminous volcanic intrusive complexes are com-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes and today's landscape in the Karoo Basin and offshore Norway. The resulting multimedia art of the project corresponds to the publication of geological pamphlets and field guides of the Karoo Basin and publish popular science booklets on the geology of the Karoo Basin for distribution in Norway and South

Polteau, Stephane

344

Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) whichto eliminate explosive nuclear tests anywhere on the planetman-made sources include nuclear tests, supersonic aircraft,

Matoza, Robin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a...

346

Geothermal spas in Hawaii: A new tourist industry. : A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

There are at least three very good uses for active volcanism: Obtain energy from it. Study it. Enjoy it. We are already obtaining electrical energy and industrial heat from Kilauea's abundant resource by drilling geothermal wells and building power plants. Our Volcano Observatory is recognized as a world renowned center of learning about volcanism. Our Volcanoes National Park allows us to view and appreciate this awesome phenomenon. For several years people have speculated about the high potential in Hawaii for another way of enjoying this warmth of mother earth -- spas or resorts that would make use of water that is naturally heated and mineralized by volcanic activity. However, before spas are developed in Hawaii, answers are needed to several important questions dealing with such topics as the suitability of our geothermal waters, sources of water that could be tapped, special equipment and materials needed, land availability, governmental and environmental hurdles, and the economics of this unique business. Though a considerable amount of research is still needed, it was felt worthwhile to summarize the information gathered to date from historical works, brochures, personal communications, and other sources. This report should stimulate interest in, and perhaps accelerate, the development of one of Hawaii's most important natural resources.

Woodruff, J.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Seismic imaging of the Medicine Lake Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50 km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. The USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. This experiment had two purposes: To produce high-quality velocity and attenuation images of the young magma body presumed to be the source for the young volcanic features, and to collect a dataset that can be used to develop and test seismic imaging methods that may be useful for understanding other geothermal systems. Eight large explosions were detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano, a distance chosen to produce strong upward traveling signals through the area of interest. The data were inverted using Aki's method to produce three-dimensional velocity and attenuation images of the sub-surface. Preliminary interpretation shows low velocity and attenuation on the flanks of the volcano, and coincident high attenuation values and low velocities (-20%) from 3 to 5 km beneath the center of the caldera. This zone may be a region of partial melt which fed the youngest eruptions.

Zucca, J.J.; Evans, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Preliminary studies for geothermal exploration in Hawaii, 1973--1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first volume of the series on geothermal exploration in Hawaii is a compilation of information and data relevant to geothermal resources, which are available prior to the commencement of the exploration program. A narrative account of the exploration program puts into perspective the various stages of the exploration program from 1973 to 1975. The value of this narrative account lies in that it shows how the conclusion was reached to concentrate the exploration program on the east rift of Kilauea volcano as that rift zone showed the most promise of all the volcanic centers and rift zones. The narrative ends at the selection of a drilling site. The geology and hydrology of the east rift was summarized to include data existing before the exploration program and some of the early results of the field surveys. A literature survey of Kilauea volcano attempted to cover the information available on the volcano. A literature survey of the geothermal potential of the volcanoes on the island of Oahu has already been published elsewhere. A short summary and reference is included in the volume.

Furumoto, A.S.; MacDonald, G.A.; Druecker, M.; Fan, P.F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Cinder Cone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Cinder Cone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Cinder Cone Dictionary.png Cinder Cone: Cinder cones, also known as scoria or spatter cones, are a relatively simple type of volcano consisting of a steep conical pile of volcanic ash and tephra. They exhibit a lower profile than stratovolcanoes (usually rising no more than a thousand feet above the surrounding topography), and typically have a bowl-shaped depression at their summits. They form primarily from the eruption of pyroclastic ejecta and are commonly encountered on the flanks of stratovolcanoes, shield volcanoes, and

350

Stratovolcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Stratovolcano Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Stratovolcano Dictionary.png Stratovolcano: Stratovolcanoes, also known as composite volcanoes, are conical volcanoes composed of multiple layers of intermediate to felsic lava, ash, and other volcanic debris. Their steep profiles are the result of the high viscosity of less mafic lavas, which prevents them from flowing great distances during eruption and cooling. Stratovolcanoes are commonly encountered in chains adjacent to subduction zones, where dewatering of the subducting slab and melting of the slab and overlying mantle rocks leads to magma

351

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An interpretation theory based on the fluid-filled crack model of geothermal systems is being developed and tested against a variety of data from various geothermal areas. Progress is reported on the following subjects: (1) analysis and interpretation of seismic data obtained from the bore holes at the LASL Hot Dry Rock geothermal site. (2) Collection, analysis and interpretation of data on deep volcanic tremors at the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory. (3) Development of a new method for determining seismic attenuation at frequencies higher than 1HZ, and initiation of a cooperative work with Mexican seismologists on the attenuation measurements at various geothermal areas in Baja, California using the method. (4) Installation of 3-component digital event-recorders at four stations in the Newberry Peak volcano, Oregon. (5) Developing a computer program for calculating seismic motion generated by the vibration of fluid-filled crack in a layered medium.

Aki, K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The paper presents a controversial interpretation of a mid-Ordovician volcano-sedimentary complex. It deals with the cyclic interdependence of intrusive, volcanic, and sedimentary processes, due to the development of a nearshore resurgent cauldron in the Caledonian fold belt of North Wales. Deformed volcanotectonic features include a resurgent dome and apical graben, surrounded by a moat and peripheral crescentic ring-fault, constituting a caldera 20 km in diameter. The resurgent Snowdon caldera developed through three cycles of ash-flow volcanism resulting from

355

Aeromagnetic Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Zablocki, 1978) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zablocki, 1978) Zablocki, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Zablocki, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes These VLF induction methods should have wide application to studies of active volcanic regions in other parts of the world and could provide some insights into the workings of larger-scaled geothermal systems. Uses high-resolution aeromagnetics References Charles J. Zablocki (1978) Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aeromagnetic_Survey_At_Kilauea_Summit_Area_(Zablocki,_1978)&oldid=40223

356

Caldera Depression | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caldera Depression Caldera Depression Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Caldera Depression Dictionary.png Caldera Depression: Calderas form from the catastrophic eruption of large amounts of felsic lava and ash. Emptying of the magma chamber and subsequent collapse of the overlying volcanic edifice forms a ring-shaped caldera depression up to several kilometers in diameter. The edges of the underlying magma chamber are roughly marked by a ring fracture zone that acts as a conduit for ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas: Mountainous Horst and Graben Shield Volcano Flat Lava Dome Stratovolcano Cinder Cone Caldera Depression

357

Interpretation of long-offset transient electromagnetic data fromMount Merapi, Indonesia, using a three-dimensional optimizationapproach  

SciTech Connect

In the years 1998, 2000, and 2001, long-offset transientelectromagnetic (LOTEM) surveys were carried out at the active volcanoMerapi in Central Java. The measurements investigated the conductivitystructure of the volcanic edifice. Our area of interest, which is belowthe summit and the upper flanks, was investigated using horizontal andvertical magnetic field time derivative data from seventransmitter-receiver setups. Because of topography and athree-dimensional (3-D) underground structure, a 3-D interpretation isused. The method optimizes few parameters of a 3-D model by a stableleast squares joint inversion of the data, providing sufficientresolution capability. Reasonable data fits are achieved with anonhorizontally layered model featuring a very conductive basement belowdepths of 1.5 km. While hydrothermal alteration is also considered, wetentatively explain the high conductivities by aqueous solutions withrelatively high salt contents. A large magma body or a small superficialreservoir below Merapi's central volcanic complex, as discussed by otherauthors, cannot be resolved by the LOTEM data.

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan L.; Hordt, Andreas; Tezkan, Bulent

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Lava Butte Site Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

point sample made of Newberry Volcano obsidian and thus, arein lithic type (Newberry Volcano obsidian) and productionpercussion flakes of Newberry Volcano obsidian was found in

Davis, Carl M.; Scott, Sara A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Geothermal energy resource investigations in the Eastern Copper River Basin, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of a review of the geological, geochemical and geophysical data available for the Eastern Copper River basin with emphasis on the mud volcanoes, and the results of geophysical and geochemical studies carried out in the summers of 1982 and 1984. The purpose was to determine if there are geothermal energy resources in the Copper River Basin. The Eastern Copper River basin is situated on the flanks of a major volcano, Mt. Drum, which was active as late as 200,000 years ago and which is thought to have retained significant amounts of residual heat at high levels. Mt. Wrangell, farther to the east, has been volcanically active up to the present time. The 1982 geophysical and geochemical surveys located three principal areas of possible geothermal interest, one near Tazlina and two near the Klawasi mud volcanoes. The intensive survey work of 1984 was concentrated on those areas. We have integrated the results of soil helium, soil mercury, gravity, aeromagnetic, electrical, self-potential, and controlled-source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) surveys to evaluate the geothermal potential of the areas studied. 36 figs.

Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM, AND AEROMAGNETIC DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an allotetraploid hybrid of A. aleuticum (Ruprecht) Paris (Aleutian Maidenhair Fern) and A. pedatum Linnaeus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A 3D Magnetic Structure Of Izu-Oshima Volcano And Their Changes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

363

He-CO? Systematics in groundwaters at Mount Lassen Volcano , Northern Califronia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , (1992). Global carbon dioxide emission to the Rate of diffuse carbon dioxide Earth degassing Ventura, G. (2004). Carbon dioxide Earth degassing

Franz, Brian Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Spatial variation of seismic b-values beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19 April 2006 Editor: S. King Abstract The frequency­magnitude distribution was spatially mapped]. Makushin has had several small steam and ash emissions since it's dis- covery. Little is known about the magma distribution in the crust beneath Makushin. The purpose of the study is to provide constraints

Gao, Stephen Shangxing

365

Orographic Cloud over the Eastern Slopes of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, Related to Insolation and Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period 111 June 1978, solar radiation and other meteorological data were gathered at eight stations arranged in a nearly linear transaction extending from the coast at Hilo, Hawaii to Mauna Loa Observatory, 60 km inland and 3400 m ...

Alfred J. Garrett

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Colonization of an island volcano, Long Island, Papua New Guinea, and an emergent island,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of pitfall, water and tube traps, fallout collectors, and hand collecting. Results At least thirty. Keywords Allochthonous arthropods, ants, arthropod colonists, organic fallout. INTRODUCTION The origin

367

July 6, 2012 Atmospheric Pollution, Climate Change 1 Vog plume rising from Klauea Volcano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacts (negative and positive) for different living things. Typically, as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and stores large amounts of energy from the sun and releases it slowly, moderating and stabilizing global

Businger, Steven

368

Frequency dependence of mud volcano response to earthquakes Maxwell L. Rudolph1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the nearby Hudson Ranch I geothermal facility; all visits occurred prior to the plant's commissioning on March 9, 2012 (M. Cichon, 49.9-MW Hudson Ranch I Geothermal Plant Unveiled in California, 2012, http://www. renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2012/05/49-9- mw-hudson-ranch-i-geothermal-plant-unveiled-in-calif). [7

Manga, Michael

369

Modeling study of growth and potential geohazard for LUSI mud volcano: East Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and entomologists who informed Jake Kosek's ethnographic account of drone aircraft in the hills of Afghanistan and Pakistan, programmed with algorithms modeled on bee behavior to adopt "swarming" tactics (Kosek this issue

Manga, Michael

370

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary source of destruction and loss of volume of many oceanic islands, but our knowledge of mass wasting is still rudimentary in many seamount and island chains. To better understand mass wasting in the western Galapagos Islands, multi-beam bathymetry and backscatter sidescan sonar images were used to examine topography and acoustic backscatter signatures that are characteristic of mass wasting. Observations show that mass wasting plays an important role in the development of Galapagos volcanoes. While volcanic activity continues to conceal the submarine terrain, the data show that four forms of mass wasting are identified including debris flows, slumps sheets, chaotic slumps, and detached blocks. A total of 23 mass wasting features were found to exist in the western Galapagos Islands, including fourteen debris flows with one that incorporated a set of detached blocks, seven slump sheets, and one chaotic slump. Some of the indentified features have obvious origination zones while the sources of others are not clearly identifiable. Approximately 73 percent of the surveyed coastlines are affected by slumping on the steep upper slopes and ~64 percent are affected by debris flows on the lower slopes. Unlike the giant landslides documented by GLORIA imagery around the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study indicates that submarine mass wasting is widespread in the western Galapagos, suggesting that the production of small-scale downslope movement is part of the erosive nature of these oceanic volcanic islands.

Hall, Hillary

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Are there significant hydrothermal resources in the US part of the Cascade Range?  

SciTech Connect

The Cascade Range is a geothermal dichotomy. On the one hand, it is an active volcanic arc above a subducting plate and is demonstrably an area of high heat flow. On the other hand, the distribution of hydrothermal manifestations compared to other volcanic arcs is sparse, and the hydrothermal outflow calculated from stream chemistry is low. Several large estimates of undiscovered geothermal resources in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range prepared in the 1970s and early 1980s were based fundamentally on two models of the upper crust. One model assumed that large, partly molten, intrusive bodies exist in the upper 10 km beneath major volcanic centers and serve as the thermal engines driving overlying hydrothermal systems. The other model interpreted the coincident heat-flow and gravity gradients west of the Cascade crest in central Oregon to indicate a partly molten heat source at 10 {+-} 2 km depth extending {approx}30 km west from the axis of the range. Investigations of the past ten years have called both models into question. Large long-lived high-temperature hydrothermal systems at depths <3 km in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range appear to be restricted to silicic domefields at the Lassen volcanic center, Medicine Lake volcano, Newberry volcano, and possibly the Three Sisters. Federal land-use restrictions further reduce this list to Medicine Lake and Newberry. Dominantly andesitic stratocones appear to support only small transitory hydrothermal systems related to small intrusive bodies along the volcanic conduits. The only young caldera, at Crater Lake, supports only low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems. Most of the Cascade Range comprises basaltic andesites and has little likelihood for high-level silicic intrusions and virtually no potential for resultant large high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Undiscovered hydrothermal resources of the Cascade Range of the United States are substantially lower than previous estimates. The range does have potential for intermediate-temperature hot dry rock and localized low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems.

Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Guffanti, Marianne

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

372

North Atlantic geoid high, volcanism and glaciations Eugenio Carminati1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a regional geoid high. The upper mantle, being pumped from the deep mantle and rising to a few km shallower underlies the youngest (part of the Atlantic Ocean. This portion of the northern on various grounds [e.g., Foulger and Anderson, 2005]: the persistence of magmatism on the westerly moving

Doglioni, Carlo

373

Studies of digital seismic data obtained in geothermal and volcanic regions. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) study of tremor waveforms recorded at Mount St. Helens during 1980; (2) study of seismicity recorded during 1981 at Mount St. Helens; and (3) the monitoring of seismicity accompanying hydrofracturing experiments carried out in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. (ACR)

Fehler, M.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

374

Influence of the geological history of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-eight populations (210 individuals) were sequenced for one nuclear (rpb2) and two chloroplast (trnL­F and psb time, geology, Mexico, nuclear marker, phylogeography, plant spe- ciation, psbA­trnH, rpb2, Trans-Miocene around the mod- ern-day cities of Morelia and Queretaro in central Mexico, ª 2013 Blackwell Publishing

375

Earth Planets Space, 61, 7181, 2009 Gilbert-Gauss geomagnetic reversal recorded in Pliocene volcanic sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montpellier, Cedex 5, France 4Tbilisi State University Ivane Djavakhishvili, 3, Tshavtshavadze St., 380064 Tbilisi, Georgia 5Institute of Geology, Alexidze 9, 380009 Tbilisi, Georgia (Received October 23, 2007

Demouchy, Sylvie

376

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal strain and tilt field observations were carried out during the period February 1978 to December 1979 at the Klamath Graben and Newberry Caldera in Oregon and at Krafla in Northern Iceland. Moreover, tilt observations were made at Mt. St. Helens, Washington, during the summer of 1980. Two strainmeters of the same type as now in use by the US Geological Survey were applied in the strain work. Tilts were measured by two Kinemetrics model TM-1B biaxial tilt meters. The instruments were placed at depths of approximately one to two meters below the ground surface. Both strain and tilt fields turn out to be heavily contaminated by noise that is mostly of thermoelastic origin. In spite of considerable efforts, it has not been possible to process the strain field data to obtain sufficiently clear tidal signals. The tilt data are less contaminated and rather clear tidal signals were observed at Newberry in Oregon and Krafla in Iceland. A local magnification by a factor of about 3 of the EW component of the theoretical solid earth and ocean load tilt was observed at one station at Krafla. Moreover, the tidal tilt component across the ring fault at Newberry appears to be magnified by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9. The phenomena at the Krafla may possibly be due to a local magma chamber. These results are a clear indication of a tilt field modification by local structure and indicate the possibility of using tilt data to locate subsurface magma bodies.

Bodvarsson, G.; Axelsson, G.; Johnson, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A GCM Study of Volcanic Eruptions as a Cause of Increased Stratospheric Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent general circulation model (GCM) experiments have shown that idealized climatic perturbations that increase the temperature of the tropical tropopause region can cause larger than expected surface temperature increases. This is because the ...

Manoj M. Joshi; Keith P. Shine

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Independent Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) for the Yucca Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain has been proposed for the disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and other nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from defense and nuclear weapons programs. On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for repository construction. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended) directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to promulgate a Yucca ...

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

Volcanic and Solar Forcing of the Tropical Pacific over the Past 1000 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of El Nio to natural radiative forcing changes over the past 1000 yr is investigated based on numerical experiments employing the ZebiakCane model of the tropical Pacific coupled oceanatmosphere system. Previously published ...

Michael E. Mann; Mark A. Cane; Stephen E. Zebiak; Amy Clement

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Increasing Resilience to Natural Hazards in Earthquake-prone and Volcanic Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Earthquakes without frontiers: a partnership for increasing resilience to seismic hazard in the continents (EwF for increasing resilience to seismic hazard in the continents (EwF): Professor James Jackson, University

Brierley, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

382

Volcanic, erosional, tectonic, and biogenic peaks on Guyot Summit Plains in the Louisville Seamount Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

became submerged due to thermal subsidence of the underlyinginception to emergence and subsidence below sea level, andis the rapid change from subsidence to uplift as the guyot

Ebuna, Daniel R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that extends 50 miles eastward from Williams, Arizona, through Flagstaff to the canyon of the Little Colorado RTMENT OF AGRICULT URE U S This aerial view of Red Mountain cinder cone in northern Arizona shows crystals erode out of its walls. Studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Northern Arizona University

Fleskes, Joe

384

Toward assessing the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains volcanic complex: a telluric-magnetotelluric survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telluric-magnetotelluric studies were performed in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico to characterize the total geothermal system of the Valles Caldera and to be integrated with an east-west regional survey supported by the United States Geological Survey. The data from the regional survey indicate that electrically the San Juan Basin to the west of the Jemez Mountains is rather homogeneous in contrast to the eastern side near Las Vegas where the presence of a broad heterogeneous structure is clearly sensed. The data from the Jemez Mountain area are strikingly similar to other Rio Grande rift data and suggest a conducting layer at a depth of approximately 15 km. The telluric data indicate that the hydrothermal system in the area is of a localized nature.

Hermance, J.F.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Duration of hydrothermal activity at Steamboat Springs, Nevada, from ages of spatially associated volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steamboat Springs is a presently active equivalent of epithermal gold-silver ore-forming systems. Hot-spring sinter deposits contain small amounts of gold, silver, mercury, antimony, and arsenic. Hot-spring activity probably started before extrusion of the basaltic andesite of Steamboat Springs. Old sinter from the Steamboat Springs system occurs in gravels above and below the basaltic andesite. Intense hydrothermal alteration, including almost complete replacement by hydrothermal potassium-feldspar, has affected the basaltic andesite. Three plagioclase separates of differing potassium content from fresh basaltic andesite yielded potassium-argon ages of 2.52 to 2.55 m.y. Basaltic andesite almost completely replaced by potassium-feldspar yielded an age of 1.1 m.y. The source of energy for the thermal convection system is probably a large rhyolitic magma chamber that supplied the pumice and from which the rhyolite domes were emplaced. Sanidine and obsidian from four of the rhyolite domes yielded potassium-argon ages of 1.15 to 1.52 m.y. and obsidian from one of the northeastern domes yielded apparent ages of 2.97 and 3.03 m.y. The data indicate that hydrothermal activity has occurred at Steamboat Springs, possibly intermittently, for more than 2-1/2 m.y. These data agree with other radiogenic age studies indicating 1- and 2-m.y. lifetimes for the hydrothermal systems that generate epithermal gold-silver deposits.

Silberman, M.L.; White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Dockter, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geothermal resource assessment in the Aleutian Islands and Alaska peninsula: Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 30, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report the authors have now completed dating work on 20 rock samples. Analytical results for the dated samples are given in the enclosed table. The results are generally in good agreement with observed stratigraphic relationships and provide a well-constrained time framework for the eruptive history of this volcanic area. The argon extraction and potassium analyses are completed and the argon sample is awaiting mass spectrometry. In addition to documenting the eruptive history of Umnak volcanoes, the K-Ar ages will provide a time framework for the chemical evolution of the magmatic system, when combined with the rock chemistry analyses presently in progress at U.C., Santa Cruz. 1 tab.

Turner, D.L.; Nye, C.J.

1989-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Direct-Current Resistivity At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes An electromagnetic sounding survey by Jackson and Keller (1972) defined a strong resistivity anomaly above the center of inflation associated with volcanic activity during the early 1960's. References George V. Keller, L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray, Catherine K. Skokan (1979) Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Kilauea_Summit_Area_(Keller,_Et_Al.,_1979)&oldid=594370"

388

An Approach to Problems of a Geothermal Mercury Survey, Puna, Hawaii | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approach to Problems of a Geothermal Mercury Survey, Puna, Hawaii Approach to Problems of a Geothermal Mercury Survey, Puna, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Approach to Problems of a Geothermal Mercury Survey, Puna, Hawaii Abstract Concentrations of soil mercury of 15 to 1250ppb were determined in the Puna geothermal areaon the lower east rift zone of Kilauea volcano. As the area is young and volcanically active a wide range of soils exist. Hg concentrations are partly controlled by such factors as soil development and organic content, which tend to complicate interpretation of the absolute concentrations measured. The pH of both ground gas and soil may also influence transport and fixation of the Hg, and some low pH soils may be due to SO2 and C02 in ground gas. By relating the Hg concentration of

389

Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain: What Do They Tell Us about the Security of Engineered Storage of CO2 Underground?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: What do they teLL us about the security of eNgiNeered storage of co 2 uNdergrouNd? Introduction Lake Nyos in the Northwest Province of Cameroon in western Africa and Mammoth Mountain in California are the sites of two well-known underground releases of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in nature, both with adverse effects. Both Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain are atop current or former volcanoes and the released CO 2 is volcanic in origin (sometimes referred to as magmatic origin). Molten rock (magma) far below the Earth's surface contains entrained amounts of water, CO 2 , and other gases. If the magma rises toward the Earth's surface, the pressure it is under is reduced and the entrained gases begin to expand. The expansion of the

390

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya Rift Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Kenyan part of the East African rift is among the most studied rift zones in the world. It is characterized by: (1) a classic rift valley, (2) sheer escarpments along the faulted borders of the rift valley, (3) voluminous volcanics that flowed from faults and fissures along the rift, and (4) axial and flank volcanoes where magma flow was most intense. In northern Kenya, the rift faults formed in an area where the lithosphere was weakened and stretched by Cretaceous-Paleogene extension, and in central and southern Kenya, it formed along old zones of weakness at the

391

Microbial Life on the Seafloor: Where's the Energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microbial Life on the Seafloor: Where's the Microbial Life on the Seafloor: Where's the Energy? image 1 Pillow basalts on the side of the volcano. image 2 Pillow basalts from from inside the Pisces V. During the past 10 years there has been a growing recognition that the vast expanse of bare, unsedimented rocks on the seafloor harbor abundant and diverse microbial communities. Surprisingly, biofilms rapidly develop as volcanic rocks are produced at the mid-ocean ridges and Seamounts, and these types of microbial biomes are relatively unexplored. Geochemists, oceanographers and microbiologist have all questioned the role of the microbial organisms in the breakdown and weathering of the ocean crust. In particular, the energy sources and metabolisms supporting this rock-hosted microbial biosphere are currently unknown. Since the majority of the cold,

392

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes An electromagnetic sounding survey by Jackson and Keller (1972) defined a strong resistivity anomaly above the center of inflation associated with volcanic activity during the early 1960's. References George V. Keller, L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray, Catherine K. Skokan (1979) Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Kilauea_Summit_Area_(Keller,_Et_Al.,_1979)&oldid=510532

393

Experiments in cold fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

Palmer, E.P.

1986-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

FY 1984 and FY 1985 geochemistry and materials studies in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemistry and materials studies are being performed in support of the Magma Energy Extraction Program. The work is largely restricted to: (1) characterizing magmatic environments at sites of interest, (2) testing engineering materials in laboratory simulated magmatic environments, (3) investigating chemical mass transport effects inherent in designs for direct contact heat exchangers, and (4) evaluating degassing hazards associated with drilling into and extracting energy from shallow magma. Magma characterization studies have been completed for shallow magma at Long Valley, Coso volcanic field, and Kilauea volcano. The behavior of 17 commercially available materials has been examined in rhyolite magma at 850/sup 0/C and 200 MPa for periods up to seven days. Analysis of reaction products from materials tests to date indicate that oxidation is the main corrosion problem for most alloys in rhyolitic magma. Considerations of corrosion resistance, high-temperature strength, and cost indicate nickel-base superalloys offer the most promise as candidates for use in rhyolitic magma.

Westrich, H.R.; Weirick, L.J.; Cygan, R.T.; Reece, M.; Hlava, P.F.; Stockman, H.W.; Gerlach, T.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Field geology of the northwest quarter of the Broken Top 15' quadrangle, Deschutes County, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is a compilation of geologic field observations and supporting laboratory data obtained during a study of the eastern slope of the High Cascade Range of Oregon, north of Broken Top volcano. General geologic relationships are summarized, then followed by lithologic descriptions, petrographic characteristics, and stratigraphic information, cross-indexed to tables of chemical analyses of pertinent rock units. The 7.5-minute N.W. Broken Top quadrange is bounded by 44/sup 0/07'30'' and 44/sup 0/15'00'' north latitude and by 121/sup 0/37'30'' and 121/sup 0/45'00'' west longitude, 6 km east of North and Middle Sister volcanoes and 35 km northwest of Bend. The quadrangle is covered by glacial till and calc-alkaline lavas, most of which originated on the adjacent slopes of the High Cascades. Basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, and rhyodacite are represented in a variety of forms including lava flows, volcanic domes, cinder cones, and a welded ash-flow tuff.

Taylor, E.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Alaska Open-file Report 144 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites Aleutian Arc, Atka Island to Becherof Lake -- Preliminary Results and Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty of more than 30 thermal spring areas reported to exist in the Aleutian arc extending from Atka Island to Becherof Lake were investigated during July and August, 1980. Thermal activity of three of these sites had diminished substantially or no longer existed. At least seven more sites where thermal-spring activity is probable or certain were not visited because of their remoteness or because of time constraints. The existence of several other reported thermal spring sites could not be verified; these sites are considered questionable. On the basis of geothermometry, subsurface reservoir temperatures in excess of 150 C are estimated for 10 of the thermal spring sites investigated. These sites all occur in or near regions of Recent volcanism. Five of the sites are characterized by fumaroles and steaming ground, indicating the presence of at least a shallow vapor-dominated zone. Two, the Makushin Valley and Glacier Valley thermal areas, occur on the flanks of active Mukushin Volcano located on Unalaska Island, and may be connected to a common source of heat. Gas geothermometry suggests that the reservoir feeding the Kliuchef thermal field, located on the flanks of Kliuchef volcano of northeast Atka Island, may be as high as 239 C.

Motyka, R.J.; Moorman, M.A.; Liss, S.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solid earth geosciences research activities at LASL. Progress report, January 1--June 30, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geoscience group at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) supports existing geoscience-related programs and conducts a basic research program related to energy and earth resources. Projects supporting the dry hot-rock geothermal energy program include study of drill cores, seismic activity associated with hydraulic fracturing at the drill site, and the thermal state of the Valles Caldera. Research in igneous processes includes the modeling of large-scale volcanic eruptions such as the one which deposited the Bandelier Tuff around the Jemez Mountains, the petrology of those tuffs, and the dimensions of the magma chamber below the Valles Caldera. Recent activity at Mt. Baker, WA, presented an opportunity to observe increasing fumarolic activity which may precede an eruption. The activity is continuously monitored by two sequence cameras. Samples of the tephra from around the vent have been studied, temperatures were measured, and ground observations were made of the new fumaroles. Every three months a flight is made over the volcano for aerial photography and infrared scanning. Field studies in the Southern Cascade Mountains were begun to determine the petrochemistry, mode of eruption, and volume of erupted materials for the last 0.5 million years. This study will be used to evaluate the present thermal state and composition of magmas below the range. Investigations ofactive volcanoes and their eruptions will provide data for geothermal research on the physical properties of the magma. (auth)

Heiken, G. (comp.)

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Brittle creep in basalt and its application to time-dependent volcano deformation M.J. Heap a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpreted as due to a reduction in stress corrosion reactions; the result of a reduction in crack aperture-dependent, subcritical crack growth, of which stress corrosion is the most important mechanism in the Earth's brittle). Stress corrosion is a process by which strained atomic bonds at crack tips react preferentially

400

It takes three to tango: 2. Bubble dynamics in basaltic volcanoes and ramifications for modeling normal Strombolian activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the second paper of two that examine numerical simulations of buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In the first paper, we demonstrated that a combination of three numerical tools, an ...

Suckale, Jenny

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

157Recent Events: A Perspective on Carbon Dioxide On March 21, 2010 the Eyjafjalla Volcano in Iceland erupted, and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;Answer Key 157 Problem 1 ­ The Gulf Oil Spill is predicted to generate 200,000 gallons of crude to be burned to generate electricity, and combusted in cars, the fact that the clean-up is producing carbon

402

Limitations of the advection-diffusion equation for modeling tephra fallout: 1992 eruption of Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Detailed mapping and granulometric analyses of the 1992 Cerro Negro tephra blanket reveal remarkable departures from the expected distribution of tephra. Isomass maps show that (more)

Martin, Kristin Terese

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fluid transport properties and estimation of overpressure at the Lusi mud volcano, East Java Basin (Tanikawa et al., 2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Java Basin (Tanikawa et al., 2010) Richard Daviesa, , Michael Mangab , Mark Tingayc , Richard was caused by drilling of the Banjar Panji 1 gas exploration well (Davies et al., 2007; Manga, 2007; Davies et al., 2008; Tingay et al., 2008) or due to the Yogyakarta earthquake that occurred at 05:54 am

Manga, Michael

404

Facing the Challenges of the International Airways Volcano Watch: The 2004/05 Eruptions of Manam, Papua New Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devastating eruptions occurred at Manam, Papua New Guinea, from October 2004 to January 2005. An unprecedented set of pilot reports were obtained; ground-, air-, and satellite-observed eruption heights differed greatly. Satellite postanalysis and ...

Andrew Tupper; Ima Itikarai; Michael Richards; Fred Prata; Simon Carn; Daniel Rosenfeld

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anomaly beneath the Newberry volcano, and to its immediatethe Cascades and the Newberry Volcano are shown as blue andDepth (km) The Cascades Newberry Volcano SE (b) NW Depth (

Xue, Mei; Allen, Richard A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Boulders to Bifaces: Initial Reduction of Obsidian at Newberry Crater, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. 1973 Petrology of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon.MacLeod, Norman S. 1982 Newberry Volcano, Oregon: A CascadeEdwin H. McKee 1981 Newberry Volcano, Oregon. In: Guides to

Ozbun, Terry L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mechanism of instantaneous coal outbursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of mine workers die every year from mining accidents, and instantaneous coal outbursts in underground coal mines are one of the major killers. Various models for these outbursts have been proposed, but the precise mechanism is still unknown. We hypothesize that the mechanism of coal outbursts is similar to magma fragmentation during explosive volcanic eruptions; i.e., it is caused by high gas pressure inside coal but low ambient pressure on it, breaking coal into pieces and releasing the high-pressure gas in a shock wave. Hence, coal outbursts may be regarded as another type of gas-driven eruption, in addition to explosive volcanic, lake, and possible ocean eruptions. We verify the hypothesis by experiments using a shock-tube apparatus. Knowing the mechanism of coal outbursts is the first step in developing prediction and mitigation measures. The new concept of gas-driven solid eruption is also important to a better understanding of salt-gas outbursts, rock-gas outbursts, and mud volcano eruptions.

Guan, P.; Wang, H.Y.; Zhang, Y.X. [Peking University, Beijing (China). School of Earth & Space Science

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mechanical Controls on Eruptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan: Evidence for excess fluiddistributions: examples from Azerbaijan and Lusi, East Java,mud volcano eruptions in Azerbaijan occur in the two days

Rudolph, Maxwell Lutman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Exchange Items or Hunters' Tools? Another Look at Lanceolate Biface Caches in Central Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edwin H. McKee 1981 Newberry Volcano, Oregon. In: Guides toon the western flank of Newberry Volcano, and a K-Ar age of

Minor, Rick; Toepel, Kathryn Anne

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

I n d i a n O c e a nI n d i a n O c e a n Arafura Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAMPOSHOTO -- Okinawa Okino-tori- shima BONIN ISLANDS VOLCANO ISLANDS Timor Bali Madura Sumba Flores Sumbawa

411

A U S T R A L I A I N D O N E S I A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Okinawa shima Okino-tori- BONIN ISLANDS VOLCANO ISLANDS Timor Bali Madura Sumba Flores Sumbawa ANDAMAN

412

NATURE GEOSCIENCE | ADVANCE ONLINE PUBLICATION | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 1 antle plumes and their related hotspot volcanism constitute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

graduate school, he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines. He was a professor, in Kauai in 1990. LLooookkiinngg ffoorr Editor-in-Chief Our section is looking for a new Editor

Jellinek, Mark

413

Possible Influences of Volcanic Dust Veils or Changes in Solar Luminosity on Long-term Local Temperature Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two external forcing functions are examined in their relationship to temperature records at individual locations. Postulated changes in solar luminosity, deduced from sunspot structure, and the dust veil hypothesis are separately considered as ...

Douglas V. Hoyt; Richard A. Siquig

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Second technical status report, June 1, 1978--September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objectives are stated. The progress, problems, and future plans are listed briefly. (MHR)

Bodvarsson, G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. First technical status report, April 1, 1978-June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial steps in a physical analytic and field study of the general applicability of the rheidity sensing techniques in the Oregon-Washington Cascade region are listed. (MHR)

Bodvarsson, G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Properties of Northern Hemisphere Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Volcanic Aerosol in 1991/92 from UARS/ISAMS Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of polar stratospheric clouds by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) experiment on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) have revealed new details of their global properties and behavior. These ...

F. W. Taylor; A. Lambert; R. G. Grainger; C. D. Rodgers; J. J. Remedios

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NAME M/YEAR MASTERS THESES TITLES SCOPEL, ROBERT B Jun49 The Volcanic History of Jackson Hole, Wyoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects across the west, including coal, uranium, oil, oil shale, trona, and natural gas extraction

Baskaran, Mark

419

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so even though drilling fluid is a common contaminant, itdrill fluid at high pressure during the mechanical drillingfluid, designed to match the density of ice, will be used to continue drilling

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. M. Pashkevich, Antarctic Ice Sheet as a model in Searchmethods for discovery of ice-entrapped microorganisms inV. M. Pashkevich, Antarctic Ice Sheet as Object for Solving

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Airborne Asian Dust: Case Study of Long-Range Transport and Implications for the Detection of Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of fine-grained Asian dust from its source (e.g., the Gobi Desert, Mongolia) to North America is a common springtime phenomenon. Because of its chemical composition (silicon, iron, aluminum, and calcium) and its particle size ...

J. J. Simpson; G. L. Hufford; R. Servranckx; J. Berg; D. Pieri

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Turbulent Atmospheric Plumes above Line Sources with an Application to Volcanic Fissure Eruptions on the Terrestrial Planets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of turbulent plumes maintained above steady fine sources of buoyancy is worked out in detail within the limitations of Taylor's entrainment assumption. It is applied to the structure of a pure plume injected into a stably stratified ...

Richard B. Stothers

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aviation Applications for Satellite-Based Observations of Cloud Properties, Convection Initiation, In-Flight Icing, Turbulence, and Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Satellite Aviation Weather Products (ASAP) was jointly initiated by the NASA Applied Sciences Program and the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program in 2002. The initiative provides a valuable bridge for transitioning new and existing ...

John R. Mecikalski; Todd A. Berendes; Wayne F. Feltz; Kristopher M. Bedka; Sarah T. Bedka; John J. Murray; Anthony J. Wimmers; Pat Minnis; David B. Johnson; Julie Haggerty; Ben Bernstein; Michael Pavolonis; Earle Williams

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc  

SciTech Connect

The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Volatile contents in subduction-related basaltic magmas from Central Mexico: considerations on mantle enrichment processes and low pressure magma degassing during basaltic eruptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from primitive lavas from five different volcanoes in the Sierra Chichinautzin (Central Mexico) were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and electron microprobe to determine their major element chemistry and their H?O and CO? concentrations. The compositions of the inclusions range from basalt to andesite and include both alkaline and calc-alkaline varieties. Most inclusions have low H?O concentrations (average values 0.4[]0.2 wt.% H?O for Xitle, 0.6[]0.5 wt.% for Tuxtepec, 0.6[]0.3 wt.% for Ixcatepec, 0.8[]0.5 wt.% for Las Tetillas, 1.0[]0.3 wt.% for Jumiltepec) and no measurable CO?. The lack of CO?, which has strongly pressure-dependent solubility in silicate melts, and the low and variable H?O contents indicate that low pressure degassing is a widespread phenomenon during basaltic cinder cone eruptions. One model is presented to explain the extensive low pressure degassing in a well studied volcano (Xitle). The model explains the formation of an initial tephra cone and its temporal growth by explosive events followed by a switch in eruptive style to effusive. The model is based on the fact that cinder cones are highly porous, which allows efficient degassing of reticulating, low viscosity basaltic magma. The presence of alkaline and calc-alkaline primitive lavas throughout the volcanic field indicates heterogeneities in source region compositions. Rare melt inclusions in the primitive lavas contain measurable CO? and were trapped at relatively high pressures (~1 to 3 kb). These inclusions constrain the primary H?O contents of the magmas before low pressure degassing. The results clearly show that the calc-alkaline magmas contain higher H?O (~2 to 4 wt%) than the alkaline (~1 wt.%). Calculations of a hypothetical mantle source and comparison with EMORB and NMORB mantle sources shows that these volcanics were formed by two different processes: (1) partial melting caused by fluxing of the mantle wedge with a water-rich component from the subjected slab (calc-alkaline magmas) and (2) partial melting of the mantle wedge by upwelling-induced decompression (alkaline magmas). These two processes can be considered as end-members in arc magma genesis.

Cervantes, Pablo

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Heat flow studies in the Steamboat Mountain-Lemei Rock area, Skamania County, Washington. Information circular 62  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to investigate the possible occurrence of geothermal energy in areas of Quaternary basaltic volcanism, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources drilled several 152 m deep heat-flow holes in the Steamboat Mountain-Lemei Rock area of Skamania County, Washington. The study area is located in the southern part of Washington's Cascade Mountains between 45/sup 0/54' and 46/sup 0/07' N. and 121/sup 0/40' and 121/sup 0/53'W. This area was selected for study because geologic mapping had identified a north-trending chain of late Quaternary basaltic volcanoes that had extruded a sequence of lava flows up to 600 m thick and because the chain of volcanoes is areally coincident with a well-defined gravity low with a minimum value of about -110 mgals. Gradients of 52.7 and 53.4/sup 0/C/km and heat flows of 1.8 and 1.6 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/sec, respectively, were measured in two drill holes near the east flank of the chain of volcanoes. Gradients of 44.5 and 58/sup 0/C/km and heat flows of 1.3 and 1.6 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ sec, respectively, were measured in two holes near the axis of the chain, and one gradient of 49.8/sup 0/C/km and heat flow of 1.5 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ sec were measured in a drill hole near the west flank of the chain. All gradients and heat flows are terrain corrected. These heat-flow values are typical regional heat-flow values for the Cascade Mountains. The data show that there is no large-sized heat source body within the general area of the heat-flow study. However, there is only one location in Washington, also in the Cascade Mountains, where higher gradients have been measured.

Schuster, J.E.; Blackwell, D.D.; Hammond, P.E.; Huntting, M.T.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Petrogenesis of intraplate lavas from isolated volcanoes in the Pacific : implications for the origin of the enriched mantle source of OIB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Niu, Y. , M. Regelous, I. J. Wendt, R. Batiza, and M. J. O10.1016/0012-821X(88)90099-4. Wendt, J. I. , M. Regelous, K.Niu, Y. , M. Regelous, I. J. Wendt, R. Batiza, and M. J. O

Tian, Liyan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geothermal resource assessment of Mt. Hood volcano, Oregon, Phase I study. Technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1977--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several phases of the Mt. Hood geothermal resource assessment project are nearing completion. Most of the field work has been completed for the geologic study, gravity survey, and water sampling portions of the project. Thermal modelling, water analyses, rock analyses and age dating, and preparation of a complete Bouguer gravity map are in progress.

Hull, D.A.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

SOEST Publications List (7000 on) 7000 Garcia, M.O., E.H. Haskins, E.M. Stolper, and M. Baker, 2007, Anatomy of a Hawaiian shield volcano,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes, Chemie der Erde-Geochem., 67, 85-131, doi:10.1016/j, and A. Deutsch (eds.), Large Meteorite Impacts III, Geological Society of America, Special Paper 384, p

430

Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes using the Landsat-1 Data Collection System. Part III. Heat discharge from Mount St. Helens, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two thermal anomalies, A at 2740 m altitude on the north slope, and B between 2650 and 2750 m altitude on the southwest slope at the contact of the dacite summit dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington, were confirmed by aerial infrared-scanner surveys between 1971 and 1973. Landsat-1 Data Collection Platform 6166, emplaced at site B anomaly, transmitted 482 sets of temperature values in 1973 and 1974, suitable for estimating the differential radiant exitance as 84 W m/sup -2/, approximately equivalent to the Fourier conductive flux of 89 W m/sup -2/ in the upper 15 cm below the surface. The differential geothermal flux, including heat loss via evaporation and convection, was estimated at 376 W m/sup -2/. Total energy yield of Mount St. Helens probably ranges between 0.1 and 0.4 x 10/sup 6/ W.

Friedman, J.D.; Frank, D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Natural Geochemistry of Tetrafluoromethane and Sulfur Hexafluoride : Studies of Ancient Mojave Desert Groundwaters, North Pacific Seawaters and the Summit Emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfs_desc/8-9.pdf Flint L. E. ,Hevesi J. A. , Flint A. L. , Christensen A. H. , Sneed M. ,of our child. Lorrie Flint (USGS) kindly sent me the

Deeds, Daniel A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MMI) close to the Lusi eruption site (U.S. Geological Survey, 2006). Note that the Watu- kosek fault

Mazzini, Adriano

433

Volcano Experiment Caitlin Hoy http://www.spectroscopynow.com/coi/cda/detail.cda?id=12202&type=Feature&chId=8&page=1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Aluminum foil pan 50 mL flat-bottom centrifuge tubes Newspaper and newspaper strips Tape Baking dioxide is produced, pressure builds up inside the plastic bottle until the gas starts to bubble out

Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

434

New results on the resistivity structure of Merapi Volcano (Indonesia), derived from 3D restricted inversion of long-offset transient electromagnetic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. E. , 1993. Electrical resistivities of crustal ?uids, J.G. E. , 1942. The electrical resistivity log as an aid inthe electrical structure, DC resistivity soundings on the

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan, L.; Hordt, Andreas; Scholl, Carsten; Tezkan, Bulent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Volcano Rekindled: The Renewed Eruption of Mount St. Helens, 20042006 Edited by David R. Sherrod, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750, 2008 Chapter 12 1 U.S. Geological Survey, 1300 SE Cardinal Court, Vancouver, WA 98683 2 U.S. Geological Survey, PO Box by other researchers to correlate with repetitive, nearly periodic shallow earthquakes. Introduction Aerial

436

The natural geochemistry of tetrafluoromethane and sulfur hexafluoride : : studies of ancient Mojave Desert groundwaters, North Pacific seawaters and the summit emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 is detectable, and the source rock for CF 4 in upwellingsource of lithospheric CF 4 and SF 6 to Mojave Desert groundwaters is accessory fluorites contained in granitic rock.

Deeds, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Natural Geochemistry of Tetrafluoromethane and Sulfur Hexafluoride : Studies of Ancient Mojave Desert Groundwaters, North Pacific Seawaters and the Summit Emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 is detectable, and the source rock for CF 4 in upwellingsource of lithospheric CF 4 and SF 6 to Mojave Desert groundwaters is accessory fluorites contained in granitic rock.

Deeds, Daniel A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ash cloud aviation advisories  

SciTech Connect

During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

LANL | Solid Earth Geophysics | EES-17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) Home Publications Collaboration & Links Staff Research Highlights Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Geodynamics & National Security Nonlinear Elasticity Time Reversal Los Alamos Seismic Network Stimulated Porous Fluid Flow Resource Recovery Seismic & Acoustic Imaging Exploration Geophysics Induced Seismicity Volcanoes & Earthquakes Other Research CONTACTS Group Leader Ken Rehfeldt Administrative Contacts Jody Benson Cecilia Gonzales Geophysics (EES-17) The Geophysics Group supports the national security mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory by providing technical expertise to monitor movement of Earth's crust while predicting the effects of these events on the environment. Though our focus is on seismic monitoring, we also apply electric, magnetic, radionuclide, and acoustic technologies to monitor underground explosions, maintain our ability to conduct tests, and develop the Yucca Mountain Project. In addition, we study the nonlinear properties of earth materials, imaging with seismic waves, how seismic waves affect the interaction of porous rocks and fluids, use of seismic waves to characterize underground oil reservoirs, volcanology and volcanic seismicity, advanced computational physics of earth materials, and using drilling technology to study the crust of the earth. These tasks are complemented by our extensive background in both conventional and hot dry rock geothermal energy development and geophysical support of the Nevada Test Site.

440

Gravity and fault structures, Long Valley caldera, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main and catastrophic phase of eruption in Long Valley occurred 0.73 m.y. ago with the eruption of over 600 km/sup 3/ of rhyolitic magma. Subsequent collapse of the roof rocks produced a caldera which is now elliptical in shape, 32 km east-west by 17 km north-south. The caldera, like other large Quarternary silicic ash-flow volcanoes that have been studied by various workers, has a nearly coincident Bouguer gravity low. Earlier interpretations of the gravity anomaly have attributed the entire anomaly to lower density rocks filling the collapsed structure. However, on the basis of many additional gravity stations and supporting subsurface data from several new holes, a much more complex and accurate picture has emerged of caldera structure. From a three-dimensional inversion of the residual Bouguer gravity data we can resolve discontinuities that seem to correlate with extensions of pre-caldera faults into the caldera and faults associated with the ring fracture. Some of these faults are believed related to the present-day hydrothermal upflow zone and the zone of youngest volcanic activity within the caldera.

Carle, S.F.; Goldstein, N.E.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A variety of new seismological methods is being developed for determining the structure of a geothermal energy source region. In one approach, seismic signals generated in the source region are utilized by interpreting them in terms of the parameters of a seismic source model. For example, using a fluid-filled tensile crack driven by excess pressure in fluid as a model of volcanic tremor, formulas are derived which relate seismic observations with model parameters, and applied the formulas successfully to an actual eruption in Kilauea, giving a new insight to the magma transport in a volcano. Theoretical work is continued on the diffraction of seismic waves by a crack and it was demonstrated that the size and location of a crack can be well determined by particle motion near the crack at various frequencies. The method was applied to Kilauea Iki and the location of the magma lens was found to be in agreement with that estimated by another method. An extensive field experiment in Kilauea Iki was carried out with the cooperation of USGS and SANDIA, and interesting properties of the magma reservoir were revealed by a multiple use of active, passive, conventional, and unconventional seismic methods. The self-contained, digital event recorder has been developed and successfully tested.

Aki, K.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Geological and Geobotanical Studies of Long Valley Caldera, CA, USA Utilizing New 5m Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1989, a six month-long small magnitude earthquake swarm began beneath the Pleistocene-aged dacitic cumulovolcano Mammoth Mountain. The following year, increased mortality of trees in the Horseshoe Lake region was observed. Their deaths were initially attributed to the Sierran drought of the 1980's. In 1994 however, soil gas measurements made by the USGS confirmed that the kills were due to asphyxiation of the vegetation via the presence of 30-96 % CO{sub 2} in ground around the volcano[1]. Physiological changes in vegetation due to negative inputs into the ecological system such as anomalously high levels of magmatic CO{sub 2}, can be seen spectrally. With this phenomena in mind, as well as many other unanswered geological and geobotanical questions, seven lines of hyperspectral 5-meter HyMap data were flown over Long Valley Caldera located in eastern California on September 7, 1999. HyMap imagery provides the impetus to address geobotanical questions such as where the treekills are currently located at Mammoth and other locales around the caldera as well as whether incipient kills can be identified. The study site of the Horseshoe Lake treekills serves as a focus to the initial analyses of this extensive HyMap dataset due to both the treekill's geologically compelling origins and its status as a serious volcanic geohazard.

Martini, B.A.; Silver, E.A.; Potts, D.C.; Pickles, W.L.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Living in the shadow of Mauna Loa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of Hawaii's most dangerous natural hazards is sitting in plain sight: Mauna Loa volcano. The mighty mountain makes up more than fifty percent of the island and is the largest volcano on Earth. Since 1843, when people ...

Hirji, Zahra R. (Zahra Rafik)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-known, but less well-preserved, flood basalt provinces such as the Deccan and Karoo. The shield volcanoes have

Demouchy, Sylvie

446

NIST Signs US-China Cooperative Agreement on Earthquake ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Signs US-China Cooperative Agreement on Earthquake and Volcano Sciences. For Immediate Release: October 20, 2009. ...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Collision, metamorphism and uplift recorded in the Latimojong Mountains, Sulawesi, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and petroleum. However, the source of the fluids and the fluid­rock interactions within the mud volcano conduit.S., 2007. Regional evaluation of source rock in Azerbaijan from the geochemistry of organic-rich rocks volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan, Marine and Petroleum

448

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area, New Zealand Area, New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Lake Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_New_Zealand_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510814

449

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about...

450

Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The ancient Romans, however, made concrete by mixing lime and volcanic rock. For underwater structures, lime and volcanic ash were mixed to form mortar, and this mortar and...

451

Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks, International Atomic EnergyMxico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks, International Atomic Energy

Dobson, P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Neon. Radiogenic isotope geology. p. 303. ISBN 978-0-Geology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/chemgeo Helium and carbon isotopeosmium isotope evidence from Canary Island lavas. Geology

Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Paleoseismology of latest Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in central Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Latest Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in Oregon concentrates along four zones that splay northward from seismically active faults along the Central Nevada and Eastern California seismic zones. The Central Oregon fault zone is one of these zones, which splays northward from dextral faults of the Walker Lane, stretching across the flanks of several ranges in south-central Oregon along a N20[degree]W trend, and ultimately merges with the Cascade volcanic arc near Newberry volcano. Aerial-photo interpretations and field investigations reveal fault scarps with, on average about 4 m, but in places as much as [approximately]10 m of vertical expression across latest Pleistocene pluvial lake deposits and geomorphic surfaces. Trenches across three different faults in the Central Oregon zone reveal evidence for multiple episodes of faulting in the form of fault-related colluvial deposits and deformed horizons which have been cut by younger fault movements. Trench exposures reveal faults with relatively steep dips and anastomosing traces, which are interpreted locally as evidence for a small oblique-slip component. Vertical offsets measured in the trenches are [approximately]2 m or more for each event. Radiocarbon analyses and preliminary tephra correlations indicate that the exposed deposits are [approximately]30,000 yr in age and younger, and record the decline of latest Pleistocene pluvial lakes. Commonly, reworked or deformed lacustrine deposits and interlayered and faulted colluvial deposits mark the second and third events back, which probably occurred in the Latest Pleistocene, at a time during low to moderate lake levels. If offsets of the past 18,000 yr are representative of the long-term average, then faults along this zone have slip rates of from 0.2 mm/yr to 0.6 mm/yr and recurrence intervals that range from [approximately]4,000 yr to 11,000 yr.

Pezzopane, S.K.; Weldon, R.J. II (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air traffic is partly reopening., based on more accurate risk assessments using data collected in a number of test flights that have been conducted on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 April. Lufthansa and Air Frances KLM unit reported successful testing of flights without passengers during the weekend, and Air France said an inspection of an Airbus A320 flown yesterday from Paris to Toulouse showed no anomalies. The Association of European Airlines, which represents 36 carriers, said it wants an immediate assessment of the airspace restrictions. (Business week) Additional flights authorized by Italian ENAC and have found no measureable traces of the ash in the Italian air space. This is a statement by the Italian Civil Protection Italy is constantly monitoring the fallout of ashes produced by the eruption of the Icelandic volcano. Following a preliminary assessment made on the Alps snow surface, no ashes fallout has been detected. To this regard, we will be grateful to the Participating States involved in the phenomenon if they would kindly provide us with information on the ashes fallout in their respective countries. The Italian scientific community and the national Agencies responsible of flight control and safety has requested detailed information regarding the threshold values adopted by the scientific models currently under analysis of the VAAC (Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre) based in London. In fact, the VAAC reports are increasingly precise in their delineation of the area covered by ash (thinner polygons). Yet, the criteria for this delineation (ash concentration thresholds) are unknown. The satellite image below shows the ash plume as of 18 April 2010, as seen from MODIS optical satellite imagery.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Whitney. 2004. Yucca Mountain Site Description. TDR-tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, J. Geophys.volcanoes near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. Geological

Karasaki, Kenzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Isotopic Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al....  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

but also may provide additional insight to subsurface conditions. For example, CO2-rich groundwaters that are cold and dilute may be a general indicator that a volcano...

458

A U S T R A L I A I N D O N E S I A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- I S L A N D S R Y U K Y U Okinawa shima Okino-tori- BONIN ISLANDS VOLCANO ISLANDS Timor Bali Madura

459

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Validation of...

460

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References Gordon G. Goles, Richard St J. Lambert (1990) A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Retrieved from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcano taupo volcanic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Isotopic Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles & Lambert,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References Gordon G. Goles, Richard St J. Lambert (1990) A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Retrieved from...

462

EA-1897: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment EA-1897: Final Environmental Assessment AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon This EA evaluates the environmental impacts...

463

Core Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al., 1987...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

H. Mariner, Terry E. C. Keith (1987) Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCoreAnaly...

464

Property:Geothermal/Partner10 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10 Pages using the property "GeothermalPartner10" Showing 1 page using this property. N Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project + University of Utah + Retrieved...

465

Isotopic Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

H. Mariner, Terry E. C. Keith (1987) Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIsotopicA...

466

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix K RENEWABLE RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest geothermal resources. Agreements have been negotiated for projects at Newberry Volcano, Oregon and Glass Mountain, California. Complete demonstration projects at Newberry and Glass Mountain and document

467

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,...

468

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea on a Mariana forearc serpentinite mud volcano: Ocean Drillingfluid flow in the western Nankai subduction zone, Japan. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Definition: Fumaroles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fumaroles An opening in the earth's crust, typically near a volcano, in which steam and hot sulfurous gasses are discharged. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ret...

470

Rock units in regional tectonic analysis - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

sins, chains of volcanoes, faulting, uplift and subsidence of crustal blocks, and so on. The causative processes remain unseen, and can only be inferred ftom...

471

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from...

472

A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Study...

473

Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Conduction...

474

A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A five-week survey showed that seismic activity within 20 km of Wairakei Geothermal Field took place mainly at shallow depths (< 2 km), in or close to the Taupo Fault Belt, and occurred in swarms. Twenty-eight earthquakes, with magnitudes (M) between -1.3 and +2.8, were located; 43 other earthquakes, with M < 0.2, were recorded but could not be located. The distribution of located earthquakes did not correlate with known areas of surface geothermal activity. No located earthquake occurred beneath the

475

Subduction dynamics at the middle America trench : new constraints from swath bathymetry, multichannel seismic data, and ?Be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cosmogenic radionuclide ?Be is a unique tracer of shallow sediment subduction in volcanic arcs. The range in ?Be enrichment in the Central American Volcanic Arc between Guatemala and Costa Rica is not controlled by ...

Kelly, Robyn K

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Annual Technical Conference and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and wood. The presence of a zeolite, phillipsite, indicates alteration of volcanic glass by seawater with a high content of volcanic glass and basalt fragments. The benthic foraminiferal assemblage within Unit

Backe, Knut

477

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal conductivity and heat capacity close to the initialby increasing the volumetric heat capacity of the rock massT2. The increase in heat capacity is described by Equation (

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z