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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morgan, Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Paul Morgan, Wendell Duffield, John Sass, Tracey Felger (2003) Searching For An Electrical-Grade Geothermal Resource In Northern Arizona To Help Geopower The West Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_San_Francisco_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Morgan,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510822" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

2

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Juan Volcanic Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

3

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Arizona Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

4

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

5

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

6

The Origin of High-Enthalpy Geothermal of Non-Volcanic Environment---As a Case Study of Yangbajing Geothermal Field at Qinghai-Tibet Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among global high-enthalpy geothermal resources, geothermal fields within Tibet are located in non-volcanic environment only. Results of the PTt(pressure-temperature-time) trajectory calculation of the Plateau uplifting gave a comparatively satisfactory ...

Jin Shenghai; Yao Zujin; Yin Miying

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (6) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Arizona Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

8

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses, and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. The work accomplished during Year 1 of this ongoing program is described in the present report. A brief overview of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is given. The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature, and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures. Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter. Finally, plans for future work are outlined.

Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Stevens, J.L.; Luu, L. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lassen Volcanic National Park Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

11

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

12

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

13

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic National Park Geothermal Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related

14

Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; PETROGRAPHY; BIOTITE; CALCITE; CLAYS; LIMESTONE; PYRITE; SANDSTONES; SEDIMENTS; SHALES; VOLCANIC ROCKS; ZEOLITES; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBONATE ROCKS; CARBONATES; CHALCOGENIDES; IDAHO; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; IRON COMPOUNDS; IRON SULFIDES; MICA; MINERALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PYRITES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS;

15

Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. Wells drilled along this feature have encountered production from distinct fractures in crystalline basement rocks. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which

16

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References

17

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Great Basin- A Progress Report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Great Basin- A Progress Report Abstract Considering a lack of recent volcanism, the abundant geothermal activity in the northwestern Great Basin is somewhat anomalous. The prolific activity may result from enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension in the Great Basin. Although faults control most geothermal activity in the Great Basin, few detailed investigations have been conducted on the specific structural controls of individual fields.

20

A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A preliminary magnetotelluric study consisting of twenty measurements, in the frequency range 128-0.016 Hz, was undertaken on the active volcanic island of Nissyros. Two boreholes identify the existence of high enthalpy manifestations. The results correlate well with the borehole logs and delineate, in a 1-D approximation, the existence and symmetry of a possible geothermal reservoir. Some of the main faulting features were detected as well as an inferred highly conductive zone at the centre of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

23

Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details...

24

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada; relationssurface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir, Chemicalapplication to volcanic- geothermal areas and landfills,

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This interim report presents the results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. Recommendations

27

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

28

Geothermal emissions data base, Wairakei geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A database subset on the gaseous emissions from the Wairakei geothermal field is presented. Properties and states of the reservoir fluid such as flow rates, wellhead pressure, and enthalpy are included in the file along with the well name and constituent measurement. This subset is the result of an initial screening of the data covering 1965 to 1971, and new additions will be appended periodically to the file. The data is accessed by a database management system as are all other subsets in the file. Thereby, one may search the database for specific data requirements and print selective output. For example, one may wish to locate reservoir conditions for cases only when the level of the constituent exceeded a designated value. Data output is available in the form of numerical compilations such as the attached, or graphical displays disposed to paper, film or magnetic tape.

Schwartz, S.R. (comp.)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal Field, Monograph on The Geysers GeothermalField, Geothermal Resources Council, Special Report no. 17,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of...

31

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique...

32

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

33

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios in gases of thirty hot springs and geothermal wells and of five natural gas wells in the western United States show no relationship to regional conductive heat flow, but do show a correlation with magma-based thermal activity and reservoir fluid temperature (or total convective heat discharge). Gases from high-T (> 200°C) reservoirs have 3He/4He > 2 _ the atmospheric value, with high He

34

3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model of the Coso geothermal field has been constructed. TheResistivity model of the Coso geothermal site compiled fromthe Department of Energy, Geothermal Program Office. MT data

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, Michael; Gasperikova, Erika; Wannamaker, Philip E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

130, 475-496. the Coso Geothermal Field, Proc.28 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanfords ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California: J.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a particular geothermal reservoir. Author(s): J. A. Welhan, R. J. Poredai, W. Rison, H. Craig Published: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1988 Document Number:...

37

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the level of maturation of the Fruitland Formation coals, and time-dependet temperature models, based on heat-flow data in the San Juan region, to further investigate both the thermal history of the region and the nature of the influence of the San Juan volcanic field thermal source on the thermal

38

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Oxygen isotopes. References Peter B. Larson, Hugh P. Taylor Jr (1986) An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_San_Juan_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Larson_%26_Jr,_1986)&oldid=687474" Categories: Exploration Activities

39

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004)...

40

Geothermal Field Developments in Iceland  

SciTech Connect

The exploration and research carried out in conjunction with the exploitation of the various geothernal fields has vastly deepened our understanding of the hydrothermal systems in Inceland. They have proved to be more diverse with respect to physical state, chemical composition, hydrological properties, and geological control than previously thought. The purpose of the present paper is to review the present state of knowledge regarding the Icelandic geothermal systems, with emphasis on the production and reservoir engineering aspects.

Palmason, G.; Stefansson, V.; Thorhallsson, S.; Thorsteinsson, T.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Citation Online Nevada Encyclopedia. Dixie...

42

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

43

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

44

Direct-Current Resistivity At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...

45

IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA) USING REMOTE SENSING AND FIELD DATA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

46

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique...

47

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique...

48

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

49

A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (10) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The Baca location #1 geothermal field is located in north-central New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where downhole temperatures exceed 260°C at depths of less than 2 km. Stratigraphically the reservoir region can be described as a five-layer sequence that includes Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, and Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments overlying Precambrian granitic

50

Microseismicity and 3-D Mapping of an Active Geothermal Field, Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microseismicity and 3-D Mapping of an Active Geothermal Field, Kilauea Microseismicity and 3-D Mapping of an Active Geothermal Field, Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone, Puna, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Microseismicity and 3-D Mapping of an Active Geothermal Field, Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone, Puna, Hawaii Abstract The local fault and dike structures in Puna, southeastern Hawaii, are of interest both in terms of electricity productionand volcanic hazard monitoring. The geothermal powerplant at Puna has a 30 MW capacity and is built on a sectionof the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone that was resurfaced by lava flows as recently as 1955 and 1960.The Puna Borehole Network was established in 2006 inorder to provide detailed seismic data about the Puna geothermal field. The array consists of eight 3-component borehole

51

Characteristics of geothermal wells located in the Salton Sea geothermal field, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is given of the geophysical, geochemical, and geothermal characteristics of wells located in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Based on the geothermal characteristics of the wells, a subsurface heat profile was developed for the entire geothermal field. Maps of temperature contours for specified depths throughout the field were also drawn.

Palmer, T.D.

1975-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

53

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of...

54

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

55

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report:...

56

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation...

57

Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details...

58

Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details...

59

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009)...

60

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Three-dimensional anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Three-dimensional anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast-Central California...

62

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration...

63

Field Mapping At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

64

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

67

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

68

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in Southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Moore, J.L. Published: Publisher Unknown, 9/1/1987 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Structural_interpretation_of_the_Coso_geothermal_field._Summary_report,_October_1986-August_1987&oldid=473519"

69

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to:...

70

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Van Soest, Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that _7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow

71

Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field, Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field are investigated using seismicity, focal mechanisms and stress analysis. Comparison of hypocenters of microearthquakes with locations of development wells indicates that microseismic activity has increased since the commencement of fluid injection and circulation. Microearthquakes in the geothermal field are proposed as indicators of shear fracturing associated with fluid injection and circulation along major pre-existing

72

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Inverse modeling and forecasting for the exploitation of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat and mass transfer in geothermal systems of Kamchatka.study of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia.Modeling the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia.

Kiryukhin, A.V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Automatic History Matching of Geothermal Field Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the multiphase multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching and parameter estimation based on data obtained during exploitation of geothermal fields. The ITOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding TOUGH2 output can be calculated. Furthermore, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. This paper focuses on the solution of the inverse problem, i.e. the determination of model-related parameters by automatically calibrating a conceptual model of the geothermal system against data obtained during field operation. We first describe the modeling approach used to simulate fluid and heat flow in fractured-porous media. The inverse problem is then formulated, followed by a brief discussion of the optimization algorithm. A sample problem is given to demonstrate the application of the method to geothermal reservoir data.

Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Automatic history matching of geothermal field performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the multiphase multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching, and parameter estimation based on data obtained during exploitation of Geothermal fields. The ITOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding TOUGH2 output can be calculated. Furthermore, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. This paper focuses on the solution of the inverse; problem, i.e. the determination of model-related parameters by automatically calibrating a conceptual model of the Geothermal system against data obtained during field operation. We first describe the modeling, approach used to simulate fluid and heat flow in fractured-porous media. The inverse problem is then formulated, followed by a brief discussion of the optimization algorithm. A sample problem is given to demonstrate the application of the method to Geothermal reservoir data.

Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K>

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site and the Okuaizu geothermal field, Japan", Geothermics,at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California,and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,

Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Seismic response to fluid injection and production in two Salton Trough geothermal fields, southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 12: 221-258patterns in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs: Six case

Lajoie, Lia Joyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geological Interpretation of Self-Potential Data from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of samples from geothermal reservoirs: Riverside,study of samples from geothermal reservoirs: petrology andat the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, in Proceedings, First

Corwin, R.F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use thermal infrared (TIR) data from the spaceborne ASTER instrument to detect surface temperature anomalies in the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. The identification of such anomalies in a known geothermal area serves as an incentive to apply similar markers and techniques to areas of unknown geothermal potential. We carried out field measurements concurrently with the collection of ASTER images. The field

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geothermal emissions data base: Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new database subset on the gaseous emissions from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field is presented. Properties and states of the reservoir fluid such as flow rates, wellhead pressure, and enthalpy are included in the file along with the well name and constituent measurement. This subset is the result of an initial screening of the data covering 1967 to 1969, and new additions will be appended periodically to the file. The data are accessed by a database management system as are all other subsets in the file. Thereby, one may search the database for specific data requirements and print selective output. For example, one may wish to locate reservoir conditions for cases only when the level of the constituent exceeded a designated value. Data output is available in the form of numerical compilations such as the attached, or graphical displays disposed to paper, film, or magnetic tape.

Schwartz, S.R. (comp.)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical Characteristics And The Effects Of Gas On Well Performance Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical Characteristics And The Effects Of Gas On Well Performance Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This study, which focuses on the Aluto-Langano geothermal field, is part of the ongoing investigations of the geothermal systems in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Aluto-Langano is a water-dominated gas-rich geothermal field, with a maximum temperature close to 360°C, in the Lakes District region of the Ethiopian Rift Valley. The upflow zone for the system lies along a deep, young NNE trending fault and is characterized by

84

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine impact of brittle faulting and seismogenic deformation on permeability in geothermal reservoir Notes New mapping documents a series of late Quaternary NNE-striking normal faults in the central Coso Range that dip northwest, toward and into the main production area of the Coso geothermal field. The faults exhibit geomorphic features characteristic of Holocene activity, and locally are associated with fumaroles and hydothermal alteration. The active faults

85

Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Steven Wesnousky, S. John Caskey, John W. Bell (2003) Recency Of Faulting And Neotechtonic Framework In The Dixie Valley Geothermal Field And Other Geothermal Fields Of The Basin And Range Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field_Area_(Wesnousky,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510736" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here

86

SEISMOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS AT THE GEYSERS GEOTHERMAL FIELD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Muffler, 1972. The Geysers Geothermal Area, California.B. C. Hearn, 1977. ~n Geothermal Prospecting Geology, TheC. , 1968. of the Salton Sea Geothermal System. pp. 129-166.

Majer, E. L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In recent years there has been interest in the possibility of generating electricity from geothermal steam in many countries. The initial stage is the preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources and, apart from economic considerations, the problem is essentially geological. This paper deals with the factors involved in the selection of areas that warrant expenditure on investigation and development. Preferred requirements in geothermal fields for power generation are temperatures above 200°C and permeable aquifers or zones within 2000 m from the surface. The existence

88

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress in understanding geothermal systems by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and thereby perhaps suggesting new areas for field expansion. To these ends, a dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipole array profiling has been acquired over the east flank of the Coso geothermal system. Acquiring good quality MT data in producing geothermal systems is a challenge due to production related electromagnetic (EM) noise and, in the

89

An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Author Marshall J. Reed Conference Proceedings, 32nd Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; Stanford University; 2007 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Citation Marshall J. Reed. 2007. An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests. In:

90

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

91

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

92

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

93

Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for Understanding Linkages Between Northeast-Trending Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for Understanding Linkages Between Northeast-Trending Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Abstract Detailed geologic mapping, delineation of Tertiary strata, analysis of faults and folds, and a new gravity survey have elucidated the structural controls on the Desert Peak and Brady geothermal fields in the Hot Springs Mountains of northwestern Nevada. The fields lie within the Humboldt

94

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary...

95

An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using...

96

Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The gravity data are...

97

Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Dixie Valley, Nevada Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGroundGravitySurveyAtDixieValleyGeothermalFieldArea(Blackwell,EtAl.,2009)&oldid38834...

98

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search...

99

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2002 a high-resolution...

100

Optimization of injection scheduling in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study discusses the application of algorithms developed in Operations Research to the optimization of brine reinjection in geothermal fields. The injection optimization problem is broken into two sub-problems: (1) choosing a configuration of injectors from an existing set of wells, and (2) allocating a total specified injection rate among chosen injectors. The allocation problem is solved first. The reservoir is idealized as a network of channels or arcs directly connecting each pair of wells in the field. Each arc in the network is considered to have some potential for thermal breakthrough. This potential is quantified by an arc-specific break-through index, b/sub ij/, based on user-specified parameters from tracer tests, field geometry, and operating considerations. The sum of b/sub ij/-values for all arcs is defined as the fieldwide breakthrough index, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells and rates so as to minimize B subject to constraints on the number of injectors and the total amount of fluid to be produced and reinjected. The study presents four computer programs which employ linear or quadratic programming to solve the allocation problem. In addition, a program is presented which solves the injector configuration problem by a combination of enumeration and quadratic programming. The use of the various programs is demonstrated with reference both to hypothetical data and an actual data set from the Wairakei Geothermal Field in New Zealand.

Lovekin, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in Geothermal Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study discusses the application of algorithms developed in Operations Research to the optimization of brine reinjection in geothermal fields. The injection optimization problem is broken into two sub-problems: (1) choosing a configuration of injectors from an existing set of wells, and (2) allocating a total specified injection rate among chosen injectors. The allocation problem is solved first. The reservoir is idealized as a network of channels or arcs directly connecting each pair of wells in the field. Each arc in the network is considered to have some potential for thermal breakthrough. This potential is quantified by an arc-specific breakthrough index, b{sub ij}, based on user-specified parameters from tracer tests, field geometry, and operating considerations. The sum of b{sub ij}-values for all arcs is defined as the fieldwide breakthrough index, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells and rates so as to minimize B subject to constraints on the number of injectors and the total amount of fluid to be produced and reinjected. The use of the various methods is demonstrated with reference both to hypothetical data and an actual data set from the Wairakei Geothermal Field in New Zealand.

Lovekin, James; Horne, Roland N.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Aerial Photography Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic mapping from air photos in some places clearly located the structures in the valley and hence is very site specific. References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aerial_Photography_At_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field_Area_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=388817

104

Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Hyperspectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Hyperspectral data was also used to successfully map soil-mineral anomalies that are structurally related in Dixie Valley, Nevada. In the area of the power plant, 20 m spatial resolution AVIRIS data were used. For Dixie Meadows, Nevada, 3 m spatial resolution HyVista HyMap hyperspectral data

105

3D MAGNETOTELLURIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: 3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Knowledge of the subsurface electrical resistivity/conductivity can contribute to a better understanding of complex hydrothermal systems, typified by Coso geothermal field, through mapping the geometry (bounds and controlling structures) over existing production. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion is now an emerging technology for characterizing the resistivity structures of complex geothermal systems. The method appears to hold great promise, but histories exploiting truly 3D inversion that demonstrate the advantages that can be gained by acquiring

106

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas and Isotopes Geochemistry, Kennedy, van Soest and Shevenell. During FY04, we concentrated on two primary projects. The first was a detailed study of helium isotope systematics throughout Dixie Valley and the inter-relationship between the Dixie Valley geothermal reservoir and local hydrology. The second is the construction of a helium isotope "map" of the

107

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs. Since microseismic sources occur more or less continuously both due to the operations of a geothermal field and the naturally occurring background seismicity, passive seismic monitoring is well suited to quantify the temporal variations in the vicinity of a

108

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed by Unocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this development included building and operating a 10 MWe power plant. Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning the project in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potential of the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeable sands contained moderately saline water, high porosity, and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, Ormat Nevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmed the

109

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and alteration mapping analyzed exposed rocks in geothermal region. Neither geologic mapping nor deep drilling have revealed potential deep primary aquifers. Surface alteration at Coso is of three main types: (1) clay-opal-alunite alteration, (2) weak argillic alteration, and (3) stockwork calcite veins and veinlets, which are locally associated with calcareous sinter. References Hulen, J. B. (1 May 1978) Geology and alteration of the Coso

110

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the areal extent of the magma reservoir Notes The distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range was analyzed. Thirty-eight separate domes and flows of phenocryst-poor, high-silica rhyolite of similar major element chemical composition were erupted over the past 1 m.y. from vents arranged in a crudely S-shaped array atop a granitic horst in the Coso Range, California. The immediate source of heat for the surficial geothermal phenomena is probably a silicic

111

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two. Our...

112

Analysis of cause and mechanism for injection-induced seismicity at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock from the Geysers Geothermal Field, California. Int. J.strain at The Geysers geothermal field. Ph.D. dissertation,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curtis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2010 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine if there is geothermal potential in the South Ranges Notes It has been believed that the South Ranges at China Lake may host geothermal resources for several decades. Recent Garlock Fault mapping, associated thermochronology work and a well documented but geologically unresolved steaming well to the west suggests that the South Ranges should be investigated for geothermal potential. In 2009, GPO awarded a contract to the University of Kansas to follow through on detailed mapping, trenching, dating and thermochronoloy in the Lava Mountains and the

114

Application Of Active Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal Field Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal Field Of Travale, Tuscany Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of Active Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal Field Of Travale, Tuscany Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In October 1981 the AAMT method was tested in the geothermal field of Travale. This method is based on the MT method, but uses artificial EM fields excited by a transmitter some kilometres from the receiving station. The transmitter consists of a switch mode amplifier for the lower frequency band (< 300 Hz) and six stacked linear amplifiers for the high frequency band. Maximum output is about 5 kW. For measurement of the very small EM field at the receiver the correlation technique is used

115

Pilot fruit drier for Los Azufres geothermal field, Michoacan, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) has a Division in charge of the exploration of a geothermal reservoir located in Los Azufres, State of Michoacan. At present, CFE is only using the steam of the wells and rejecting the hot water that comes off associated with the steam. Based on a trip to the Los Azufres geothermal field in December of 1992, a design for a pilot geothermal fruit drier was undertaken for CFE. The details of the geothermal field and the local fruit production are detailed.

Lund, J.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Together, field and 40Ar/39Ar results suggest that Late Cretaceous extension occurred in the Sevier belt hinterland at the same time as shortening in the eastern foreland and at depth in the hinterland. Sufficient topography must have been present to drive upper-crustal extension in the eastern hinterland. References Wells, M.L.; Allmendinger, R.W.; Dallmeyer, R.D. (1 October 1990) Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt,

118

A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The Blue Mountain geothermal field is a blind geothermalprospect (i.e., no surface hot springs) along the west flank of BlueMountain in southern Humboldt County, Nevada. Developmentwells in the system have high flow rates and temperatures above190°C at depths of ~600 to 1,070 m. Blue Mountain is a small~8-km-long east-tilted fault block situated between the EugeneMountains and Slumbering Hills. The geothermal field occupiesthe intersection between a regional NNE- to ENE-striking,west-dipping

119

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal Trans Geotherm Resour Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Citation Gregory Nimz,Cathy Janik,Fraser Goff,Charles Dunlap,Mark Huebner,Dale

120

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To estimate the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, and the possible existence of barrier boundaries. Notes Production and interference tests were conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 during September--November, 1975. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. The data collected during the tests also indicated that the reservoir pressure varies systematically in response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the

122

Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Abstract The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed byUnocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this developmentincluded building and operating a 10 MWe power plant.Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning theproject in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potentialof the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeablesands contained moderately saline water, high porosity,and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, OrmatNevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmedthe earlier conclusions and

123

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Using a simple one-dimensional steady-state fluid flow model, the helium content and isotopic composition imply vertical fluid flow rates from the mantle of _7 mm/yr. This is a strict lower limit to the fluid flow rate: the one-dimensional model does not consider diffusive re-distribution of helium or mixing with water containing only a crustal helium component and

124

An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne Portugal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne Portugal) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In an attempt to define the resistivity model of the Chaves geothermal field in NE Portugal, a detailed survey with scalar audiomagnetotelluric measurements was performed. The soundings were made in the frequency range from 2300 to 4.1 Hz. Electrical resistivity models were derived from the application of 1-D inversion, 2-D trial and error modeling and 2-D inversion procedures. The resistivities inside the geothermal field are low, reaching not more than 30 Ωm and increasing up to 60-150 Ωm

125

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 660 fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature (Th) and 44 freezing temperature (Tm) measurements, mainly on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368°C range). Tm (-0.3 to -12.7°C range) and crushing stage observations indicate that early trapped fluids contained up to (approximate)2 mol% CO2 (now measured at <0.4 mol%). reservoir temperatures have decreased by

126

Active Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Active Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New mapping documents a series of late Quaternary NNE-striking normal faults in the central Coso Range that dip northwest, toward and into the main production area of the Coso geothermal field. The faults exhibit geomorphic features characteristic of Holocene activity, and locally are associated with fumaroles and hydothermal alteration. The active faults sole into or terminate against the brittle-ductile transition zone (BDT) at a depth of about 4 to 5 km. The BDT is arched upward over a volume of crust

127

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1999 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata Notes A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history.

128

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: As a contribution to the EEC study of the potential contribution of electric and electromagnetic techniques to geothermal exploration, magnetotelluric studies have been undertaken with a sounding bandwidth ranging from 2 to 7 decades of period at more than 30 sites within the chosen test area of Travale. This area must be one of the most unfavourable for the application of electrical techniques on account both of the thickness (up to 2 km) of conducting (< 1 ohm / m in some locations) cover

130

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The high resolution aeromagnetic technique was very successful along the east side of the valley, but less along the geothermally important west side. Detailed correlation will be investigated when the high resolution data are available. The magnetic results will also vary from area to area depending on the local rock types more than in the other techniques. Nonetheless important information on the style of the faulting is contained in the data. References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

131

Results of investigations at the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well logging operations were performed in eight of the geothermal wells at Ahuachapan. High-temperature downhole instruments, including a temperature/rabbit, caliper, fluid velocity spinner/temperature/pressure (STP), and fluid sampler, were deployed in each well. The caliper tool was used primarily to determine if chemical deposits were present in well casings or liners and to investigate a suspected break in the casing in one well. STP logs were obtained from six of the eight wells at various flow rates ranging from 30 to 80 kg/s. A static STP log was also run with the wells shut-in to provide data to be used in the thermodynamic analysis of several production wells. The geochemical data obtained show a system configuration like that proposed by C. Laky and associates in 1989. Our data indicate recharge to the system from the volcanic highlands south of the field. Additionally, our data indicate encroachment of dilute fluids into deeper production zones because of overproduction. 17 refs., 50 figs., 10 tabs.

Dennis, B.; Goff, F.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Hanold, B. (comps.)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Field trip guide to the Valles Caldera and its geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This field trip guide has been compiled from extensive field trips led at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the past six years. The original version of this guide was designed to augment a workshop on the Valles Caldera for the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). This workshop was held at Los Alamos, New Mexico, 5-7 October 1982. More stops were added to this guide to display the volcanic and geothermal features at the Valles Caldera. The trip covers about 90 miles (one way) and takes two days to complete; however, those who wish to compress the trip into one day are advised to use the designated stops listed in the Introduction. Valles Caldera and vicinity comprise both one of the most exciting geothermal areas in the United States and one of the best preserved Quaternary caldera complexes in the world.

Goff, F.E.; Bolivar, S.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368C...

134

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These are appendices A thru E of the Ahuachapan geothermal field reservoir analysis. The volume contains: mineralogy contours, ionic chlorine and silicon dioxide contours, well summaries, and temperature and pressure effects. (JEF)

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SELF-POTENTIAL SURVEY AT THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the Geothermal Resources Council 1978 AnnualPrepared for the Division of Geothermal Energy of the U. S.of th'e dipole in km. Geothermal Field, Baja Cal ifornia,

Corwin, R.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Development of an Enhanced Two-Phase Production System at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method was developed to enhance geothermal steam production from two-phase wells at THE Geysers Geothermal Field. The beneficial result was increased geothermal production that was easily and economically delivered to the power plant.

Steven Enedy

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

A STUDY OF ALTERNATIVE REINJECTION SCHEMES FOR THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the Geothermal Resources . Council 1978 Annual~RTHE CERRO PRIETO , GEOTHERMAL FIELD, BAJI:\\CI:\\LIFORNIA. ,Prepared for the Division of Geothermal Energy of the U. S.

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault

139

Reservoir enhancement on the impermeable margins of productive geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate the performance of Los Alamos technology in selected geothermal fields, to adapt the technology to the existing industry infrastructure where necessary, and to facilitate its application through demonstration and communication. The primary specific objective was to identify, collaborate, and partner with geothermal energy- producing companies in an evaluation of the application of Los Alamos microseismic mapping technology for locating fracture permeability in producing geothermal fields.

Goff, S.; Gardner, J.; Dreesen, D.; Whitney, E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Symposium in the field of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mexico and the US are nations with abundant sources of geothermal energy, and both countries have progressed rapidly in developing their more accessible resources. For example, Mexico has developed over 600 MWe at Cerro Prieto, while US developers have brought in over 2000 MWe at the Geysers. These successes, however, are only a prologue to an exciting future. All forms of energy face technical and economic barriers that must be overcome if the resources are to play a significant role in satisfying national energy needs. Geothermal energy--except for the very highest grade resources--face a number of barriers, which must be surmounted through research and development. Sharing a common interest in solving the problems that impede the rapid utilization of geothermal energy, Mexico and the US agreed to exchange information and participate in joint research. An excellent example of this close and continuing collaboration is the geothermal research program conducted under the auspices of the 3-year agreement signed on April 7, 1986 by the US DOE and the Mexican Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The major objectives of this bilateral agreement are: (1) to achieve a thorough understanding of the nature of geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary and fractured igneous rocks; (2) to investigate how the geothermal resources of both nations can best be explored and utilized; and (3) to exchange information on geothermal topics of mutual interest.

Ramirez, Miguel; Mock, John E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

142

Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and Implications for District-Scale Resource Exploration, Inferred from Magnetotelluric (MT) Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and Implications for District-Scale Resource Exploration, Inferred from Magnetotelluric (MT) Resistivity Surveying Abstract Magnetotelluric (MT) profiling in northwestern Nevadais used to test hypotheses on the main sources of heat andhydrothermal fluid for the Dixie Valley-Central NevadaSeismic Belt area. The transect reveals families of resistivitystructures commonly dominated by steeply-dipping features,some of which may be of key geothermal significance. Mostnotably, 2-D inversion

143

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in The Geysers. GeothermalResourcesCouncilA planned Enhanced Geothermal System demonstrationproject. Geothermal Resources Council Transactions33,

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

145

Volcanology and volcanic activity with a primary focus on potential hazard impacts for the Hawaii geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography reviews published references about potential volcanic hazards on the Island of Hawaii that are pertinent to drilling and operating geothermal wells. The first two sections of this annotated bibliography list the most important publications that describe eruptions of Kilauea volcano, with special emphasis on activity in and near the designated geothermal subzones. References about historic eruptions from Mauna Loa`s northeast rift zone, as well as the most recent activity on the southern flank of dormant Mauna Kea, adjacent to the Humu`ula Saddle are described. The last section of this annotated bibliography lists the most important publications that describe and analyze deformations of the surface of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Moore, R.B. [Federal Center, Denver, CO (United States); Delaney, P.T. [2255 North Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kauahikaua, J.P. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN  

SciTech Connect

The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 10c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm. Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the importance of Early to Middle Miocene period in the northern Basin and Range region. Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

148

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2002 a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was conducted over a 940 km2 area extending from Dixie Meadows northeastward to the Sou Hills, and from the eastern front of the Stillwater Range to the western edge of the Clan Alpine Range (Grauch, 2002). The resulting aeromagnetic map is described and discussed by Smith et al. (2002). Many of the shallow faults revealed by the aeromagnetic data (Figure 3) coincide with faults mapped based on surface expression on aerial photographs (Smith et al., 2001). However, in

149

Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Nye, C.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Property:VolcanicAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:VolcanicAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name VolcanicAge Property Type String Description Describes the time of the most recent volcanism by epoch, era, or period per available data. Subproperties This property has the following 7 subproperties: E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area Pages using the property "VolcanicAge" Showing 19 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + No volcanism + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + No volcanism +

151

Geothermal field tests: heat exchanger evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the heat exchanger tests conducted on a scale model of a heat exchanger that has been designed and fabricated for the Geothermal Test Facility show that this exchanger will lose 60% of its heat transfer capability and fall below design requirements after 92 hours of operation. When the test exchanger was clean and operating as close as possible to design conditions, its overall heat transfer coefficient was 426 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f. when calculating in the fouling factor of .0035 this gave a design coefficient of 171 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f which was reached after less than four days of steady state operation. Thermal shocking of the test heat exchanger once each hour while the exchanger was operating at design conditions had no effect on scale removal or heat transfer. Results of tube cleaning showed that chemical treatment with 30% hydrochloric acid followed by a high pressure water jet (6000 psig), was effective in removing scale from tubes contacted with geothermal brine. After cleaning, the tubes were examined and some pitting was observed throughout the length of one tube.

Felsinger, D.E.

1973-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson, Gregory D. Nash and Dick Benoit Published Journal TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation R. G. Allis,Stuart D. Johnson,Gregory D. Nash,Dick Benoit. 1999. A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field. TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL. 23:493-498. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_model_for_the_shallow_thermal_regime_at_Dixie_Valley_geothermal_field&oldid=682587"

153

Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Smith, Et Al., 2001) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2001) Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Smith, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Richard P. Smith, Kenneth W. Wisianz, David D. BlackweIl (2001) Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field_Area_(Smith,_Et_Al.,_2001)&oldid=510735" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

154

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a period of exploration and development in the mid-late 1970's, there was little activity at the Raft River geothermal field for the next ~20 years. US Geothermal Inc. acquired the project in 2002, and began commercial power generation in January 2008. From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the

156

Subsidence and uplift at Heber Geothermal field, California  

SciTech Connect

Heber Geothermal field is in the Imperial Valley near the City of Heber, California, about 3 1/2 miles north of the Mexican border. The field is at the southern end of a network of irrigated agricultural fields extending across the valley floor. The Heber geothermal system is circular, producing water of moderate temperature (360{degrees}F) and low-salinity (13,000-14,000 ppm TDS). In cross section, the geothermal system resembles a lopsided mushroom. The system has three major permeability units: capping clays form 500 to 1800 feet; a high-matrix-permeability, deltaic-sandstone outflow reservoir from 1,800 to 5,500 feet; and feeder faults and fractures in indurated sediments below 5,500 feet. The deltaic sandstones were deposited by the ancestral Colorado River. As both power plants continue operating in Heber field, the need persists to monitor subsidence and uplift. The field`s subsidence bowl is not expected to expand significantly, but some small changes are expected due to pressure changes caused by production for the SIGC binary power plant. The three SIGC injection wells, located between the production areas for the two power plants, will be managed for adequate reservoir pressure support.

Boardman, T.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In ...

Speer, Kevin G. (Kevin George)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

Thomas, R.P.

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Reservoir Assessment of the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Upon moderately dipping, fracture network. Condensed steam at the steep reservoir flank drains back to the hot water table. These flanks are defined roughly by marginally-producing geothermal wells. Field extensions are expected to be on the southeast and northwest. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably represent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resitivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. Monitoring gravity and geodetic changes with time and mapping microearthquake activity are methods that show promise for determining reservoir size, possible recharge, production lifetime, and other characteristics of the known stream field. Seismic reflection data may contribute to the efficient exploitation of the field by identifying fracture zones that serve as conduits for the steam. (DJE-2005)

Thomas, Richard P.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Dykstra, Herman; Stockton, A.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This "geothermal central plant" concept will provide ground source loop energy as a utility to be shared by the academic and residential buildings on the soon-to-be-constructed campus.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; MAGNETIC SURVEYS; MAPS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; AERIAL SURVEYING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Author(s): Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5456508 Source: View Original Report Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area

162

3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO GeothermalField  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the subsurface electrical resistivity/conductivity can contribute to a better understanding of complex hydrothermal systems, typified by Coso geothermal field, through mapping the geometry (bounds and controlling structures) over existing production. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion is now an emerging technology for characterizing the resistivity structures of complex geothermal systems. The method appears to hold great promise, but histories exploiting truly 3D inversion that demonstrate the advantages that can be gained by acquiring and analyzing MT data in three dimensions are still few in number. This project will address said issue, by applying 3D MT forward modeling and inversion to a MT data set acquired over the Coso geothermal field. The goal of the project is to provide the capability to image large geothermal reservoirs in a single self-consistent model. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data has been carried out using 2D MT imaging technology to construct an initial 3D resistivity model from a series of 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric field measurements (Zxy impedance elements) along different measurement transects. This model will be subsequently refined through a 3D inversion process. The initial 3D resistivity model clearly shows the controlling geological structures possibly influencing well production at Coso. The field data however, also show clear three dimensionality below 1 Hz, demonstrating the limitations of 2D resistivity imaging. The 3D MT predicted data arising from this starting model show good correspondence in dominant components of the impedance tensor (Zxy and Zyx) above 1Hz. Below 1 Hz there is significant differences between the field data and the 2D model data.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, Michael; Gasperikova, Erika; Wannamaker, Philip E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing

164

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1968 - 1971 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fumarolic and hot springs activity Notes Snowmelt patterns has the greatest utility in locating areas of presently active thermal fluid leakage References Koenig, J.B.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Austin, C.F. (1 February 1972) Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county, California. Technical publication 1968--1971 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1968-1971)&oldid=473716"

165

Hydrogeologic model of the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogeological model of the Ahuachapan geothermal field has been developed. It considers the lithology and structural features of the area and discerns their impact on the movement of cold and hot fluids in the system. Three aquifers were identified, their zones of mixing and flow patterns were obtained on the basis of temperature and geochemical data from wells and surface manifestations. 12 refs., 9 figs.

Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Retana, M.; Cuellar, G. (Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) (El Salvador))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we have presented data in four sections: (1) THE GEYSERS HISTORICAL UPDATE 1990-2010 - A historical update of the primary developments at The Geysers between 1990 and 2010 which uses as its start point Section IIA of the Monograph - 'Historical Setting and History of Development' that included articles by James Koenig and Susan Hodgson. (2) THE GEYSERS COMPREHENSIVE REFERENCE LIST 1990-2010 - In this section we present a rather complete list of technical articles and technical related to The Geysers that were issued during the period 1990-2010. The list was compiled from many sources including, but not limited to scientific journals and conference proceedings. While the list was prepared with care and considerable assistance from many geothermal colleagues, it is very possible that some papers could have been missed and we apologize to their authors in advance. The list was subdivided according to the following topics: (1) Field characterization; (2) Drilling; (3) Field development and management; (4) Induced seismicity; (5) Enhanced Geothermal Systems; (6) Power production and related issues; (7) Environment-related issues; and (8) Other topics. (3) GRC 2010 ANNUAL MEETING GEYSERS PAPERS - Included in this section are the papers presented at the GRC 2010 Annual Meeting that relate to The Geysers. (4) ADDITIONAL GEYSERS PAPERS 1990-2010 - Eighteen additional technical papers were included in this publication in order to give a broad background to the development at The Geysers after 1990. The articles issued during the 1990-2010 period were selected by colleagues considered knowledgeable in their areas of expertise. We forwarded the list of references given in Section 2 to them asking to send us with their selections with a preference, because of limited time, to focus on those papers that would not require lengthy copyright approval. We then chose the articles presented in this section with the purpose of providing the broadest possible view across all technical fields, as related to The Geysers steam-dominated geothermal system. The Geysers has seen many fundamental changes between 1990-2010 and yet the geothermal resource seems still to be robust to the extent that, long after its anticipated life span, we are seeing new geothermal projects being developed on the north and west peripheries of the field. It is hoped that this report provides a focused data source particularly for those just starting their geothermal careers, as well as those who have been involved in the interesting and challenging field of geothermal energy for many years. Despite many hurdles The Geysers has continued to generate electrical power for 50 years and its sustainability has exceeded many early researchers expectations. It also seems probable that, with the new projects described above, generation will continue for many years to come. The success of The Geysers is due to the technical skills and the financial acumen of many people, not only over the period covered by this report (1990-2010), but since the first kilowatt of power was generated in 1960. This Special Report celebrates those 50 years of geothermal development at The Geysers and attempts to document the activities that have brought success to the project so that a permanent record can be maintained. It is strongly hoped and believed that a publication similar to this one will be necessary in another 20 years to document further activities in the field.

Brophy, P.; Lippmann, M.; Dobson, P.F.; Poux, B.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Recency of Faulting and Neotechtonic Framework in the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field and Other Geothermal Fields of the Basin and Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We studied the role that earthquake faults play in redistributing stresses within in the earths crust near geothermal fields. The geographic foci of our study were the sites of geothermal plants in Dixie Valley, Beowawe, and Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada. Our initial results show that the past history of earthquakes has redistributed stresses at these 3 sites in a manner to open and maintain fluid pathways critical for geothermal development. The approach developed here during our pilot study provides an inexpensive approach to (1) better define the best locations to site geothermal wells within known geothermal fields and (2) to define the location of yet discovered geothermal fields which are not manifest at the surface by active geothermal springs. More specifically, our investigation shows that induced stress concentrations at the endpoints of normal fault ruptures appear to promote favorable conditions for hydrothermal activity in two ways. We conclude that an understanding of the spatial distribution of active faults and the past history of earthquakes on those faults be incorporated as a standard tool in geothermal exploration and in the siting of future boreholes in existing geothermal fields.

Steven Wesnousky; S. John Caskey; John W. Bell

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reservoir studies of the Seltjarnarnes geothermal field, Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Seltjarnarnes geothermal field in Iceland has been exploited for space heating for the last 16 years. A model of the field has been developed that integrates all available data. The model has been calibrated against the flow rate and pressure decline histories of the wells and the temperature and chemical changes of the produced fluids. This has allowed for the estimation of the permeability and porosity distribution of the system, and the volume of the hot reservoir. Predictions of future reservoir behavior using the model suggest small pressure and temperature changes, but a continuous increase in the salinity of the fluids produced.

Tulinius, H.; Spencer, A.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kristmannsdottir, H.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gas geochemistry of the Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in gas concentrations in Central and Southeast Geysers steam are related to the decreases in pressure caused by heavy exploitation in the 1980s. When reservoir pressures in the central parts of the field decreased, high-gas steam from undrilled reservoir margins (and possibly from underlying high-temperature zones) flowed into exploited central areas. The Northwest Geysers reservoir probably lacks high-gas marginal steam and a decline in pressure may not cause a significant increase of gas concentrations in produced steam.

Truesdell, A.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 6 total. G GeothermalExploration GeothermalLand Use GeothermalLeasing GeothermalPower Plant GeothermalTransmission GeothermalWell Field Retrieved from "http:...

171

A database for The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1985-1986 the Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) began a multi-year project for SLC to organize and analyze the field data from The Geysers. In the first year, most of the work concentrated on the development of a comprehensive database for The Geysers, and conventional reservoir engineering analysis of the data. Essentially, all non-proprietary data for wells at The Geysers have been incorporated into the database, as well as proprietary data from wells located on State leases. In following years, a more detailed analysis of The Geysers data has been carried out. This report is a summary of the non- proprietary work performed in FY 1985--1986. It describes various aspects of the database and also includes: review sections on Field Development, Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry and Reservoir Engineering. It should be emphasized that these background chapters were written in 1986, and therefore only summarize the information available at that time. The appendices contain individual plots of wellhead pressures, degree of superheat, steam flow rates, cumulative mass flows, injection rates and cumulative injection through 1988 for approximately 250 wells. All of the data contained in this report are non-proprietary, from State and non-State leases. The production/injection and heat flow data from the wells were obtained from the California State Division of Oil and gas (DOG) (courtesy of Dick Thomas). Most of the other data were obtained from SLC files in Sacramento (courtesy of Charles Priddy), or DOG files in Santa Rosa (courtesy of Ken Stelling). 159 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Cox, B.L.; Fuller, P.; Ripperda, M.; Tulinius, H.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Goldstein, N.; Flexser, S.; Pruess, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Soil gases have been used as an exploration tool for minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy, through the detection of anomalous gas levels. This paper describes a soil gas survey conducted over a large part of the Rotorua geothermal field to supplement the sparse gas data from drillhole samples and to determine gas distribution patterns over the field. Data collected from a reference hole were used to observe the effect changing meteorological conditions had on soil gas levels. The results were

173

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

174

Three-dimensional anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast-Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast-Central anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Three-dimensional anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper reviews geophysical and seismological imaging in the Coso geothermal field, located in southeast-central California. The Coso geothermal production area covers approximately 6X10 km 2 . Although regional seismicity is addressed, as it sheds light on the magma, or heat, sources in the field, the primary focus of this paper is on the main production area. Three-dimensional inversions for P- and S- wave velocity variations, distribution of attenuation, and anisotropy are presented side-by-side so that anomalies can be compared spatially in a direct

175

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that _7.5% of the total helium is derived from the

176

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Jump to:...

178

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

179

The Ngatamariki Geothermal Field, NZ: Surface Manifestations - Past and Present  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ngatamariki geothermal field, located 7 km south of Orakeikorako, discharges dilute chloride-bicarbonate waters of almost neutral pH from springs mostly on the margins of the field. Rhyolite tuffs in the northwestern part of the field are weakly silicified, probably due to their having reacted with heated groundwaters. Sinter deposits are common at Ngatamariki but are mostly relict from former activity. In 1994, the natural heat loss from the field was 30 {+-} 5 MW{sub thermal}. There has been a shift of thermal activity southward over the past 60 years; the changes were recognized by comparing air photographs taken in 1941 and 1991. In 1948, a hydrothermal eruption deposited breccia around its crater, which is now occupied by a pool at 52.5 C. Another pool at 88 C, first noticed in 1993, deposits a mixture of silica and calcite.

Brotheridge, J.M.A.; Browne, P.R.L.; Hochstein, M.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Valley Geothermal Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The gravity data are not as site specific as the seismic, but put the major parts of the structure in their proper location and places vital constraints on the possible interpretations of the seismic data. References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Gravity_Survey_At_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field_Area_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=388459

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A five-week survey showed that seismic activity within 20 km of Wairakei Geothermal Field took place mainly at shallow depths (< 2 km), in or close to the Taupo Fault Belt, and occurred in swarms. Twenty-eight earthquakes, with magnitudes (M) between -1.3 and +2.8, were located; 43 other earthquakes, with M < 0.2, were recorded but could not be located. The distribution of located earthquakes did not correlate with known areas of surface geothermal activity. No located earthquake occurred beneath the

182

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The efficiency of geothermal energy production at the Coso Geothermal Field in eastern California is reliant on the knowledge of fluid flow directions associated with fracture networks. We use finite element analysis to establish the 3D state of stress within the tectonic setting of the Coso Range. The mean and differential stress distributions are used to infer fluid flow vectors and second order fracture likelihood and orientation. The results show that the Coso Range and adjacent areas are

183

A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We report here the first U-Th disequilibrium age for a hydrothermal mineral from an active geothermal system in New Zealand. Vein calcite recovered from a depth of 389 m in Well Thm-1 at the Tauhara geothermal field has an age of 99±44 ka BP. This age was determined using a leachate-leachate isochron technique on four silicate containing sub-samples of calcite from a single vein. Although the error on this isochron age is considerable, it is significantly younger than the earlier

184

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A new inversion method for P wave anisotropy (Wu and Lees, 1999a) has been applied to high-precision, microseismic traveltime data collected at Coso geothermal region, California. Direction-dependent P wave velocity and thus its perturbation, are represented by a symmetric positive definite matrix A instead of a scalar. The resulting anisotropy distribution is used to estimate variations in crack density, stress distribution and permeability within the producing geothermal field. A circular dome-like

185

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Toward assessing the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains volcanic complex: a telluric-magnetotelluric survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telluric-magnetotelluric studies were performed in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico to characterize the total geothermal system of the Valles Caldera and to be integrated with an east-west regional survey supported by the United States Geological Survey. The data from the regional survey indicate that electrically the San Juan Basin to the west of the Jemez Mountains is rather homogeneous in contrast to the eastern side near Las Vegas where the presence of a broad heterogeneous structure is clearly sensed. The data from the Jemez Mountain area are strikingly similar to other Rio Grande rift data and suggest a conducting layer at a depth of approximately 15 km. The telluric data indicate that the hydrothermal system in the area is of a localized nature.

Hermance, J.F.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Summary of Modeling Studies of the Krafla Geothermal Field, Iceland |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Summary of Modeling Studies of the Krafla Geothermal Field, Iceland A Summary of Modeling Studies of the Krafla Geothermal Field, Iceland Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Summary of Modeling Studies of the Krafla Geothermal Field, Iceland Abstract A comprehensive modeling study of the Krafla geothermal field in Iceland has been carried out. The study consists of four tasks: the analysis of well test data, modeling of the natural state of the field, the determination of the generating capability of the field, and modeling of well performance. The results of all four tasks are consistent with field observations. Authors Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson and Karsten Pruess Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1983 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

189

Fracture patterns in graywacke outcrops at The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers geothermal field covers an area of more than 35,000 acres and represents one of the most significant steam fields in the world. The heterogeneous nature of the reservoir, its fracture network and non-sedimentary rock distinguish it from ordinary sandstone reservoirs in terms of reservoir definition and evaluation (Stockton et al. 1984). Analysis of cuttings, record of steam entries, temperature and pressure surveys and spinner logs have contributed to an understanding of the subsurface geology and rock characteristics of the Geysers. Few conventional electrical log data are available for the main body of the reservoir. It is generally believed that while the fractures are the main conducts for fluid transport through the reservoirs, tight rocks between the major fractures contain the bulk of the fluid reserves. No independent measurement of liquid and vapor saturation can be made from the existing downhole tools. Pressure depletion in The Geysers geothermal field has become a major concern to the operators and utility companies in recent years. Plans for further development activities and future field management are contingent upon accurate computer modeling and definition of the field. The primary issues in reliable characterization of The Geysers field are the role of the rock matrix in holding liquid reserves and providing pressure support, the nature of fracture network, extent of liquid saturation in the reservoirs and injection pattern strategies to maximize heat recovery. Current modeling of The Geysers field is done through the use of general purpose geothermal reservoir simulators. Approaches employed include treating the reservoir as a single porosity equivalent or a dual porosity system. These simulators include formulation to represent transport of heat, steam and water. Heterogeneities are represented by spatial variations in formation or fracture permeability-thickness product, porosity or fluid saturations. Conceptual models based on dual porosity representations have been shown to duplicate the history. Prediction of future performance is, however, not reliable because of uncertainties in assumptions of the initial state of the reservoir, Specifically, several different initial state conditions have led to a fairly good match of the historical data. Selection of the exact initial conditions is a major dilemma. In dual porosity models, the complex nature of fracture network is formulated by a systematic, well-organized set of orthogonal fractures. Also, the exact nature of matrix-fracture interaction, and the role of adsorption and capillarity in pressure support are not well-defined.

Sammis, Charles G.; Lin Ji An; Ershaghi, I.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1977 - 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogeologic investigation of Coso hot springs was conducted by field examination of geologic rock units and springs and other features of hydrologic significance and sampling of waters for chemical analysis; determination of the local Coso Hot Springs and regional groundwater hydrology, including consideration of recharge, discharge, movement, and water quality; determination of the possible impact of large-scale geothermal development on Coso Hot Springs.

191

40AR/39AR THERMAL HISTORY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR/39AR THERMAL HISTORY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD AR/39AR THERMAL HISTORY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: 40AR/39AR THERMAL HISTORY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The age of the geothermal system and the granitic host rock at Coso geothermal system in California is poorly known. This is mainly due to a paucity of vein-type minerals (e.g. adularia, sericite) that can be directly dated. A downhole 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology study of granitic host-rock Kfeldspar is presently being undertaken at the New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory at New Mexico Tech. The technique couples the measurement of argon loss from K-feldspar and knowledge of the diffusion parameters of transport in K-feldspar to estimate the longevity

192

A Test Of The Transiel Method On The Travale Geothermal Field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Transiel Method On The Travale Geothermal Field Of The Transiel Method On The Travale Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Test Of The Transiel Method On The Travale Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An original electromagnetic method has been applied to geothermal prospecting on the Travale test site. The results show good correlations between observed polarization anomalies and productive zones. It is believed that these anomalies are related to reduction phenomena that occurred in the overburden (such as pyrite formation) caused by thermochemical exchanges between the reservoir and the overburden above those zones where the reservoir permeability is highest. Author(s): A. Duprat, M. Roudot, S. Spitz Published: Geothermics, 1985

193

Thermodynamic calculations of calcium carbonate scaling in geothermal wells, Dixie Valley geothermal field, U. S. A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wells in the Dixie Valley geothermal field of central Nevada intercept a fracture-dominated hydrothermal system at depths of 2.5 to 3 km. The reservoir water is a dilute sodium-bicarbonate-chloride type of solution thought to be in equilibrium with quartz, calcite, chlorite, and albite. Fluid sampling and chemical analysis of production during an early flow test gave remarkably low calcium concentrations. Thermodynamic calculations of mineral stability in the presence of the reservoir water indicate that five times the amount of calcium measured in fluid reaching the surface is actually in solution in the reservoir fluid. Approximately 80 percent of the calcium is lost as calcium carbonate scale on the well casing before the fluid reaches the surface. The results of thermodynamic calculations compare well with the scale-volume measurements of Benoit.

Reed, M.J. (Geothermal Technology Div., U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. ,2010. GeyserspowerplantH 2 Sabatement update. operationsatTheGeyserspowerplant,GeothermalResourcesTable1:GeothermalPowerPlantsOperatingatTheGeysers(

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modeling of geothermal reservoirs: Fundamental processes, computer simulation, and field applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. Then we examine applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation technology on geothermal energy development are pointed out. We conclude with considerations on possible future developments in the mathematical modeling of geothermal fields. 45 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Pruess, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development history of the Tiwi geothermal field, Philippines  

SciTech Connect

Commercial production of electricity from the Tiwi geothermal system began in 1979. In 1982, Tiwi became the world`s first water-dominated system to produce more than 160 MWe. Today the field supplies about 11% of Luzon`s electricity. Initially, the reservoir was single-phase liquid with a small, shallow steam zone on the east side. Temperature reversals in the first wells showed the east to be an outflow zone. As production began, reservoir pressure declined, two-phase conditions developed, and groundwater entered the reservoir from the east. As many productions wells cooled, brine production increased and generation decreased from about 280 MWe in 1983 to about 190 MWe in 1986. Improvements to surface facilities and new wells drilled farther west raised generation to about 280 MWe by mid-1993. Separated brine was first injected into the reservoir, but this lowered steam production; injection is now outside the field.

Gambill, D.T.; Beraquit, D.B. [Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati (Philippines)] [Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati (Philippines)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

STRESS AND FAULTING IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: UPDATE AND RECENT RESULTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

STRESS AND FAULTING IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: UPDATE AND RECENT RESULTS STRESS AND FAULTING IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: UPDATE AND RECENT RESULTS FROM THE EAST FLANK AND COSO WASH Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: STRESS AND FAULTING IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: UPDATE AND RECENT RESULTS FROM THE EAST FLANK AND COSO WASH Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We integrate new geologic mapping and measurements of stress orientations and magnitudes from wells 34-9RD2 and 58A-10 with existing data sets to refine a geomechanical model for the Coso geothermal field. Vertically averaged stress orientations across the field are fairly uniform and are consistent with focal mechanism inversions of earthquake clusters for stress and incremental strain. Active faults trending NNW-SSE to

198

A Model For The Sulphur Springs Geothermal Field St Lucia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Sulphur Springs Geothermal Field St Lucia Model For The Sulphur Springs Geothermal Field St Lucia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Model For The Sulphur Springs Geothermal Field St Lucia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A model to explain the behaviour of the Sulphur Springs geothermal field has been derived from downhole temperature records in the exploration boreholes. The model incorporates a main reservoir at 1 - 1.5 km depth, intersected by steeply inclined fissures which carry steam and gas to the well bores, and to the natural fumaroles. A substantial decline in the gas content of the steam could have serious consequences where the fissures are utilised as conduits between the boreholes and the deep reservoir. Further development of the field should concentrate on the

199

Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of US organizations sponsored by the US Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: (1) surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; (2) the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; (3) geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and (4) reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modeling discharge requirements for deep geothermal wells at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, MX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the mid-l980's, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) drilled a number of deep wells (M-200 series) at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California, Mexico to investigate the continuation of the geothermal reservoir to the east of the Cerro Prieto-II and III production areas. The wells encountered permeability at depths ranging from 2,800 to 4,400 m but due to the reservoir depth and the relatively cold temperatures encountered in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m of the wells, it was not possible to discharge some of the wells. The wells at Cerro Prieto are generally discharged by injecting compressed air below the water level using 2-3/8-inch tubing installed with either a crane or workover rig. The objective of this technique is to lift sufficient water out of the well to stimulate flow from the reservoir into the wellbore. However, in the case of the M-200 series wells, the temperatures in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m are generally below 50 C and the heat loss to the formation is therefore significant. The impact of heat loss on the stimulation process was evaluated using both a numerical model of the reservoir/wellbore system and steady-state wellbore modeling. The results from the study indicate that if a flow rate of at least 300 liters/minute can be sustained, the well can probably be successfully stimulated. This is consistent with the flow rates obtained during the successful stimulations of wells M-202 and M-203. If the flow rate is closer to 60 liters/minute, the heat loss is significant and it is unlikely that the well can be successfully discharged. These results are consistent with the unsuccessful discharge attempts in wells M-201 and M-205.

Menzies, Anthony J.; Granados, Eduardo E.; Puente, Hector Gutierrez; Pierres, Luis Ortega

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

202

Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei geothermal field, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an abbreviated summary of the final project report on an extensive collection of fundamental field information concerning the history of the Wairakei geothermal field in New Zealand. The purpose of the effort was to accumulate any and all pertinent data so that various theoretical reservoir simulation studies may be carried out in the future in a meaningful way. Categories of data considered include electrical resistivity measurements, magnetic force surveys, surface heat flow data and a catalog of surface manifestations of geothermal activity, geological and stratigraphic information, residual gravity anomaly surveys, laboratory measurements of formation properties, seismic velocity data, measurements of fluid chemical composition, monthly well-by-well mass and heat production histories for 1953 through 1976, reservoir pressure and temperature data, and measurements of subsidence and horizontal ground deformation. The information is presented in three forms. A review of all the data is contained in the final project report. The present report summarizes that information. In addition, a magnetic tape suitable for use on a computer has been prepared. The magnetic tape contains a bank of information for each well in the field, on a well-by-well basis. For each well, the tape contains the completion date, the surface altitude, the bottomhole depth, the geographic location, the slotted and perforated interval locations, the bottomhole diameter, locations of known casing breaks, the geologic drilling log, fault intersections, shut-in pressure measurements, and month-by-month production totals of both mass and heat for each month from January 1953 through December 1976.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Scattering from a fault interface in the Coso geothermal field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scattering from a fault interface in the Coso geothermal field Scattering from a fault interface in the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Scattering from a fault interface in the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large-amplitude, secondary arrivals are modeled as scattering anomalies near the Coso, California, geothermal field. Polarization and ray tracing methods determine the orientation and location of the scattering body. Two models are proposed for the scatterer: (1) a point scatterer located anywhere in a one-dimensional (1-D), layered velocity model; and (2) a dipping interface between two homogeneous half spaces. Each model is derived by non-linear, grid search inversion for the optimal solution which best predicts observed travel times. In each case the models predict a

204

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

205

CRUSTAL STRESS HETEROGENEITY IN THE VICINITY OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRUSTAL STRESS HETEROGENEITY IN THE VICINITY OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA CRUSTAL STRESS HETEROGENEITY IN THE VICINITY OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: CRUSTAL STRESS HETEROGENEITY IN THE VICINITY OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole induced structures in image logs of wells from the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF), CA record variation in the azimuth of principal stress. Image logs of these structures from five wells were analyzed to quantify the stress heterogeneity for three geologically distinct locations: two wells within the CGF (one in an actively produced volume), two on the margin of the CGF and outside the production area, and a control well several tens of kilometers south of the CGF. Average directions of

206

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: an updated picture of the Travale field is given, based on geophysical and drilling data acquired since 1978. In deriving the model, extensive use is made of the geophysical data produced in the course of the EEC test site programme (1980-1983), particularly from seismic and time domain EM methods which allowed for penetrating thick and conductive cover formations and to match deep tectonic and hydrothermal alteration trends thought to indirectly characterize the geothermal reservoir. It is

207

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Dixie Valley study suggests that helium isotopes may provide a new tool for mapping zones of deep permeability and therefore the potential for high fluid temperatures. The permeable zones are identified by local enrichments in 3He relative to a regional helium isotope trend. More work needs to be done, but it appears that helium isotopes may provide the best and perhaps

208

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in Mesozoic crystalline rocks that host a producing geothermal field. The reflection data were processed in two steps that incorporate new seismic imaging methods: (1) Pwave first arrivals in the seismic data were inverted for subsurface acoustic velocities using a non-linear simulated annealing approach; and (2) 2-D Velocity tomograms obtained from the inversions were

209

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. In: Geological and Nuclear Sciences. World Geothermal Congress 2005; 20050424; Antalya, Turkey. New Zealand:...

210

Results of investigation at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 95 megawatt geothemal-sourced power-plant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the past decade, as part of an effort to increase in situ thermal reserves in order to realize the full generation capacity of the AGF, extensive surface geophysical coverage has been obtained over the AGF and the prospective Chipilapa area to the east. The geophysical surveys were performed to determine physical property characteristics of the known reservoir and then to search for similar characteristics in the Chipilapa area. A secondary objective was to evaluate the surface recharge area in the highlands to the south of the AGF. The principal surface electrical geophysical methods used during this period were DC resistivity and magnetotellurics. Three available data sets have been reinterpreted using drillhole control to help form geophysical models of the area. The geophysical models are compared with the geologic interpretations.

Fink, J.B. (HydroGeophysics, Tucson, AZ (United States))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Listing of scientific data on the Baca Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a record of the available open-file technical data collected at the Baca Geothermal Field, New Mexico. The data base is located at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California. This document will serve as a handbook for using the data base. Section 1 includes general reference materials such as published reports, bibliographies, and proposals. Section 2 contains various types of progress reports. Sections 3 and 4 describe individual well data: Section 3 consists of well log data (retained in both the original and digitized forms) and Section 4 lists various tests carried out in the different wells. Data in both Sections are listed by test date.

Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present a new example of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar's (InSAR) remarkable utility for defining an operating geothermal reservoir's lateral extent and hydrologically active fracture systems. InSAR reveals millimeter-level surface change due to volume change in the reservoir and overlying aquifer systems caused by fluid pressure reduction

213

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation was carried out for the magnetotelluric (MT) data obtained in a geothermal area in Indonesia. The inversion scheme was based on the linearized leastsquares method with smoothness regularization. In addition to the subsurface resistivity structure, static shifts were also included as unknown parameters in the inversion. Forward modeling was by the finite difference scheme. The sensitivity matrix was computed once for a homogeneous half space and used

214

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A better understanding of active volcanic areas in the United States through electromagnetic geophysical studies received foundation from the many surveys done for geothermal exploration in the 1970's. Investigations by governmental, industrial, and academic agencies include (but are not limited to) mapping of the Cascades. Long Valley/Mono area, the Jemez volcanic field, Yellowstone Park, and an area in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity,

216

Subsurface structure of the southern portion of the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsurface correlation of sedimentary strata was attempted among ten geothermal wells in the southern portion of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The spontaneous potential (SP) log was the principal tool used for correlation purposes. The structure that emerges from the correlation diagrams is a shallow plunging syncline with an east-west axis perpendicular to the axis of the Salton Trough.

Chan, M.A.; Tewhey, J.D.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal strain and tilt field observations were carried out during the period February 1978 to December 1979 at the Klamath Graben and Newberry Caldera in Oregon and at Krafla in Northern Iceland. Moreover, tilt observations were made at Mt. St. Helens, Washington, during the summer of 1980. Two strainmeters of the same type as now in use by the US Geological Survey were applied in the strain work. Tilts were measured by two Kinemetrics model TM-1B biaxial tilt meters. The instruments were placed at depths of approximately one to two meters below the ground surface. Both strain and tilt fields turn out to be heavily contaminated by noise that is mostly of thermoelastic origin. In spite of considerable efforts, it has not been possible to process the strain field data to obtain sufficiently clear tidal signals. The tilt data are less contaminated and rather clear tidal signals were observed at Newberry in Oregon and Krafla in Iceland. A local magnification by a factor of about 3 of the EW component of the theoretical solid earth and ocean load tilt was observed at one station at Krafla. Moreover, the tidal tilt component across the ring fault at Newberry appears to be magnified by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9. The phenomena at the Krafla may possibly be due to a local magma chamber. These results are a clear indication of a tilt field modification by local structure and indicate the possibility of using tilt data to locate subsurface magma bodies.

Bodvarsson, G.; Axelsson, G.; Johnson, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin. Authors Philip E. Wannamaker, William M. Doerner and Derrick P. Hasterok Published Journal 31st Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford,...

219

Geothermal field case studies that document the usefulness of models in predicting reservoir and well behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant art of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Falls in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources. 14 refs., 6 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Geothermal Field Case Studies that Document the Usefulness of Models in Predicting Reservoir and Well Behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant part of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Fall in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. The resource consists of primarily dry steam which is produced from a low, porosity fractured graywacke. Over the last several years steam pressure at the Geysers has been dropping. Concern over decline of the resource has prompted research to understand its fundamental nature. A key issue is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and attenuation data at the Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of approximately 300 earthquakes that are of magnitude 1.2 and are distributed in depth between sea level and 2.5 km. Using compressional-wave arrival times, we invert for earthquake location, origin time, and velocity along a three-dimensional grid. Using the initial pulse width of the compressional-wave, we invert for the initial pulse width associated with the source, and the one-dimensional Q structure. We find that the velocity structure correlates with known mapped geologic units, including a velocity high that is correlated with a felsite body at depth that is known from drilling. The dry steam reservoir, which is also known from drilling, is mostly correlated with low velocity. The Q increases with depth to the top of the dry steam reservoir and decreases with depth within the reservoir. The decrease of Q with depth probably indicates that the saturation of the matrix of the reservoir rock increases with depth.

Zucca, J. J.; Hutchings, L. J.; Kasameyer, P. W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1993) Geothermal Region (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

223

Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository  

SciTech Connect

The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso GeothermalField  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress inunderstanding geothermal systems by imaging the geometry, bounds andcontrolling structures in existing production, and thereby perhapssuggesting new areas for field expansion. To these ends, a dense grid ofmagnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipolearray profiling has been acquired over the east flank of the Cosogeothermal system. Acquiring good quality MT data in producing geothermalsystems is a challenge due to production related electromagnetic (EM)noise and, in the case of Coso, due to proximity of a regional DCintertie power transmission line. To achieve good results, a remotereference completely outside the influence of the dominant source of EMnoise must be established. Experimental results so far indicate thatemplacing a reference site in Amargosa Valley, NV, 65 miles from the DCintertie, isstill insufficient for noise cancellation much of the time.Even though the DC line EM fields are planar at this distance, theyremain coherent with the nonplanar fields in the Coso area hence remotereferencing produces incorrect responses. We have successfully unwrappedand applied MT times series from the permanent observatory at Parkfield,CA, and these appear adequate to suppress the interference of thecultural EM noise. The efficacy of this observatory is confirmed bycomparison to stations taken using an ultra-distant reference site eastof Socorro, NM. Operation of the latter reference was successful by usingfast ftp internet communication between Coso Junction and the New MexicoInstitute of Mining and Technology, using the University of Utah site asintermediary, and allowed referencing within a few hours of datadownloading at Coso. A grid of 102 MT stations was acquired over the Cosogeothermal area in 2003 and an additional 23 stations were acquired toaugment coverage in the southern flank of the first survey area in 2005.These data have been inverted to a fully three-dimensional conductivitymodel. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data was carried out using 2D MTimaging. An initial 3D conductivity model was constructed from a seriesof 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric fieldmeasurements (Zyx impedance elements) along several measurementtransects. This model was then refined through a 3D inversion process.This model shows the controlling geological structures possiblyinfluencing well production at Coso and correlations with mapped surfacefeatures such as faults and regional geoelectric strike. The 3D modelalso illustrates the refinement in positioning of conductivity contactswhen compared to isolated 2D inversion transects. The conductivity modelhas also been correlated with microearthquake locations, well fluidproduction intervals and most importantly with an acoustic and shearvelocity model derived by Wu and Lees (1999). This later correlationshows the near-vertical high conductivity structure on the eastern flankof the producing field is also a zone of increased acoustic velocity andincreased Vp/Vs ratio bounded by mapped fault traces. South of theDevil's Kitchen is an area of high geothermal well density, where highlyconductive near surface material is interpreted as a clay cap alterationzone manifested from the subsurface geothermal fluids and relatedgeochemistry. Beneath the clay cap, however, the conductivity isnondescript, whereas the Vp/Vs ratio is enhanced over the productionintervals. It is recommended that more MT data sites be acquired to thesouthwest of the Devil's Kitchen area to better refine the conductivitymodel in that area.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Fracture Characterization Technologies Project Description The proposed program will focus on predicting characteristics of fractures and their orientation prior to drilling new wells. It will also focus on determining the location of the fractures, spacing and orientation during drilling, as well as characterizing open fractures after stimulation to help identify the location of fluid flow pathway within the EGS reservoir. These systems are created by passively injecting cold water, and stimulating the permeation of the injected water through existing fractures into hot wet and hot dry rocks by thermo-elastic cooling shrinkage. The stimulated, existing fractures thus enhance the permeability of the hot rock formations, hence enabling better circulation of water for the purpose of producing the geothermal resource. The main focus of the project will be on developing better understanding of the mechanisms for the stimulation of existing fractures, and to use the information for better exploitation of the high temperature geothermal resources located in the northwest portion of the Geysers field and similar fields.

226

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

228

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

229

IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA) USING REMOTE SENSING AND FIELD DATA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA) USING REMOTE SENSING AND FIELD DATA Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We attempt to identify thermal anomalies using thermal infrared (TIR) data collected over the Coso Geothermal Power Project with the spaceborne ASTER instrument. Our analysis emphasizes corrections for thermal artifacts in the satellite images caused by topography, albedo, and

230

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2001-2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-2003) -2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2001-2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2001 - 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine structural control on permeability and fluid production Notes New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in a zone of localized crustal extension between two major strike-slip faults. Production in the Coso field primarily occurs in the hanging walls of the listric faults. References Unruh, J. (1 January 2001) NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO

231

Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mexican--American cooperative program at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto project incorporates studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and geophysical setting of the geothermal field as well as its structural, reservoir engineering, and subsidence characteristics. A description of the activities involved in each part of this cooperative program is presented. Text of the agreement between the Comision Federal de Electricidad of Mexico and the USERDA for the cooperative study of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field is included.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Espinosa, H.A.; Lippmann, M.J.; Mercado, A.M.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent field laboratory to study the nature of geothermal systems in an extensional environment. Much of the geologic complexity that is found in the Basin and Range is absent because the rift is located on cratonic crust with a thin and well-characterized Phanerozoic stratigraphy and tectonic history. On the other hand, the Neogene thermo-tectonic history of the rift has many parallels with the Basin and Range to the west. The geology of the southern Rio Grande rift is among the best characterized of any rift system in the world. Also, most geologic maps for the region are rather unique in that detailed analyses of Quaternary stratigraphic and surficial unit are added in concert with the details of bedrock geology. Pleistocene to Holocene entrenchment of the Rio Grande and tributaries unroofs the alteration signatures and permeability attributes of paleo outflow plumes and upflow zones, associated with present-day, but hidden or ''blind,'' hydrothermal systems at Rincon and San Diego Mountain.

James C Witcher

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

A STUDY OF THE STRUCTURAL CONTROL OF FLUID FLOW WITHIN THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herzen, R. P. : "A Major Geothermal Anomaly in the Gulf ofA s s e s s m e n t of Geothermal R e s o u r c e s i n thein the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico", in P r o c e

Noble, John E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Coso geothermal field: A nascent metamorphic core complex | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Coso geothermal field: A nascent metamorphic core complex The Coso geothermal field: A nascent metamorphic core complex Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: The Coso geothermal field: A nascent metamorphic core complex Abstract Investigation of the Coso Range using seismicity, gravity, and geochemistry of rocks and fluids, supports the interpretation that the structure hosting the geothermal resource is a nascent metamorphic core complex. The structural setting is a releasing bend in a dextral strike-slip system that extends from the Indian Wells Valley northward into the Owens Valley. This tectonic setting results in NW-directed transtension, which is accommodated by normal and strike-slip faulting of the brittle upper 4-6 km of the crust, and shearing and ductile stretching below this depth, accompanied by

237

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Silicates In The Larderello Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen Isotope Study Of Silicates In The Larderello Geothermal Field, Oxygen Isotope Study Of Silicates In The Larderello Geothermal Field, Italy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Silicates In The Larderello Geothermal Field, Italy Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Stable-isotope analyses were carried out on hydrothermal minerals sampled from the deep metamorphic units at Larderello, Italy. The D18O values obtained for the most retentive minerals, quartz and tourmaline, are from + 12.0‰ to + 14.7‰ and 9.9‰, respectively, and indicate deposition from an 18O-rich fluid. Calculated D18O values for these fluids range from + 5.3‰ to + 13.4‰. These values, combined with available fluid inclusion and petrographic data, are consistent with the proposed

238

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1987 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare multiple theories of the structural control of the geothermal system Notes The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which range from 10 - 100s of feet in extent, separated by regions of essentially unfractured rock of similar composition. Wells in the Devil's Kitchen area have encountered fluids in excess of 4500F and flow rates of 1 million lb/hr at depths less than 4000

239

Field Monitoring of a Geothermal Heat Pump Water Heater: Unicoi County High School, Erwin, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geothermal heat pump water heater (HPWH) system -- installed to preheat water entering a 250-gallon gas-fired water heater (GWH) at a Tennessee high school -- reduced water-heating costs by 34 percent per year, compared to the base case GWH system. This report provides results from field monitoring of the geothermal HPWH system, tested in three distinct operating modes for five months. The program goal was to assess the energy and economic benefits of the GWH system with and without the geothermal HPWH...

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

InSAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Localized Strain as a Discriminator of Hidden Geothermal Systems, Vasco and Foxall, 2005. Recent work has focused on (1) collaborating with Alessandro Ferretti to use Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR data to infer strain at depth, (2) working with Lane Johnson to develop a dynamic faulting model, and (3) acquiring InSAR data for the region surrounding the Dixie Valley fault zone in collaboration with Dr. William Foxall of LLNL. The InSAR data have been processed and an initial interpretation of the results is

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241

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

242

Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

243

Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Trough Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

244

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysersanalysis of the geothermal steam production and cold waterAs a result of high rate of steam withdrawal, the reservoir

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a tracer test at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Proc. 22 ndand footwall faulting at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermalthe shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field,

Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 5431977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

Crowe, B.; Morley, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wells, S. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murrell, M.; Poths, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milos From Geophysical Milos From Geophysical Experiments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of geophysical experiments carried out by eight teams on the island of Milos as part of an integrated project under the European Commission's geothermal R & D programme are considered. The combination of these data with earlier studies on the geology and geophysics of Milos allow the compilation of a possible model of the geothermal reservoir and its surroundings in the central eastern part of the island. The reservoir is fed by convection of hot fluids from a depth of several kilometres, but the geophysical data provide no strong support for the earlier hypothesis

249

Preliminary investigation of scale formation and fluid chemistry at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemistry of geothermal, production, and injection fluids at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada, was characterized to address an ongoing scaling problem and to evaluate the effects of reinjection into the reservoir. Fluids generally followed mixing-dilution trends. Recharge to the Dixie Valley system apparently originates from local sources. The low-pressure brine and injection waters were saturated with respect to amorphous silica, which correlated with the ongoing scaling problem. Local shallow ground water contains about 15% geothermal brine mixed with regional recharge. The elevated Ca, Mg, and HCO{sub 3} content of this water suggests that carbonate precipitation may occur if shallow groundwater is reinjected. Downhole reservoir fluids are close to equilibrium with the latest vein mineral assemblage of wairakite-epidote-quartz-calcite. Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is predicted to affect the region near the wellbore differently than it does the region farther away.

Bruton, C.J.; Counce, D.; Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Johnson, S.D.; Moore, J.N.; Nimz, G.

1997-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Geothermal Systems of the Yellowstone Caldera Field Trip Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal studies are proceedings on two fronts in the West Yellowstone area. High-temperature resources for the generation of electricity are being sought in the Island Park area, and lower temperatures resources for direct applications, primarily space heating, are being explored for near the town of West Yellowstone. Potential electric geothermal development in the Island Park area has been the subject of widespread publicity over fears of damage to thermal features in Yellowstone Park. At the time of writing this guide, companies have applied for geothermal leases in the Island Park area, but these leases have not yet been granted by the US Forest Service. The Senate is now discussing a bill that would regulate geothermal development in Island Park; outcome of this debate will determine the course of action on the lease applications. The Island Park area was the site of two cycles of caldera activity, with major eruptions at 2.0 and 1.2 million years ago. The US Geological Survey estimates that 16,850 x 10{sup 18} joules of energy may remain in the system. Geothermal resources suitable for direct applications are being sought in the West Yellowstone vicinity by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, under funding from the US Department of Energy. West Yellowstone has a mean annual temperature of 1-2 C. Research thus far suggests that basement rocks in the vicinity are at a depth of about 600 m and are probably similar to the rocks exposed north of Hebgen Lake, where Precambrian, Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks have been mapped. A few sites with anomalously warm water have been identified near the town. Work is continuing on this project.

Foley, Duncan; Neilson, Dennis L.; Nichols, Clayton R.

1980-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackwell, Et Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "The gravity data are described by (Blackwell et al., 1999; 2002). On a basin-wide scale the gravity low in Dixie Valley is strongly asymmetrical from east to west. The west side is relatively well-defined by rapid horizontal changes in the gravity anomaly value, whereas along the east side horizontal changes are more subdued and often consist of several steps. The horizontal gradient of the gravity field has proved most useful

253

Session 10: The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico: The Experiences Gained from Its Exploration and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto case study demonstrated the value of a multidisciplinary effort for exploring and developing a geothermal field. There was no problem in recognizing the geothermal potential of the Cerro Prieto area because of the many obvious surface manifestations. However, the delineation of the geothermal reservoir at depth was not so straightforward. Wells drilled near the abundant surface manifestations only produced fluids of relatively low enthalpy. Later it was determined that these zones of high heat loss corresponded to discharge areas where faults and fractures allowed thermal fluids to leak to the surface, and not to the main geothermal reservoir. The early gravity and seismic refraction surveys provided important information on the general structure of the area. Unaware of the existence of a higher density zone of hydrothermally altered sediments capping the geothermal reservoir, CFE interpreted a basement horst in the western part of the field and hypothesized that the bounding faults were controlling the upward flow of thermal fluids. Attempting to penetrate the sedimentary column to reach the ''basement horst'', CFE discovered the {alpha} geothermal reservoir (in well M-5). The continuation of the geothermal aquifer (actually the {beta} reservoir) east of the original well field was later confirmed by a deep exploration well (M-53). The experience of Cerro Prieto showed the importance of chemical ratios, and geothermometers in general, in establishing the subsurface temperatures and fluid flow patterns. Fluid chemical and isotopic compositions have also been helpful to determine the origin of the fluids, fluid-production mechanisms and production induced effects on the reservoir.

Lippman, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California,monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California,~~W. and Faust, C. R. , 1979, Geothermal resource simulation:

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geothermal Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward http://energy.gov/eere/articles/geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward" class="title-link"> Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward

256

Geothermal News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System http://energy.gov/articles/nevada-deploys-first-us-commercial-grid-connected-enhanced-geothermal-system geothermal-system" class="title-link">Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System

257

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The seismic reflection data are very useful and can be site specific when a profile is in the right place, but are sparse, very difficult to interpret correctly, and expensive to collect. The velocity values used are uncertain even though there are several sonic logs for the wells. A VSP, Vertical Seismic Profile, survey would significantly improve the precision of the interpretation References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

258

Direct-Current Resistivity At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault

259

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, CaliforniaGeothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water injection into geothermal systems has often become arequired strategy to extended and sustain production of geothermalresources. To reduce a trend of declining pressures and increasingnon-condensable gas concentrations in steam produced from The Geysers,operators have been injecting steam condensate, local rain and streamwaters, and most recently treated wastewater piped to the field fromneighboring communities. If geothermal energy is to provide a significantincrease in energy in the United States (US Department of Energy (DOE)goal is 40,000 megawatts by 2040), injection must play a larger role inthe overall strategy, i.e., enhanced geothermal systems, (EGS). Presentedin this paper are the results of monitoring microseismicity during anincrease in injection at The Geysers field in California using data froma high-density digital microearthquake array. Although seismicity hasincreased due to increased injection it has been found to be somewhatpredicable, thus implying that intelligent injection control may be ableto control large increases in seismicity.

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Tough2/PC application simulation project for Heber geothermal field, California, a progress report  

SciTech Connect

A numerical simulation model for the Heber geothermal field in Southern California is being developed under a technology transfer agreement between the Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR). The main objectives of the cooperation are (1) to train DOGGR personnel in the use of the TOUGH2PC computer code; and (2) to develop a module compatible with TOUGH2 to investigate the effects of production/injection operations on the ground surface subsidence-rebound phenomenon observed in the Heber geothermal field. Initial-state calibration (undisturbed system) runs are being conducted to calibrate the model.

Boardman, Timothy S.; Khan, M. Ali; Antunez, Emilio

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Application of the SP technique over Lagadas low enthalpy geothermal field, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that in order to verify the applicability of the SP gradient method as a tool for geothermal exploration, Lagadas low enthalpy geothermal field was used as a test site. A total of 63 lines km was surveyed using SP gradient method along 10 profiles covering the main geothermal field area. The complied SP map correlates in a satisfactory was with other geological and geophysical information available. Detected SP anomalies were inverted to causative polarized planes and their relationship with existing deep fractures in the basement is investigated. As a result, two main fracture zones were detected, which were electrically polarized, and coincide with already known similar tectonic features identified by other geological and geophysical methods. Circulation of hot water in deep permeable fracture zones is considered to be the originating mechanism of the observed SP anomalies.

Thanassoulas, C.; Lazou, A. (Inst. of Geology and Mineral Exploration, Dept. of Geophysical Research, 57 Messoghion Avenue, Athens 115-26 (GR))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New Mexico, 1978e Geothermal demonstration plant--1975. Hydrologic testing geothermal test hole no. 2. Losof the ~lles Caldera geothermal system, New Mexico. Trans.

Wilt, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, California Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Geysers, California, geothermal area, U.S. Geol. Surv.seismicity at The Geysers geothermal reservoir, Californiaseismic image of a geothermal reservoir: The Geysers,

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Application of oil-field well log interpretation techniques to the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An example is presented of the application of oil-field techniques to the Cerro Prieto Field, Mexico. The lithology in this field (sand-shale lithology) is relatively similar to oil-field systems. The study was undertaken as a part of the first series of case studies supported by the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program (GLIP) of the US Department of Energy. The suites of logs for individual wells were far from complete. This was partly because of adverse borehole conditions but mostly because of unavailability of high-temperature tools. The most complete set of logs was a combination of Dual Induction Laterolog, Compensated Formation Density Gamma Ray, Compensated Neutron Log, and Saraband. Temperature data about the wells were sketchy, and the logs had been run under pre-cooled mud condition. A system of interpretation consisting of a combination of graphic and numerical studies was used to study the logs. From graphical studies, evidence of hydrothermal alteration may be established from the trend analysis of SP (self potential) and ILD (deep induction log). Furthermore, the cross plot techniques using data from density and neutron logs may help in establishing compaction as well as rock density profile with depth. In the numerical method, R/sub wa/ values from three different resistivity logs were computed and brought into agreement. From this approach, values of formation temperature and mud filtrate resistivity effective at the time of logging were established.

Ershaghi, I.; Phillips, L.B.; Dougherty, E.L.; Handy, L.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity (Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15_15 km) are reliably

267

1974 geothermal field tests at the Niland Reservoir in the Imperial Valley of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The phases of the 1974 geothermal field tests at the Niland Reservoir in the Imperial Valley of California are documented. The following tests are included: separator, steam scrubber, steam turbine, heat exchanger, packed heat exchanger, corrosion, chemical cleaning, and control and instrumentation. (MHR)

Not Available

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Microearthquake source mechanism studies at the Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the authors discuss moment tensors obtained from inversion of MEQ waveform data recorded at the Southeast (SE) and Northwest (NW) Geysers geothermal areas by the high-resolution seismic networks operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Coldwater Creek Geothermal Company (now CCPA). The network in the SE Geysers consists of 13 high-frequency (4.5 Hz), digital (480 samples), three-component, telemetered stations deployed on the surface in portions of the Calpine, Unocal-NEC-Thermal (U-N-T), and Northern California Power Agency (NCPA) leases. The network in the NW Geysers is a 16-station borehole array of three-component geophones (4.5 Hz), digital at 400 samples/sec, and telemetered to a central site. One of the main objectives of Berkeley Lab`s program at the Geysers is to assess the utility of MEQ monitoring as a reservoir management tool. Discrimination of the mechanisms of these events may aid in the interpretation of MEQ occurrence patterns and their significance to reservoir processes and conditions of interest to reservoir managers. Better understanding of the types of failure deduced from source mechanism studies, and their relations to production parameters, should also lead to a better understanding of the effects of injection and withdrawal.

Kirkpatrick, A.; Romero, A. Jr.; Peterson, J. Jr.; Johnson, L.; Majer, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Use of slim holes for reservoir evaluation at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect

Three slim holes were drilled at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada about 15 km south of Reno. The slim holes were drilled to investigate the geologic conditions, thermal regime and productive characteristics of the geothermal system. They were completed through a geologic sequence consisting of alluvium cemented by geothermal fluids, volcaniclastic materials, and granodiorite. Numerous fractures, mostly sealed, were encountered throughout the drilled depth; however, several open fractures in the granodiorite, dipping between 65 and 90{degree}, had apertures up to 13 mm in width. The depths of the slim holes vary from 262 to 277 m with open-hole diameters of 76 mm. Pressure and temperature logs gave bottom-hole temperatures ranging from 163 to 166{degree} C. During injection testing, downhole pressures were measured using capillary tubing with a surface quartz transducer while temperatures were measured with a Kuster temperature tool located below the capillary tubing pressure chamber. No pressure increase was measured at reservoir depths in any of the three slim holes while injecting 11 kg/s of 29{degree}C water indicating a very high permeability in the geothermal reservoir. These injection test results suggested that productive geothermal fluids could be found at depths sufficient for well pumping equipment and at temperatures needed for electrical power production using binary-type conversion technology.

Combs, Jim; Goranson, Colin

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tule Chek, Bc, Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A method is described to determine bounds characterizing axisymmetric bodies from a set of gravity data. Bounds on the density contrast as a function of depth to the top and thickness of the anomalous source are obtained by using Parker's ideal body theory and linear programming algorithms. Such bounds are given in terms of trade-off diagrams, where regions of feasible solutions compatible with the observed data can be assured. Gravity data from the Tule Chek, B.C., Mexico, geothermal area were used to compute such trade-off diagrams. Seismic

272

A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The present study completes a study by Thanassoulas et al. (1986) Geophys. Prosp.34, 83-97 and deals with geophysical exploration for geothermal resources in Nea Kessani area, NE Greece. The results of some deep electrical soundings (AB = 6000 m) with the interpretation of a gravity profile crossing the investigated area are considered together with thermal investigations. All subsequent information, along with the conclusions of an earlier paper dealing with a reconnaissance geophysical

273

Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

Kutscher, C.

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Geological control on the reservoir characteristics of Olkaria West Geothermal Field, Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The reservoir of the West Olkaria Geothermal Field is hosted within tuffs and the reservoir fluid is characterized by higher concentrations of reservoir CO{sub 2} (10,000-100,000 mg/kg) but lower chloride concentrations of about 200 mg/kg than the East and North East Fields. The West Field is in the outflow and main recharge area of the Olkaria geothermal system. Permeability is generally low in the West Field and its distribution is strongly controlled by the structures. Fault zones show higher permeability with wells drilled within the structures havin larger total mass outputs. However, N-S and NW-SE faults are mainly channels for cold water downflow into the reservoir. Well feeder zones occur mostly at lava-tuff contacts; within fractured lava flows and at the contacts of intrusives and host rocks.

Omenda, Peter A.

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow

276

36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Inverse modeling and forecasting for the exploitation of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional numerical model of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field has been developed based on a conceptual hydrogeological model of the system. It extends over a 13.6-km2 area and includes three layers: (1) a base layer with inflow; (2) a geothermal reservoir; and (3) an upper layer with discharge and recharge/infiltration areas. Using the computer program iTOUGH2 (Finsterle, 2004), the model is calibrated to a total of 13,675 calibration points, combining natural-state and 1960-2006 exploitation data. The principal model parameters identified and estimated by inverse modeling include the fracture permeability and fracture porosity of the geothermal reservoir, the initial natural upflow rate, the base-layer porosity, and the permeabilities of the infiltration zones. Heat and mass balances derived from the calibrated model helped identify the sources of the geothermal reserves in the field. With the addition of five makeup wells, simulation forecasts for the 2007-2032 period predict a sustainable average steam production of 29 kg/s, which is sufficient to maintain the generation of 6.8 MWe at the Pauzhetsky power plant.

Finsterle, Stefan; Kiryukhin, A.V.; Asaulova, N.P.; Finsterle, S.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reservoir simulation studies: Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical reservoir simulation techniques were used to perform a history-match of the Wairakei geothermal system in New Zealand. First, a one-dimensional (vertical) model was chosen; realistic stratigraphy was incorporated and the known production history was imposed. The effects of surface and deep recharge were included. Good matches were obtained, both for the reservoir pressure decline history and changes in average discharge enthalpy with time. Next, multidimensional effects were incorporated by treating with a two-dimensional vertical section. Again, good history matches were obtained, although computed late-time discharge enthalpies were slightly high. It is believed that this disparity arises from inherently three-dimensional effects. Predictive calculations using the two-dimensional model suggest that continued future production will cause little additional reservoir pressure drop, but that thermal degradation will occur. Finally, ground subsidence data at Wairakei was examined. It was concluded that traditional elastic pore-collapse models based on classical soil-mechanics concepts are inadequate to explain the observed surface deformation. It is speculated that the measured subsidence may be due to structural effects such as aseismic slippage of a buried reservoir boundary fault.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260{degrees}C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was develope. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220{degrees}C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S. Lippmann, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mainieri, A. [Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad, San Jose (Costa Rica)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Session 18: Geothermal Well Stimulation - Program Summary and the Beowawe Field Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Republic Geothermal, Inc. and its subcontractors have planned and executed laboratory studies and eight well stimulation field experiments under the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The program, begun in February 1979, has concentrated on extending petroleum industry stimulation technology for use by the geothermal industry. The most recent experiment was in a naturally fractured Chevron well at Beowawe and involved an acid stimulation of a damaged interval which yielded a 2.3-fold increase in injectivity. Overall results to date have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formations. However, wells in marginal naturally fractured reservoirs have not been saved by the types of well stimulation jobs performed thus far. A recent discovery is that many wells can possibly be made outstanding producers by widening and propping compliant natural fractures. Confirmation of this constitutes unfinished business of the GRWSP, and offers one of the greatest potential opportunities for enhancing the economics of geothermal power production.

Verity, R.V.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

El Centro Geothermal Utility Core Field Experiment environmental-impact report and environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of El Centro is proposing the development of a geothermal energy utility core field experiment to demonstrate the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing moderate temperature geothermal heat, on a pilot scale, for space cooling, space heating, and domestic hot water. The proposed facility is located on part of a 2.48 acre (1 hectare) parcel owned in fee by the City in the southeastern sector of El Centro in Imperial County, California. Geothermal fluid at an anticipated temperature of about 250/sup 0/F (121/sup 0/C) will heat a secondary fluid (water) which will be utilized directly or processed through an absorption chiller, to provide space conditioning and water heating for the El Centro Community Center, a public recreational facility located approximately one-half mile north of the proposed well site. The geothermal production well will be drilled to 8500 feet (2590m) and an injection well to 4000 feet (1220m) at the industrially designated City property. Once all relevant permits are obtained it is estimated that site preparation, facility construction, the completion and testing of both wells would be finished in approximately 26 weeks. The environmental impacts are described.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 10-14, 1988, The Geothermal Research Society ofcaused by the mixing of different geothermal fluids, Proc.Twenty-third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity;

286

A summary of modeling studies of the Nesjavellir geothermal field, Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nesjavellir geothermal field in Iceland is being developed to provide the capital city of Reykjavik and surrounding areas with hot water for space heating. In the last few years, many wells have been drilled at the site and various geothermal studies have been conducted. The main upflow to the system is underneath the nearby Hengill volcano, and the natural recharge rate and enthalpy are estimated to be 65 kg/s and 1850 kJ/kg, respectively. An extensive vapor zone is believed to be present in the upflow region. Permeabilities and porosities of the system range between 1 and 50 md and 1 and 10 percent, respectively. In this paper, the characteristics of the Nesjavellir field are described and a three-dimensional numerical model of the resource in discussed. 15 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Bjornsson, S.; Gunnarsson, A.; Gunnlaugsson, E.; Sigurdsson,, O. Stefansson, V.; Steingrimsson, B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems on the margins of the Basin and Range province that is associated with recent volcanic activity. This system, which is developed entirely in fractured granitic and metamorphic rocks, consists of a well-defined thermal plume that originates in the southern part of the field and then flows upward and laterally to the north. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present

289

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Akutan geothermal system, which is a part of Alaska's Aleutian volcanic arc, has several known thermal springs and a known fumarole field. It is reported to be one of the few high-grade geothermal resources in Alaska with a potential for further development as a geothermal energy resource. However, there is paucity of data and limited understanding and characterization of this system for optimal resource development. We used cloud-free summer-time thermal infrared (TIR) images

290

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the magma beneath melt zones Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters were analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems. These were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510800"

291

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. First technical status report, April 1, 1978-June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial steps in a physical analytic and field study of the general applicability of the rheidity sensing techniques in the Oregon-Washington Cascade region are listed. (MHR)

Bodvarsson, G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (<20 ka) to recent (<50a). Valley groundwater is older than water from perennial springs and artesian wells in adjacent ranges, with Clan Alpine range (east) much younger (most <50a) than Stillwater range (west; most >1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

295

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Segall, P. 1997. Subsidence at The Geysers geothermalA.P. 2001. Seismicity, subsidence and strain at The Geysersrespectively, as well as subsidence of about 0.5 to 1 meter.

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Summary of modeling studies of the East Olkaria geothermal field, Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed three-dimensional well-by-well model of the East Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya has been developed. The model matches reasonably well the flow rate and enthalpy data from all wells, as well as the overall pressure decline in the reservoir. The model is used to predict the generating capacity of the field, well decline, enthalpy behavior, the number of make-up wells needed and the effects of injection on well performance and overall reservoir depletion. 26 refs., 10 figs.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Stefansson, V.; Bjornsson, S.; Ojiambo, S.B.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mapping the acid stimulation in the Beowawe geothermal field using surface electrical potentials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface electrical potential system was fielded during the chemical stimulation of the Rossi 21-19 well in the Beowawe Geothermal Field. The technique, which measures variations in resistivity resulting from the flow of conductive fluid into the reservoir, was not only shown to be highly sensitive to the chemical treatment, but was also responsive to in situ conductive zones before any acid injection. A review of the experiment and a preliminary interpretation of the data are presented. The data provide convincing evidence that it should be possible to map the treated zone as well as the primary pretreatment in situ conductive zones.

Hart, C.M.; Engi, D.; Morris, H.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mapping the Acid Stimulation in the Beowawe Geothermal Field Using Surface Electrical Potentials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface electrical potential system was fielded during the chemical stimulation of the Rossi 21-19 well in the Beowawe Geothermal Field. The technique, which measures variations in resistivity resulting from the flow of conductive fluid into the reservoir, was not only shown to be highly sensitive, not only to the chemical treatment, but also to the in situ conductive zones before any acid injection. A review of the experiment and a preliminary interpretation of the data are presented. The data provide convincing evidence that it should be possible to map the treated zone as well as the primary pretreatment in situ conductive zones.

Hart, Carolyne M.; Engi, Dennis; Morris, Harris E.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active...

300

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Geothermal energy resource assessment of parts of Alaska. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The central Seward Peninsula was the subject of a geological, geophysical and geochemical reconnaissance survey during a 30-day period in the summer of 1980. The survey was designed to investigate the geothermal energy resource potential of this region of Alaska. A continental rift system model was proposed to explain many of the Late Tertiary-to-Quaternary topographic, structural, volcanic and geothermal features of the region. Geologic evidence for the model includes normal faults, extensive fields of young alkalic basalts, alignment of volcanic vents, graben valleys and other features consistent with a rift system active from late Miocene time to the present. Five traverses crossing segments of the proposed rift system were run to look for evidence of structure and geothermal resources not evident from surface manifestation. Gravity, helium and mercury soil concentrations were measured along the traverses. Seismic, resistivity, and VLF studies are presented.

Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Kienle, J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Exploitation model, performance predictions, economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). This appendix to the report describes the work done during the second year of the study (FY89--90). The first year's report included (1) the development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) the evaluation of the reservoir's initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) the evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. In these appendices the results of reservoir engineering studies to evaluate different production-injection scenarios for the Ahuachapan geothermal field are discussed. The purpose of the work was to evaluate possible reservoir management options to enhance as well as to maintain the productivity of the field during a 30-year period (1990--2020). The ultimate objective was to determine the feasibility of increasing the electrical power output at Ahuachapan from the current level of about 50 MW{sub e} to the total installed capacity of 95 MW{sub e}. the flow rate and flowing enthalpy are shown for 1975--1990 and extrapolated out to 2015. Future temperature distributions are predicted.

Ripperda, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Goranson, C. (Geothermal Consultant Richmond, California (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Exploitation model, performance predictions, economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). This report describes the work done during the second year of the study (FY89--90). The first year's report included (1) the development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) the evaluation of the reservoir's initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) the evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. In the present report the results of reservoir engineering studies to evaluate different production-injection scenarios for the Ahuachapan geothermal field are discussed. The purpose of the work was to evaluate possible reservoir management options to enhance as well as to maintain the productivity of the field during a 30-year period (1990--2020). The ultimate objective was to determine the feasibility of increasing the electrical power output at Ahuachapan from the current level of about 50 MW{sub e} to the total installed capacity of 95 MW{sub e}. 20 refs., 75 figs., 10 tabs.

Ripperda, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Goranson, C.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Modeling studies of the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modeling studies of Ahuachapan include analyses of interference test data, modeling of the fieldwide pressure decline and the development of a three-dimensional natural state model of the field. The main objective of this work is to obtain reasonable estimates for the transmissivity and storativity of the reservoir and to investigate fluid and heat flow patterns in the system. The analyses of the interference test data and the long term pressure decline data indicate that the average reservoir transmissivity is about 30 Dm and the storativity about 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} m/Pa. The natural state modeling supports an overall average transmissivity of 25--35 Dm and indicates that the system is recharged with 255{degree}C hot water at a rate of about 225 kg/s. The total thermal throughflow for the Ahuachapan system is estimated to be about 250 MW{sub t}. 10 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Aunzo, Z.; Steingrimsson, B.; Bodvarsson, G.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Escobar, C.; Quintanilla, A. (Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) (El Salvador))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Geysers_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510811

306

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

3D Extended Logging for Geothermal Resources: Field Trials with the Geo-Bilt System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geo-BILT (Geothermal Borehole Induction Logging Tool) is an extended induction logging tool designed for 3D resistivity imaging around a single borehole. The tool was developed for deployment in high temperature geothermal wells under a joint program funded by the California Energy Commission, Electromagnetic Instruments (EMI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. EM1 was responsible for tool design and manufacture, and numerical modeling efforts were being addressed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) and other contractors. The field deployment was done by EM1 and LLNL. The tool operates at frequencies from 2 to 42 kHz, and its design features a series of three-component magnetic sensors offset at 2 and 5 meters from a three-component magnetic source. The combined package makes it possible to do 3D resistivity imaging, deep into the formation, from a single well. The manufacture and testing of the tool was completed in spring of 2001, and the initial deployment of Geo-BILT occurred in May 2001 at the Lost Hills oil field in southern California at leases operated by Chevron USA. This site was chosen for the initial field test because of the favorable geological conditions and the availability of a number of wells suitable for tool deployment. The second deployment occurred in April 2002 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, operated by Caithness Power LLC, in central Nevada. This constituted the first test in a high temperature environment. The Chevron site features a fiberglass-cased observation well in the vicinity of a water injector. The injected water, which is used for pressure maintenance and for secondary sweep of the heavy oil formation, has a much lower resistivity than the oil bearing formation. This, in addition to the non-uniform flow of this water, creates a 3D resistivity structure, which is analogous to conditions produced from flowing fractures adjacent to geothermal boreholes. Therefore, it is an excellent site for testing the 3D capability of the tool in a low risk environment. The Dixie Valley site offered an environment where the tool could locate near-well fractures associated with steam development. The Lost Hills field measurements yielded a data set suitable for 3D imaging. The Geo-BLT data corresponded to existing conventional logging data and showed clear indications, in several depth intervals, of near-well 3D structure. Subsequent 3D inversion of these data produced a model consistent with non-planar water flow in specific layers. The Dixie Valley measurements identified structures associated with dike intrusions and water inflow at particular depths. Preliminary analysis suggests these structures are steeply dipping, which is consistent with the geology.

Mallan, R; Wilt, M; Kirkendall, B; Kasameyer, P

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

310

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geothermal: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links News DOE Geothermal Technologies Program News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection September 30, 2008 Update: "Hot Docs" added to the Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection. A recent enhancement to the geothermal legacy site is the addition of "Hot Docs". These are documents that have been repeatedly searched for and downloaded more than any other documents in the database during the previous month and each preceding month. "Hot Docs" are highlighted for researchers and stakeholders who may find it valuable to learn what others in their field are most interested in. This enhancement could serve, for

313

Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0) 0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare results of dense arrays with less densely spaced instruments Notes Results from a dense array of passive seismometers are presented. Data collected during the 18-month deployment of 16 dense mini-arrays in the region of the China Lake geothermal field near Ridgecrest, CA was used. The crustal structure within the geothermal field, its relationship to regional tectonic features, and search for an indication of mantle influence on volcanism was imaged. The mini-arrays consist of mostly short period

314

Arsenic speciation and transport associated with the release of spent geothermal fluids in Mutnovsky field (Kamchatka, Russia)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geothermal fluids for the production of electricity poses a risk of contaminating surface waters when spent fluids are discharged into (near) surface environments. Arsenic (As) in particular is a common component in geothermal fluids and leads to a degradation of water quality when present in mobile and bioavailable forms. We have examined changes in arsenic speciation caused by quick transition from high temperature reducing conditions to surface conditions, retention mechanisms, and the extent of transport associated with the release of spent geothermal fluids at the Dachny geothermal fields (Mutnovsky geothermal region), Kamchatka, Russia -- a high temperature field used for electricity production. In the spent fluids, the arsenic concentration reaches 9 ppm, while in natural hot springs expressed in the vicinity of the field, the As concentration is typically below 10 ppb. The aqueous phase arsenic speciation was determined using Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The arsenic speciation in the bottom sediments (geothermal source fluids is predominantly found as As(III), while a mixture of As(III)/As(V) is found in the water and sediment of the Falshivaia River downstream from the power plant. The extent of elevated arsenic concentrations in water is limited by adsorption to the bottom sediment and dilution, as determined using Cl{sup -} from the deep well fluids as a tracer. Analysis of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra shows that sediment phase arsenic is associated with both Al- and Fe-rich phases with a bi-dentate corner sharing local geometry. The geothermal waste fluids released in the surface water create a localized area of arsenic contamination. The extent of transport of dissolved As is limited to {approx}7 km downstream from the source, while As associated with bottom sediment travels {approx}3 km farther.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Rychagov, Sergey N.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks); (Russ. Acad. Sci.)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement and test a series of innovative geothermal exploration strategies in two phases. Phase 1 studies will comprise surface mapping, shallow seismic surveys, potential field surveys (gravity and magnetics), compilation of existing well data, and the construction of three dimension structure sections. Phase 2 will comprise two intermediate depth (1.5-1.6 km) slim-hole exploration wells with a full suite of geophysical borehole logs and a vertical seismic profile to extrapolate stratigraphy encountered in the well into the surrounding terrain. Both of the exploration wells will be fully cored to preserve a complete record of the volcanic stratigraphy that can be used in complementary science projects. This project will function in tandem with Project Hotspot, a continental scientific drilling project that focuses on the origin and evolution of the Yellowstone hotspot.

316

Repetitive precision gravity studies at the Cerro Prieto and Heber geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To study subsidence and mass removal, a precise gravity network was established on 60 permanent monuments in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in early 1978, and repeated annually through early 1981; the survey was tied to two bedrock sites outside the limits of the current production zone. The looping technique of station occupation was utilized, in which occupation of the base was followed by occupation of several stations, followed by a return to the base. Use of two LaCoste and Romberg gravity meters, and replication of values within loops as well as entire loops, enhanced precision such that the median standard deviations of the base-to-station differences, reduced to observed gravity values, ranged from 7 to 15 microgals for individual surveys. The smaller values were obtained as field and data reduction techniques were improved and experience was gained. A similar survey was initiated in the Heber area just north of the Mexican border in early 1980. It too was established on permanent monuments, was tied to bedrock stations outside the geothermal area, and used multiple repetitions of values with two meters to achieve high precision.

Grannell, R.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of...

318

Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by of a mile toward the north and is located over mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Property:GeothermalDevelopmentPhases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalDevelopmentPhases GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalDevelopmentPhases" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + Geothermal/Power Plant + C CA-017-05-051 + Geothermal/Well Field + CA-170-02-15 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-650-2005-086 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-670-2010-CX + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-96062042 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + D DOE-EA-1116 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + DOE-EA-1621 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1676 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1733 + Geothermal/Well Field +

322

Mulitdimensional reactive transport modeling of CO2 minreal sequestration in basalts at the Helllisheidi geothermal field, Iceland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. , 2004. ICEBOX. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering SoftwareUnited Nations Uni- versity Geothermal Training Programme,H. , 1982. The chemistry of geothermal waters in Iceland. I.

Aradottir, E.S.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Integrated High Resolution Microearthquake Analysis and Monitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and after SEGEP injection. Geothermal Resources Council,tectonics at the Geysers Geothermal Area, California, J.seismicity in The Geysers Geothermal Area, California, J.

Majer, Ernest; Peterson, John; Stark, Mitch; Smith, Bill; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kennedy, Mack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A PLAUSIBLE TWO-DIMENSIONAL VERTICAL MODEL OF THE EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA, U.S.A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~:::. -:: .. ::_ Geothermal Reservoir , SGP .. ~TR~/+ 0,CUl'{ER of the p,. l'1~esa Geothermal Anomaly, Imperial 58,convection in an unconfined geothermal reservoir, IGPP 72-

Goyal, K.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Project: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utilitiy for a new community college campus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colorado Northwestern Community College (CNCC) is working collaboratively with recipient vendor Chevron Energy Solutions, an energy services company (ESCO), to develop an innovative GHP project at the new CNCC Campus constructed in 2010/2011 in Craig, Colorado. The purpose of the CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program scope was to utilize an energy performance contracting approach to develop a geothermal system with a shared closed-loop field providing geothermal energy to each building's GHP mechanical system. Additional benefits to the project include promoting good jobs and clean energy while reducing operating costs for the college. The project has demonstrated that GHP technology is viable for new construction using the energy performance contracting model. The project also enabled the project team to evaluate several options to give the College a best value proposition for not only the initial design and construction costs but build high performance facilities that will save the College for many years to come. The design involved comparing the economic feasibility of GHP by comparing its cost to that of traditional HVAC systems via energy model, financial life cycle cost analysis of energy savings and capital cost, and finally by evaluating the compatibility of the mechanical design for GHP compared to traditional HVAC design. The project shows that GHP system design can be incorporated into the design of new commercial buildings if the design teams, architect, contractor, and owner coordinate carefully during the early phases of design. The public also benefits because the new CNCC campus is a center of education for the much of Northwestern Colorado, and students in K-12 programs (Science Spree 2010) through the CNCC two-year degree programs are already integrating geothermal and GHP technology. One of the greatest challenges met during this program was coordination of multiple engineering and development stakeholders. The leadership of Principle Investigator Pres. John Boyd of CNCC met this challenge by showing clear leadership in setting common goals and resolving conflicts early in the program.

Chevron Energy Solutions; Matt Rush; Scott Shulda

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal- bearing aquifers. Geothermal Aquifer Resources Montana's many geothermal features attest to the volcanic activity that shaped much of the landscape. Geothermal springs form when ground water is heated range from 50 to 190 degrees F. Oil well drillers have encoun- tered geothermal water edging up to 240

Smerdon, Jason E.

328

A gravity model for the Coso geothermal area, California | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gravity model for the Coso geothermal area, California gravity model for the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A gravity model for the Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Two- and three-dimensional gravity modeling was done using gridded Bouguer gravity data covering a 45 x 45 km region over the Coso geothermal area in an effort to identify features related to the heat source and to seek possible evidence for an underlying magma chamber. Isostatic and terrain corrected Bouguer gravity data for about 1300 gravity stations were obtained from the US Geological Survey. After the data were checked, the gravity values were gridded at 1 km centers for the area of interest centered on the Coso volcanic field. Most of the gravity

329

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Heiken &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heiken & Heiken & Goff, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Heiken & Goff, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Development of a geologically-based model of the thermal and hydrothermal potential of the Fenton Hill HDR area. References Grant Heiken, Fraser Goff (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Heiken_%26_Goff,_1983)&oldid=511328

330

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State...

331

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Investigation of the thermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

332

Guidebook to Geothermal Finance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "The seismic reflection profiles of the range front structures are difficult to interpret because of he steep dips and 3-d fault zone geometry, in the-classical paper by Okaya and Thompson (1985) the range-bounding fault is not imaged as they proposed. The reflection seismic studies are the most useful of the geophysical techniques also the most expensive. The reflection data are two-dimensional making structural interpretation complicated for the three-dimensional geometry of the basin so that the other structural studied have been critical in correctly interpreting the seismic profiles. There are many

334

Closed-loop flow test Miravalles Geothermal Field well log results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE) conducted a closed-loop flow test in the Miravalles Geothermal Field. The closed-loop test was started in May and ran through August of 1990. The effluent from the production well PG-11 was carried by a pipeline through a monitor station to the injection well PG-2. Before starting the long-term flow test in May, cold-water injection experiments were performed in each well to determine the pressure and temperature response. A series of downhole measurements were made in each well to obtain background information. The downhole measurements were repeated in August just before terminating the flow test to evaluate the results.

Dennis, B.; Eden, G.; Lawton, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

Joseph N. Moore

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reservoir-scale fracture permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wellbore image data recorded in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with an active normal fault at Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used in conjunction with hydrologic tests and in situ stress measurements to investigate the relationship between reservoir productivity and the contemporary in situ stress field. The analysis of data from wells drilled into productive and non-productive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicates that fractures must be both optimally oriented and critically stressed to have high measured permeabilities. Fracture permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively small number of fractures oriented parallel to the local trend of the Stillwater Fault. Fracture geometry may also play a significant role in reservoir productivity. The well-developed populations of low angle fractures present in wells drilled into the producing segment of the fault are not present in the zone where production is not commercially viable.

Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Hickman, S. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Morin, R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Benoit, D. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Studies of brine chemistry, precipitation of solids, and scale formation at the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Factors affecting the precipitation of solids and deposition of scale from the hypersaline brines of the Salton Sea geothermal field - two potential problems in the proposed utilization of these brines for electric power generation - were investigated. The average physical and chemical composition of the fluid from Magmamax No. 1 well was noted and the effects of changes in well flowrate on the chemistry of the brine and the formation of solids were determined. The effects of pH on the process stream chemistry and on the composition and rates of formation of solids and scale that precipitated from this brine were studied. Reduction of the pH from 6 to 4-5 decreased the scaling rates and increased the proportions of bariun sulfate and calcium fluoride in the scales and precipitated solids. These studies were conducted using a small-scale four-stage brine flash system constructed at the site.

Harrar, J.E.; Otto, C.H. Jr.; Deutscher, S.B.; Ryon, R.W.; Tardiff, G.E.

1979-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Analysis of field-performance data on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of field performance data from a binary cycle test loop using geothermal brine and a hydrocarbon working fluid is reported. Results include test loop operational problems, and shell-and-tube heat exchanger performance factors such as overall heat transfer coefficients, film coefficients, pinch points, and pressure drops. Performance factors are for six primary heaters having brine in the tubes and hydrocarbon in the shells in counterflow, and for a condenser having cooling water in the tubes and hydrocarbon in the shell. Working fluids reported are isobutane, 90/10 isobutane/isopentane, and 80/20 isobutane/isopentane. Performance factors are for heating each working fluid at supercritical conditions in the vicinity of their critical pressure and temperature and condensing the same fluid.

Silvester, L.F.; Doyle, P.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is supported by interpreting the combined geological, geophysical, and thermal data. In the model, heat is transferred from an area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock.

Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Preliminary Gas and Isotope Geochemistry in the Rehai Geothermal Field, P.R. China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on gas and sulphur isotopic composition, two types of steam in Rehai geothermal field are identified. One is with higher CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range 2.49{per_thousand} to -1.04{per_thousand} (vs CDT), from which the H{sub 2}S-temperature is over than 250 C. The other is with lower CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range -4.0{per_thousand} to -8.36{per_thousand}, from which the H{sub 2}S- and H{sub 2}-temperatures are 180 C-210 C, in good agreement with quartz temperature. The thermal water in the Rehai field is of local meteoric origin. Maximum {delta}{sup 18}O-value shift is less than 2.0{per_thousand} (vs SMOW). Mixing is widespread and could be identified on isotope and solute chemistry.

P., Zhao; Z., Liao

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

2012 Geothermal Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2012 Geothermal Webinar 2012 Geothermal Webinar January 10, 2012 - 12:47pm Addthis This Office of...

344

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

345

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Phases of a Geothermal Development...

346

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Development Phases Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field...

347

Geothermal Prospecting using Hyperspectral Imaging and Field Observations, Dixie Meadows, NV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an ongoing project to relate surface hydrothermal alteration to structurally controlled geothermal aquifers, we mapped a 16 km swath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Range using Hyperspectral fault and mineral mapping techniques. The Dixie Valley Fault system produces a large fractured aquifer heating Pleistocene aged groundwater to a temperature of 285 C at 5-6 km. Periodically over the last several thousand years, seismic events have pushed these heated fluids to the surface, leaving a rich history of hydrothermal alteration in the Stillwater Mountains. At Dixie Hot Springs, the potentiometric surface of the aquifer intersects the surface, and 75 C waters flow into the valley. We find a high concentration of alunite, kaolinite, and dickite on the exposed fault surface directly adjacent to a series of active fumaroles on the range front fault. This assemblage of minerals implies interaction with water in excess of 200 C. Field spectra support the location of the high temperature mineralization. Fault mapping using a Digital Elevation Model in combination with mineral lineation and field studies shows that complex fault interactions in this region are improving permeability in the region leading to unconfined fluid flow to the surface. Seismic studies conducted 10 km to the south of Dixie Meadows show that the range front fault dips 25-30 to the southeast (Abbott et al., 2001). At Dixie Meadows, the fault dips 35 to the southeast, demonstrating that this region is part of the low angle normal fault system that produced the Dixie Valley Earthquake in 1954 (M=6.8). We conclude that this unusually low angle faulting may have been accommodated by the presence of heated fluids, increasing pore pressure within the fault zone. We also find that younger synthetic faulting is occurring at more typical high angles. In an effort to present these findings visually, we created a cross-section, illustrating our interpretation of the subsurface structure and the hypothesized locations of increased permeability. The success of these methods at Dixie Meadows will greatly improve our understanding of other Basin and Range geothermal systems.

Kennedy-Bowdoin, T; Silver, E; Martini, B; Pickles, W

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The spatial and temporal subsidence variability of the East Mesa Geothermal Field, California, USA, and its potential impact on the All American Canal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatiotemporal variability of subsidence around the East Mesa Geothermal Field (EMGF) near the All American Canal (AAC) has been measured using 30 temporally averaged interferograms from 1992 to 2000. Deformation rate maps from two shorter time periods ...

Joo-Yup Han; R. R. Forster; D. E. Moser; A. L. J. Ford; J. Ramirez-Hernandez; K. F. Tiampo

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Pressure Profiles in Two-Phase Geothermal Wells: Comparison of Field Data and Model Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased confidence in the predictive power of two-phase correlations is a vital part of wellbore deliverability and deposition studies for geothermal wells. Previously, the Orkiszewski (1967) set of correlations has been recommended by many investigators to analyze geothermal wellbore performance. In this study, we use measured flowing pressure profile data from ten geothermal wells around the world, covering a wide range of flowrate, fluid enthalpy, wellhead pressure and well depth. We compare measured and calculated pressure profiles using the Orkiszewski (1967) correlations.

Ambastha, A.K.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Exploration of Ulumbu geothermal field, Flores-east nusa tenggara, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress made in developing geothermal resources at Ulumbu Flores, Indonesia for utilization mini geothermal power generation. Two deep exploratory wells drilling drilled by PLN confirmed the existence of the resources. The well measurement carried out during drilling and after completion of the well indicated that the major permeable zone at around 680 m depth and that this zone is a steam cap zone, which is likely to produce high enthalpy steam. The above information indicates that well ULB-01 will produce a mass flow at least 40 tonnes per hour, which will ensure a 3 MW (E) Ulumbu mini geothermal power plant.

Sulasdi, Didi

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fracture Mapping in the Soultz-sous-Forets Geothermal Field from Microearthquake Relocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2003, a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment was carried out at the European Geothermal Hot Dry Rock site at Soultz-sous-Forts, France. The two week injection of water generated a high level of microseismic activity. ...

Michelet, Sophie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

Parker, Beatrice Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geothermal HVAC System Performance in a Quick Service Restaurant: Field Experience From McDonald's Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the monitored results from a geothermal heat pump system installed at a new McDonald's restaurant in Westland, Michigan, a suburb 23 miles west of Detroit.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Petrologic considerations for hot dry rock geothermal site selection in the Clear Lake Region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Clear Lake area is well known for anomalous heat flow, thermal springs, hydrothermal mineral deposits, and Quaternary volcanism. These factors, along with the apparent lack of a large reservoir of geothermal fluid north of Collayomi fault make the Clear Lake area an attractive target for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. Petrologic considerations provide some constraints on site selection for HDR development. Spatial and temporal trends in volcanism in the Coast Ranges indicate that magmatism has migrated to the north with time, paralleling passage of the Mendocino triple junction and propagation of the San Andreas fault. Volcanism in the region may have resulted from upwelling of hot asthenosphere along the southern margin of the subducted segment of the Gorda plate. Spatial and temporal trends of volcanism within the Clear Lake volcanic field are similar to larger-scale trends of Neogene volcanism in the Cost Ranges. Volcanism (especially for silicic compositions) shows a general migration to the north over the {approximately}2 Ma history of the field, with the youngest two silicic centers located at Mt. Konocti and Borax Lake. The Mt. Konocti system (active from {approximately} 0.6 to 0.3 Ma) was large and long-lived, whereas the Borax Lake system is much smaller but younger (0.09 Ma). Remnants of silicic magma bodies under Mt. Konocti may be in the latter stages of cooling, whereas a magma body centered under Borax Lake may be in the early stages of development. The existence of an upper crustal silicic magma body of under Borax Lake has yet to be demonstrated by passive geophysics, however, subsurface temperatures in the area as high (> 200{degrees}C at 2000 m) as those beneath the Mt. Konocti area. Based on petrologic considerations alone, the Mt. Konocti-Borax Lake area appears to be the most logical choice for HDR geothermal development in the region.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hearn, B.C. Jr. (US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, Branch of Lithospheric Processes (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing a fault-zone trapped Rayleigh-type guided wave from microearthquake data. The wavelet transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling calculation suggests that the fault zone is {approx} 200m wide, and has a P wave velocity of 4.80 km/s and a S wave velocity of 3.00 km/s, which is sandwiched between two half spaces with relatively higher velocities (P wave velocity 5.60 km/s, and S wave velocity 3.20 km/s). zones having vertical or nearly vertical dipping fault planes.

SGP-TR-150-16

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Northern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} Province is situated in northern Idaho and western Montana and includes folded mountains, fault-bounded uplifts, and volcanics formed during middle Cretaceous to late Eocene mountain period. The region is structtually cojmplex with faulting and folding asociated with eastward thrust faulting. Western Montana and northwestern Wyoming contain large areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks, including smaller localized Quaternary silicic volcanic rocks. Replace Citation[1] References ↑ "Replace Citation" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Idaho, Montana Area 97,538 km²97,538,000,000 m²

360

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Maps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen chloride in superheated steam and chloride in deep brine at The Geysers geothermal field, California  

SciTech Connect

Chloride (Cl) concentrations of 10-120 ppm{sub w} have been measured in superheated steam produced by wells at The Geysers, a vapor-dominated geothermal field in northern California. Corrosion of the well casing and steam-gathering system has been recognized in some parts of The Geysers, and is apparently related to the presence of Cl. Cl in the steam is in a volatile form, generated with the steam at reservoir temperatures, and probably travels to the wellhead as HCl gas. Published experimental data for partial pressures of HCl in steam over aqueous HCl solutions and for dissociation constants of HCl were used to calculate distribution coefficients for HCl. Reservoir liquid Cl concentrations capable of generating steam with the observed Cl concentrations were then calculated as a function of pH and temperatures from 250 to 350 C. Equilibrium mineral/liquid reactions with the K-mica and K-feldspar assemblage found in the wells limit the reservoir liquid pH values at various Cl concentrations to about 5 to 6 (near neutral at 250 to 350 C). Within this pH range, liquid at 250 C could not produce steam containing the high Cl concentrations observed. However, liquid at higher temperatures (300 to 350 C) with chloride concentrations greater than 10,000 ppm{sub w} could generate steam with 10 to over 200 ppm{sub w} Cl. There is a positive correlation between pH and the chloride concentrations required to generate a given Cl concentration in steam. The concentration of Cl in superheated steam constrains not only the reservoir liquid composition, but the temperature at which the steam last equilibrated with liquid.

Haizlip, J.R.; Truesdell, A.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

Howard, J.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Challenging Water Dominated Geothermal System: the CerroSixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Simulation, Uenotai Geothermal Field, Akita Prefecture,

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlin sector ofThe Geysers geothermal system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

felsite unit), Geysers geothermal field, California: a 40California A summary. Geothermal Resources Councilsystematics of a continental geothermal system: results from

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest, Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in jointed and layered rocks in geothermal fields.of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 116, 257- 278.fracturing in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: Results

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution of Geothermal Fluids, Long Valley, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Sciences and Office of Geothermal Technologies underconcentrations in Long Valley geothermal waters discriminateand wells from the geothermal field and a nearby exploratory

Brown, Shaun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Environmental summary document for the Republic Geothermal, Inc. application for a geothermal loan guaranty project: 64 MW well field and 48 MW (net) geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review and analysis is provided of the environmental consequences of (1) guaranteeing a load for the completion of the 64 MW well field and the 48 MW (net) power plant or (2) denying a guaranteed load that is needed to finish the project. Mitigation measures are discussed. Alternatives and their impacts are compared and some discussion is included on unavoidable adverse impacts. (MHR)

Layton, D.W.; Powers, D.J.; Leitner, P.; Crow, N.B.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Ricker, Y.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Geothermal energy in Iceland. A trip report: June 16-21, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal installations in Iceland are reviewed. The difficulties experienced with seismic and volcanic activity are discussed. A brochure published by The Krafla Geothermal Project Executive Committee is included. (MHR)

Kestin, J.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geothermal programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a number of geothermal programs supported through two offices in the Department of Energy: the Office of Renewable Technologies, Geothermal Technologies Division, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Engineering, Mathematics and Geosciences. Within these programs, we are carrying out research in injection monitoring, optical instrumentation for geothermal wells, seismic imaging methods, geophysical and drilling investigations of young volcanic systems in California, and fundamental studies of the rock and mineral properties.

Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Modeling of geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last decade the use of numerical modeling for geothermal resource evaluation has grown significantly, and new modeling approaches have been developed. In this paper we present a summary of the present status in numerical modeling of geothermal systems, emphasizing recent developments. Different modeling approaches are described and their applicability discussed. The various modeling tasks, including natural-state, exploitation, injection, multi-component and subsidence modeling, are illustrated with geothermal field examples. 99 refs., 14 figs.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Environmental assessment of proposed geothermal well testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental assessment is made of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. (LBS )

Not Available

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Long Term Geothermal Heat Pump System Ground Loop Heat Exchanger Performance: Field Data from a Quick Service Restaurant Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes measured long-term performance of the ground loop heat exchanger in a geothermal heat pump system in a McDonald's Quick Service Restaurant located in Westland near Detroit, Michigan. Heat build-up in the soil around the heat exchanger over a long period of time has always been a concern, but only limited data has been available in the past. The gradual increase in the return loop temperature over a period of five years is evidence of the heat built up in the ground loop field, whic...

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Lateral steam flow revealed by a pressure build-up test at the Matsukawa vapor-dominated geothermal field, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results and discussion of a pressure build-up test at the Matsukawa vapor-dominated geothermal field in north-east Japan are reported. Pressure build-up behavior of three dry steam wells was monitored at the wellhead in October 1986. The observed pressure gradient clearly shows the existence of a lateral steam flow from south-west to north-east in the reservoir. This result suggests that the vapor-dominated reservoir extends further south-west than it is currently being developed. These conclusions are supported by production records and chemical data.

Hanano, M. Sakagawa, Y. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., 24-Ukai, Takizawa-mura, Iwate 020-01 (JP))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A system is proposed for the monitoring of changes in the underground structure of an active volcano over time by applying a transient electromagnetic method. The monitoring system is named ACTIVE, which stands for Array of Controlled Transient-electromagnetics for Imaging Volcano Edifice. The system consists of a transmitter dipole used to generate a controlled transient electromagnetic (EM) field and an array of receivers used to measure the vertical component of the transient magnetic

376

Geothermal Energy Program overview  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

378

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is mined. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

380

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal(Redirected from Leasing) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

382

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties, Nevada (May 2008)

383

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

384

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

385

Geothermal handbook. Geothermal project, 1976. [Ecological effects of geothermal resources development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal program of Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior, aims to develop ecologically sound practices for the exploration, development, and management of geothermal resources and the identification of the biological consequences of such development so as to minimize adverse effects on fish and wildlife resources. This handbook provides information about the ecological effects of geothermal resource development. Chapters are included on US geothermal resources; geothermal land leasing; procedures for assessing the effects on fish and game; environmental impact of exploratory and field development operations; and wildlife habitat improvement methods for geothermal development.

Not Available

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Inversion of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferograms for Sources of Production-Related Subsidence at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We used synthetic aperture radar interferograms to image ground subsidence that occurred over the Dixie Valley geothermal field during different time intervals between 1992 and 1997. Linear elastic inversion of the subsidence that occurred between April, 1996 and March, 1997 revealed that the dominant sources of deformation during this time period were large changes in fluid volumes at shallow depths within the valley fill above the reservoir. The distributions of subsidence and subsurface volume change support a model in which reduction in pressure and volume of hot water discharging into the valley fill from localized upflow along the Stillwater range frontal fault is caused by drawdown within the upflow zone resulting from geothermal production. Our results also suggest that an additional source of fluid volume reduction in the shallow valley fill might be similar drawdown within piedmont fault zones. Shallow groundwater flow in the vicinity of the field appears to be controlled on the NW by a mapped fault and to the SW by a lineament of as yet unknown origin.

Foxall, W; Vasco, D

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

387

Field evaluation of sampling methods for pressurized geothermal liquids, gases, and suspended solids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many different sampling methods were tested and compared for collecting samples for measurement of brine chemistry, gases, and suspended solids from pressurized geothermal systems. The tests were conducted on the 6-2 wellhead and a test loop at the Department of Energy's Geothermal Test Facility at East Mesa, California. The recommended methods for single-phase liquid or single-phase steam (with gases) are presented, together with detailed procedures. The results of testing methods for sampling two phase liquid-steam systems showed significant errors can result. It was recommended that two-phase flowing wells be directed to a full flow separator and the single-phase liquid and single-phase steam sampled separately using the recommended methods.

Shannon, D.W.; Cole, M.W.; DeMonia, D.D.; Divine, J.R.; Jensen, G.A.; Kindle, C.H.; Koski, O.H.; Smith, R.P.; Woodruff, E.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Preliminary simulation of land subsidence at the Wairakei geothermal field in New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal system has been treated as an isothermal, liquid system and the preliminary model studies the effect of heterogeneity and plasticity on the subsidence phenomenon. The system was idealized as consisting of the Waiora aquifer and the overlying Huka Falls (mudstone) aquitard. An idealized graded thickness of the Huka Falls formation of 40 m, 80 m, 120 m, 160 m, and 200 meters was used. Results were obtained which were qualitatively similar to those measured at the site. (MHR)

Narasimhan, T.N.; Goyal, K.P.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electromagnetic soundings for geothermal resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electromagnetic (EM) sounding survey was performed over a region encompassing the Dixie Valley geothermal field to map the subsurface resistivity in the geothermal field and the surrounding area. The EM survey, consisting of 19 frequency-domain depth soundings made with the LBL EM-60 system, was undertaken to explore a narrow region adjacent to the Stillwater Range to a depth of 2 to 3 km. Lithologic and well log resistivity information from well 66-21 show that for EM interpretation the section can be reduced to a three-layer model consisting of moderately resistive alluvial sediments, low resistivity lacustrine sediments, and high resistivity Tertiary volcanics and older rocks. This three layer model was used as a starting point in interpreting EM sounding data. Variations in resistivity and thickness provided structural information and clues to the accumulation of geothermal fluids. The interpreted soundings reveal a 1 to 1.5-km-deep low-resistivity zone spatially associated with the geothermal field. The shallow depth suggests that the zone detected is either fluid leakage or hydrothermal alteration, rather than high-temperature reservoir fluids. The position of the low-resistivity zone also conforms to changes in depth to the high resistivity basal layer, suggesting that faulting is a control on the location of productive intervals. 10 refs., 7 figs.

Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone Authors H.M. Bibby, G.F. Risk, T.G. Caldwell and S.L. Bennie Conference World Geothermal Congress 2005; Antalya, Turkey; 2005/04/24 Published ?, 2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone Citation H.M. Bibby,G.F. Risk,T.G. Caldwell,S.L. Bennie. 2005. Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from

391

Geothermal: About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - About Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

392

Geothermal: Publications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Publications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

393

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

394

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Guidebook to Geothermal Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance The Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance (the Guidebook), funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides insights and conclusions related to past influences and recent trends in the geothermal power project financing market before and after the 2008 economic downturn. Using the information in the Guidebook, developers and investors can innovate in new ways and develop partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal power projects in a dynamic and evolving marketplace. The Guidebook relies heavily on interviews conducted with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. It includes detailed information on

395

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems, paper presentedin the Deep Reservoir of the Mt. Amiata Geothermal Field,Italy, Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, 31, 153-

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

398

Direct utilization of geothermal resources field experiments at Monroe, Utah. Final report, July 14, 1978-July 13, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Monroe, Utah undertook a project to demonstrate the economic and technical viability of utilizing a low temperature geothermal resource to provide space and hot water heating to commercial, municipal, and domestic users within the community. During the course of the project, resource development and assessment, including drilling of a production well, was successfully completed. Upon completion of the field development and assessment phase of the program and of a preliminary design of the district heating system, it was determined that the project as proposed was not economically viable. This was due to: (1) a significant increase in estimated capital equipment costs resulting from the general inflation in construction costs, the large area/low population density in Monroe, and a more remote fluid disposal well site than planned, could not balance increased construction costs, (2) a lower temperature resource than predicted, and (3) due to predicted higher pumping and operating costs. After a thorough investigation of alternatives for utilizing the resource, further project activities were cancelled because the project was no longer economical and an alternative application for the resource could not be found within the constraints of the project. The City of Monroe, Utah is still seeking a beneficial use for the 600 gpm, 164/sup 0/F geothermal well. A summary of project activities included.

Blair, C.K.; Owen, L.B. (eds.)

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Study of core chips from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Study of core chips from the State of California, Well No. 1 in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field using petrographic,...

400

Geothermal Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Geothermal Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Geothermal Webinar Presentation Slides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Full moment tensor and source...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Full moment tensor and source location inversion based on full waveform adjoint inversion: application at the Geysers geothermal field Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

402

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

403

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: P wave...

404

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D...

405

Application Of Active Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal Field Of Travale, Tuscany Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of Active...

406

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian...

407

Field tests of corrosion and chemical sensors for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes approximately two years of continuous monitoring of corrosion (and other variables that affect corrosion) in a 10-megawatt binary cycle geothermal power plant. The project goal was to develop methods for detecting adverse plant conditions soon enough to prevent equipment failures. The instruments tested were: (1) resistance-type corrosion probes; (2) linear polarization corrosion probes; (3) oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) probes for oxygen detection; (4) high-temperature pH electrodes; and (5) electrodeless conductivity cells for gas bubble detection.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.; Mackey, D.B.; Koski, O.H.; McBarron, F.O.; Duce, J.L.; Pierce, D.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Case Study of Wide Diameter Casing for Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Three wells have been drilled in the central resistivity area of a geothermal field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Using a well bore simulator, WELL SIM V3.0, reservoir conditions and well characteristics are evaluated to determine the increase in output by increasing production casing diameters from either 8-5/8 inches OD or 9-5/8 inches OD to 13-3/8 inches OD. Increases in well drilling costs are determined to provide a commentary on the economics. While open hole size is effectively doubled, well costs increase by 10% and, in this study, output increases by an average of 18%.

King, T.R.; Freeston, D.H.; Winmill, R.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Mexican-American cooperative program at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: recent results of the well-drilling program at Cerro Prieto  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 and 1981 well drilling activities at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field are summarized. Details are given on the new series of deeper wells completed in the western (older) part of the field (Cerro Prieto I), and on the development and step-out wells drilled in the eastern part of the field (Cerro Prieto II and III). Production characteristics of on-line and standby wells are discussed. Recent changes in well completion procedures are also described.

Dominguez A, B.; Lippmann, M.J.; Bermejo M.; F.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Results of geothermal gradient core hole TCB-1, Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site, Guatemala, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical field studies conducted in 1988 and 1989 at the Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site in Guatemala indicated that there is a substantial shallow heat source beneath the area of youngest volcanism. To obtain information on subsurface temperatures and temperature gradients, stratigraphy, hydrothermal alteration, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids, a geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to 808 m low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro volcano Complex, 300 km south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, dated at 2,910 years. Gases from acid-sulfate springs near Laguna Ixpaco consistently yield maximum estimated subsurface temperatures of 250--300{degrees}C. The temperature versus depth curve from TCB-1 does not show isothermal conditions and the calculated thermal gradients from 500--800 m is 230{degrees}C/km. Bottom hole temperature is 238{degrees}C. Calculated heat flow values are nearly 9 heat flow units (HFU). The integration of results from the TCB-1 gradient core hole with results from field studies provides strong evidence that the Tecuamburro area holds great promise for containing a commercial geothermal resource.

Adams, A.I.; Chipera, S.; Counce, D.; Gardner, J.; Goff, S.; Goff, F.; Heiken, G.; Laughlin, A.W.; Musgrave, J.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Aycinena, S.; Martinelli, L. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O.; Revolorio, M.; Roldan, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion); D

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Exploration ofr geothermal resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case history of SUNEDCO's exploratory efforts, which ultimately led to the drilling and discovery of the Dixie Valley goethermal field, is presented. The geochemistry from three active lot springs in the area: Dixie Hot Springs, South Hot Springs, and Hyder Hot Springs, was examined. Two heat flow drilling programs were conducted at Dixie Hot Springs consisting of 45 temperature gradient holes ranging in depth from 30 to 1500 ft. From this program a heat-flow anomaly was mapped extending along the Stillwater Range front in which temperature gradients are greater than 100/sup 0/c/Km. in 1978, the number 1 SW Lamb well was drilled on a 152 acre farmout from Chevron. The well was completed as a geothermal producer in a zone of fractured volcanic rocks. Since then, five additional geothermal producing wells were completed within the anomalous area. (MJF)

Parchman, W.L.; Knox, J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

417

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

418

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

419

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

420

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

422

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

423

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and production wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production and injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan, were examined in an effort to establish relationships (1) between productivity of large-diameter wells and slim holes, (2) between injectivity and productivity indices and (3) between productivity index and borehole diameter. The production data from Oguni boreholes imply that the mass production from large-diameter wells may be estimated based on data from slim holes. Test data from both large- and small-diameter boreholes indicate that to first order the productivity and the injectivity indices are equal. Somewhat surprisingly, the productivity index was found to be a strong function of borehole diameter; the cause for this phenomenon is not understood at this time.

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Abe, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Permeability enhancement due to cold water injection: A Case Study at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure transient buildup and falloff data from 3 wells at the Los Azufres geothermal field have been evaluated to determine the extent to which cold water infection increases the permeability of the near-bore reservoir formation. Simultaneous analysis of the buildup and falloff data provides estimates of the permeability-thickness of the reservoir, the skin factor of the well, and the degree of permeability enhancement in the region behind the thermal front. Estimates of permeability enhancement range from a factor of 4 to 9, for a temperature change of about 150{degree}C. The permeability enhancement is attributed to thermally induced contraction and stress-cracking of the formation. 9 refs., 18 figs.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.; Ortiz, J.; Iglesias, E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geothermal power plants of Mexico and Central America: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the fifth in a series describing the geothermal power plants of the world, the countries of Mexico and of Central America are studied. The geothermal plants are located in areas of recent and active volcanism; the resources are of the liquid-dominated type. Details are given about the plants located at Cerro Prieto in Mexico and at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. In both cases, attention is paid to the geologic nature of the fields, the well programs, geofluid characteristics, energy conversion systems, materials of construction, effluent handling systems, economic factors and plant operating experience. Exploration and development activities are described for other promising geothermal areas in Mexico and El Salvador, along with those in the countries of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama.

DiPippo. R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Geothermal: Home Page  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Home Page Home Page Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links Search for: (Place phrase in "double quotes") Sort By: Relevance Publication Date System Entry Date Document Type Title Research Org Sponsoring Org OSTI Identifier Report Number DOE Contract Number Ascending Descending Search Quickly and easily search geothermal technical and programmatic reports dating from the 1970's to present day. These "legacy" reports are among the most valuable sources of DOE-sponsored information in the field of geothermal energy technology. See "About" for more information. The Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection is sponsored by the Geothermal Technologies Program, DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

427

geothermal2.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N N M T R A P E D O F E N E R G Y E T A T S D E T I N U S O F A M E R I CA E GEOTHERMAL TESTING S ince 2006, several geothermal power production companies and the Department of Energy have expressed interest in demonstrating low- temperature geothermal power projects at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). Located at Teapot Dome Oilfield in Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), RMOTC recently expanded its testing and demonstration of power production from low- temperature, co- produced oilfield geothermal waste water. With over 1,000 existing well- bores and its 10,000-acre oil field, RMOTC offers partners the unique opportunity to test their geot- hermal tech- nologies while using existing oilfield infra- structure. RMOTC's current low-temperature geothermal project uses 198°F water separated from Tensleep

428

Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Dictionary.png Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

429

Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

W. C. Maurer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project EA at San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant USG Nevada LLC Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Comments USG Nevada submitted Utilization POU on 7/25/2013 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office BLM Black Rock

431

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Need to develop a reservoir model for Coso Notes Analysis of complex geothermal system was done by looking at the available data on the Coso Geothermal Field References Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F. (1 September 1985) Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=510801" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers

432

Human Resources in Geothermal Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some 80 countries are potentially interested in geothermal energy development, and about 50 have quantifiable geothermal utilization at present. Electricity is produced from geothermal in 21 countries (total 38 TWh/a) and direct application is recorded in 35 countries (34 TWh/a). Geothermal electricity production is equally common in industrialized and developing countries, but plays a more important role in the developing countries. Apart from China, direct use is mainly in the industrialized countries and Central and East Europe. There is a surplus of trained geothermal manpower in many industrialized countries. Most of the developing countries as well as Central and East Europe countries still lack trained manpower. The Philippines (PNOC) have demonstrated how a nation can build up a strong geothermal workforce in an exemplary way. Data from Iceland shows how the geothermal manpower needs of a country gradually change from the exploration and field development to monitoring and operations.

Fridleifsson, I.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Discovering New Events Beyond...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Discovering New Events Beyond the Catalog - Application of Matched Field Processing to Salton Sea Geothermal Field Seismicity...

434

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Environment Geothermal/Environment < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

435

Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascades Geothermal Region Cascades Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (3) Techniques (5) Map: {{{Name}}} The Cascade Range is part of a vast mountain chain that extends from British Columbia to northern California and has been volcanically active for ~ 40 million years as a result of the convergence of the of the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. Two physiographic sub-provinces make up the Cascade Range; the Western Cascades and the High Cascades on the east. Middle Eocene to early Pliocene (40 - 5 million years) thick mafic lava flows, primarily of andesitic composition are associated with ash flows, tuffs, and silicic intrusive bodies and stocks that decrease in age eastward to the High Cascades. Miocene to Holocene volcanic rocks make up

436

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

437

Geothermal Information Dissemination and Outreach  

SciTech Connect

Project Purpose To enhance technological and topical information transfer in support of industry and government efforts to increase geothermal energy use in the United States (power production, direct use, and geothermal groundsource heat pumps). Project Work GRC 2003 Annual Meeting. The GRC convened the meeting on Oct. 12-15, 2003, at Morelia's Centro de Convenciones y ExpoCentro in Mexico under the theme, International Collaboration for Geothermal Energy in the Americas. The event was also sponsored by the Comision Federal de Electricidad. ~600 participants from more than 20 countries attended the event. The GRC convened a Development of Geothermal Projects Workshop and Geothermal Exploration Techniques Workshop. GRC Field Trips included Los Azufres and Paricutin Volcano on Oct. 11. The Geothermal Energy Association (Washington, DC) staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Annual Meeting Opening Session was convened on Oct. 13, and included the governor of Michoacan, the Mexico Assistant Secretary of Energy, CFE Geothermal Division Director, DOE Geothermal Program Manager, and private sector representatives. The 2003 Annual Meeting attracted 160 papers for oral and poster presentations. GRC 2004. Under the theme, Geothermal - The Reliable Renewable, the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting convened on Aug. 29-Sept. 1, 2004, at the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort at Indian Wells, CA. Estimated total attendance (including Trade Show personnel, guests and accompanying persons) was ~700. The event included a workshop, Geothermal Production Well Pump Installation, Operation and Maintenance. Field trips went to Coso/Mammoth and Imperial Valley/Salton Sea geothermal fields. The event Opening Session featured speakers from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the private sector. The Geothermal Energy Association staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Geothermal Education Office staged its Geothermal Energy Workshop. Several local radio and TV station interviews were conducted during the event. Technical Program included 136 technical papers. All were published in Volume 28 of the GRC Transactions. Volume 28, GRC Transactions Pblished as a high-quality, durable casebound volume, Volume 28 of the Transactions published 119 out of 136 technical papers (692 pp) presented at the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting. The papers were submitted by geothermal experts and professionals from around the world. The papers were reviewed over a 2-day period by 25 volunteer (in-kind) geothermal experts from the private sector and DOE National Laboratories. GRC staff received and cataloged the papers, and maintained interaction with authors for revisions and corrections. DOE Geothermal Technologies Newsletter The Office of Geothermal Technologies quarterly newsletter, Geothermal Technologies, is produced at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This 2-color, 4- to 16-page newsletter summarizes federal geothermal research and development projects and other DOE geothermal news. The GRC receives newsletter disk copy and color-key proof from NREL for each newsletter, then follows through with print production and distribution. Circulation is 1,000 per issue (plus 300 copies of the newsletter shipped to NREL for internal and public distribution). During the project period, the GRC printed, stitched and bound the Geothermal Technologies newsletter into the Sept/Oct 2003, Jan/Feb 2004, and May/June 2004 editions of the GRC Bulletin. Multiple copies (300) of the newsletter sans magazine were provided to NREL for internal DOE distribution. GRC Geothermal Research Library The GRC has built the largest and most comprehensive library in the world devoted to geothermal energy. The GRC Geothermal Library provides rapid accessibility to the majority of technical literature crafted over the past 30 years, and preserves hard copy and on-line databases for future use by geothermal researchers and developers. A bibliography for over half of the physical library's citations is available through keyword search on the GRC web site (www.geothe

Ted J. Clutter, Geothermal Resources Council Executive Director

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Geothermal: Distributed Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links Geothermal Collection (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) E-print Network (DOE) National Technical Information Service (NTIS) Geothermal Legacy Collection (DOE) NREL Publications U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Scientific and Technical Information Network (STINET) Select All Enter one or more search terms to search the following fields: [Searches for the following specific fields are available for the sites and databases as indicated below.] Author: (Geothermal Collections, NREL, STINET, and U.S. Patent Server) Title: (All sources except NTIS)

439

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volcanic field geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2geology of the Desert Peak Geothermal