Sample records for volcanic environments cxs

  1. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  2. Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Htun, K.M.

    1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

  3. Volcanic activity can have a profound effect on the Earth's atmosphere and environment across many spatial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    . Fink (Eds.) 117 Earth's Deep Interior: Mineral Physics and Tomography From the Atomic to the Global and the atmosphere will find this work an important resource. Volcanism and the Earth's Atmosphere Alan Robock IUGG Volumes Maurice Ewing Volumes Mineral Physics Volumes #12;105 New Perspectives on the Earth

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  5. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Environment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee...

  6. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebbaEnvironment Environment A

  7. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovation PortalHanford SiteMonitoringEnvironment

  8. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebba SignEconomicEnvironment

  9. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  10. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcanism was modeled in experiments in which thermite melt fFe + AtOj explosively interacted with water

  11. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  12. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism, Crustal...

  13. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  14. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon...

  15. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lack of surface thermal manifestation * Assessing unconventional targets requires re-tooling the standard geothermal exploration kit and adding in new tools Gravity Aeromagnetics...

  16. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10| Departmentin theIssues

  17. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |Bleckley County, Georgia: EnergyMulti-phase

  18. Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

  19. Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM 2:30 p.m. Crystal Ballroom B Chairs: J. E. Bleacher M. H to the northeast. 2:45 p.m. Baloga S. M. * Glaze L. S. Time-Dependent Levee Growth for Mars Lava Flows [#1276, for very cold climate, sulfur dioxide glaciers and liquid sulfur dioxide runoff. 4:00 p.m. Johnson S. S

  20. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,...

  1. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the vents, being flanked or covered with volcaniclastic flow deposits. Each volcanic pile is several kilometers wide and several hundred meters thick, and overlaps one after...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson,...

  4. archean volcanic hosted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greenstone pile Sandiford, Mike 23 Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and...

  5. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

  7. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982)...

  8. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search...

  9. anatolian volcanic province: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volcanic Province Geosciences Websites Summary: the Lonar crater. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns in the target basalts and brecciaTrace element and...

  10. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico...

  11. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,...

  12. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  13. Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archipelago, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension To The...

  14. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

  15. The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C. Varekamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C (northern Patagonia, Argentina) is a large glacial lake acidified by volcanic fluids from Copahue volcano

  16. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  17. Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mege, Daniel

    Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1 Anthony C. Cook,2,3 Erwan Garel,4 Yves: Solar System Objects: Mars; 8121 Tectonophysics: Dynamics, convection currents and mantle plumes; 8010: Me`ge, D., A. C. Cook, E. Garel, Y. Lagabrielle, and M.-H. Cormier, Volcanic rifting at Martian

  18. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  19. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the youngest pulses of volcanism. > Oxygen-isotope data from illitesmectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from -2.15 to +7.97...

  20. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  1. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  2. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  3. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  4. Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western United States, II. Long...

  5. Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log...

  7. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of...

  8. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  9. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  10. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Halogen emissions from a small volcanic eruption: Modeling the peak concentrations, dispersion, and volcanically induced ozone loss in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , with lesser quantities of H2S, H2 and CO. Volcanic emissions also often include halogen-bearing species, and the greater water vapor content in the lower troposphere at tropical latitudes, which enhance removal

  12. A model simulation of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turco, R.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Toon, O.B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. The authors` model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO{sub 2} emissions. The large amounts of SO{sub 2} (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reached their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 {mu}m approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion. 57 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  13. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  14. SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC Youxue Zhang,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Youxue Zhang,1,2 Zhengjiu Xu,2 Mengfan Zhu,1 2007. [1] Knowledge about the properties of silicate melts is needed by volcanologists and petrologists and diffusivity of volatile components in silicate melts, silicate melt viscosity, and the fragmentation condition

  15. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  16. Peace Corps / Environment Environment Volunteers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Peace Corps / Environment Environment Volunteers Environmental damage can have enormous choices about how to best protect and preserve the local environment. Programs and Sample Projects and communications technology, agriculture, and environment. We are looking for applicants with a variety of skills

  17. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  18. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  19. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ValleyMono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  20. sustainable environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainable resource management environment fisheries aquaculture Cefas capability statement #12 that they can manage their environments and resources in a responsible, effective and sustainable manner. Our costs · Understand, assess and develop opportunities in the short, medium and long-term · Build

  1. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:WindLaoLaredoLassen Volcanic

  2. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco Volcanic Field

  3. Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump

  4. Temporal and petrogenetic constraints on volcanic accretionary processes at 9-10 degrees North East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Christopher L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic accretion at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) occurs over a ~2-4 km wide neo-volcanic zone on either side of the axial summit trough (AST). Eruption ages are critical for understanding the distribution ...

  5. Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-ą). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

  6. Spatio-temporal variability in volcanic sulphate deposition over the past 2 kyr in snow pits and firn cores from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    environmental effects. Apart from volcanic ashes, CO2 and water vapour, the reactive gaseous compounds SO2, H2S Running median RRMi Reduced running mean (after removal of all volcanic peaks) xi Ion concentration

  7. Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya V. Sakkas volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B

  8. OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities Reawakens Volcanic Threat Assessment: Analysis of Hazard and Risk Factors......................... 14 · Table 2. List of hazard and exposure factors used in the NVEWS threat assessment · Figure 3

  9. Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

  10. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden

  11. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    to produce a synthetic and objective map of recent mud flows covering a 640 · 700 km2 area, which representsORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western Mediterranean model for the origin for Mediterranean Ridge mud volcanism. Image analysis techniques are used

  12. Arctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols and ozone depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of perturbation experiments, the full radiative effects of the observed Pinatubo aerosol cloud were included eruption, which produced the largest global volcanic aerosol cloud in the twentieth century. A seriesArctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols

  13. Late Quaternary geology of small basaltic volcanic centers, SW USA: Disparity among dating methods and implications for volcanic and geomorphic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology; Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Byrd Polar Research Center; Crowe, B.; Pothis, J.; Olinger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of volcanic hazards near the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain provides the impetus for a series of detailed field and geochronologic studies of selected small late Quaternary basaltic scoria cones and lava flows in Nevada and California. Two of the most significant results of these studies are: the presence of chronostratigraphic units which indicate multiple eruptions with significant intervals of no activity between events (polycyclic volcanism); and a marked difference between conventional, numerical ages derived from K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 methods and numerical, calibrated, and relative ages derived from thermoluminescence, cosmogenic He-3, the degree of soil development, and geomorphology of these volcanic landforms. Soil-bounded unconformities and buried stone pavements define the boundaries of chronostratigraphic units within these small volume basaltic centers. Volcanic centers displaying this type of stratigraphy may appear morphological simple but cannot be considered mongenetic. Recent studies by Perry and Crowe demonstrate that geochemical variations within a single basaltic volcanic center in NV are consistent with several magma batches forming a complex polycyclic volcano. The K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are 1--2 orders of magnitude older than either TL or cosmogenic He-3 and appear to have insufficient precision to constrain the ages of chronostratigraphic units within polycyclic volcanoes. In contrast, preliminary data indicate the TL and cosmogenic He-3 dating methods have the ability to resolve the late Quaternary volcanic stratigraphy, and results from these dating methods are consistent with the degree of soil development and geomorphic modification of the volcanic units. K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 dates from these small basaltic volcanic centers have been used to calibrate new Quaternary dating methods, e.g. rock varnish, which in turn have been used to interpret landscape evolution in the SW US.

  14. DSW Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pdf) Section 2 - Proposed Action and Alternatives (6.8 MB pdf) Section 3 - Affected Environment for the extension of the right of way to the Harry Allen Substation and for the...

  15. Drying analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Eaton, R.R.; Russo, A.J.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A submeter-scale drying experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially wet cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was dried by blowing dry nitrogen over the ends. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport is unimportant in the interior of the core; the rate of drying is controlled by transport of liquid water to the ends of the core, where it can evaporate and escape into the dry environment outside. By using previous experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement between measured and calculated drying rates was achieved. However, predicted saturation profiles were much smoother that those measured experimentally, presumably because of centimeter-scale inhomogeneities in the core sample. Our results indicate that water is transported chiefly as liquid from the interior to the edges of the core, where it evaporates and escapes out the ends. Thus, liquid-phase transport controls the overall drying rate. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

  17. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckale, Jenny

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

  19. Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W. (David William)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

  20. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  1. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  2. Ice core evidence for a second volcanic eruption around 1809 in the Northern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    is reported in the historical volcanism record between 1801 and 1812 [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. [3] Analysis and a March 1809 eruption date for Cosiguina [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. However, recent work on Cosiguina has

  3. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  4. Geologic origin of magnetic volcanic glasses in the KBS tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlinger, C.M.; Smith, R.M.; Veblen, D.R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic glass shards and banded pumice from the KBS tuff of northern Kenya exhibit marked variations in magnetic susceptibility and color (colorless to dark brown). The darker glass shards exhibit superparamagnetism, which they now know to be carried by a population of tiny microcrystals of Fe-rich cubic oxide, approx. 20 to approx. 100 A in size, thought to be magnetite. A theory for their origin is one of nucleation and growth (precipitation) in quenched homogeneous glass (colorless) at temperatures of approx. 700-1000/sup 0/C during and immediately subsequent to eruption. Results from high-temperature heating experiments on KBS shards support this idea. The precipitate appears in the KBS shards as a consequence of their cooling history and is the origin of their coloring; the origin cannot lie in negligible compositional differences between the colorless and darkest shards. On the other hand, banded pumice from the KBS tuff has both dark and colorless glasses of differing compositions. The pumice appears banded because precipitation occurred preferentially in the Fe-rich glass. Although magma mixing may have played a role in the eruption of these materials, on the basis of their survey of distal eruptive products, it would appear that the volumetric amount of the mafic end member (dark pumice) was insubstantial.

  5. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ft. Both the sandstones are capped by marine shales. The Caballos Formation was deposited during a world- wide transgression, and rests nonconformably on Jurassic volcanics. The Lower Caballos is composed of braided stream deposits.... The Middle Caballos consists of shale and sandy shale deposited in restricted to open- marine and bay environments. The Upper Caballos was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment, and individual sandstone units, which are separated by shale, have a...

  6. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ft. Both the sandstones are capped by marine shales. The Caballos Formation was deposited during a world- wide transgression, and rests nonconformably on Jurassic volcanics. The Lower Caballos is composed of braided stream deposits.... The Middle Caballos consists of shale and sandy shale deposited in restricted to open- marine and bay environments. The Upper Caballos was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment, and individual sandstone units, which are separated by shale, have a...

  7. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

  8. Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

  9. Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

  10. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  11. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  12. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  13. Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

  14. Ecology and environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

  15. GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES) Richard Rijkers 1 & Robert Hack 2 ABSTRACT A geomechanical analysis of a shallow small scale landslide, (NITG-TNO), Geomechanical Research, PO box 97, 2600 JA Delft, The Netherlands, tel.: +31 15 2697222, r

  16. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  17. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  18. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  19. Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter caused significant species extinctions. This includes the 170 km-diameter Chicxulub impact crater or even significant species extinctions. The K/T mass extinction may have been caused by the coincidenceImpacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect? G. KELLER

  20. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

  1. Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    geothermal heat associated with their em- placement and cooling could play a crucial role in basal melt water [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help production. For instance, the geothermal flux estimate in the vicinity of a (potential) recently active

  2. Did the Toba volcanic eruption of $74 ka B.P. produce widespread glaciation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model 3.0 (CCSM3 that the Toba volcanic eruption, approximately 74 ka B.P., was responsible for the extended cooling period a maximum global cooling of 10 K and ModelE runs produced 8­17 K of cooling within the first years

  3. Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

  4. American Journal of Science UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Matthew

    American Journal of Science JUNE 2008 UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO MID. Uturuncu volcano, SW Bolivia, is a dormant stratovolcano ( 85 km3 ) dominated by dacitic lava domes §§§ Empresa Minera Unificada S.A., La Paz, Bolivia; Mayelsuco@hotmail.com Institute of Geophysics, University

  5. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  6. UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 2015 ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COME AND YOUR F I N D PLACE UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 2015 EARTH and ENVIRONMENT #12;| CONTENTS | www OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT Why study earth and environment at Leeds? 2 Why study an earth science course? 4 Why study an environment course? 8 Choosing the right degree 12 Four-year industrial degrees (BA

  7. The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological and geochemical features2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological Group 2). Both magmatic groups belong to the under-saturated alkaline40 sodic series. Petrological

  8. Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning Bel¨oningsbaserad Inl¨arning Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements 1 Defining the Problem Framework Role of Reward Simplifying Assumptions Central Concepts 2 Known Environment Bellmans

  9. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  10. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  11. Lesson 34a: Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasifiki [Pacific Ocean] Bahari Aktiki [Arctic Ocean] Bahari ya Mediterani [Mediterranean Sea] Bahari yaLesson 34a: Environment Environment [mazingira] bahari / bahari [ocean / sea / oceans / seas / farms] Bahari [ocean / sea] Bahari Hindi [Indian Ocean] Bahari Atlantiki [Atlantic Ocean] Bahari

  12. Computing environment logbook

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  13. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

  14. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions – height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters – are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 14–16 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  15. Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

  16. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  17. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  18. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumeric JumpTerrace,the Jemez Volcanic

  19. Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic

  20. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  1. Environment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Ecological Resources and Systems Environmental Security and Restoration Land and Renewable Resources Radiation and Chemical Risk Management Environment True energy...

  2. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  3. environment and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

  4. Sustainability Statement Environment Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metropolitan University www.mmu.ac.uk/environment MMU Annual Sustainability Statement 2008/2009 CO2 2 Contents 6 MMU Environment Strategy 7 Key Area 1 ­ Environmental Management Systems & Reporting 8 ­ 9 Key Area 2 ­ Energy and Carbon Emissions 10 ­ 11 Key Area 3 ­ Sustainable Buildings 12 Key Area 4 ­ Water

  5. Forests and historic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  6. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  7. Oxygen buffering of Kilauea volcanic gases and the oxygen fugacity of Kilauea basalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, T.M. (Geological Survey, Vancouver, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic gases collected during episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption along the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, have uniform C-O-H-S-Cl-F compositions that are sharply depleted in CO[sub 2]. The CO[sub 2]-poor gases are typical of Type II volcanic gases (GERLACH and GRAEBER, 1985) and were emitted from evolved magma stored for a prolonged period of time in the east rift zone after releasing CO[sub 2]-rich gases during an earlier period of temporary residence in the summit magma chamber. The samples are remarkably free of contamination by atmospheric gases and meteoric water. Thermodynamic evaluation of the analytical data shows that the episode 1 gases have equilibrium compositions appropriate for temperatures between 935 and 1032[degrees]C. Open- and closed-system equilibrium models of species distributions for the episode 1 gases show unequivocally that coexisting lavas buffered the gas oxygen fugacities during cooling. These models indicate that the F[sub o[sub 2

  8. Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning Bel¨oningsbaserad Inl¨arning #12;Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements 1 Defining the Problem Framework Role of Reward Simplifying Assumptions Central Concepts 2 Known Environment Bellman

  9. Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning Bel¨oningsbaserad Inl¨arning #12;Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements 1 Defining the Problem Framework Role of Reward Simplifying Assumptions Central Concepts 2 Known Environment Bellmans

  10. Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

  11. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to the TSPA, which uses the ASHPLUME software described and used in this model report. Thus, ASHPLUME software inputs are inputs to this model report for ASHPLUME runs in this model report. However, ASHPLUME software inputs are outputs of this model report for ASHPLUME runs by TSPA.

  12. High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications for Volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications emissions at numerous water prospection drillings in the volcanic island of Tenerife. Large concentrations region of the island (Las Can~ adas del Teide caldera). In this work we analysed CO2 concentrations

  13. Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands: the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) Joan Andújara,* , Fidel Costab , Bruno Scailleta a. Université1 Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands eruptions (ca. 1 km3 ) of the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife Island). Combined with previous

  14. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  15. Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

  16. Age, geochemical and SrNdPb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Age, geochemical and Sr­Nd­Pb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics, Northern Kohistan Terrane, Pakistan S.D. Khana,*, R.J. Sternb , M.I. Mantonb, University of Peshawar, Pakistan Accepted 21 April 2004 Available online 23 September 2004 Abstract

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of a 3334 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA. 2 Department and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201­203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated

  18. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA d Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can: Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK. 2 Present address: NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

  19. Photographs of MIT environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strand, C. Mark

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on an exhibition of 43 photographs shown in a visual thesis exhibition at the Creative Photography Gallery November 15-December 15, 1983. The photographs document MIT environments with special categories ...

  20. Environment induced incoherent controllability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffaele Romano; Domenico D'Alessandro

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that the environment induced entanglement between two non interacting, two-dimensional quantum systems S and P can be used to control the dynamics of S by means of the initial state of P. Using a simple, exactly solvable model, we show that both accessibility and controllability of S can be achieved under suitable conditions on the interaction of S and P with the environment.

  1. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Hardcastle

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  2. Polymers in disordered environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; N. Fricke; W. Janke

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of our recent studies aiming at a better understanding of the scaling behaviour of polymers in disordered environments is given. The main emphasis is on a simple generic model where the polymers are represented by (interacting) self-avoiding walks and the disordered environment by critical percolation clusters. The scaling behaviour of the number of conformations and their average spatial extent as a function of the number of monomers and the associated critical exponents $\\gamma$ and $\

  3. Energy/Environment/Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakahara, N.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    / Energy / Environment/ SutainabilitySutainability Resource/ Energy System TheoryPreserve/Degrade Man Economy/SocietyHealth/Hygiene Enviro nment Global Env.Urban Env. Environm- ent ModelChemical/Thermal PollutionRecycle Diffused Energy Active System... Energy Use Pattern Global Env. Pollution Urban Environment ? Demand Control Optimization Humanism Maintenance/Moral ? Renewable Energy Energy Recycle Proper Evaluation ? High Efficiency Energy Conservation PrincipleEnergy Conservation Principle Reflection...

  4. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  5. The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiss, Steven P.

    The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment Revised Paper Steven P. Reiss1@cs.brown.edu Abstract The Desert software engineering environment is a suite of tools developed to enhance pro- grammer virtual files on demand to address specific tasks. All this is done in an open and extensible environment

  6. Environment scattering in GADRAS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean James; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Harding, Lee T.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the angular tallies for scattered gamma-rays as a function of distance, height, and environment. Green's Functions were then used to encapsulate the results a reusable transformation function. The calculations represent the transport of photons throughout scattering surfaces that surround sources and detectors, such as the ground and walls. Utilization of these calculations in GADRAS (Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software) enables accurate computation of environmental scattering for a variety of environments and source configurations. This capability, which agrees well with numerous experimental benchmark measurements, is now deployed with GADRAS Version 18.2 as the basis for the computation of scattered radiation.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateEnvironment ClimateEnvironment On January 27, 2011, in ClimateEnvironment Sensing and Monitoring Modeling and Analysis Carbon Management Water & Environment Publications...

  8. Sample Environment Plans and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sample Environment Plans and Progress at the SNS & HFIR SNS HFIR User Group Meeting American Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 ­ 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group our sample environment capabilities Feedback SHUG meetings User surveys Sample Environment Steering

  9. DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    1 DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS Chandrajit L. Bajaj and Fausto Bernardini with synthetic environments1,2,3,4,5,6 . A synthetic environment system is generally characterized and the synthetic environment generated by the computer. Several degrees of immersion are possible, ranging from

  10. Research Articles Holistic Programming Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Gary

    Research Articles Holistic Programming Environments Gary Marsden a Harold Thimbleby b a Department a development environment. Of course, we can scoff at the distinction and say that a development environment to the development of programming environments and suggest ways in which this may be achieved. Keywords: Programming

  11. Author's personal copy Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    . The easternmost main islands of the Canary archipelago (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, North Atlantic Ocean, Spain Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Arid environments; Canary islands; Cream-coloured courser) harbour a stable population. The species showed an intense habitat selection pattern in these islands. Its

  12. Environment US Army Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Asia, Europe and the U. S. An environment once pristine and rich in biological diversity now suffers · Pentagon official lauds services for energy strategies · Corps among winners at `GOVgreen' 16 Sustainability Awards coming soon Corps team earns international recognition Regulators discuss mitigation

  13. Interactive Virtual Environments Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    sensor data or by animation scripts. Human users can interact and directly manipulate objects within Reality Interactive Virtual Reality Virtualized Reality Augmented Reality #12;HUMAN PERCEPTION OF REALITY REAL WORLD / ENVIRONMENT HUMAN (sentient living animal able of sensible reasoning) #12;Real

  14. Multiprocessor programming environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  15. save energy, environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    was especially emphasized dur- ing the 1970s to combat the energy crisis caused by Arab oil embargoes. The recentsave energy, money, and the environment Windbreaks and shade trees #12;PrePared by Bryan R trees is based on their potential to save money from subsequent energy re- ductions. Winter heating

  16. Center for volcanic and tectonic studies, Department of Geoscience, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV. Annual report No. 69, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report of the Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, maps, and reprints that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1991 and December 31, 1992. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that had direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics included: (1) The role of the mantle during regional extension. (2) The structural controls and emplacement mechanisms of Pliocene/Quaternary basaltic centers and dikes. (3) The detailed geochemistry of individual volcanic centers in Crater Flat, Nevada. (4) Estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruption (this topic is being studied by Dr. C-H. Ho at UNLV).

  17. Abstract The Holocene Parinacota Volcanic Debris Av-alanche (ca. 8,000 years B.P.) is located in the central An-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    that material that travelled further broke up and had an initial greater kinetic energy. Keywords Debris Andes Volcanic Zone of northern Chile (Figs. 1 and 2). Parinacota Volcano is located on the Chile­Bolivia

  18. CX-007925: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-007925: Categorical Exclusion Determination Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02222012 Location(s):...

  19. Environment and Protostellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yichen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of resulting star and planetary systems. Here we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focussing on low-mass, Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), to very high pressures that may be found in the densest Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) or in the Galactic Center (GC). We present unified analytic and numerical models for collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution and bipolar outflows, coupled to radiative transfer (RT) calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting...

  20. Sustainable Environment Technologies (4578)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action Title: Sustainable Environment Technologies

  1. Galaxy Evolution and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter van Dokkum; Ryan Quadri

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of galaxies are strongly correlated with their environment, with red galaxies dominating galaxy clusters and blue galaxies dominating the general field. However, not all field galaxies are young: studies of the colors, line strengths, and M/L ratios of massive early-type galaxies at 0environment. There is good evidence that the growth of these galaxies does continue longer in the field than in clusters, via (nearly) dissipationless mergers of already old galaxies. These results are consistent with predictions of recent galaxy formation models, which incorporate AGN feedback to suppress star formation in the most massive halos. Systematic studies of the relation of galaxies with their environment beyond z=1 are difficult, and still somewhat contradictory. Intriguingly both the DEEP2 and VVDS surveys find that the color-density relation disappears at z~1.3, unfortunately just at the point where both surveys become highly incomplete. On the other hand, clustering studies at z~2.5 have shown that red galaxies cluster more strongly than blue galaxies, implying that the color-density relation was already in place at that redshift.

  2. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  3. Analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow imbibition experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.

    1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-meter-scale imbibition experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially dry cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was saturated by contacting the ends with pressurized water. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport has a small (less than 5%) effect on the speed of the wetting front. By using experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement with measured, transient, saturation data was achieved. The sensitivity of predicted transient wetting fronts to permeability data indicates a need for more extensive measurements. We conclude that it will be difficult to characterize an entire repository - where inhomogeneities due to variations in matrix and fracture properties are not well known - solely from the results of sub-meter-scale laboratory testing and deterministic modeling. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Ecology and environment What ecology and environment course is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Ecology and environment Essentials What ecology and environment course is there? Ecology 01273 876787 Why ecology and environment at Sussex? · You will be taught by lecturers who are leaders in research, with a broad range of experience and expertise including plant, bird and insect ecology, climate

  5. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Environment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    and industrial research in chemistry, biology, environmental science and biotechnology. Our research is carried: environmental biotechnology and sustainability ­ bioremediation, water quality, microbial ecology and inorganicn CAPABILITY STATEMENT Environment and Biotechnology Centre Overview The Environment

  6. Painting in a sonic environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greated, Marianne

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis explores how painting is affected by its sonic environment. The research stems from an artistic response to noise in the environment and how this can be explored through artistic practice. The boundaries of ...

  7. Guest Editors' Introduction: Hostile Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukowicz, Paul

    Pervasive computing technology can save lives by both eliminating the need for humans to work in hostile environments and supporting them when they do. In general, environments that are hazardous to humans are hard on ...

  8. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Miracle, Ann L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants in vadose zone environments pose a long-term source and threat to groundwater resources, human health, and the environment. Several technical, regulatory, and policy challenges and opportunities are associated with contamination in vadose zone environments, particularly in remediation. In this special issue, ten papers present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments.

  9. QCD in Extreme Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John B. Kogut

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I review present challenges that QCD in extreme environments presents to lattice gauge theory. Recent data and impressions from RHIC are emphasized. Physical pictures of heavy ion wavefunctions, collisions and the generation of the Quark Gluon Plasma are discussed, with an eye toward engaging the lattice and its numerical methods in more interaction with the experimental and phenomenological developments. Controversial, but stimulating scenarios which can be confirmed or dismissed by lattice methods are covered. In the second half of the talk, several promising developments presented at the conference Lattice 2002 are reviewed.

  10. Environment Induced Time Arrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janos Polonyi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

  11. Environment Feature Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeeches EnergyActive for Life"Environment Feature

  12. Geoscience/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,DioxideGeoscience/Environment

  13. NERSC Modules Software Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal:Ott2006.jpgEnvironment » Modules

  14. School of Environment and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    School of Environment and Sustainability Room 323, Kirk Hall 117 Science Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8 Telephone: (306) 966-1985 E-mail: sens.info@usask.ca Master of Environment and Sustainability (MES) Opportunity Sustainability Science in the Delta Dialogue Network The School of Environment and Sustainability

  15. 4/22/08 4:15 PMCientficos estudian origen de los volcanes costarricenses -ALDEA GLOBAL -nacion.com Page 1 of 2http://nacion.com/ln_ee/2008/abril/22/aldea1502437.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, W. Steven

    volcanes y los sismos aquĂ­ PABLO FONSECA Q. | pfonseca@nacion.com Un grupo de cientĂ­ficos estadounidenses y

  16. Petrology and geochemistry of the Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vespucci, P.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late Cenozoic rocks of Hispaniola are subdivided into two petrographically and geochemically contrasting series, a calc-alkaline series (CA-series), and a mafic alkaline series (MA-series). The CA-series are basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites occurring in several eruptive centers in the southern part of the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic. MA-series basalts are alkali-olivine basalts and limburgitic basalts occurring in the San Juan Valley of the Dominican republic and in the Cul de Sac of south central Haiti. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, mica, feldspar, and titanomagnetite were analyzed for major element chemical composition. MA-series basalts are slightly to moderately silica undersaturated, have high TiO2 (>1.5%) and MgO (>5.0%) and moderately high total alkalis (>2.0%). MA-series basalts are enriched in K, Rb, Sr, Ba, U, Th and LREEs with Ba/La ratios around 0.98. REE patterns are fractionated (chrondrite normalized La/Yb ratios around 62, and La/Sm ratios around 6). HFS elements Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are high resembling intraplate basalts. 86SR/87SR ratios are high (0.7060-0.7070) with low Rb/Sr ratios (0.03 to 0.15). Basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites of the CA-series show low MgO (<5.0%) and TiO2(<2.0%), and moderately high total alkali contents (2 to 7%). Enrichment is seen in K Rb, Sr, Ba, Th, U, and LREEs with Ba/La ratios as high as 5.6 REE patterns are fractionated to a lesser degree compared to the MA-series (chondrite normalized La/Yb around 23, and La/Sm ratios less than 5). HFS elements are lower resembling typical island arc volcanic rocks. CA-series have 87Sr/86Sr ratios (.7043-.7053), with low Rb/Sr ratios as in the MA-series.

  17. Alaska Forum on the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Forum on the Environment is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals from government agencies, non-profit and for-profit businesses, community leaders, Alaskan...

  18. Alaska Forum on the Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Alaska Forum on the Environment (AFE) is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals from government agencies, non-profit and for-profit businesses, community leaders,...

  19. Stretched Polymers in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched random environments.

  20. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Arid Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142­156 Carbon sequestration, afforestation added $50% more C to the initial ecosystem carbon pool, with annual sequestration rate ranging 0 and suitable for tree planting, afforesting this area could result in a carbon sequestration rate of 1.7 Tg C

  1. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Goods, Steven Howard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  2. Market Design Test Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

  3. Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2002 RIFE - 8 2003 #12;1 ENVIRONMENT AGENCY ENVIRONMENT AND HERITAGE SERVICE FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2002 RIFE - 8 October 2003 #12;2 This report was compiled by the Centre for Environment

  4. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  5. REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 CHAPTER 1: REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of the Environment John R. Jensen (2007) Second Edition Pearson Prentice Hall What is Remote Sensing? #12;2 Photogrammetry ­ the art of identifying objects and judging their significance (Colwell, 1966). Remote Sensing ­ the measurement

  6. THE TEPHRA STRATIGRAPHY OF TWO LAKES IN SOUTH-CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON, USA Objective · New evidence of the ages and plume trajectories for four tephras. First evidence of Glacier Peak A, D, and Dusty Creek, and Mt. St. Helens P, as airfall tephra in south-central British Columbia. · The Glacier

  7. Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz and M. A l t a f Mubaraki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a t approximately 0.4 Tg S y-l, emissions from biomass burning a t approximately 2 Tg S Y-' and volcanic emissions localized i n the highly populated and industrialized regions i n Eastern North America, and across Europe from the United Kingdom over Central Europe t o the Donbas region #12;in Russia (Benkovitz et a!., 1996

  8. Spiral Structure and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidney van den Bergh

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Among 330 normal spirals of types Sa-Sc the fraction of objects exhibiting ``ring'', ``intermediate'' and ``spiral'' arm varieties does not correlated with environment. A similar conclusion appears to apply to the arm varieties of 123 barred spirals of types SBa-SBc. It is concluded that, among the northern Shapley-Ames galaxies, the distinction between the spiral and ring varieties of spiral arms is, within the accuracy of presently available data, independent of galaxy environment. This result suggests that the detailed morphology of spiral arms depends primarily on parent galaxy characteristics, rather than on the galactic environment.

  9. Undergraduate Degrees 2014 School of Earth & Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Undergraduate Degrees 2014 School of Earth & Environment FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT #12;UNIVERSITYOFLEEDS 03 Contents Welcome to the School of Earth & Environment 4 Choosing the right degree 6 Three, MGeol, MGeophys) The MSc Track Fieldwork 8 Why study the environment? 10 Environment and Business 12

  10. Robot manipulation in human environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edsinger, Aaron Ladd, 1972-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human environments present special challenges for robot manipulation. They are often dynamic, difficult to predict, and beyond the control of a robot engineer. Fortunately, many characteristics of these settings can be ...

  11. Robot Manipulation in Human Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edsinger, Aaron

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Human environments present special challenges for robot manipulation. They are often dynamic, difficult to predict, and beyond the control of a robot engineer. Fortunately, many characteristics of these settings can be ...

  12. DPC materials and corrosion environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review focuses on the performance of basket materials that could be exposed to ground water over thousands of years, and prospective disposal overpack materials that could possibly be used to protect dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) in disposal environments.

  13. Musicpainter : a collaborative composing environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wu-Hsi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of Musicpainter, a networked graphical composing environment that encourages sharing and collaboration within the composing process. Instead of building a computer-assisted ...

  14. Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfaff, Alex

    Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office PROTECTED AREAS AND AVOIDED DEFORESTATION #12;Protected Areas and Avoided Deforestation: An Econometric Evaluation - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS 1................................................................................4 3.3 ESTIMATED EFFECTS OF PROTECTED AREAS ON DEFORESTATION

  15. Arbeidslivets lover Act relating to working environment,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Arbeidslivets lover Act relating to working environment, working hours and employment protection, etc. (Working Environment Act). as subsequently amended, last by the Act of 14. December 2012 No. 80.notification................................................................... 6 Chapter 3. Working environment measures..................................... 6 Section.3

  16. Learning Curve Management in Educational Programming Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Kenneth J.

    Learning Curve Management in Educational Programming Environments Benjamin H. Brinckerhoff Computer programmers are best served by integrated development environments that adapt to their growing sophistication programming environments. We provide pedagogical justification for each goal, describe possible supporting

  17. Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment Transport, and Water Quality) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment Transport, and Water...

  18. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO)...

  19. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  20. Impact of a simulated nuclear winter environment on growth development and productivity of potatoes, winter wheat, pines and soybeans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palta, J.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several recent studies predict strong land surface cooling and reduction in solar irradiance following nuclear explosions (Turco et al., 1983; Covey et al., 1984; Thompson et al., 1984). Although there is disagreement among scientists on the extent and the duration of temperature and irradiation decrease, there is a general agreement on the nuclear winter'' hypothesis following nuclear war (Covey, 1985). Agreements between the timing of excessive frost events and volcanic eruptions supports such nuclear winter scenarios (La Marche Jr. and Hirschboek, 1984). More recently Robock (1988) recorded a drop in surface temperatures following the entrapment of smoke from a forest fire in northern California. These measurements also support the nuclear winter hypothesis. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of a simulated nuclear winter environment on productivity of four plant species. 20 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B. DOE O 231.1B cancels all portions pertaining to environment, safety, and health reporting. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information provisions remain in effect until January 1, 2012.

  2. learn.environment.utoronto.ca @EnvironmentAtUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    University of Toronto learn.environment.utoronto.ca #12;AECOM Agriculture Canada Alberta Energy Apotex Atomic Canadian Mint State University of New York, Fredonia Swiss Solar Development Group Teknion Toronto District 401 8 Wind Energy CRE 402 9 Urban Energy Systems CRE 403 9 Solar Energy CRE 404 10 Geographic

  3. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, and DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

  4. MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gaston, Derek

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of Idaho National Laboratory's MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment

  5. DCE DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @dmu.dk · +45 8715 8617 DCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY #12;DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCEDCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY Director Hanne Bach hba@dmu.dk +45 8715 1348 to authorities and other parties on environment and energy AARHUS UNIVERSITY DCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT

  6. DCE DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8617 DCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY #12;DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCEDCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY Director Hanne Bach hba@dce.au.dk +45 8715 1348 and other parties on environment and energy AARHUS UNIVERSITY DCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY

  7. Active Learning of Group-Structured Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szepesvari, Csaba

    Active Learning of Group-Structured Environments G´abor Bart´ok, Csaba Szepesv´ari , Sandra Zilles with their environment. We investigate learning environments that have a group structure. We introduce a learning model an environment from partial information is far from trivial. However, positive results for special subclasses

  8. OBJECTIVES OF THE EDINBURGH KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    OBJECTIVES OF THE EDINBURGH KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT PARTNERSHIP The University of Edinburgh, Heriot and natural environment. The Edinburgh Knowledge Environment Partnership will thus provide a unique research between key stakeholders in the built and natural environment and to reach out in assisting

  9. Using Usage Information in Collaborative Information Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalmers, M.; Position paper, Proceedings of the Collaborative Virtual Environments Workshop: CVE96 (Nottingham University) [More Details

    Chalmers,M. Position paper, Proceedings of the Collaborative Virtual Environments Workshop: CVE96 (Nottingham University)

  10. Midcontinent rift volcanism in the Lake Superior region: Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic evidence for a mantle plume origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, S.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA) Univ. of Minnesota, MN (USA)); Shirey, S.B. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1091 and 1098 Ma, most of a 15- to 20-km thickness of dominantly tholeiitic basalt erupted in the Midcontinent Rift System of the Lake Superior region, North American. The Portage Lake Volcanics in Michigan, which are the youngest MRS flood basalts, fall into distinctly high- and low-TiO{sub 2} types having different liquid lines of descent. Incompatible trace elements in both types of tholeiites are enriched compared to depleted or primitive mantle (La/Yb = 4.3-5.3; Th/Ta = 2.12-2.16; Zr/Y = 4.3-4.4), and both basalt types are isotopically indistinguishable. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of the Portage Lake tholeiites have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr{sub i} {approx}0.7038, {epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 {plus minus} 2, and {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2. Model ages with respect to a depleted mantle source (T{sub DM}) average about 1950-2100 Ma. Portage Lake rhyolits fall into two groups. Type I rhyolites have Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 to {minus}4.7; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2-7.8) consistent with contamination of tholeiitic rocks by 5-10% Archean crust. The one type II rhyolite analyzed has Nd and Pb isotopic compositions ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}{minus}13 to {minus}16; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}7.6-7.7) which are consistent with partial melting of Archean crust. Early Proterozoic crust was not a major contaminant of MRS rocks in the Lake Superior region. Most reported Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of MRS tholeiites from the main stage of volcanism in the Lake Superior region and of the Duluth Complex are comparable to the Nd and Pb isotopic data for Portage lake tholeiites. The isotopic enrichment of the MRS source compared to depleted mantle is striking and must have occurred at least 700 m.y. before 1100 Ma.

  11. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins, Will

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  12. The Center for Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    review of indoor air pollution in schools requested by the Environment Committee of the Connecticut risk 99 Industrial hygiene visit and walk- through assessment 99 Review of industrial hygiene interventions 99 Provide guidance on protecting occupants from exposures during construction 99 Coordinate

  13. Environment-induced dynamical chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidhan Chandra Bag; Deb Shankar Ray

    2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the interplay of nonlinearity of a dynamical system and thermal fluctuation of its environment in the ``physical limit'' of small damping and slow diffusion in a semiclassical context and show that the trajectories of c-number variables exhibit dynamical chaos due to the thermal fluctuations of the bath.

  14. Star Formation and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. K. C. Yee

    2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of star formation rate on galaxian environment is a key issue in the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, the study of this subject is complex and observationally challenging. This paper reviews some of the current results, drawing mostly from recent large redshift surveys such the LCRS, the MORPH collaboration, and the CNOC1 and CNOC2 redshift surveys.

  15. Air PSE (Problem Solving Environment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    PSE - 1 Air PSE (Problem Solving Environment) MODELLING OF AIR POLLUTION IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN WITH AIR PSE Developed by Prof. Donald Dabdub Computational Environmental Sciences Laboratory Mechanical COMPUTER MODELS An air pollution model is a computer program that computes how the different chemical

  16. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkins, Will

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  17. environment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2A en6/%2A en Concern

  18. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebba

  19. Influence of deterministic geologic trends on spatial variability of hydrologic properties in volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States); Chornack, M.P. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Istok, J.D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Fling, L.E. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic properties have been measured on outcrop samples taken from a detailed, two-dimension grid covering a 1.4 km outcrop exposure of the 10-m thick non-welded-to-welded, shardy base microstratigraphic unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paintbrush Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These data allow quantification of spatial trends in rock matrix properties that exist in this important hydrologic unit. Geologic investigation, combined with statistical and geostatistical analyses of the numerical data, indicates that spatial variability of matrix properties is related to deterministic geologic processes that operated throughout the region. Linear vertical trends in hydrologic properties are strongly developed in the shardy base microstratigraphic unit, and they are more accurately modeled using the concept of a thickness-normalized stratigraphic elevation within the unit, rather than absolute elevation. Hydrologic properties appear to be correlated over distances of 0.25 to 0.3 of the unit thickness after removing the deterministic vertical trend. The use of stratigraphic elevation allows scaling of identified trends by unit thickness which may be of particular importance in a basal, topography-blanketing unit such as this one. Horizontal changes in hydrologic properties do not appear to form obvious trends within the limited lateral geographic extent of the ash-flow environment that was examined. Matrix properties appear to be correlated horizontally over distances between 100 and 400 m. The existence and quantitative description of these trends and patterns of vertical spatial continuity should increase confidence in models of hydrologic properties and groundwater flow in this area that may be constructed to support the design of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the hydrothermal system in Lassen Volcanic National Park and Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lassen hydrothermal system is in the southern Cascade Range, approximately 70 kilometers east-southeast of Redding, California. The conceptual model of the Lassen system is termed a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system with a parasitic vapor-dominated zone. The essential feature of this model is that steam and steam-heated discharge at relatively high elevations in Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and liquid discharge with high chloride concentrations at relatively low elevations outside LVNP in the Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) are both fed by an upflow of high-enthalpy, two-phase fluid within the Park. Liquid flows laterally away from the upflow area towards the areas of high-chloride discharge, and steam rises through a vapor-dominated zone to feed the steam and steam-heated features. The geometric model corresponds to an areally restricted flow regime that connects the Bumpass Hell area in LVNP with regions of chloride hot springs in the Mill Creek canyon in the KGRA south of LVNP. Simulations of thermal fluid withdrawal in the Mill Creek Canyon were carried out in order to determine the effects of such withdrawal on portions of the hydrothermal system within the Park. 19 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  2. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2 and DOE N 234.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12, cancels DOE O 231.1B.

  3. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2 and DOE N 234.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12.

  4. Coping with Hot Work Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    exposed to these conditions. A hot work environment can impair safety and health. Both workers and their employers are responsi- ble for taking steps to prevent heat stress in the work- place. How Your Body Handles Heat Humans are warm-blooded, which... evaporation. Wiping sweat from the skin with a cloth also prevents cooling from evaporation. In hot, humid conditions, hard work becomes harder. The sweat glands release moisture and essential David W. Smith, Extension Safety Program The Texas A...

  5. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  6. RNEDE: Resilient Network Design Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Tanu Malik, Arun Giridh; Craig Rieger; Keith Daum; Miles McQueen

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern living is more and more dependent on the intricate web of critical infrastructure systems. The failure or damage of such systems can cause huge disruptions. Traditional design of this web of critical infrastructure systems was based on the principles of functionality and reliability. However, it is increasingly being realized that such design objectives are not sufficient. Threats, disruptions and faults often compromise the network, taking away the benefits of an efficient and reliable design. Thus, traditional network design parameters must be combined with self-healing mechanisms to obtain a resilient design of the network. In this paper, we present RNEDEa resilient network design environment that that not only optimizes the network for performance but tolerates fluctuations in its structure that result from external threats and disruptions. The environment evaluates a set of remedial actions to bring a compromised network to an optimal level of functionality. The environment includes a visualizer that enables the network administrator to be aware of the current state of the network and the suggested remedial actions at all times.

  7. Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

  8. Study of changes in the Solar Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M N Vahia

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that the local environment of the Sun is a complex one with the presence of several supernova shock bubbles and interstellar clouds. Even within this environment, the Sun is moving with a velocity of about 15 km/s toward the interior of the galaxy. We examine the changes in the local ISM environment experienced by the Sun in the past and then discuss the interaction of the Sun with these different environments. Lastly, we inquire how this must have changed the cosmic ray environment of the earth since this remains one of the few methods to test the changes in the local ISM environment over astronomical time scales. %

  9. ELG 5124: Virtual Environments, (Winter 2008) ELG 5124 Virtual Environments (Winter 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    , human body modeling and animation. #12;ELG 5124: Virtual Environments, (Winter 2008) AnimationELG 5124: Virtual Environments, (Winter 2008) ELG 5124 Virtual Environments (Winter 2008) Tuesday% _______________________________________________ Calendar description Basic concepts. Virtual worlds. Hardware and software support. World modeling

  10. Study of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gabrielle

    and Cell (MAC) method for the governing equations, transport of passive scalars like the pollutantStudy of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments Razvan Corneliu Carbunescu Center head: Study of pollutant dispersion in urban environments #12;Abstract Computational simulations can

  11. Analytical techniques for debugging pervasive computing environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigam, Atish, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    User level debugging of pervasive environments is important as it provides the ability to observe changes that occur in a pervasive environment and fix problems that result from these changes, especially since pervasive ...

  12. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH REPORTING, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. Chg 1, 11-7-96.

  13. Environment Safety and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Robert Heinecken's TV/Time Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfahler, Zachary Austin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environment, for example, exploits the televisual medium inMedium is the Message:” The Aesthetics of TV/Time Environmentwith TV/Time Environment. 11 “The Medium is the Message:”

  15. CONCEPTUAL MODELLING OF A CONCURRENT ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amor, Robert

    CONCEPTUAL MODELLING OF A CONCURRENT ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENT Z. Turk1 , R. Wasserfuhr2 , P assisted concurrent engineering. Later experiences have shown that product modelling alone modelling framework which decomposes an abstract concurrent engineering environment into several modelling

  16. Expressive Autonomous Cinematography for Interactive Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Bill

    Expressive Autonomous Cinematography for Interactive Virtual Environments Bill Tomlinson Synthetic an automatic cinematography system for interactive virtual environments. This system controls a virtual camera this cinematography system with an ethologically-inspired structure of sensors, emotions, motivations, and action

  17. Environment assisted energy transfer in dimer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Salman, E-mail: sksafi@comsats.edu.pk [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ibrahim, M.; Khan, M.K. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of collective and multilocal environments on the energy transfer between the levels of a dimer is studied. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated by considering coupling of collective environment with the levels of the dimer in the presence of both two individuals and mutually correlated multilocal environments. It is shown that every way of coupling we consider assists, though differently, the probability of transition between the levels of dimer. The probability of transition is strongly enhanced when the two local environments are mutually correlated. -- Highlights: • The dynamics of energy transfer between the levels of a dimer are studied. • Coupling of collective as well as individual environments are considered. • The environments are in spin star configurations. • The environment assists the energy transfer between the levels. • For correlated multilocal environments, the transition probability is almost 100%.

  18. Quantum Darwinism in a hazy environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Zwolak; H. T. Quan; Wojciech H. Zurek

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Darwinism recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the "systems of interest" indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Here, we show that information about a system can be acquired from a mixed-state, or hazy, environment, but the storage capacity of an environment fragment is suppressed by its initial entropy. In the case of good decoherence, the mutual information between the system and the fragment is given solely by the fragment's entropy increase. For fairly mixed environments, this means a reduction by a factor 1-h, where h is the haziness of the environment, i.e., the initial entropy of an environment qubit. Thus, even such hazy environments eventually reveal the state of the system, although now the intercepted environment fragment must be larger by ~1/(1-h) to gain the same information about the system.

  19. FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................... 21 1.2.4. Food irradiation ....1 FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY Radioactivity in Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science on behalf of the Food Standards Agency and the Scottish Environment

  20. Toward an Integrated Online Learning Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodorescu, Raluca

    We are building in LON-CAPA an integrated learning environment that will enable the development, dissemination and evaluation of PER-based material. This environment features a collection of multi-level research-based ...

  1. Advanced engineering environment pilot project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwegel, Jill; Pomplun, Alan R.; Abernathy, Rusty (Parametric Technology Corporation, Needham, MA)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a concurrent engineering concept that enables real-time process tooling design and analysis, collaborative process flow development, automated document creation, and full process traceability throughout a product's life cycle. The AEE will enable NNSA's Design and Production Agencies to collaborate through a singular integrated process. Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) are working together on a prototype AEE pilot project to evaluate PTC's product collaboration tools relative to the needs of the NWC. The primary deliverable for the project is a set of validated criteria for defining a complete commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution to deploy the AEE across the NWC.

  2. Harsh environments electronics : downhole applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operational sustainment of renewable (geothermal) and non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy resources will be accompanied by increasingly higher costs factors: exploration and site preparation, operational maintenance and repair. Increased government oversight in the wake of the Gulf oil spill will only add to the cost burden. It is important to understand that downhole conditions are not just about elevated temperatures. It is often construed that military electronics are exposed to the upper limit in terms of extreme service environments. Probably the harshest of all service conditions for electronics and electrical equipment are those in oil, gas, and geothermal wells. From the technology perspective, advanced materials, sensors, and microelectronics devices are benefificial to the exploration and sustainment of energy resources, especially in terms of lower costs. Besides the need for the science that creates these breakthroughs - there is also a need for sustained engineering development and testing. Downhole oil, gas, and geothermal well applications can have a wide range of environments and reliability requirements: Temperature, Pressure, Vibration, Corrosion, and Service duration. All too frequently, these conditions are not well-defifined because the application is labeled as 'high temperature'. This ambiguity is problematic when the investigation turns to new approaches for electronic packaging solutions. The objective is to develop harsh environment, electronic packaging that meets customer requirements of cost, performance, and reliability. There are a number of challenges: (1) Materials sets - solder alloys, substrate materials; (2) Manufacturing process - low to middle volumes, low defect counts, new equipment technologies; and (3) Reliability testing - requirements documents, test methods and modeling, relevant standards documents. The cost to develop and sustain renewable and non-renewable energy resources will continue to escalate within the industry. Downhole electronics can provide a very cost-effective approach for well exploration and sustainment (data logging). However, the harsh environments are a 'game-changer' in terms defining materials, assembly processes and the long-term reliability of downhole electronic systems. The system-level approach will enable the integration of each of these contributors - materials, processes, and reliability - in order to deliver cost-effective electronics that meet customer requirements.

  3. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, F. [Universitŕ di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  4. Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

  5. An environment for font design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkovic, Lily

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characters 4, TEX System Flowchart 5. A Likely Curve . 6. The Drawing Window . 7. Font Parameter Window 8. Point Coordinate Window 9. Source Window Page 10 12 15 17 18 19 INTRODUCTION Today's workstations enable users to interactively view data..., into an environment that makes them easy to use through visual tools. One should keep in mind that despite the good features of the systems mentioned above, neither of them enable users to create quality fonts in a short period of time. In [15], Donald Knuth...

  6. Environment Ohio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:EmminolEntergy Arkansas IncEnthoneEnvironment Energy

  7. Environment | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:EmminolEntergy Arkansas IncEnthoneEnvironment

  8. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and Health AssessmentsA-Z

  9. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and Health

  10. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and HealthHealth Services

  11. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and HealthHealth

  12. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and HealthHealthMinute

  13. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and HealthHealthMinute1.

  14. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety and

  15. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety andBerkeley Lab Recycling

  16. Environment/Health/Safety Concerns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, SafetySafetyEHS Emergencies

  17. SC e-journals, Environment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity thanBiology/Genetics ACMEarthEnvironment

  18. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebbaEnvironment...Work Planning

  19. LDTA'02 Preliminary Version The ELAN Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreau, Pierre-Etienne

    LDTA'02 Preliminary Version The ELAN Environment: a Rewriting Logic Environment based on ASF+SDF for the design and implementation of a new ELAN environment. The idea was to use the ASF+SDF parsing technology are not viewed as part of the ELAN syntax [6]. ASF+SDF technology The technology applied in the ASF+SDF Meta

  20. Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    expansion continues, mathematical scientists can play key roles in shaping sustainable living environments1 Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments Fred Roberts Rutgers University #12 Clusters, beginning with workshops: Sustainable Human Environments (Rutgers U.), April 23-25, 2014 (this

  1. Eco-innovation indicators European Environment Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eco-innovation indicators European Environment Agency Copenhagen, February 2006 #12;Page 2 consisted of Timo Mäkelä, DG Environment, Pierre Valette, DG Research, and Björn Stigson World Business measure the progress made in implementing the Environment Technology Action Plan. Currently, the field

  2. COOPER PAIR TRANSISTOR IN A TUNABLE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    COOPER PAIR TRANSISTOR IN A TUNABLE ENVIRONMENT S. Corlevi, W. Guichard, and D. B. Haviland* 1 measurements of the CPT, which are performed in a low impedance environment, the charging effects are observed as gate voltage modulation of the critical current. However, in a high impedance environment, a Coulomb

  3. RANDOM WALK IN DETERMINISTICALLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liverani, Carlangelo

    RANDOM WALK IN DETERMINISTICALLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENT DMITRY DOLGOPYAT AND CARLANGELO LIVERANI Abstract. We consider a random walk with transition probabilities weakly dependent on an environment of the environment the walk satisfies the CLT. 1. Introduction The continuing interest in the limit properties

  4. Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2004 RIFE - 10 2005 #12;Food Standards Agency Emergency Planning, Radiation and Incidents Division Aviation House 125 Kingsway London WC2B 6NH RadioactivityinFoodandtheEnvironment,2004 Scottish Environment ProtectionAgency Radioactive Substances Unit Erskine Court The Castle

  5. Coevolution of compositional protocells and their environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancet, Doron

    Coevolution of compositional protocells and their environment Barak Shenhav*, , Aia Oz and Doron of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel The coevolution of environment and living organisms is well known in nature. Specifically, it is suggested that the chemical composition of the environment may have governed the chemical

  6. Programming Environments for Novices Mark Guzdial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzdial, Mark

    Programming Environments for Novices Mark Guzdial College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology guzdial@cc.gatech.edu May 7, 2003 1 Specializing Environments for Novices The task of specializing programming environments for novices begins with the recog- nition that programming is a hard skill to learn

  7. The Environment Team to Waste & Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    The Environment Team A-Z Guide to Waste & Recycling www.le.ac.uk/environment #12;Welcome ...to the University of Leicester's `A-Z Guide to Waste and Recycling'. Over the last 3 years, the Environment Team has introduced an award- winning recycling scheme across the campus that allows us to recycle paper, plastics

  8. The ASF+SDF Meta-Environment: a Component-Based Language Development Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klint, Paul

    The ASF+SDF Meta-Environment: a Component-Based Language Development Environment M.G.J. van den and Computer Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 14, 2584 CH Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. The ASF+SDF The ASF+SDF Meta-Environment [12] is an interactive development environment for the automatic gen- eration

  9. The ASF+SDF MetaEnvironment: a ComponentBased Language Development Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klint, Paul

    The ASF+SDF Meta­Environment: a Component­Based Language Development Environment M.G.J. van den and Computer Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 14, 2584 CH Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. The ASF+SDF The ASF+SDF Meta­Environment [12] is an interactive development environment for the automatic gen­ eration

  10. Environment to Environment (E2E) Communication Systems for Collaborative Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Environment to Environment (E2E) Communication Systems for Collaborative Work Ish Rishabh irishabh with intelligent sensing of environments, to provide effective bi-directional communication which is free from, connecting environments, sentient communication. ACM Classification Keywords H5.1. Multimedia information

  11. www.ni-environment.gov.uk Agency Northern Ireland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.ni-environment.gov.uk Agency Northern Ireland Environment Summary of Radioactivity in Food and the Environment 2004-2008 #12;#12;ENVIRONMENT AGENCY FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY NORTHERN IRELAND ENVIRONMENT AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY Summary of Radioactivity in Food and the Environment 2004-2008 April

  12. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

  13. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, C [comp.] [comp.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  14. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  15. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  16. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  17. Feedback between Volcanism and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    and Simkin (2002) and a compilation by Bryson, Bryson and Reuter (2006). #12;Eruption frequency (events

  18. BRINGING AROUND REAL CHANGE JOBS. ECONOMY. ENVIRONMENT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    positively effect school environment REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) EMISSIONS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP Investing and FL, expanding to other states PACE MOMENTUM ACROSS THE NATION #12;RENEWABLE ENERGY Solar Photovoltaic

  19. Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    . Appreciate the main aspects of hydropower resource estimation, turbine design, deployment and environmental AND ASSESSMENTS Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society I am a Civil Hydraulic

  20. Corporate Governance, the Environment, and the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Jane

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contemporary society: Corporate governance at a crossroads.R. (1997). A survey of corporate governance. The Journal ofCorporate Governance, the Environment, and the Internet Jane

  1. Chimera: Hypertext for Heterogeneous Software Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, James

    Chimera: Hypertext for Heterogeneous Software Environments Kenneth M. Anderson, Richard N. Taylor the approach and presents an architecture which supports it. Experience with the Chimera prototype and its

  2. Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nevada Test Site (NTS) in September and October 2002. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment,...

  3. Assistant Manager for Safety and Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will provide high quality and timely services to fulfill environment, safety, health, and quality programs and responsibilities. This includes oversight of...

  4. CUTEst: a Constrained and Unconstrained Testing Environment ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Gould

    2013-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    May 5, 2013 ... CUTEst: a Constrained and Unconstrained Testing Environment with safe threads. Nicholas Gould(nick.gould ***at*** stfc.ac.uk) Dominique ...

  5. a Constrained and Unconstrained Testing Environment, revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N.I.M. Gould

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2002 ... Abstract: The initial release of CUTE, a widely used testing environment for optimization software was described by Bongartz, Conn, Gould and ...

  6. Measuring Galaxy Environments with Deep Redshift Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael C. Cooper; Jeffrey A. Newman; Darren S. Madgwick; Brian F. Gerke; Renbin Yan; Marc Davis

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the applicability of several galaxy environment measures (n^th-nearest-neighbor distance, counts in an aperture, and Voronoi volume) within deep redshift surveys. Mock galaxy catalogs are employed to mimic representative photometric and spectroscopic surveys at high redshift (z ~ 1). We investigate the effects of survey edges, redshift precision, redshift-space distortions, and target selection upon each environment measure. We find that even optimistic photometric redshift errors (\\sigma_z = 0.02) smear out the line-of-sight galaxy distribution irretrievably on small scales; this significantly limits the application of photometric redshift surveys to environment studies. Edges and holes in a survey field dramatically affect the estimation of environment, with the impact of edge effects depending upon the adopted environment measure. These edge effects considerably limit the usefulness of smaller survey fields (e.g. the GOODS fields) for studies of galaxy environment. In even the poorest groups and clusters, redshift-space distortions limit the effectiveness of each environment statistic; measuring density in projection (e.g. using counts in a cylindrical aperture or a projected n^th-nearest-neighbor distance measure) significantly improves the accuracy of measures in such over-dense environments. For the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, we conclude that among the environment estimators tested the projected n^th-nearest-neighbor distance measure provides the most accurate estimate of local galaxy density over a continuous and broad range of scales.

  7. Observing the galaxy environment of QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus J"ager; Klaus J. Fricke; Jochen Heidt

    1997-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline our recently started program to investigate the galaxy environment of QSOs, in particular of radio-quiet objects at intermediate redshifts.

  8. A fluctuation theorem in a random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bonetto; G. Gallavotti; G. Gentile

    2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple class of chaotic systems in a random environment is considered and the fluctuation theorem is extended under the assumption of reversibility.

  9. Continuous quantum measurement in spin environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong Xie; An Min Wang

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a formalism of stochastic master equations (SME) which describes the decoherence dynamics of a system in spin environments conditioned on the measurement record. Markovian and non-Markovian nature of environment can be revealed by a spectroscopy method based on weak quantum measurement (weak spectroscopy). On account of that correlated environments can lead to a nonlocal open system which exhibits strong non-Markovian effects although the local dynamics are Markovian, the spectroscopy method can be used to demonstrate that there is correlation between two environments.

  10. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free environ- ment. Unlike incineration with air, which is areaction. Again, unlike incineration, which producesconventional method of incineration which is compatible with

  11. Environment - Invertebrates' role in bioaccumulation ... | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment - Invertebrates' role in bioaccumulation ... By studying fish and invertebrates in a creek with known mercury contamination, researchers are gaining a better...

  12. auditory virtual environments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    impor- tance Liu, Ling 52 Natural Interaction in Virtual Environments Gabriel Zachmann Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: -environment...

  13. Essays on Foreign Direct Investment, Growth and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Waner

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. C. , 2010. R: A Language and Environment for StatisticalTeam (2010), R: A Language and Environment for Statistical

  14. Statistical studies of supernova environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Joseph P; Habergham, Stacey M; Galbany, Lluís; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations of the environments of SNe allow statistical constraints to be made on progenitor properties. We review progress that has been made in this field. Pixel statistics using tracers of e.g. star formation within galaxies show differences in the explosion sites of, in particular SNe types II and Ibc (SNe II and SNe Ibc), suggesting differences in population ages. Of particular interest is that SNe Ic are significantly more associated with H-alpha emission than SNe Ib, implying shorter lifetimes for the former. In addition, such studies have shown that the interacting SNe IIn do not explode in regions containing the most massive stars, which suggests that at least a significant fraction of their progenitors arise from the lower end of the core-collapse SN mass range. Host HII region spectroscopy has been obtained for a significant number of core-collapse events, however definitive conclusions have to-date been elusive. Single stellar evolution models predict that the fraction of SNe Ibc to SNe II sho...

  15. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  16. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tveten, U. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. s Earth and environment s Living resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4 s Earth and environment s Living resources s Societies and health s Expertise and consulting of this trend is the acquisition, on a joint proposal from the Earth and Environment department and the Living phenomena so as to improve forecasting of the attendant hazards. The earth's crust: processes and natural

  18. Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;2 Sustainable Human Environments · In 1900, only 13% of the world's population lived in cities. · By 2050 · As rapid city expansion continues, mathematical scientists can play key roles in shaping sustainable living1 Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments Fred Roberts Rutgers University #12

  19. HAZARD ALERT ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    HAZARD ALERT ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY EH&S Hazard Alert - 2010.06.18 HAZARD ALERT ­ Reaction Manual. http://www.ucalgary.ca/safety/files/safety/LaboratoryFumeHoodUserStandard.pdf #12;HAZARD ALERT ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY EH&S Hazard Alert - 2010.06.18 In the recent incident the sash was closed while

  20. Chimera: Hypermedia for Heterogeneous Software Development Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, James

    1 of 31 Chimera: Hypermedia for Heterogeneous Software Development Environments Abstract Emerging of "Chimera: Hypertext for Heterogeneous Software Environments," which appeared in the proceedings of ECHT'94 the approach employed by the Chimera open hypermedia system to address this research area, and also serves

  1. Roadmapbased Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Roadmap­based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars.cs.uu.nl #12; Roadmap­based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars April obstacles. We propose a practical algorithm based on a roadmap that is created for the static part

  2. Extending Programming Environments to Support Architectural Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Richard C.

    environments are tightly integrated tool sets that support the production of source code in a programming, debugging, and source code browsing. These en­ vironments, however, do not necessarily support nota­ tions of programming environments 1 include Smalltalk [11] and Interlisp [28] from Xerox Parc, In­ tegral C [25] from

  3. Adaptation in constant utility nonstationary environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littman, Michael L.

    ­stationary environments are so pathological. Even if the environment, when viewed as a monolithic function, may of the results created by the organism over some given lifespan determines the organism's fitness. The nasty, the fitness produced by any single mapping will be at the chance level. The adaptive challenge is to produce

  4. CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT SECOND EDITION ISSUES PAPER, No. 2001-1 PUBLISHED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: North American Wetlands Conservation Council Committee Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Tourbe de and funding of: · Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association · Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada

  5. Using Euler Diagrams in Traditional Library Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verroust-Blondet, Anne

    Introduction The role of the "Institut National de l'Audiovisuel" is to manage the preservation of the FrenchUsing Euler Diagrams in Traditional Library Environments J´er^ome Thi`evre, Marie-Luce Viaud 1 INA for traditional library environments, which allows the user to elaborate easily and efficiently new strategies

  6. Location Privacy and the Personal Distributed Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Robert C

    Location Privacy and the Personal Distributed Environment Robert C Atkinson, Swee Keow Goo, James-- The Personal Distributed Environment is a new concept being developed within the Mobile VCE Core 3 research, wherever their location: ubiquitous access. Devices are co-ordinated by Device Management Entities (DMEs

  7. CX-010928: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Harsh Environment Adaptable Thermionic (HEAT) Sensor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-011469: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/29/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-011576: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiation Hardened Electronics Destined for Severe Nuclear Reactor Environments CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  10. CX-007857: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Endurance Testing of SLH Timing Belt Powertrain in Hydraulic Laboratory Environment CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/26/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-011573: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Predictive Characterization of Aging and Degradation of Reactor Materials in Extreme Environments CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  12. Phenomenological approach for describing environment dependent growths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibyendu Biswas; Swarup Poria

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Different classes of phenomenological universalities of environment dependent growths have been proposed. The logistic as well as environment dependent West-type allometry based biological growth can be explained in this proposed framework of phenomenological description. It is shown that logistic and environment dependent West-type growths are phenomenologically identical in nature. However there is a difference between them in terms of coefficients involved in the phenomenological descriptions. It is also established that environment independent and enviornment dependent biological growth processes lead to the same West-type biological growth equation. Involuted Gompertz function, used to describe biological growth processes undergoing atrophy or a demographic and economic system undergoing involution or regression, can be addressed in this proposed environment dependent description. In addition, some other phenomenological descriptions have been examined in this proposed framework and graphical representations of variation of different parameters involved in the description are executed.

  13. Execution Environments for Parallel ApplicationsDept. d'Arquitectura de Computadors Execution Environments for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbalan, Julita

    Execution Environments for Parallel ApplicationsDept. d'Arquitectura de Computadors UPC Execution Environments for Parallel Applications Master CANS 2007/2008 Departament d'Arquitectura de Computadors Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya #12;Dept. d'Arquitectura de Computadors Execution Environments

  14. Execution Environments for Parallel ApplicationsDept. d'Arquitectura de Computadors Execution Environments for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbalan, Julita

    Execution Environments for Parallel ApplicationsDept. d'Arquitectura de Computadors Execution Environments for Parallel Applications Master CANS 2007/2008 Departament d'Arquitectura de Computadors Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya Dept. d'Arquitectura de Computadors Execution Environments for Parallel

  15. The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice high into the air and rained fine volcanic ash as far away as Winnemucca, Nevada, 200 miles to the east. In this photograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice of volcanic rock, called lava domes, were created by eruptions of lava too viscous to flow readily away from its source. Eruptions about 27,000 years ago formed Lassen Peak, probably in only a few years

  16. Extracting Information from Qubit-Environment Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Reina; Cristian E. Susa; Felipe F. Fanchini

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Most works on open quantum systems generally focus on the reduced physical system by tracing out the environment degrees of freedom. Here we show that the qubit distributions with the environment are essential for a thorough analysis, and demonstrate that the way that quantum correlations are distributed in a quantum register is constrained by the way in which each subsystem gets correlated with the environment. For a two-qubit system coupled to a common dissipative environment $\\mathcal{E}$, we show how to optimise interqubit correlations and entanglement via a quantification of the qubit-environment information flow, in a process that, perhaps surprisingly, does not rely on the knowledge of the state of the environment. To illustrate our findings, we consider an optically-driven bipartite interacting qubit $AB$ system under the action of $\\mathcal{E}$. By tailoring the light-matter interaction, a relationship between the qubits early stage disentanglement and the qubit-environment entanglement distribution is found. We also show that, under suitable initial conditions, the qubits energy asymmetry allows the identification of physical scenarios whereby qubit-qubit entanglement minima coincide with the extrema of the $A\\mathcal{E}$ and $B\\mathcal{E}$ entanglement oscillations.

  17. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  18. MERCURY STABILITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Pavlish

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine whether the presence of mercury and 188 other trace substances, referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), in the stack emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric utility power plants poses an unacceptable public health risk (1). The EPA's conclusions and recommendations were presented in two reports: Mercury Study Report to Congress and Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units-Final Report to Congress. The first congressional report addressed both human health and the environmental effects of anthropogenic mercury emissions, while the second report addressed the risk to public health posed by emissions of HAPs from steam electricity-generating units. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is also required by the CAAAs to investigate mercury and determine a safe threshold level of exposure. Recently the National Academy of Sciences has also been commissioned by Congress to complete a report, based the available scientific evidence, regarding safe threshold levels of mercury exposure. Although the EPA reports did not state that mercury controls on coal-fired electric power stations should be required given the current state of the art, they did indicate that EPA views mercury as a potential threat to human health. It is likely that major sources of mercury emissions, including fossil-fired combustion systems, will be controlled at some point. In fact, municipal waste combustion units are already regulated. In anticipation of additional control measures, much research has been done (and continues) regarding the development of control technologies for mercury emitted from stationary sources to the atmosphere. Most approaches taken to date involve sorbent injection technologies or improve upon removal of mercury using existing technologies such as flue gas desulfurization scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators. Depending on the fly ash chemistry and the form of mercury present in the flue gas, some of these existing technologies can be effective at capturing vapor-phase mercury from the flue gas stream. Although much research has been done on enhancing the removal of mercury from flue gas streams, little research has focused on what happens to the mercury when it is captured and converted and/or transferred to a solid or aqueous solution. The stability (or mobility) of mercury in this final process is critical and leads to the questions, What impact will the increased concentration of mercury have on utilization, disposal, and reuse? and Is the mercury removed from the flue gas really removed from the environment or rereleased at a later point? To help answer these questions, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement did a series of experiments using thermal desorption and leaching techniques. This report presents the results from these tests.

  19. Control of single spin in Markovian environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Haidong

    In this article we study the control of single spin in Markovian environment. Given an initial state, we compute all the possible states to which the spin can be driven at arbitrary time, under the assumption that fast ...

  20. MMV: Metamodeling Based Microprocessor Validation Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    MMV: Metamodeling Based Microprocessor Validation Environment Ajit Dingankar, Deepak A. Mathaikutty- tionality, recent generations of microprocessors face difficult validation challenges. The systematic to production RTL, which is likely to remain the dominant design methodology of complex microprocessors

  1. Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments Marc J. Palmeri Princeton University Arnold Lab #12;Outline · Motivation ­ Applications of laser micromachining ­ Problems with laser micromachining · How do lasers work? · What is laser micromachining? · Micromachining assembly · Methods

  2. Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

  3. Built Environment Analysis Tool: April 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This documentation describes the tool development. It was created to evaluate the effects of built environment scenarios on transportation energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This documentation also provides guidance on how to apply the tool.

  4. Key Implications of the Global Economic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    Key Implications of the Global Economic Environment For PCT Filings: A Survey of the Issues DMI...............................................................................9 Annex 1: Incentives for Patent Filing: The Analytical Framework...........................11 I-1 Intellectual property, innovation, and economic growth.................................13 2-2 Individual

  5. Line Environment, Safety and Health Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth the Department's expectations line management environment, safety and health (ES&H) oversight and for the use of contractor self-assessment programs as the cornerstone for this oversight. Canceled by DOE O 226.1.

  6. Essays on trade, CO?, and the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Joseph S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first chapter of this thesis uses a general equilibrium model of trade and the environment to investigate two questions. First, how do the gains from trade compare against the environmental costs of trade? Trade can ...

  7. Sustainable and equitable urban environments in Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badshah, Akhtar

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study identifies some of the factors and conditions that can encourage the development of sustainable and equitable urban environments. It argues that cities will continue to grow and that it is not productive to view ...

  8. Environment Assisted Metrology with Spin Qubit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Cappellaro; G. Goldstein; J. S. Hodges; L. Jiang; J. R. Maze; A. S. Sřrensen; M. D. Lukin

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the sensitivity of a recently proposed method for precision measurement [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 140502 (2011)], focusing on an implementation based on solid-state spin systems. The scheme amplifies a quantum sensor response to weak external fields by exploiting its coupling to spin impurities in the environment. We analyze the limits to the sensitivity due to decoherence and propose dynamical decoupling schemes to increase the spin coherence time. The sensitivity is also limited by the environment spin polarization; therefore we discuss strategies to polarize the environment spins and present a method to extend the scheme to the case of zero polarization. The coherence time and polarization determine a figure of merit for the environment's ability to enhance the sensitivity compared to echo-based sensing schemes. This figure of merit can be used to engineer optimized samples for high-sensitivity nanoscale magnetic sensing, such as diamond nanocrystals with controlled impurity density.

  9. An environment-mediated quantum deleter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Srikanth; Subhashish Banerjee

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Environment-induced decoherence presents a great challenge to realizing a quantum computer. We point out the somewhat surprising fact that decoherence can be useful, indeed necessary, for practical quantum computation, in particular, for the effective erasure of quantum memory in order to initialize the state of the quantum computer. The essential point behind the deleter is that the environment, by means of a dissipative interaction, furnishes a contractive map towards a pure state. We present a specific example of an amplitude damping channel provided by a two-level system's interaction with its environment in the weak Born-Markov approximation. This is contrasted with a purely dephasing, non-dissipative channel provided by a two-level system's interaction with its environment by means of a quantum nondemolition interaction. We point out that currently used state preparation techniques, for example using optical pumping, essentially perform as quantum deleters.

  10. The Environments of SLACS Gravitational Lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Auger

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an investigation of the environments of the SLACS sample of gravitational lenses. The local and global environments of the lenses are characterized using SDSS photometry and, when available, spectroscopy. We find that the lens systems that are best modelled with steeper than isothermal density profiles are more likely to have close companions than lenses with shallower than isothermal profiles. This suggests that the profile steepening may be caused by interactions with a companion galaxy as indicated by N-body simulations of group galaxies. The global environments of the SLACS lenses are typical of non-lensing SDSS galaxies with comparable properties to the lenses, and the richnesses of the lens groups are not as strongly correlated with the lens density profiles as the local environments. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of line-of-sight contamination affecting the lens models but do not find a significant over-density of sources compared to lines of sight without lenses.

  11. Probing the Environment with Galaxy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Romanowsky

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I present various projects to study the halo dynamics of elliptical galaxies. This allows one to study the outer mass and orbital distributions of ellipticals in different environments, and the inner distributions of groups and clusters themselves.

  12. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component Materials," LBL-

  13. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component

  14. Webinar: Tapping Into Wind in Urban Environments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This live webinar presented by DOE on "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Tapping into Wind in Urban Environments" will take place on Tuesday, September 18, 2012, from 3:00 – 4:15 p.m....

  15. Responsibility and the traditional Muslim built environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbar, Jamel A

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to analyze the effect of the responsibility enjoyed by individuals over the built environment. To understand these effects the study concentrates on the physical state of the property. It is concluded that ...

  16. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Componentin In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80, Paper No.6-10, 1981 CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A.

  17. RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY Panel Discussion Roundtable Moderator: S, although higher market values for recyclable will certainly stimulate increased interest in collection in recycling and deinking technologies and process design among North American, European, and Pacific Rim

  18. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. (Paragraphs 2a, 2a(1), 2a(2), 2b, 2b(1), 2b(2), and 2i(3)(a) through 2i(3)(d) of Chapter II, and Appendix A canceled by DOE N 231.1; Chapter IV canceled by DOE O 470.2A.)

  19. Polymer translocation into laterally unbounded confined environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaifu Luo; Ralf Metzler

    2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Langevin dynamics simulations in three dimensions (3D), we investigate the dynamics of polymer translocation into the regions between two parallel plane walls with separation $R$ under a driving force $F$, respectively. Compared with an unconfined environment, the translocation dynamics is greatly changed due to the crowding effect of the partially translocated monomers. Translocation time $\\tau$ initially decreases rapidly with increasing $R$ and then saturates for larger $R$, and the confined environment leads to a nonuniversal dependence of $\\tau$ on $F$.

  20. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Air Quality Research Institute Ministry of the Environment Air Quality Monitoring Programme Annual Summary for 2004 Berkowicz and Jřrgen Brandt Department: Department of Atmospheric Environment Serial title and no.: NERI

  1. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Air Quality Research Institute Ministry of the Environment Air Quality Monitoring Programme Annual Summary for 2003: Department of Atmospheric Environment Serial title and no.: NERI Technical Report No. 497 Publisher: National

  2. GENOTYPE x ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS (1) J. C. BOWMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    GENOTYPE x ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS (1) J. C. BOWMAN Department of Agriculture, University of Reading, Great Britain SUMMARY A genotype x environment interaction may be defined as a change in the relative perfor- mance of a 'environments

  3. META-ENVIRONMENTS FOR SOFTWARE PRODUCTION ANTHONY S. KARRER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    META-ENVIRONMENTS FOR SOFTWARE PRODUCTION ANTHONY S. KARRER Computer Science Department, Loyola December 1994 Researchers who create software production environments face considerable problems. Soft- ware production environments are large systems that are costly to develop. Furthermore, soft- ware

  4. Presence in a Distributed Virtual Environment for Cooperative Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    Presence in a Distributed Virtual Environment for Cooperative Visualization Juan Casanueva of computer networks and computer graphics technology, Collabora- tive Virtual Environments are becoming-Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW). Collaborative Vir- tual Environments involve the use of a distributed architecture

  5. Talking In Circles: Designing A Spatially-Grounded Audioconferencing Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to become a popular medium for social interaction. Traditional chat environments, however, are limitedTalking In Circles: Designing A Spatially-Grounded Audioconferencing Environment Roy Rodenstein, a multimodal audioconferencing environment whose novel design emphasizes spatial grounding with the aim

  6. altered environment created: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environment in which to simulate the Punitive Ostracism condition. Categories Richards, Debbie 17 The University of Oklahoma creates a safe environment for all faculty, staff,...

  7. Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality...

  8. German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety Jump to: navigation, search Logo: German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and...

  9. Environment - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Power Plant Environmental International Emissions All Environment Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Reports environment State CO2 Emissions Data for: 2012 | Release Date:...

  10. The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, Daniel Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    density (interstellar medium) environment is consistent withan interstellar medium or wind environment, or whether theenvironments: ellipticals, spirals, distant star-forming galaxies, the intracluster medium, and

  11. affect business environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    test environment configuration and utilization, lack of automation and comprehensive tooling, and the unavailability of test environments can impact the quality of testing and...

  12. Chapter 23 - Environment, Energy and Water Efficiency, Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 - Environment, Energy and Water Efficiency, Renewable Energy Technologies, Occupational Safety, and Drug-free Workplace. Chapter 23 - Environment, Energy and Water Efficiency,...

  13. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the requirements and responsibilities for conducting and managing the Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments required reading program. Office of Environment,...

  14. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium...

  15. CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF METALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF METALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT Annual Report Submitted to: U.S. Environmental of Contents Unit World Model for Metals in Aquatic Environments

  16. GCL Engineering Ltd formerly Jiangsu Suyuan Environment Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GCL Engineering Ltd formerly Jiangsu Suyuan Environment Protection Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: GCL Engineering Ltd (formerly Jiangsu Suyuan Environment Protection...

  17. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29,...

  18. Work Environment It is important to note the specific criteria you are seeking in a work environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Work Environment It is important to note the specific criteria you are seeking in a work environment as you consider various career paths and again as you evaluate actual job opportunities. Circle work environment preferences

  19. The galactic environment of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Frisch

    1999-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The interstellar cloud surrounding the solar system regulates the galactic environment of the Sun and constrains the physical characteristics of the interplanetary medium. This paper compares interstellar dust grain properties observed within the solar system with dust properties inferred from observations of the cloud surrounding the solar system. Properties of diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity are discussed to gain insight into the properties of the diffuse cloud complex flowing past the Sun. Evidence is presented for changes in the galactic environment of the Sun within the next 10$^4$--10$^6$ years. The combined history of changes in the interstellar environment of the Sun, and solar activity cycles, will be recorded in the variability of the ratio of large- to medium-sized interstellar dust grains deposited onto geologically inert surfaces. Combining data from lunar core samples in the inner and outer solar system will assist in disentangling these two effects.

  20. How does clustering depend on environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummi Abbas; Ravi K. Sheth

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the current paradigm, galaxies form and reside in extended cold dark matter (CDM) halos and in turn are key tracers of cosmological structure. Understanding how different types of galaxies occupy halos of different masses is one of the major challenges facing extragalactic astrophysics. The observed galaxy properties depend on the environment surrounding the galaxy. Within the framework of most galaxy formation models the environmental dependence of the galaxy population is mainly due to the change of the halo mass function with large-scale environment. Such models make precise predictions for how galaxy clustering should depend on environment. We will illustrate this by presenting analytical models of dark matter and galaxy clustering along with results obtained from numerical simulations. With these results we can hope to obtain a better understanding of the link between galaxies and dark matter and thereby constrain galaxy formation models.

  1. EnvironmentEnvironment New Mexico is a state of scenic beauty, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    EnvironmentEnvironment New Mexico is a state of scenic beauty, an inspiration for artists Albuquerque, NM 87106 (505) 272-7764, optics@unm.edu The University of New Mexico is an Affirmative Action in alternate formats upon request. Founded in 1889, The University of New Mexico (UNM) has become one

  2. Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won't Last Real Price Projections, Selected Commodities 2007-2017 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 and Environment Institute (GDAE), Tufts University Project of Working Groups on Development and Environment, Tufts University Three-year Collaborative Project Rationale: assess the promise of agro

  3. Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klarer, P.R. (Sandia National Lab., Advanced Technology Div., Albuquerque, NM (US))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's on board navigation system and map-maker. The system software, hardware and performance data are discussed.

  4. Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of the Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool, which is designed to assess impacts of future land use/built environment patterns on transportation-related energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tool can be used to evaluate a range of population distribution and urban design scenarios for 2030 and 2050. This tool was produced as part of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  5. Conformational properties of polymers in anisotropic environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Haydukivska; V. Blavatska

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the conformational properties of polymer macromolecules in solutions in presence of extended structural obstacles of (fractal) dimension $\\varepsilon_d$ causing the anisotropy of environment. Applying the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM), we obtain numerical estimates for scaling exponents and universal shape parameters of polymers in such environments for a wide range $0polymer renormalization scheme. Both numerical and analytical studies qualitatively confirm the existence of two characteristic length scales of polymer chain in directions parallel and perpendicular to the extended defects.

  6. Principled design for an integrated computational environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Disessa, A.A.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boxer is a computer language designed to be the base of an integrated computational environment providing a broad array of functionality -- from text editing to programming -- for naive and novice users. It stands in the line of Lisp inspired languages (Lisp, Logo, Scheme), but differs from these in achieving much of its understandability from pervasive use of a spatial metaphor reinforced through suitable graphics. This paper describes a set of learnability and understandability issues first and then uses them to motivate design decisions made concerning Boxer and the environment in which it is embedded.

  7. Hydrothermal flow systems in the Midcontinent Rift: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic studies of the North Shore Volcanic Group and related hypabyssal sills, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y.R.; Ripley, E.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift-related lavas of the North Shore Volcanic Group (NSVG) are intruded by plutonic rocks of the Duluth Complex along the unconformity between the NSVG and the underlying Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks (Animikie Group) and Archean volcano-sedimentary and plutonic rocks. Heat associated with the emplacement of the mafic intrusions generated fluid flow in the overlying plateau lavas. {delta}{sup 18}O values for whole rocks from the NSVG and hypabyssal sills range from 5.5 to 17.7{per_thousand} and 5.3 to 11.5{per_thousand}, respectively, and most values are higher than those considered normal for basaltic rocks (5.4 to 6.0{per_thousand}). In general, there is a positive correlation between whole rock {delta}{sup 18}O and water content, which suggests that elevated {delta}{sup 18}O values are related primarily to secondary mineral growth and isotopic exchange during hydrothermal alteration and metamorphism. {delta}{sup 18}O{sub H{sub 2}O} values computed from amygdule-filling minerals such as smectite, chlorite, and epidote found in low- to high-temperature metamorphic zones range from {approximately}{minus}1 to 6{per_thousand} with an average value of {approximately}3{per_thousand}. Smectite in the lower-grade zones gives computed {delta}D{sub H{sub 2}O} values between {minus}26 and {minus}83{per_thousand}, whereas epidote in the higher-grade zones gives {delta}D{sub H{sub 2}O} values of {minus}15 to 6{per_thousand}. Fluid isotopic compositions computed from epidote and smectite values are suggestive of the involvement of at least two fluids during the early stages of amygdule filling. Fluid {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values determined from epidote at the higher metamorphic grades indicate that seawater dominated the deeper portions of the system where greenschist facies assemblages and elevated {delta}{sup 18}O values were produced in flow interiors, as well as margins. Smectite isotopic compositions suggest that meteoric water was predominant in the shallower portions of the system. The increase in {delta}{sup 18}O values of massive flow interiors with depth is interpreted as a result of rock interaction with a fluid of constant oxygen isotopic composition with increasing temperature. The stable isotopic data are supportive of previous suggestions that seawater was involved in the hydrothermal system associated with the Midcontinent Rift. Although the origin of the seawater remains problematic, it appears that marine incursions may have occurred during the late stages of Portage Lake volcanism, and periodically thereafter.

  8. Environment Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Strategy which, since its publication in 2006 has given strong emphasis to the role of Scotland% in winter months. Climate impacts for Scotland have been summarised in the UK 2012 Climate Change Risk demand for energy from woodfuel and wind, or a desire to conserve peatland carbon stocks, will have

  9. Environment Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Company Purchased an area of Acharossan Forest (125 hectares). Since then they have improved local access development in our area." Community applicant National Forest Land Scheme #12;NFLS - summary report | 3 include: business development, timber production, woodland crofts, renewable energy, allotments

  10. Benthic Terrain Modeler: Interpreting the Bathymetric Environment Shaun Walbridge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    interactively with an environment such as IPython 6 . Finally, the project now includes an extensive testing

  11. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 10 Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 10 Marine Environment 367367 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 10. THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT "Some might be tempted to attribute all changes that environment allows, management interventions are more important when the ocean environment reduces natural

  12. An Ontology for Semantic Representation of an Urban Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An Ontology for Semantic Representation of an Urban Virtual Environment K. Harkouken Saiah1, N of semantic representation of a dynamic virtual environment. Our model is embodied into a simulation with the semantic state of their environment. The idea is to represent the services offered by the environment

  13. Finding Environment Guarantees Marsha Chechik, Mihaela Gheorghiu, Arie Gurfinkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Marsha

    Finding Environment Guarantees Marsha Chechik, Mihaela Gheorghiu, Arie Gurfinkel University a software component, a model of the environ- ment in which that component is supposed to run is constructed of the environment model. In this paper, we identify and formalize a problem related to environment models

  14. Comparing the Parix and PVM parallel programming environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, Universiteit van

    1 Comparing the Parix and PVM parallel programming environments A.G. Hoekstra, P.M.A. Sloot, and L Genericity of parallel programming environments, enabling development of portable parallel programs environments are important issues if a choice between programming environments has to be made. We propose

  15. SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT THE DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT THE DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS MAY 2013MAY 2013 #12;#12;SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT 1 The Working Environment Organisation at the Department The Working Environment organisation at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG) is divided into 11 working

  16. Towards a Virtual Environment for Interactive World Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Virtual Environment for Interactive World Building Dieter Schmalstieg and Michael|gervautz@cg.tuwien.ac.at http://www.cg.tuwien.ac.at/ Abstract We propose an architecture for virtual environments that is aimed and maintenance of the virtual environment. Users can be present in the environment using software clients

  17. The R Environment A high-level overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    use it. #12;What exactly is R? R is a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics Sarkar The R Environment #12;What exactly is R? R is a language and environment for statisticalThe R Environment A high-level overview Deepayan Sarkar Indian Statistical Institute, Delhi 6

  18. Virtualizing Operating Systems for Seamless Distributed Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Partha

    Virtualizing Operating Systems for Seamless Distributed Environments 1 Tom Boyd and Partha Dasgupta of the "Computing Communities" project, a joint effort between Arizona State University and New York University. Abstract Applications and operating systems can be augmented with extra functionality by injecting

  19. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 24: Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 24: Training Quick Start Summary Product ID: 520-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/trainingQuickstart.pdf 1 Who needs to know about these requirements The requirements of Training apply to all persons on-site, employees and non-employees, their SLAC

  20. Digital image library development in academic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corran, Ruth

    1 Digital image library development in academic environment: designing and testing usability@aup.fr Keywords: Digital image library, usability, student projects, participatory design Abstract Case study Purpose By reporting the experience gained in the development of a digital image library in academic

  1. Department of Architecture and Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Gail

    of Sydney Sydney Australia The University of Western Australia Perth Australia The University of British Australia The University of Melbourne Melbourne Australia Deakin University Geelong, near Melbourne Australia For students from Architecture & Built Environment only The University of Newcastle Newcastle, New

  2. THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOT GUARANTEED · PROFITS ARE NOT LOCAL #12;BAD FOR THE ENVIRONMENT · Increased CO2­ global warming, ocean #12;PT COGENERATION LLC A wood-burning cogeneration power plant - Generates electricity (for sale off FOR PAPER TURBINE/ GENERATOR 25 MW MORE ELECTRICITY (currently make about 13MW) HIGH PRESSURE STEAM ADDS 15

  3. Collaborative Virtual Environment Standards: A Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottawa, University of

    for each standard varies from graphics and rendering to simulation and network communication. Standards categories: Rendering and Graphics and Communications Middleware. 2.1 Rendering and Graphics These standards1 Collaborative Virtual Environment Standards: A Performance Evaluation Jauvane C. de Oliveira

  4. NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

  5. Neutrino Mixing and Oscillations in Astrophysical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  6. School of Civil Engineering and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    1 School of Civil Engineering and the Environment Forecasting the Use of New Local Railway Stations Using GIS Simon Blainey Transportation Research Group Supervisor: Prof. John Preston School of Civil increased since privatisation · Existing models inaccurate · Better demand forecasts needed School of Civil

  7. Battery charging in float vs. cycling environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COREY,GARTH P.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In lead-acid battery systems, cycling systems are often managed using float management strategies. There are many differences in battery management strategies for a float environment and battery management strategies for a cycling environment. To complicate matters further, in many cycling environments, such as off-grid domestic power systems, there is usually not an available charging source capable of efficiently equalizing a lead-acid battery let alone bring it to a full state of charge. Typically, rules for battery management which have worked quite well in a floating environment have been routinely applied to cycling batteries without full appreciation of what the cycling battery really needs to reach a full state of charge and to maintain a high state of health. For example, charge target voltages for batteries that are regularly deep cycled in off-grid power sources are the same as voltages applied to stand-by systems following a discharge event. In other charging operations equalization charge requirements are frequently ignored or incorrectly applied in cycled systems which frequently leads to premature capacity loss. The cause of this serious problem: the application of float battery management strategies to cycling battery systems. This paper describes the outcomes to be expected when managing cycling batteries with float strategies and discusses the techniques and benefits for the use of cycling battery management strategies.

  8. Green Virtual Enterprises and their Breeding Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Green Virtual Enterprises and their Breeding Environments David Romero, Arturo Molina Tecnológico. This paper introduces a Green Virtual Enterprise (GVE) model as an emerging sustainable manufacturing and logistics mode focused on offering, delivering and recovering green products to/from the market, under

  9. Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa © 2002, Professor Robert Thornton Department of Anthropology University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Acknowledgements: Research), and by the Centre for Science Development, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa. Printed:24 April

  10. Collaborative Editor Environments for Player Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SSL #11-12 #12;2 #12;3 Collaborative Editor Environments for Player Programs Sonny Thai, Dr. Alvar Saenz-Otero May 2012 SSL #11-12 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Sonny Thai

  11. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bledsoe, Brian

    FrontiersinEcology and the Environment Stream restoration strategies for reducing river nitrogen). Natural resource managers are now asking how restoration of stream ecosystems might reduce the downstream turned to ecological restoration as a tool for reducing N loading. While more than 30% of the stream

  12. Energy Regulation and the Environment (Spring 2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    since so many energy choices­the use of oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, the green alternatives the greatest threats to the global environment. This course introduces students to the legal, economic problems. The course focuses primarily on the regulation and design of electricity systems and markets

  13. Energy Regulation and the Environment (Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    , since so many energy choices­the use of oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, the green alternatives the greatest threats to the global environment. This course introduces students to the legal, economic problems. The course focuses primarily on the regulation and design of electricity systems and markets

  14. Extending Programming Environments to Support Architectural Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancoridis, Spiros

    integrated tool sets that support the production of source code in a programming language. They usually comprise tools for editing often syntax directed, compiling, executing, debugging, and source code browsing 28 from Xerox Parc, Integral C 25 from Tektronics, and the Turbo environments from Borland

  15. REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS AND AUGMENTED MEDIA SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

    REACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS AND AUGMENTED MEDIA SPACES by Jeremy R. Cooperstock A thesis submitted in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Toronto © Copyright by Jeremy R. Cooperstock, 1996 #12;ii REACTIVE

  16. NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

  17. An Environment for Empirical Data Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruegge, Bernd

    An Environment for Empirical Data Interpretation Gudrun J. Klinker Cambridge Research Lab, Digital, such as biomedical imaging, robotics, seismic data analysis, and wood classification. Current visualization systems exploration and interpretation tools which can be adapted to the requirements of different applications

  18. DCE DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DCE ­ DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY Director Hanne Bach hba@dmu.dk · +45 8715 1348 Vibeke Vestergaard Nielsen · vive@dmu.dk · + 45 8715 1304 DEPARTMENT OF BIOSCIENCE Arctic marine.wang@biology.au.dk · +45 8715 5998 DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Atmospheric chemistry and physics, air quality

  19. Memory in the system: trajectory-environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Budaev

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper the memory effect in the system consisting from a trajectory of process and an environment is considered. The environment is presented by scalar potential and noise. The evolution of system is interpreted as process of the continuous "measurement" of a trajectory by an environment and\\or on the contrary. In this sense the measured value is entropy-the information about embedding of the trajectory into configurations space. The concepts "measurement" and "interaction" are identified alike in quantum theory. Thus, the entropy evolution is not only the effect of dynamics, but also its cause, if it is possible to speak about causality in this case. It is shown, that such non-elastic interaction leads to occurrence of memory in the system. The reflex memory mechanism is realized as a real conformal dynamic metrics. The metastable event (attractor) is defined and time of its life is estimated. It is shown, that in the system there is a change of dynamic modes from spatial localization to random walk (fluctuation, relaxation). On scale of the attractors dynamics the memory is appearing as a semi-regular (in some information sense) drift of the image of fluctuations in a power spectrum of environment to absolute minimum. The latter properties (topological convergence) attract the attention to algorithmic aspect of a considered system.

  20. The Crab pulsar and its environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesper Sollerman; Veronica Flyckt

    2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new data of the Crab pulsar and its environment. Images taken in the infrared with ISAAC allow us to measure the pulsar spectrum and to reveal the red knot close to the pulsar. Complementary optical data from VLT and HST are presented. The full article, with full resolution nice color images, is presented in Messenger, 107, 32

  1. How `heredity' and `environment' shape galaxy properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriella De Lucia

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review, I give a brief summary of galaxy evolution processes in hierarchical cosmologies and of their relative importance at different masses, times, and environments. I remind the reader of the processes that are commonly included in modern semi-analytic models of galaxy formation, and I comment on recent results and open issues.

  2. ucsf sustainability healthy environment, sustainable future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    ucsf sustainability healthy environment, sustainable future UC SAN FRANCISCO ANNUAL REPORT FY 2009-2010 Annual Report of the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 UCSF Sustainability Governance 3 Table 1: CACS Members 4 Figure 1: UCSF Sustainability

  3. Characterization of the Hanford Site and environs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. (ed.)

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to site, construct, and operate a new production reactor (NPR) intended to produce materials for the US nuclear weapons program. The DOE has determined that this proposed action constitutes an action that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment; therefore, the DOE is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the potential impacts of the proposed action and reasonable alternatives on the human and natural environment. The NPR-EIS is being prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented in regulations (40 CFR 1500--1508) promulgated by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Information on the potentially affected environment at the Hanford Site and its environs was provided to ANL by PNL in various submissions during CY-1989, and some of that information was consolidated into this report, which is considered to be supporting documentation for the NPR-EIS. 93 refs., 35 figs., 46 tabs.

  4. Virtualized Environments for the Harness Workbench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Of The Requirements For The Degree Of Master of Science In Network Centered Computing, High Performance Computing of computational sciences today leads to a signicant need of high performance computing systems. High performance to develop an appropriate development and runtime environment for high performance computing platforms

  5. Ambient Telepresence: Colleague Awareness in Smart Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    · Building smartness into the things that surround us rather than introducing new smart devices · CollectingAmbient Telepresence: Colleague Awareness in Smart Environments Hans-W. Gellersen and Michael Beigl-located. In this approach, everyday things that people use are augmented with awareness technology, creating a smart

  6. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  7. MATLAB as an Environment for Bayesian Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, James H.

    MATLAB as an Environment for Bayesian Computation Jim Albert 1 Bowling Green State University July 1997 1 Address for correspondence: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA. #12; Abstract The current status of Bayesian software is reviewed

  8. Low Oxygen Environments in Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Low Oxygen Environments in Chesapeake Bay Jeremy Testa Chesapeake Biological Laboratory University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Why we care about low oxygen? What causes low oxygen? Where and When does Chesapeake Bay lose oxygen? #12;#12;Hypoxia and Chesapeake Animals Low dissolved oxygen

  9. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although only a small contributor to total electricity production needs, built-environment wind turbines (BWTs) nonetheless have the potential to influence the public's consideration of renewable energy, and wind energy in particular. Higher population concentrations in urban environments offer greater opportunities for project visibility and an opportunity to acquaint large numbers of people to the advantages of wind projects on a larger scale. However, turbine failures will be equally visible and could have a negative effect on public perception of wind technology. This roadmap provides a framework for achieving the vision set forth by the attendees of the Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The BWT roadmap outlines the stakeholder actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers identified. The actions are categorized as near-term (0 - 3 years), medium-term (4 - 7 years), and both near- and medium-term (requiring immediate to medium-term effort). To accomplish these actions, a strategic approach was developed that identifies two focus areas: understanding the built-environment wind resource and developing testing and design standards. The authors summarize the expertise and resources required in these areas.

  10. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balantekin, A. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  11. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    temperatures, partial melting of the polar ice caps, ocean acidification, and a host of other impacts on EarthFrontiersinEcology and the Environment Do trophic cascades affect the storage and flux RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS Do trophic cascades affect the storage and flux of atmospheric carbon? An analysis

  12. IN TELLIGENT CONTROLLING SYSTEM OF AQUICULTURE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    oxygen and fan and opening of windows and electromagnetism valve, The system hardware is composed of monitoring computer and PROFIBUS-DP field controlling units, which detects and controls the ecologicalIN TELLIGENT CONTROLLING SYSTEM OF AQUICULTURE ENVIRONMENT Deshen Zhao ,*1 1 Department of Electric

  13. Video Mediated Communication for Domestic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tollmar, Konrad

    ). The core argument is that information and com- munication technologies (ICT) are a prerequisite for the transformation process from a society focused on industrial production to a society dominated by information could change due to new social movements and new use of the domestic environment, we have designed

  14. CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment 2013 Annual Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    colleges · Capital Programs and Academic Space ­ ~$70M in new Academic buildings ­ Continued pressure and expect/demand technology integrated into delivery ­ We have successfully navigated a difficult decade, and responsibility for developing a better world. #12;CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment Critical Questions to consider

  15. Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

  16. PHOTOVOLTAICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 1998. REPORT ON THE WORKSHOP PHOTOVOLTAICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.; ZWEIBEL,K.; MOSKOWITZ,P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the workshop ``Photovoltaics and the Environment'' was to bring together PV manufacturers and industry analysts to define EH and S issues related to the large-scale commercialization of PV technologies.

  17. Copyright 2005 Water Environment Federation. Water Environment Research, Volume 77, Number 6 FATE OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    and Subsurface Environments Jiao et al. (2004) evaluated the effects of agricultural practices on dissolved N complemented with sidedressing N application and a good irrigation management are key factors to reduce nitrate

  18. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  19. Environment Assisted Quantum Transport in Organic Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vattay, Gabor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the new discoveries in quantum biology is the role of Environment Assisted Quantum Transport (ENAQT) in excitonic transport processes. In disordered quantum systems transport is most efficient when the environment just destroys quantum interferences responsible for localization, but the coupling does not drive the system to fully classical thermal diffusion yet. This poised realm between the pure quantum and the semi-classical domains has not been considered in other biological transport processes, such as charge transport through organic molecules. Binding in receptor-ligand complexes is assumed to be static as electrons are assumed to be not able to cross the ligand molecule. We show that ENAQT makes cross ligand transport possible and efficient between certain atoms opening the way for the reorganization of the charge distribution on the receptor when the ligand molecule docks. This new effect can potentially change our understanding how receptors work. We demonstrate room temperature ENAQT on the c...

  20. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  1. Assessing the assessments: Pharmaceuticals in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enick, O.V. [Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)], E-mail: oana.enick@gov.bc.ca; Moore, M.M. [Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)], E-mail: mmoore@sfu.ca

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The relatively new issue of pharmaceutical contamination of the environment offers the opportunity to explore the application of values to the construction, communication and management of risk. The still-developing regulatory policies regarding environmental contamination with pharmaceuticals provide fertile ground for the introduction of values into the definition and management of risk. In this report, we summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmaceutical contamination of the environment and discuss specific attributes of pharmaceuticals that require special consideration. We then present an analysis showing that if values are incorporated into assessing, characterizing and managing risk, the results of risk assessments will more accurately reflect the needs of various stakeholders. Originating from an acknowledgement of the inherent uncertainty and value-laden nature of risk assessment, the precautionary principle (and later, the multi-criteria, integrated risk assessment), provides a direction for further research and policy development.

  2. Manufacturing Environment in the Year 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slautterback, W. H.

    -line simulation of the manufacturing environment. An individual will define privrities and the system will report on an exception basis, what is required to meet the demands. Finite scheduling will replace infinite scheduling. Quality ... Inspection systems...; hundreds of machines have been replaced with several flexible manufacturing systems; large inventories and long lead times have been re laced with small inventories and short lead times that are managable; confusion created by scrap and rework have...

  3. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  4. Gene-environment interactions in genetic epidemiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinka, Christine Marie

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    joint linkage disequilibrium and linkage mapping of quantitative trait loci is developed. Subsequently, methods are needed to determine the interaction, if any, between these genes and environmental risk factors. Many of these factors, such as weight... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Using Complex Pedigrees 2 1.3 Gene-environment Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II JOINT LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM AND LINKAGE MAP- PING FOR COMPLEX PEDIGREES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2...

  5. The Exergy Concept Beyond the Academic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Y. M.

    THE EXERGY CONCEPT BEYOND THE ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT Y.M. EL-SAYED Consultant Advanced Energy Systems Fremont, California ABSTRACT The lack of the adequate data base for thermodynaaic properties and the coaputational burden of exergy analysis... are two aajor barriers to the second law analysis of industrial processes. In this paper the essential property implementations are discussed and a coaputerization strategy for exergy analysis is described. Examples of the directive role of second law...

  6. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  7. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St, Magurele, Jud Ilfov, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (?10{sup ?9} - 10{sup ?8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  8. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  9. Apparatus for observing a hostile environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

  10. The Environment of Galaxies at Low Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas B. Cowan; Zeljko Ivezic

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare environmental effects in two analogous samples of galaxies, one from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the other from a semi-analytic model (SAM) based on the Millennium Simulation (MS), to test to what extent current SAMs of galaxy formation are reproducing environmental effects. We estimate the large-scale environment of each galaxy using a Bayesian density estimator based on distances to all ten nearest neighbors and compare broad-band photometric properties of the two samples as a function of environment. The feedbacks implemented in the semi-analytic model produce a qualitatively correct galaxy population with similar environmental dependence as that seen in SDSS galaxies. In detail, however, the colors of MS galaxies exhibit an exaggerated dependence on environment: the field contains too many blue galaxies while clusters contain too many red galaxies, compared to the SDSS sample. We also find that the MS contains a population of highly clustered, relatively faint red galaxies with velocity dispersions comparable to their Hubble flow. Such high-density galaxies, if they exist, would be overlooked in any low-redshift survey since their membership to a cluster cannot be determined due to the "Fingers of God" effect.

  11. Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ` Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys.

  12. Mapping of complex marine environments using an unmanned surface craft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leedekerken, Jacques Chadwick

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technology has combined accurate GPS localization with mapping to build 3D maps in a diverse range of terrestrial environments, but the mapping of marine environments lags behind. This is particularly true in shallow ...

  13. The Influence of the Built Environment on Poor Hispanic Youth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lei

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many studies have examined the relationship between youth physical activity and their built environment. However, most of them used subjective measurement tools to measure built environment because of their low cost and ...

  14. Position Paper: The Iteration Mechanism in the Inscape Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    (the predicates), Inscape, through the Infuse source change management and coordination subsystem-knowledgeable environment. Thus, the Inscape environment provides the Infuse subsystem to make it easy to change

  15. The Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Sexton, Steven; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices. The reason: demand for biofuel increases, and ?rst-The Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment GalThe Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment ? Gal

  16. p ro g r a m m E Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : www.slu.se/environ/built Monitoring urban development Researchers at SLU are examining the problem for children on different scales ­ from micro levels such as schoolyards, to larger-scale environments

  17. Playing Nature: The Virtual Ecology of Game Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Alenda Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    also treats the environment as a medium, a move that allowsthe self. The environment is rather the medium in which weenvironment, especially if we are willing to see social life as a medium

  18. Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids Toan Nguyen-based computing environments and deploys, tests and analyzes multiphysics codes. A second approach executes model coupling, error correlations, alert definitions, best usage practices, code verification and code

  19. Probing the size and environment induced phase transformation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the size and environment induced phase transformation in CdSe quantum dots. Probing the size and environment induced phase transformation in CdSe quantum dots. Abstract: The...

  20. augmented learning environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 81 Medium-based design: Extending a medium to create and exploratory learning environment. Interactive Learning Environments...

  1. Self-* properties of multi sensing entities in smart environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilpré, Arnaud

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computers and sensors are more and more often embedded into everyday objects, woven into garments, "painted" on architecture or deployed directly into the environment. They monitor the environment, process the information ...

  2. Performance Assessment of Prediction In Dynamic Environments (PRIDE) in Manufacturing Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kootbally, Zeid [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Schlenoff, Craig [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Madhavan, Raj [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes PRIDE (Prediction in Dynamic Environments), a multi-resolution and hierarchical framework. PRIDE was developed as a test bed to assess the performance of autonomous vehicles in the presence of moving objects in a simulated environment. By simulating scenarios in which moving objects are prevalent, a designer of an autonomous vehicle can test the performance of their path planning and collision avoidance algorithms without having to immerse the vehicle in the physical world. This framework supports the prediction of the future location of moving objects at various levels of resolution, thus providing prediction information at the frequency and level of abstraction necessary for planners at different levels within the hierarchy. Previous works have demonstrated the reliability of PRIDE to simulate on-road traffic situations with multiple vehicles. To provide realistic scenarios, PRIDE integrates a level of situation awareness of how other vehicles in the environment are expected to behave considering the situation in which the vehicles find themselves in. In recent efforts, the PRIDE framework has been extended to consider production logistics in dynamic manufacturing environment while focusing on the scheduling of material transportation system. To demonstrate the characteristics of the PRIDE framework, this paper illustrates real-time navigation of Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) at different locations in a dynamic manufacturing environment. Moreover, using the high-fidelity physics?based framework for the Unified System for Automation and Robot Simulation (USARSim), this paper analyzes the performance of the PRIDE framework on a set of realistic scenarios.

  3. Characterizing quantum dynamics with initial system-environment correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Ringbauer; Christopher J. Wood; Kavan Modi; Alexei Gilchrist; Andrew G. White; Alessandro Fedrizzi

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We fully characterize the reduced dynamics of an open quantum system initially correlated with its environment. Using a photonic qubit coupled to a simulated environment we tomographically reconstruct a superchannel---a generalised channel that treats preparation procedures as inputs---from measurement of the system alone, despite its coupling to the environment. We introduce novel quantitative measures for determining the strength of initial correlations, and to allow an experiment to be optimised in regards to its environment.

  4. Satellite Ecology: The Dearth of Environment Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank C. van den Bosch; Anna Pasquali; Xiaohu Yang; H. J. Mo; Simone Weinmann; Daniel H. McIntosh; Daniel Aquino

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007), we study the average colour and average concentration of satellite galaxies as function of (i) their stellar mass, (ii) their group mass, and (iii) their group-centric radius. We find that the colours and concentrations of satellite galaxies are (almost) completely determined by their stellar mass. In particular, at fixed stellar mass, the average colours and concentrations of satellite galaxies are independent of either halo mass or halo-centric radius. We find clear evidence for mass segregation of satellite galaxies in haloes of all masses, and argue that this explains why satellites at smaller halo-centric radii are somewhat redder and somewhat more concentrated. In addition, the weak colour and concentration dependence of satellite galaxies on halo mass is simply a reflection of the fact that more massive haloes host, on average, more massive satellites. Combining these results with the fact that satellite galaxies are, on average, redder and somewhat more concentrated than central galaxies of the same stellar mass, the following picture emerges: galaxies become redder and somewhat more concentrated once they fall into a bigger halo (i.e., once they become a satellite galaxy). This is a clear manifestation of environment dependence. However, there is no indication that the magnitude of the transformation (or its timescale) depends on environment; a galaxy undergoes a transition when it becomes a satellite, but it does not matter whether it becomes a satellite of a small (Milky Way sized) halo, or of a massive cluster. We discuss the implication of this `dearth' of environment dependence for the physical processes responsible for transforming satellite galaxies.

  5. Micro-Bioreactor Mimicking a Cellular Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that a cell-sized water droplet (CWD) with a diameter of several tens of microns can serve as a micro-biochemical reactor. Since the droplet inner surface is covered by a phospholipid layer, it provides an environment similar to that in living cells. The CWD is manipulated with laser tweezers and we monitor the time-development of biochemical reactions in a single CWD by fusing two droplets which contain a substrate and an enzyme, respectively. As actual examples of enzymatic reactions, we present results on the reaction of calcein with esterase and on the expression reaction of green fluorescent protein.

  6. Depositional environments of the Kodiak Shelf, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burbach, Stuart Peter

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sinall amounts of ash. Sills separa+i;g the Trough and Ba:al Trough environments and possfble shelf edge currents are responsible ror the !ow concentrations of' ash. The Local Bank Depression sedir. ;ents are glacial till cove ed by fine-grain ash... os ity. Clay Minora'logy Uoicanic Ash Deposits Sedimentary Struci;ures. DISCUSS IOI'i Tro;! qh, Iiain Bank Basal T~ough. Local Bank Denression CONCLUSIONS. SELECTED I". EFERENCES. APPENDIII I ?2 2? 17 32 35 an 41 nq 45 4B 4B Cg...

  7. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  8. Axion physics in a Josephson junction environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Beck

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that recent experiments based on Josephson junctions, SQUIDS, and coupled Josephson qubits have a cosmological interpretation in terms of axionic dark matter physics, in the sense that they allow for analogue simulation of early-universe axion physics. We propose new experimental setups in which SQUID-like axionic interactions in a resonant Josephson junction environment can be tested, similar in nature to recent experiments that test for quantum entanglement of two coupled Josephson qubits. We point out that the parameter values relevant for early-universe axion cosmology are accessible with present day's achievements in nanotechnology.

  9. Environment, Safety and Health (ESH) Goals

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Policy is to establish Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) goals for Department of Energy (DOE) personnel and its contractors. These goals are designed to establish Departmental ES&H expectations for: 1) DOE and contractor personnel ES&H behaviors and attitudes in the conduct of their daily work activities, and 2) operational performance regarding worker injuries and illnesses, regulatory enforcement actions, and environmental releases. Cancels DOE P 450.1, DOE P 450.6. Canceled by DOE O 450.4A

  10. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  11. Utility Locating in the DOE Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark Scott; Gail Heath

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some advances have been made in utility locating in recent years and standards have been recently published to try and categorize the level of information known about the utility in the subsurface. At the same time some characterization about the level of effort or technology in the geophysicist approach to utility locating may be generalized. The DOE environment poses some added difficulties and this presentation covers these issues, costs and the technical approach that has been developed at the INEEL to prevent utility hits and how it fits into the generalized classification of effort.

  12. Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell Testing andGeothermal/Environment <

  13. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety andBerkeley Lab

  14. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, Safety andBerkeley LabERPEHS

  15. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, SafetySafety

  16. Environment/Health/Safety Division: News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment, SafetySafetyEHS EmergenciesEHS

  17. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): JHA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebbaEnvironment...Work PlanningJHA

  18. Built Environs Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBostonBridgerBuckeyeEnergyBuilt Environs Pty Ltd

  19. Ecology Environment Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open JumpEcology & Environment, Inc. Place:

  20. Auction Equilibrium Strategies for Task Allocation in Uncertain Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Sarit

    concerning coopera- tive agents aiming for a joint goal are not applicable in such environ- ments, since self, a company, etc., operating in a dynamic environment and lacking the required re- sources to performAuction Equilibrium Strategies for Task Allocation in Uncertain Environments David Sarne1 , Meirav

  1. Production and degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production and degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste environment Sang Yup Lee*, Jong of their similar material properties to conventional plastics and complete biodegradability under natural environ the global environ- ment have created much interest in the development of biodegradable polymers [9]. Among

  2. Creating Robust Roadmaps for Motion Planning in Changing Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    Creating Robust Roadmaps for Motion Planning in Changing Environments Jur P. van den Berg1 Dennis-- In this paper we introduce a method based on the Probabilistic Roadmap (PRM) Planner to construct robust roadmaps for motion planning in changing environments. PRM's are usually aimed at static environments

  3. Reach and get capability in a computing environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Ann M. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A reach and get technique includes invoking a reach command from a reach location within a computing environment. A user can then navigate to an object within the computing environment and invoke a get command on the object. In response to invoking the get command, the computing environment is automatically navigated back to the reach location and the object copied into the reach location.

  4. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Aerosols in Danish Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Aerosols in Danish Air (AIDA) Mid Department Department of Atmospheric Environment Serial title and no.: NERI Technical Report No.460 Publisher

  5. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark The Danish Air;National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment The Danish Air Quality Monitoring: Department of Atmospheric Environment Serial title and no.: NERI Technical Report No. 584 Publisher: National

  6. Mixed Reality Environment for Web-Based Laboratory Interactive Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1(8) Mixed Reality Environment for Web-Based Laboratory Interactive Learning Ashraf Saleem1 , Kasim learning, Mixed reality environment, Laboratory learning, Fuzzy logic, Learner modeling. Abstract environment for e-learning of applied sciences by incorporating hal-00197209,version1-14Dec2007 Author

  7. The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment. An Investigation of the Possible Roskilde, Denmark Febtuary 1990 #12;1 Risř-M-2851 THE BEHAVIOUR OF IODINE IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT influence the migration behaviour of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is stated that the organic

  8. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark ExternE transport Report No. 523 #12;[Blank page] #12;National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment Departments: 1 Department of Atmospheric Environment, NERI 2 COWI Serial title and no.: NERI Technical Report

  9. The 8th International Scientific Conference Contemporary Business Environment Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The 8th International Scientific Conference Contemporary Business Environment Strategies: Novel hand, and the economic, financial, managerial, social, legal, and political environments on the other environment and similar topics relevant to the themes of the conference are welcome. It is stipulated

  10. EFFECTS OF THE OBJECTIVE AND PERCEIVED BUILT ENVIRONMENT ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    EFFECTS OF THE OBJECTIVE AND PERCEIVED BUILT ENVIRONMENT ON BICYCLING FOR TRANSPORTATION Liang Ma and Jennifer Dill #12;INTRODUCTION ¨ A growing number of studies link various features of the built environment to walking and bicycling behavior ¨ Two types of built environment measures are generally used: Perceived

  11. Computing Environment-Aware Agent Behaviours with Logic Program Updates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brogi, Antonio

    Computing Environment-Aware Agent Behaviours with Logic Program Updates Jos´e J. Alferes1 , Antonio Pisa, Italy, brogi@di.unipi.it Abstract. The ability of reacting to changes in the external environ behaviours of environment-aware agents can be naturally specified and computed in terms of logic program

  12. WREN--An Environment for Component-Based Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    WREN-- An Environment for Component-Based Development Chris Lüer David S. Rosenblum Institute in software environments focused on three impor- tant problems-- tool integration, artifact management, and process guidance. The context for that research, and hence the orientation of the resulting environments

  13. NON-PERTURBATIVE APPROACH TO RANDOM WALK IN MARKOVIAN ENVIRONMENT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liverani, Carlangelo

    NON-PERTURBATIVE APPROACH TO RANDOM WALK IN MARKOVIAN ENVIRONMENT. DMITRY DOLGOPYAT AND CARLANGELO LIVERANI Abstract. We prove the CLT for a random walk in a dynamical environment where the states of the environment at different sites are independent Markov chains. 1. Introduction The study of random walk

  14. Inverting quantum decoherence by classical feedback from the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Buscemi; Giulio Chiribella; Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that for qubits and qutrits it is always possible to perfectly recover quantum coherence by performing a measurement only on the environment, whereas for dimension d>3 there are situations where recovery is impossible, even with complete access to the environment. For qubits, the minimal amount of classical information to be extracted from the environment equals the entropy exchange.

  15. The Combination of Competitive Evolution and an Interactive Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    The Combination of Competitive Evolution and an Interactive Environment Julie Corder and Ross- ronment. We explore the combination of competitive evolution, and an interactive environment. A population, and potential remedies, are discussed. 1 Introduction In studying intelligence, the environment in which

  16. A Gameroom of Our Own: Exploring The Domestic Gaming Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    A Gameroom of Our Own: Exploring The Domestic Gaming Environment A. VOIDA Donald Bren School ________________________________________________________________________ Digital gaming plays out within different environments--from arcades to virtual worlds to the family living room. Each of these gaming environments offer different constraints and affordances for gaming

  17. Risk based motion planning and navigation in uncertain dynamic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Risk based motion planning and navigation in uncertain dynamic environment Chiara Fulgenzi, Anne of the dynamic environments. Moving obstacles are supposed to move along typical motion patterns represented the performance for a robotic wheelchair in a simulated environment among multiple dynamic obstacles. Index Terms

  18. World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment The Role of Spatial Data Infrastructure Center for Human Interactions in the Environment Introduction · Objective: to document the impacts in the Environment The Underlying Question · Which of the observed changes across systems and geographic regions

  19. World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment Why Demographic Data are not Up Interactions in the Environment Introduction · AR4 (Schneider et al. 2007: 782): ­ An impact describes Interactions in the Environment Introduction (cont.) · Layers of vulnerability ­ Everyone is vulnerable

  20. Environment-contingent sexual selection in a colour polymorphic fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    Environment-contingent sexual selection in a colour polymorphic fish Suzanne M. Gray1,*, Lawrence M environment can influence sexual selection on colourful male secondary traits such that selective advantage is environment contingent. Using a small fish endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia (Telmatherina sarasinorum) that has

  1. ASYMPTOTIC SHAPE FOR THE CONTACT PROCESS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ASYMPTOTIC SHAPE FOR THE CONTACT PROCESS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT OLIVIER GARET AND R´EGINE MARCHAND in stationary random environment. These theorems gen- eralize known results for the classical contact process environment, when the contact process survives, the set Ht/t almost surely converges to a compact set

  2. Course Syllabus -BCT 191A -Fall, 2011 The Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Course Syllabus - BCT 191A - Fall, 2011 The Built Environment Instructor: David T. Damery Office, Holdsworth 110 TEXT & MATERIALS: Reshaping the Built Environment: Ecology, Ethics and Economics, edited the issues of sustainability from the perspective of the built environment, our history of construction

  3. On a Class of Renewal Processes in a Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    On a Class of Renewal Processes in a Random Environment David Svensson April 12, 1998 #12; 1 #12 continuous lifelength distribution. A random environment is modelled by a positive recurrent birth and death, governed by the environment process and based on an underlying set of deterministic failure rate functions

  4. Scaling limits for gradient systems in random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Goncalves; M. D. Jara

    2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For interacting particle systems that satisfies the gradient condition, the hydrodynamic limit and the equilibrium fluctuations are well known. We prove that under the presence of a symmetric random environment, these scaling limits also hold for almost every choice of the environment, with homogenized coefficients that does not depend on the particular realization of the random environment.

  5. Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments Christopher Niederauer exploded views of 3D architectural environments such as multi-story buildings. These exploded views allow viewers to simultaneously see the internal and external structures of such environments. To create

  6. Visual monitoring environments, such as intrusion detection systems, debugging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbacher, Robert F.

    Abstract Visual monitoring environments, such as intrusion detection systems, debugging environments, and feature extraction systems, require that a user familiar with the target domain examine, most in an efficient form. How the users employ the environment and the type and quantity of data will also affect

  7. Simulations of Embodied Evolving Semiosis: Emergent Semantics in Artificial Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    Simulations of Embodied Evolving Semiosis: Emergent Semantics in Artificial Environments LUIS-238. Abstract. As we enter this amazing new world of artificial and virtual systems and environments in the context of human communities, we are interested in the development of systems and environments which have

  8. Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celentano, Augusto

    Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments Augusto Celentano and Fabio for in- teractive services in complex physical environments using a knowl- edge based approach to define the relations between the environ- ment and the services, and a visual interface to check the associated

  9. Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, David W.

    Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing Problem-Solving Environments Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing. The conference was chaired by Professor D. W. Walker and managing distributed high performance comput- ing resources is important for a PSE to meet the requirements

  10. Random walk in random environment: a dynamicist's approch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    , equivalently: RW in a (quenched) disordered medium, or: Random walk in random environment (RWRE) Marco LenciRandom walk in random environment: a dynamicist's approch Marco Lenci Universit`a di Bologna RWRE #12;Random walk in random environment Random walk (RW): Point (particle, walker) travels on Zd

  11. Problem solving strategies in an online homework environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Problem solving strategies in an online homework environment: "Student Choice and Analytics" Daniel.T. Seaton, MIT Online Environment using LON-CAPA · Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics - Built within LON-CAPA - E-text with instructor videos - Concept questions - Easy, Medium, Hard homework

  12. A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT FOR ACTORS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT FOR ACTORS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT �ve ROSS Maître de conférences facilitating a collaborative environment in the field of architecture and urban design. Desk research by way in an international effort. Keywords: Territorial intelligence, 3D virtual collaborative environment, sustainable

  13. space for science, enterprise and environment Bringing Space Into School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    space for science, enterprise and environment Bringing Space Into School Science The National Space Education Initiative #12;space for science, enterprise and environment National Space Education Initiative the consultations · Recommendations of the report #12;space for science, enterprise and environment Background

  14. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  15. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  16. Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

  17. Autonomous navigation for structured exterior environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletta, J B

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Telemanaged Mobile Security Station (TMSS) was developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the role of mobile robotics in exterior perimeter security systems. A major feature of the system is its capability to perform autonomous patrols of the security site`s network of roads. Perimeter security sites are well known, structured environments; the locations of the roads, buildings, and fences are relatively static. A security robot has the advantage of being able to learn its new environment prior to autonomous travel. The TMSS robot combines information from a microwave beacon system and on-board dead reckoning sensors to determine its location within the site. The operator is required to teleoperate the robot in a teach mode over all desired paths before autonomous operations can commence. During this teach phase, TMSS stores points from its position location system at two meter intervals. This map data base is used for planning paths and for reference during path following. Details of the position location and path following systems will be described along with system performance and recommendations for future enhancements.

  18. Geotoxic materials in the surface environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koranda, J.J.; Cohen, J.J.; Smith, C.F.; Ciminesi, F.J.

    1981-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The toxicology and natural occurrence of several recognized geotoxic elements including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, lead, selenium, uranium, and vanadium is reviewed. The behavior of these elements in the environment and in biological systems is examined. The properties of these eight toxic elements are summarized and presented in a toxicity matrix. The toxicity matrix identifies each of the elements in terms of average crustal abundance, average soil concentration, drinking water standards, irrigation water standards, daily human intake, aquatic toxicity, phytotoxicity, mammalian toxicity, human toxicity, and bioaccumulation factors for fish. Fish are the major aquatic environment contribution to the human diet and bioaccumulation in aquatic ecosystems has been demonstrated to be an important factor in the cycling of elements in aquatic ecosystems. The toxicity matrix is used as a first approximation to rank the geotoxicity of elements for the purpose of focusing future efforts. The ranking from highest to lowest toxicity with respect to the toxicity parameters being discussed is as follows: arsenic, cadmium, lead, selenium, chromium, vanadium, nickel, and uranium.

  19. Ring polymers in crowded environment: conformational properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Haydukivska; V. Blavatska

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the universal size characteristics of flexible ring polymers in solutions in presence of structural obstacles (impurities) in d dimensions. One encounters such situations when considering polymers in gels, colloidal solutions, intra- and extracellular environments. A special case of extended impurities correlated on large distances r according to a power law \\sim r^{-a} is considered. Applying the direct polymer renormalization scheme, we evaluate the estimates for averaged gyration radius $\\langle R_{g\\,{\\rm ring}} \\rangle$ and spanning radius $\\langle R_{1/2\\,{\\rm ring}} \\rangle$ of typical ring polymer conformation up to the first order of double \\varepsilon=4-d, \\delta=4-a expansion. Our results quantitatively reveal an extent of the effective size and anisotropy of closed ring macromolecules in disordered environment. In particular, the size ratio of ring and open (linear) polymers of the same molecular weight grows when increasing the strength of disorder according to $\\langle R^2_{g\\,{\\rm ring}} \\rangle / \\langle R^2_{g\\,{\\rm chain}} \\rangle =\\frac{1}{2} \\left(1+\\frac{13}{48}\\delta \\right)$.

  20. Environment and Earth Sciences Department The Environment and Earth Sciences Department was created in 1993 from the Department of Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Environment and Earth Sciences Department The Environment and Earth Sciences Department was created of the Earth and Vegetal Biology. Following the extension of the educational staff went incorporating of the Geological Society of Spain. It will be organized by the Department of Earth Sciences and the environment