Sample records for volcanic age host

  1. archean volcanic hosted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greenstone pile Sandiford, Mike 23 Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and...

  2. Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic

  3. Age, geochemical and SrNdPb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Age, geochemical and Sr­Nd­Pb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics, Northern Kohistan Terrane, Pakistan S.D. Khana,*, R.J. Sternb , M.I. Mantonb, University of Peshawar, Pakistan Accepted 21 April 2004 Available online 23 September 2004 Abstract

  4. Cosmos greenstone terrane: Insights into an Archaean volcanic arc, associated with komatiite-hosted nickel sulphide mineralisation, from U-Pb dating, volcanic stratigraphy and geochemistry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Joux, Alexandra; Joux, Alexandra de

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neoarchaean Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt (AWB) of the Kalgoorlie Terrane, within the Eastern Goldfields Superterrane (EGS) of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, contains several world-class, komatiite-hosted, ...

  5. AGES CONSTRAINTS IN PEGMATITE PROVINCE RELATED TO CHARNOCKITIC HOST ROCKS IN MINAS GERAIS, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AGES CONSTRAINTS IN PEGMATITE PROVINCE RELATED TO CHARNOCKITIC HOST ROCKS IN MINAS GERAIS, BRAZIL Fernando Machado de MELLO1 , Essaid BILAL2* , 1- Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil/ +33 4 7749 9707 Abstract Cambrian-Neoproterozoic granitoids suites in southeastern Brazil are the main

  6. Cheer Clinic The Oregon State Cheerleaders will be hosting a cheer clinics this winter, for kids ages 2-13. The clinic is limited to the first 150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Cheer Clinic The Oregon State Cheerleaders will be hosting a cheer clinics this winter, for kids ages 2-13. The clinic is limited to the first 150 participants that sign up. The clinic includes a t information call the Oregon State Marketing office at (541)737.1085. Jr. Cheer Clinic2008 Cheer Clinic Oregon

  7. Temporal and petrogenetic constraints on volcanic accretionary processes at 9-10 degrees North East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Christopher L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic accretion at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) occurs over a ~2-4 km wide neo-volcanic zone on either side of the axial summit trough (AST). Eruption ages are critical for understanding the distribution ...

  8. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  9. Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

  10. NAVY PRECISION OPTICAL INTERFEROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXOPLANET HOST {kappa} CORONAE BOREALIS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STAR'S AND PLANET'S MASSES AND AGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Van Belle, Gerard T., E-mail: ellyn.baines@nrl.navy.mil [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer to measure the limb-darkened angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {kappa} CrB and obtained a value of 1.543 {+-} 0.009 mas. We calculated its physical radius (5.06 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Sun }) and used photometric measurements from the literature with our diameter to determine {kappa} CrB's effective temperature (4788 {+-} 17 K) and luminosity (12.13 {+-} 0.09 L{sub Sun }). We then placed the star on an Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to ascertain the star's age (3.42{sup +0.32}{sub -0.25} Gyr) and mass (1.47 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }) using a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.15. With this mass, we calculated the system's mass function with the orbital elements from a variety of sources, which produced a range of planetary masses: m{sub p}sin i = 1.61-1.88 M{sub Jup}. We also updated the extent of the habitable zone for the system using our new temperature.

  11. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  12. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  13. Late Quaternary geology of small basaltic volcanic centers, SW USA: Disparity among dating methods and implications for volcanic and geomorphic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology; Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Byrd Polar Research Center; Crowe, B.; Pothis, J.; Olinger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of volcanic hazards near the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain provides the impetus for a series of detailed field and geochronologic studies of selected small late Quaternary basaltic scoria cones and lava flows in Nevada and California. Two of the most significant results of these studies are: the presence of chronostratigraphic units which indicate multiple eruptions with significant intervals of no activity between events (polycyclic volcanism); and a marked difference between conventional, numerical ages derived from K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 methods and numerical, calibrated, and relative ages derived from thermoluminescence, cosmogenic He-3, the degree of soil development, and geomorphology of these volcanic landforms. Soil-bounded unconformities and buried stone pavements define the boundaries of chronostratigraphic units within these small volume basaltic centers. Volcanic centers displaying this type of stratigraphy may appear morphological simple but cannot be considered mongenetic. Recent studies by Perry and Crowe demonstrate that geochemical variations within a single basaltic volcanic center in NV are consistent with several magma batches forming a complex polycyclic volcano. The K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are 1--2 orders of magnitude older than either TL or cosmogenic He-3 and appear to have insufficient precision to constrain the ages of chronostratigraphic units within polycyclic volcanoes. In contrast, preliminary data indicate the TL and cosmogenic He-3 dating methods have the ability to resolve the late Quaternary volcanic stratigraphy, and results from these dating methods are consistent with the degree of soil development and geomorphic modification of the volcanic units. K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 dates from these small basaltic volcanic centers have been used to calibrate new Quaternary dating methods, e.g. rock varnish, which in turn have been used to interpret landscape evolution in the SW US.

  14. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcanism was modeled in experiments in which thermite melt fFe + AtOj explosively interacted with water

  15. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  16. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  17. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  18. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

  19. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism, Crustal...

  20. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  1. Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

  2. Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM 2:30 p.m. Crystal Ballroom B Chairs: J. E. Bleacher M. H to the northeast. 2:45 p.m. Baloga S. M. * Glaze L. S. Time-Dependent Levee Growth for Mars Lava Flows [#1276, for very cold climate, sulfur dioxide glaciers and liquid sulfur dioxide runoff. 4:00 p.m. Johnson S. S

  3. Revised isotopic (40 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Revised isotopic (40 Ar/39 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of Cabezos Negros, Fortuna Basin (lamproites) of the Fortuna Basin in southeast Spain. This age is significantly older than earlier reported K. Because the volcanic rocks are intercalated in the stratigraphic sequence of the Fortuna Basin directly

  4. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,...

  5. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the vents, being flanked or covered with volcaniclastic flow deposits. Each volcanic pile is several kilometers wide and several hundred meters thick, and overlaps one after...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson,...

  8. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  9. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  10. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

  11. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982)...

  12. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search...

  13. anatolian volcanic province: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volcanic Province Geosciences Websites Summary: the Lonar crater. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns in the target basalts and brecciaTrace element and...

  14. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico...

  15. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,...

  16. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  17. Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archipelago, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension To The...

  18. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

  19. australian volcanic-hosted massive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES QUALITY AGENCY Report of an Audit of Swinburne; AUQA Audit Report Number 61 ISBN 978 1 877090 90 5 Australian...

  20. The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C. Varekamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C (northern Patagonia, Argentina) is a large glacial lake acidified by volcanic fluids from Copahue volcano

  1. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  2. Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mege, Daniel

    Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1 Anthony C. Cook,2,3 Erwan Garel,4 Yves: Solar System Objects: Mars; 8121 Tectonophysics: Dynamics, convection currents and mantle plumes; 8010: Me`ge, D., A. C. Cook, E. Garel, Y. Lagabrielle, and M.-H. Cormier, Volcanic rifting at Martian

  3. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  4. THE TEPHRA STRATIGRAPHY OF TWO LAKES IN SOUTH-CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON, USA Objective · New evidence of the ages and plume trajectories for four tephras. First evidence of Glacier Peak A, D, and Dusty Creek, and Mt. St. Helens P, as airfall tephra in south-central British Columbia. · The Glacier

  5. Age of Neoproterozoic Bilatarian Body and Trace Fossils, White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Kirschvink3 A uranium-lead zircon age for a volcanic ash interstratified with fossil seawater. The terminal Neoproterozoic interval is char- acterized by a period of supercontinent amal- gamation and dispersal (1, 2), low-latitude glaciations (3, 4), chemical perturbations of seawater (5

  6. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the youngest pulses of volcanism. > Oxygen-isotope data from illitesmectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from -2.15 to +7.97...

  7. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  8. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  9. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  10. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  11. Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western United States, II. Long...

  12. Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  13. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log...

  14. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of...

  15. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  16. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  17. Y-12 hosts NNSA aging infrastructure workshop | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational Nuclear Security

  18. Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:DocketFlowGpmGrossGen JumpRating JumpHeight

  19. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Relative Ages of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Puzia

    2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ages of extragalactic globular clusters can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this contribution the photometric methods of age dating old globular cluster systems are summarised. The spectroscopic approach is reviewed with an emphasis of the right choice of age diagnostics. We present a new method of quantifying the relatively best age-sensitive spectroscopic index given the quality of a data set and a certain theoretical stellar synthesis model. The relatively best diagnostic plot is constructed from the set of Lick indices and used to age date globular clusters in several early-type galaxies which are part of a large spectroscopic survey of extragalactic globular cluster systems. We find that, independently of host galaxy, metal-poor ([Fe/H] 8 Gyr) and coeval. Metal-rich clusters show a wide range of ages from ~15 down to a few Gyr.

  1. Halogen emissions from a small volcanic eruption: Modeling the peak concentrations, dispersion, and volcanically induced ozone loss in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , with lesser quantities of H2S, H2 and CO. Volcanic emissions also often include halogen-bearing species, and the greater water vapor content in the lower troposphere at tropical latitudes, which enhance removal

  2. Properties of SN-host galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is of prime importance to recognize evolution and extinction effects in supernovae results as a function of redshift, for SN Ia to be considered as distance indicators. This review surveys all observational data searching for an evolution and/or extinction, according to host morphology. For instance, it has been observed that high-z SNe Ia have bluer colours than the local ones: although this goes against extinction to explain why SN are dimmer with redshift until z ~ 1, supporting a decelerating universe, it also demonstrates intrinsic evolution effects. -- SNe Ia could evolve because the age and metallicity of their progenitors evolve. The main parameter is carbon abundance. Smaller C leads to a dimmer SN Ia and also less scatter on peak brightness, as it is the case in elliptical galaxy today. Age of the progenitor is an important factor: young populations lead to brighter SNe Ia, as in spiral galaxies, and a spread in ages lead to a larger scatter, explaining the observed lower scatter at high z. -- Selection biases also play a role, like the Malmquist bias; high-z SNe Ia are found at larger distance from their host center: there is more obscuration in the center, and also detection is easier with no contamination from the center. This might be one of the reason why less obscuration has been found for SNe Ia at high z. -- There is clearly a sample evolution with z: currently only the less bright SNe Ia are detected at high z, with less scatter. The brightest objects have a slowly declining light-curve, and at high z, no slow decline has been observed. This may be interpreted as an age effect, high-z SN having younger progenitors.

  3. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Beall, David S. (Gainesville, FL); Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H. (Gainesville, FL); Guimaraes, Walter V. (Vicosa, BR); Ohta, Kazuyoshi (Miyazaki, JP); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL); Shanmugam, Keelnatham T. (Gainesville, FL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  4. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Horton, Philip G. (Gainesville, FL); Ben-Bassat, Arie (Gainesville, FL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  5. A model simulation of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turco, R.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Toon, O.B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. The authors` model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO{sub 2} emissions. The large amounts of SO{sub 2} (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reached their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 {mu}m approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion. 57 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Molecular Gas in Quasar Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Barvainis

    1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of molecular gas in quasar host galaxies addresses a number of interesting questions pertaining to the hosts' ISM, to unified schemes relating quasars and IR galaxies, and to the processes fueling nuclear activity. In this contribution I review observations of molecular gas in quasar hosts from z=0.06 to z=4.7. The Cloverleaf quasar at z=2.5 is featured as a case where there are now enough detected transitions (four in CO, and one each in CI and HCN) to allow detailed modeling of physical conditions in the molecular ISM. We find that the CO-emitting gas is warmer, denser, and less optically thick than that found in typical Galactic molecular clouds. These differences are probably due to the presence of the luminous quasar in the nucleus of the Cloverleaf's host galaxy.

  7. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES AND HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the relationship between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) Hubble residuals and the properties of their host galaxies using a sample of 115 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory. We use host galaxy stellar masses and specific star formation rates fitted from photometry for all hosts, as well as gas-phase metallicities for a subset of 69 star-forming (non-active galactic nucleus) hosts, to show that the SN Ia Hubble residuals correlate with each of these host properties. With these data we find new evidence for a correlation between SN Ia intrinsic color and host metallicity. When we combine our data with those of other published SN Ia surveys, we find the difference between mean SN Ia brightnesses in low- and high-mass hosts is 0.077 {+-} 0.014 mag. When viewed in narrow (0.2 dex) bins of host stellar mass, the data reveal apparent plateaus of Hubble residuals at high and low host masses with a rapid transition over a short mass range (9.8 {<=} log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {<=} 10.4). Although metallicity has been a favored interpretation for the origin of the Hubble residual trend with host mass, we illustrate how dust in star-forming galaxies and mean SN Ia progenitor age both evolve along the galaxy mass sequence, thereby presenting equally viable explanations for some or all of the observed SN Ia host bias.

  8. Host a Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Host a meeting Blue Jeans is a cloud-based video, web, and audio collaboration solution available to Argonne employees for hosting meetings. Blue Jeans works for both...

  9. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  10. SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC Youxue Zhang,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Youxue Zhang,1,2 Zhengjiu Xu,2 Mengfan Zhu,1 2007. [1] Knowledge about the properties of silicate melts is needed by volcanologists and petrologists and diffusivity of volatile components in silicate melts, silicate melt viscosity, and the fragmentation condition

  11. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  12. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  13. Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Htun, K.M.

    1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

  14. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  15. Lithium depletion and the rotational history of exoplanet host stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Bouvier

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Israelian et al. (2004) reported that exoplanet host stars are lithium depleted compared to solar-type stars without detected massive planets, a result recently confirmed by Gonzalez (2008). We investigate whether enhanced lithium depletion in exoplanet host stars may result from their rotational history. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow and fast solar-type rotators from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to the age of the Sun and compare them to the distribution of rotational periods observed for solar-type stars between 1 Myr and 5 Gyr. We show that slow rotators develop a high degree of differential rotation between the radiative core and the convective envelope, while fast rotators evolve with little core-envelope decoupling. We suggest that strong differential rotation at the base of the convective envelope is responsible for enhanced lithium depletion in slow rotators. We conclude that lithium-depleted exoplanet host stars were slow rotators on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) and argue that slow rotation results from a long lasting star-disk interaction during the PMS. Altogether, this suggests that long-lived disks (> 5 Myr) may be a necessary condition for massive planet formation/migration.

  16. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  17. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ValleyMono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  18. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:WindLaoLaredoLassen Volcanic

  19. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco Volcanic Field

  20. Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump

  1. Winds of Planet Hosting Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, B A; Brookshaw, L; Vidotto, A A; Carter, B D; Marsden, S C; Soutter, J; Waite, I A; Horner, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of exoplanetary science is one of the most rapidly growing areas of astrophysical research. As more planets are discovered around other stars, new techniques have been developed that have allowed astronomers to begin to characterise them. Two of the most important factors in understanding the evolution of these planets, and potentially determining whether they are habitable, are the behaviour of the winds of the host star and the way in which they interact with the planet. The purpose of this project is to reconstruct the magnetic fields of planet hosting stars from spectropolarimetric observations, and to use these magnetic field maps to inform simulations of the stellar winds in those systems using the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. The BATS-R-US code was originally written to investigate the behaviour of the Solar wind, and so has been altered to be used in the context of other stellar systems. These simulations will give information about the velocity, pressur...

  2. Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-¹). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

  3. Spatio-temporal variability in volcanic sulphate deposition over the past 2 kyr in snow pits and firn cores from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    environmental effects. Apart from volcanic ashes, CO2 and water vapour, the reactive gaseous compounds SO2, H2S Running median RRMi Reduced running mean (after removal of all volcanic peaks) xi Ion concentration

  4. Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya V. Sakkas volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B

  5. OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities Reawakens Volcanic Threat Assessment: Analysis of Hazard and Risk Factors......................... 14 · Table 2. List of hazard and exposure factors used in the NVEWS threat assessment · Figure 3

  6. Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

  7. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden

  8. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    to produce a synthetic and objective map of recent mud flows covering a 640 · 700 km2 area, which representsORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western Mediterranean model for the origin for Mediterranean Ridge mud volcanism. Image analysis techniques are used

  9. Arctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols and ozone depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of perturbation experiments, the full radiative effects of the observed Pinatubo aerosol cloud were included eruption, which produced the largest global volcanic aerosol cloud in the twentieth century. A seriesArctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols

  10. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  11. Avian Roosting Behavior and Vector-Host Contact Rates for West Nile Virus Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, William M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    roosting height. Figure 2. Mean number of host-seeking Cx.pipiens and Cx. restuans mosquitoes collected per trap night5. Mean number of host-seeking Cx. pipiens and Cx. restuans

  12. Host conservatism, host shifts and diversification across three trophic levels in two Neotropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Chris R

    adaptive radiations (Ehrlich & Raven, 1964; Sch- luter, 2000). Evidence for the importance of major host are characterized by small radiations of moths associated with unique host plants in the same geographic area (i

  13. Solid hosts for dye laser rods: Part 1, Criteria for choosing a host material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, G.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will attempt to provide selection criteria for polymers as hosts for flashlamp-pumped dye laser rods. The properties of transparent polymer materials are compared with typical inorganic crystal and glass hosts. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  15. Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Hicken, Malcolm; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Burke, David L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    From Sloan Digital Sky Survey u{prime} g{prime} r{prime} i{prime} z{prime} imaging, we estimate the stellar masses of the host galaxies of 70 low redshift SN Ia (0.015 < z < 0.08) from the hosts absolute luminosities and mass-to-light ratios. These nearby SN were discovered largely by searches targeting luminous galaxies, and we find that their host galaxies are substantially more massive than the hosts of SN discovered by the flux-limited Supernova Legacy Survey. Testing four separate light curve fitters, we detect {approx}2.5{sigma} correlations of Hubble residuals with both host galaxy size and stellar mass, such that SN Ia occurring in physically larger, more massive hosts are {approx}10% brighter after light curve correction. The Hubble residual is the deviation of the inferred distance modulus to the SN, calculated from its apparent luminosity and light curve properties, away from the expected value at the SN redshift. Marginalizing over linear trends in Hubble residuals with light curve parameters shows that the correlations cannot be attributed to a light curve-dependent calibration error. Combining 180 higher-redshift ESSENCE, SNLS, and HigherZ SN with 30 nearby SN whose host masses are less than 10{sup 10.8} M{circle_dot} n a cosmology fit yields 1 + w = 0.22{sub -0.108}{sup +0.152}, while a combination where the 30 nearby SN instead have host masses greater than 10{sup 10.8} M{circle_dot} yields 1 + w = ?0.03{sub -0.143}{sup +0.217}. Progenitor metallicity, stellar population age, and dust extinction correlate with galaxy mass and may be responsible for these systematic effects. Host galaxy measurements will yield improved distances to SN Ia.

  16. Behavioral Interactions between Parasites and Hosts: Host Suicide and the Evolution of Complex Life Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah R.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by predation, thus preventing the maturation of its parasite and lowering the risk of parasitic infection for other members of the host specie^. If the mature parasite would have been more likely to infect the host's kin than nonkin, the host's suicidal... in reproductive success. Threatened with parasitic attack, the host—or potential host—can attempt to increase its reproductive fitness in two ways, which are not mutually exclusive. It can protect itself or it can protect its kin. Certain actions on the part...

  17. Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckale, Jenny

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

  18. Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W. (David William)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

  19. Ice core evidence for a second volcanic eruption around 1809 in the Northern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    is reported in the historical volcanism record between 1801 and 1812 [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. [3] Analysis and a March 1809 eruption date for Cosiguina [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. However, recent work on Cosiguina has

  20. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  1. Sustainability transformations in Olympic host cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mokrushina, Ksenia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Olympic Games represent an unparalleled fast-track urban development opportunity for Olympic host cities. Taking the premise that the transformational effect of the Olympics has a potential to drive long-term urban ...

  2. Secretary Chu Hosts FY 2012 Budget Briefing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu hosted a media briefing on the Department's Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request. You can watch video of the event and check out his PowerPoint presentation, or see the budget documents themselves.

  3. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale Gas Draft Report Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale Gas Draft Report November 10, 2011 -...

  4. Phosphine oxide derivatives as hosts for blue phosphors: A joint...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxide derivatives as hosts for blue phosphors: A joint theoretical and experimental study of their electronic Phosphine oxide derivatives as hosts for blue phosphors: A joint...

  5. Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under Secretary of Energy Majumdar Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under...

  6. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security...

  7. MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call February 4, 2011 -...

  8. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  9. Secretary Chu to Host Conference Call Announcing the Winners...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Host Conference Call Announcing the Winners of the America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge Secretary Chu to Host Conference Call Announcing the Winners of the America's...

  10. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and...

  11. Secretary Moniz Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr. Daniel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr. Daniel Yergin with First James R. Schlesinger Medal for Energy Security Secretary Moniz Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr....

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia to host PV Bankability workshop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECNews & EventsConferencesSandia to host PV Bankability workshop at Solar Power International (SPI) 2013 Sandia to host PV Bankability workshop at Solar Power International...

  13. Geologic origin of magnetic volcanic glasses in the KBS tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlinger, C.M.; Smith, R.M.; Veblen, D.R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic glass shards and banded pumice from the KBS tuff of northern Kenya exhibit marked variations in magnetic susceptibility and color (colorless to dark brown). The darker glass shards exhibit superparamagnetism, which they now know to be carried by a population of tiny microcrystals of Fe-rich cubic oxide, approx. 20 to approx. 100 A in size, thought to be magnetite. A theory for their origin is one of nucleation and growth (precipitation) in quenched homogeneous glass (colorless) at temperatures of approx. 700-1000/sup 0/C during and immediately subsequent to eruption. Results from high-temperature heating experiments on KBS shards support this idea. The precipitate appears in the KBS shards as a consequence of their cooling history and is the origin of their coloring; the origin cannot lie in negligible compositional differences between the colorless and darkest shards. On the other hand, banded pumice from the KBS tuff has both dark and colorless glasses of differing compositions. The pumice appears banded because precipitation occurred preferentially in the Fe-rich glass. Although magma mixing may have played a role in the eruption of these materials, on the basis of their survey of distal eruptive products, it would appear that the volumetric amount of the mafic end member (dark pumice) was insubstantial.

  14. A model for coupling within-host and between-host dynamics in an ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Studies on the modeling of the coupled dy- namics of infectious diseases at both the population level (the epidemic process or between-host dynamics).

  15. THE MASS DEPENDENCE BETWEEN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND THEIR STELLAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Sean M.; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Wilner, David J., E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a substantial extension of the millimeter (mm) wave continuum photometry catalog for circumstellar dust disks in the Taurus star-forming region, based on a new ''snapshot'' {lambda} = 1.3 mm survey with the Submillimeter Array. Combining these new data with measurements in the literature, we construct a mm-wave luminosity distribution, f(L{sub mm}), for Class II disks that is statistically complete for stellar hosts with spectral types earlier than M8.5 and has a 3{sigma} depth of roughly 3 mJy. The resulting census eliminates a longstanding selection bias against disks with late-type hosts, and thereby demonstrates that there is a strong correlation between L{sub mm} and the host spectral type. By translating the locations of individual stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram into masses and ages, and adopting a simple conversion between L{sub mm} and the disk mass, M{sub d} , we confirm that this correlation corresponds to a statistically robust relationship between the masses of dust disks and the stars that host them. A Bayesian regression technique is used to characterize these relationships in the presence of measurement errors, data censoring, and significant intrinsic scatter: the best-fit results indicate a typical 1.3 mm flux density of {approx}25 mJy for 1 M{sub Sun} hosts and a power-law scaling L{sub mm}{proportional_to}M{sub *}{sup 1.5-2.0}. We suggest that a reasonable treatment of dust temperature in the conversion from L{sub mm} to M{sub d} favors an inherently linear M{sub d} {proportional_to}M{sub *} scaling, with a typical disk-to-star mass ratio of {approx}0.2%-0.6%. The measured rms dispersion around this regression curve is {+-}0.7 dex, suggesting that the combined effects of diverse evolutionary states, dust opacities, and temperatures in these disks imprint a full width at half-maximum range of a factor of {approx}40 on the inferred M{sub d} (or L{sub mm}) at any given host mass. We argue that this relationship between M{sub d} and M{sub *} likely represents the origin of the inferred correlation between giant planet frequency and host star mass in the exoplanet population, and provides some basic support for the core accretion model for planet formation. Moreover, we caution that the effects of incompleteness and selection bias must be considered in comparative studies of disk evolution, and illustrate that fact with statistical comparisons of f(L{sub mm}) between the Taurus catalog presented here and incomplete subsamples in the Ophiuchus, IC 348, and Upper Sco young clusters.

  16. NEW MEXICO BUREAU OF GEOLOGY & MINERAL RESOURCES, BULLETIN 160, 2004 Cosmogenic 36Cl ages of lava flows in the ZuniBandera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunbar, Nelia W.

    309 NEW MEXICO BUREAU OF GEOLOGY & MINERAL RESOURCES, BULLETIN 160, 2004 Cosmogenic 36Cl ages of lava flows in the Zuni­Bandera volcanic field, northcentral New Mexico, U.S.A. Nelia W. Dunbar1 and Fred M. Phillips2 1New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining

  17. Demographics of the Galaxies Hosting Short-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Wen-fai; Chornock, Ryan; Margutti, Raffaella; Levan, Andrew J; Tanvir, Nial R; Tunnicliffe, Rachel L; Czekala, Ian; Fox, Derek B; Perley, Daniel A; Cenko, S Bradley; Zauderer, B Ashley; Laskar, Tanmoy; Persson, S Eric; Monson, Andrew J; Kelson, Daniel D; Birk, Christoph; Murphy, David; Servillat, Mathieu; Anglada, Guillem

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z=0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of 4.6e9 M_Sun and a stellar population age of 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z=0.718 with a stellar mass of 1.4e9 M_Sun, a star formation rate of 16 M_Sun yr^-1, and a stellar population age of 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i>26 mag and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. The bursts have inferred circumburst densities of ~1e-4-1 cm^-3, and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of 1e50-1e51 erg. These events highlight the diversity of galaxies that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment (~1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to May ...

  18. (New hosts and vectors for genome cloning)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of our project remains the development of new bacterial hosts and vectors for the stable propagation of human DNA clones in E. coli. During the past six months of our current budget period, we have (1) continued to develop new hosts that permit the stable maintenance of unstable features of human DNA, and (2) developed a series of vectors for (a) cloning large DNA inserts, (b) assessing the frequency of human sequences that are lethal to the growth of E. coli, and (c) assessing the stability of human sequences cloned in M13 for large-scale sequencing projects.

  19. Aging of gaseous detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Va'Vra, J.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper makes an overview of developments in the wire chamber aging field since the wire chamber aging workshop held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California on January 16--17, 1986. The author discusses new techniques to analyze the gas impurities and the wire aging products, wire nonaging'' in clean systems, wire aging in systems containing various impurities, various examples of problems which can prime'' surfaces prior to the occurrence of the aging, and some recent aging experience with the SSC micro-straw tubes.'' 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

  1. DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names Top Level Domains · .com · .net · .org · .edu · .gov.9% of the web-viewing audience is used to typing in. Chances are, a visitor will type in ".com" even if you tell and simple · Try to avoid dashes or underscores in the domain name unless there is no other option Web

  2. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; R. J. Garcia Lopez; G. Israelian; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; A. Garcia-Gil; M. R. Perez de Taoro; S. Randich

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be depletion mechanisms.

  3. Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

  4. Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

  5. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  6. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  7. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  8. Host conservatism, host shifts and diversification across three trophic levels in two Neotropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaj, Daniel

    adaptive radiations (Ehrlich & Raven, 1964; Sch- luter, 2000). Evidence for the importance of major host. The moth­plant associations in particular are characterized by small radiations of moths associated

  9. GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES) Richard Rijkers 1 & Robert Hack 2 ABSTRACT A geomechanical analysis of a shallow small scale landslide, (NITG-TNO), Geomechanical Research, PO box 97, 2600 JA Delft, The Netherlands, tel.: +31 15 2697222, r

  10. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  11. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  12. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  13. Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter caused significant species extinctions. This includes the 170 km-diameter Chicxulub impact crater or even significant species extinctions. The K/T mass extinction may have been caused by the coincidenceImpacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect? G. KELLER

  14. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

  15. Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    geothermal heat associated with their em- placement and cooling could play a crucial role in basal melt water [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help production. For instance, the geothermal flux estimate in the vicinity of a (potential) recently active

  16. Did the Toba volcanic eruption of $74 ka B.P. produce widespread glaciation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model 3.0 (CCSM3 that the Toba volcanic eruption, approximately 74 ka B.P., was responsible for the extended cooling period a maximum global cooling of 10 K and ModelE runs produced 8­17 K of cooling within the first years

  17. Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

  18. American Journal of Science UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Matthew

    American Journal of Science JUNE 2008 UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO MID. Uturuncu volcano, SW Bolivia, is a dormant stratovolcano ( 85 km3 ) dominated by dacitic lava domes §§§ Empresa Minera Unificada S.A., La Paz, Bolivia; Mayelsuco@hotmail.com Institute of Geophysics, University

  19. Host Plants of Xylosandrus mutilatus in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, W.D.; Nebeker, T.E. [Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Box 9775, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Gerard, P.D. [Experimental Statistics Unit, Mississippi State University, Box 9731, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Host range of Xylosandrus mutilatus (Blandford) in North America is reported here for the first time. Descriptive data such as number of attacks per host, size of stems at point of attacks, and height of attacks above ground are presented. Hosts observed in Mississippi were Acer rubrum L., Acer saccharum Marsh., Acer palmatum Thunb., Ostrya virginiana (Mill.) K. Koch., Cornus florida L., Fagus grandifolia Ehrh., Liquidamber styraciflua L., Carya spp., Liriodendron tulipifera L., Melia azedarach L., Pinus taeda L., Prunus serotina Ehrh., Prunus americana Marsh., Ulmus alata Michaux, and Vitus rotundifolia Michaux. Liquidamber styraciflua had significantly more successful attacks, significantly higher probability of attacks, and significantly higher number of adult beetles per host tree than did Carya spp., A. rubrum, and L. tulipifera. This information is relevant in determining the impact this exotic beetle may have in nurseries, urban areas, and other forestry systems where this beetle becomes established. (author) [Spanish] El rango de hospederos de Xylosandrus mutilatus (Blandford) en America del Norte esta reportado aqui por la primera vez. Se presentan datos descriptivos como el numero de ataques por hospederos, el tamano de los tallos en el punto de ataque y la altura por encima del nivel de tierra de los ataques. Los hospederos observados en el estado de Mississippi fueron Acer rubrum L., Acer saccharum Marsh., Acer palmatum Thunb., Ostrya virginiana (Mill.) K. Koch., Cornus florida L., Fagus grandifolia Ehrh., Liquidamber styraciflua L., Carya spp., Liriodendron tulipifera L., Melia azedarach L., Pinus taeda L., Prunus serotina Ehrh., Prunus americana Marsh., Ulmus alata Michaux y Vitus rotundifolia Michaux. Liquidamber styraciflua tuvo ataques significativamente mas exitosos, una probabilidad significativamente mas alta de ataques y un numero significativamente mayor de adultos de escarabajos por arbol hospedero que Carya spp., A. rubrum y L. tulipifera. Esta informacion es pertinente en determinar el impacto que pueda tener este escarabajo exotico en invernaderos, areas urbanas y otros sistemas forestales donde el escarabajo se establece. (author)

  20. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for large-scale, highly-efficient efforts to identify and verify infection-specific host NA signatures in human populations.

  1. Midcontinent rift volcanism in the Lake Superior region: Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic evidence for a mantle plume origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, S.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA) Univ. of Minnesota, MN (USA)); Shirey, S.B. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1091 and 1098 Ma, most of a 15- to 20-km thickness of dominantly tholeiitic basalt erupted in the Midcontinent Rift System of the Lake Superior region, North American. The Portage Lake Volcanics in Michigan, which are the youngest MRS flood basalts, fall into distinctly high- and low-TiO{sub 2} types having different liquid lines of descent. Incompatible trace elements in both types of tholeiites are enriched compared to depleted or primitive mantle (La/Yb = 4.3-5.3; Th/Ta = 2.12-2.16; Zr/Y = 4.3-4.4), and both basalt types are isotopically indistinguishable. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of the Portage Lake tholeiites have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr{sub i} {approx}0.7038, {epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 {plus minus} 2, and {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2. Model ages with respect to a depleted mantle source (T{sub DM}) average about 1950-2100 Ma. Portage Lake rhyolits fall into two groups. Type I rhyolites have Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 to {minus}4.7; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2-7.8) consistent with contamination of tholeiitic rocks by 5-10% Archean crust. The one type II rhyolite analyzed has Nd and Pb isotopic compositions ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}{minus}13 to {minus}16; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}7.6-7.7) which are consistent with partial melting of Archean crust. Early Proterozoic crust was not a major contaminant of MRS rocks in the Lake Superior region. Most reported Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of MRS tholeiites from the main stage of volcanism in the Lake Superior region and of the Duluth Complex are comparable to the Nd and Pb isotopic data for Portage lake tholeiites. The isotopic enrichment of the MRS source compared to depleted mantle is striking and must have occurred at least 700 m.y. before 1100 Ma.

  2. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  3. On Quasar Masses and Quasar Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass of massive black holes in quasar cores can be deduced using the typical velocities of Hb-emitting clouds in the Broad Line Region (BLR) and the size of this region. However, this estimate depends on various assumptions and is susceptible to large systematic errors. The Hb-deduced black hole mass in a sample of 14 bright quasars is found here to correlate with the quasar host galaxy luminosity, as determined with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This correlation is similar to the black hole mass vs. bulge luminosity correlation found by Magorrian et al. in a sample of 32 nearby normal galaxies. The similarity of the two correlations is remarkable since the two samples involve apparently different types of objects and since the black hole mass estimates in quasars and in nearby galaxies are based on very different methods. This similarity provides a ``calibration'' of the Hb-deduced black hole mass estimate, suggesting it is accurate to +-0.5 on log scale. The similarity of the two correlations also suggests that quasars reside in otherwise normal galaxies, and that the luminosity of quasar hosts can be estimated to +-0.5 mag based on the quasar continuum luminosity and the Hb line width. Future imaging observations of additional broad-line active galaxies with the HST are required in order to explore the extent, slope, and scatter of the black hole mass vs. host bulge luminosity correlation in active galaxies.

  4. Resource Overbooking and Application Profiling in Shared Hosting Platforms *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    Resource Overbooking and Application Profiling in Shared Hosting Platforms * Bhuvan Urgaonkar for provisioning CPU and network resources in shared hosting platforms running potentially antagonistic third of overbooking resources in shared platforms, to maximize the platform yield: the revenue generated

  5. Y-12 hosts NNSA Aging Infrastructure Workshop | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoinSecurityAdministrationComplex Y-12

  6. High power laser having a trivalent liquid host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser having a lasing chamber and a semiconductor pumping device with trivalent titanium ions dissolved in a liquid host within the lasing chamber. Since the host is a liquid, it can be removed from the optical cavity when it becomes heated avoiding the inevitable optical distortion and birefringence common to glass and crystal hosts.

  7. 0361-0128/01/3331/339-28 $6.00 339 The Tuscarora Au-Ag District: Eocene Volcanic-Hosted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    87801 RICHARD M. TOSDAL, Mineral Deposit Research Unit, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, 6339 Stores Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4 AND JOSEPH P that is characterized by relatively high Ag/Au ra- tios (110­150), narrow alteration zones, and quartz and carbonate

  8. Parylene C Aging Studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Sawyer, Patricia Sue.; Mata, Guillermo Adrian; White II, Gregory Von; Bernstein, Robert

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parylene C is used in a device because of its conformable deposition and other advantages. Techniques to study Parylene C aging were developed, and %22lessons learned%22 that could be utilized for future studies are the result of this initial study. Differential Scanning Calorimetry yielded temperature ranges for Parylene C aging as well as post-deposition treatment. Post-deposition techniques are suggested to improve Parylene C performance. Sample preparation was critical to aging regimen. Short-term (~40 days) aging experiments with free standing and ceramic-supported Parylene C films highlighted %22lessons learned%22 which stressed further investigations in order to refine sample preparation (film thickness, single sided uniform coating, machine versus laser cutting, annealing time, temperature) and testing issues (%22necking%22) for robust accelerated aging of Parylene C.

  9. COOEE bitumen: chemical aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study chemical aging in "COOEE bitumen" using molecular dynamic simulations. The model bitumen is composed of four realistic molecule types: saturated hydrocarbon, resinous oil, resin, and asphaltene. The aging reaction is modelled by the chemical reaction: "2 resins $\\rightarrow$ 1 asphaltene". Molecular dynamic simulations of four bitumen compositions, obtained by a repeated application of the aging reaction, are performed. The stress autocorrelation function, the fluid structure, the rotational dynamics of the plane aromatic molecules, and the diffusivity of each molecule, are determined for the four different compositions. The aging reaction causes a significant dynamics slowdown, which is correlated to the aggregation of asphaltene molecules in larger and dynamically slower nanoaggregates. Finally, a detailed description of the role of each molecule types in the aggregation and aging processes is given.

  10. Lithium abundances in exoplanet-hosts stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present surface chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The overmetallicity of EHS may be studied in the framework of two different scenarii. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses, metallicities and accretion rates. The results show different profiles for the lithium destruction according to the scenario. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium.

  11. A novel test for host-symbiont codivergence indicates ancient origin of fungal endophytes in grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schardl, Chris L; Lindstrom, Adam; Speakman, Skyler; Stromberg, Arnold; Yoshida, Ruriko

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant phylogenetic codivergence between plant or animal hosts ($H$) and their symbionts or parasites ($P$) indicate the importance of their interactions on evolutionary time scales. However, valid and realistic methods to test for codivergence are not fully developed. One of the systems where possible codivergence has been of interest involves the large subfamily of temperate grasses (Pooideae) and their endophytic fungi (epichloae). These widespread symbioses often help protect host plants from herbivory and stresses, and affect species diversity and food web structures. Here we introduce the MRCALink (most-recent-common-ancestor link) method and use it to investigate the possibility of grass-epichlo\\"e codivergence. MRCALink applied to ultrametric $H$ and $P$ trees identifies all corresponding nodes for pairwise comparisons of MRCA ages. The result is compared to the space of random $H$ and $P$ tree pairs estimated by a Monte Carlo method.

  12. The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological and geochemical features2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological Group 2). Both magmatic groups belong to the under-saturated alkaline40 sodic series. Petrological

  13. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  14. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Yip, Ching-Wa; /Pittsburgh U.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Connolly,; /Pittsburgh U.; Burton, Ross E.; /Pittsburgh U. /Case Western Reserve U.; Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Szalay, Alex S.; /Johns Hopkins; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  15. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  16. Fastbus host interface for VAX/VMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siskind, E.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A list processing microprocessor controlled host interface for FASTBUS has been constructed by connection of a FASTBUS cable segment to the VAX DR-32 Device Interconnect (DDI) implemented via the DEC DR-780 channel on a VAX-11/780 system. Block transfer rates of 5.7 megabytes/second (700 ns per 32 bit longword) are achieved on VAX-11/780 systems equipped with a single MS-780 memory controller, while interleaved dual memory controller systems reach 8.0 megabytes/second (500 ns per longword) performance. The hardware and software interface should work equally well on DR-750 equipped VAX-11/750 systems (with appropriate reductions in achievable bandwidth) as well as on any future VAX systems equipped with a DDI adapter.

  17. ISO Observations of Quasars and Quasar Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belinda J. Wilkes

    1997-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), launched in November 1995, allows us to measure the far-infrared (far-IR) emission of quasars in greater detail and over a wider energy range than previously possible. In this paper, preliminary results in a study of the 5--200 $\\mu m$ continuum of quasars and active galaxies are presented. Comparison of the spectral energy distributions show that, if the far-IR emission from quasars is thermal emission from galaxian dust, the host galaxies of quasars must contain dust in quantities comparable to IR luminous galaxies rather than normal spiral galaxies. In the near-IR, the ISO data confirm an excess due to a warm `AGN-related' dust component, possibly from the putative molecular torus. We report detection of the high-redshift quasar, 1202-0727, in the near-IR indicating that it is unusually IR-bright compared with low-redshift quasars.

  18. DEMOGRAPHICS OF THE GALAXIES HOSTING SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Margutti, R.; Czekala, I.; Zauderer, B. A.; Laskar, T.; Servillat, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J.; Tunnicliffe, R. L. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fox, D. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Perley, D. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Room 232, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Persson, S. E.; Monson, A. J.; Kelson, D. D.; Birk, C.; Murphy, D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Anglada, G. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, Universitaet Goettingen, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A, and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z = 0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z = 0.718 with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, a star formation rate of Almost-Equal-To 16 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i {approx}> 26 mag, and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. From afterglow modeling, the bursts have inferred circumburst densities of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4}-1 cm{sup -3} and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg. These three events highlight the diversity of galactic environments that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment ({approx}1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to 2012 May) and classify bursts originating from four types of environments: late-type ( Almost-Equal-To 50%), early-type ( Almost-Equal-To 15%), inconclusive ( Almost-Equal-To 20%), and ''host-less'' (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of {approx}> 26 mag; Almost-Equal-To 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to either the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. We calculate most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions of Almost-Equal-To 60%-80% and Almost-Equal-To 20%-40%, respectively. We find no clear trend between gamma-ray duration and host type. We also find no change to the fractions when excluding events recently claimed as possible contaminants from the long GRB/collapsar population. Our reported demographics are consistent with a short GRB rate driven by both stellar mass and star formation.

  19. Department of Energy Hosts Inaugural Energy Frontier Research...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News & Events DOE Announcements Department of Energy Hosts Inaugural Energy Frontier Research Center Summit Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers...

  20. Energy Department Hosts FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting Methodology Workshop at the Upcoming National Geothermal Summit, August 4-5 Energy Department Hosts FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting...

  1. NNSA hosts Illinois emergency responders during technical exchange...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA hosts Illinois emergency responders during technical ......

  2. Energy Secretary Moniz Will Host North American Energy Ministers...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will host a trilateral meeting with Natural Resources Canada Minister Greg Rickford and Mexican Secretary of Energy Pedro Joaquin Coldwell. The...

  3. Department of Energy to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy will host a public meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. The meeting will allow subcommittee members to hear...

  4. Sandia Energy - Sandia Will Host PV Bankability Workshop at Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Will Host PV Bankability Workshop at Solar Power International (SPI) 2013 Home Renewable Energy Energy Facilities Grid Integration Partnership News Distribution Grid Integration...

  5. New Age Teaching: Beyond Didactics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlaovic, Peter D; McDougall, Elspeth M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Age Teaching: Beyond Didactics TheScientificWorldJOURNAL (New age teaching: beyond didactics. TSW Urology 1, 75–85.New Age Teaching: Beyond Didactics Peter D. Vlaovic and

  6. Aging in community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Justin (Justin Thomas)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baby Boomers are on the brink of retirement. According to U.S. Census Bureau projections, the number of people aged 65 and over will more than double in the coming decades, growing from 35 million in 2000 to 72 million in ...

  7. Importance-Scanning Worm Using Vulnerable-Host Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Chuanyi

    Importance-Scanning Worm Using Vulnerable-Host Distribution Zesheng Chen School of Electrical scanning. The distribution of vulnerable hosts on the Internet, however, is highly non- uniform over the IP-address space. This implies that random scanning wastes many scans on invulnerable addresses, and more virulent

  8. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  9. An Approach to the Automated Determination of Host Information Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enterprise networks are comprised of thousands of interconnected computer hosts, each of which is capable of creating, removing, and exchanging data according to the needs of their users. Thus, the distribution of high-value, sensitive, and proprietary information across enterprise networks is poorly managed and understood. A significant technology gap in information security is the inability to automatically quantify the value of the information contained on each host in a network. Such insight would allow an enterprise to scale its defenses, react intelligently to an intrusion, manage its configuration audits, and understand the leak potential in the event that a host is compromised. This paper outlines a novel approach to the automated determination of the value of the information contained on a host computer. It involves the classification of each text document on the host machine using the frequency of the document s terms and phrases. A host information value is computed using an enterprise-defined weighting schema and applying it to a host s document distribution. The method is adaptable to specific organizational information needs, requires manual intervention only during schema creation, and is repeatable and consistent regardless of changes in information on the host machines.

  10. Managing Server Energy and Operational Costs in Hosting Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaheng

    is the growing importance of energy/power consumption of these servers at the hosting centers, in termsManaging Server Energy and Operational Costs in Hosting Centers Yiyu Chen Dept. of IE Penn State.00. General Terms: Design, Performance Keywords: Energy Management, Performance Modeling, Feed- back Control

  11. Host galaxies and environment of BL Lac objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Heidt

    1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the last meeting on BL Lac objects 10 years ago, BL Lac host galaxies and their cluster environment have gained much attention. Hence, our current knowledge of the properties of BL Lac host galaxies and their cluster environment has improved considerably, which will be reviewed. The importance of future observing programs using (very) large telescopes is briefly outlined.

  12. Host virtualization: a taxonomy of management challenges Vitalian A. Danciu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    according to established conceptual management frameworks and juxtapose the result to a survey of currentHost virtualization: a taxonomy of management challenges Vitalian A. Danciu Munich Network Management Team Ludwig­Maximilians­UniversitË? at, Munich, Germany danciu@mnm­team.org Abstract: Host

  13. Host virtualization: a taxonomy of management challenges Vitalian A. Danciu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    according to established conceptual management frameworks and juxtapose the result to a survey of currentHost virtualization: a taxonomy of management challenges Vitalian A. Danciu Munich Network Management Team Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit¨at, Munich, Germany danciu@mnm-team.org Abstract: Host

  14. Resource Overbooking and Application Profiling in Shared Hosting Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Resource Overbooking and Application Profiling in Shared Hosting Platforms #3; Bhuvan Urgaonkar resources in shared hosting platforms running potentially antagonistic third­party applications. The primary platforms, to maximize the platform yield: the revenue generated by the available resources. We do

  15. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

  16. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions – height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters – are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 14–16 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  17. Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

  18. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  19. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  20. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumeric JumpTerrace,the Jemez Volcanic

  1. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  2. Oxygen buffering of Kilauea volcanic gases and the oxygen fugacity of Kilauea basalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, T.M. (Geological Survey, Vancouver, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic gases collected during episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption along the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, have uniform C-O-H-S-Cl-F compositions that are sharply depleted in CO[sub 2]. The CO[sub 2]-poor gases are typical of Type II volcanic gases (GERLACH and GRAEBER, 1985) and were emitted from evolved magma stored for a prolonged period of time in the east rift zone after releasing CO[sub 2]-rich gases during an earlier period of temporary residence in the summit magma chamber. The samples are remarkably free of contamination by atmospheric gases and meteoric water. Thermodynamic evaluation of the analytical data shows that the episode 1 gases have equilibrium compositions appropriate for temperatures between 935 and 1032[degrees]C. Open- and closed-system equilibrium models of species distributions for the episode 1 gases show unequivocally that coexisting lavas buffered the gas oxygen fugacities during cooling. These models indicate that the F[sub o[sub 2

  3. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Introduction SN Ia Hosts109 C HAPTER 1 Cosmology, Type Ia Supernovae and HostGalaxies Observations of supernovae have played a role in

  4. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  5. Cabbage : a new host of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum for Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NOTE Cabbage : a new host of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum for Pakistan M. Siddique MIRZA Yasmin AHMAD National Agricultural Research Centre PARC, Islamabad, Pakistan. SUMMARY Sclerotinia rot of cabbage, Sclerotinia, identification, pathogenicity, Pakistan. RÉSUMÉ Le chou, un nouvel hôte de Sclerotinia

  6. Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Feb. 10 January 30, 2007 Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of...

  7. Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Jefferson Lab Science Bowl logo. Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 12 February 1, 2005 Some of the brightest young minds in the...

  8. DOE Hosts Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Testing Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a workshop on October 27, 2006, to introduce the DOE SSL Commercial Product Testing Program. The workshop, held in Washington, D.C., drew over...

  9. Host/virus interactions in the marine cyanobacterium prochlorococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frois-Moniz, Katya

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacterial viruses shape the diversity, metabolic function, and community dynamics of their microbial hosts. As microbes drive many major biogeochemical cycles, viral infection is therefore a phenomenon of global significance. ...

  10. Host nation security force development : a new roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzgerald, Shawn (Shawn Michael)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new model concerning the concepts of host nation security force development, or security sector reform (SSR), is proposed. This model is rooted in scholarly literature and seeks to fill current gaps in United States Army ...

  11. Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field, CA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the...

  12. Interfacial assembly of dendritic microcapsules with host-guest chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yu; Yu, Ziyi; Parker, Richard M.; Wu, Yuchao; Abell, Chris; Scherman, Oren A.

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    with functional groups at a water–chloroform interface using microfluidic technology. Two polymeric layers can be assembled and disassembled at the droplet interface using the efficiency of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) host–guest supramolecular chemistry...

  13. Evolution of parasite virulence when host responses cause disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Troy; Graham, Andrea; Read, Andrew F

    The trade-off hypothesis of virulence evolution rests on the assumption that infection-induced mortality is a consequence of host exploitation by parasites. This hypothesis lies at the heart of many empirical and theoretical ...

  14. Acting Biomass Program Manager Dr. Valerie Reed to Host Live...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 16th, the Energy Department (@energy) will be hosting a live Twitter Q&A on biofuels with Dr. Valerie Reed, Acting Manager of the Biomass Program. Dr. Reed holds a Ph. D....

  15. Energy and Interior Departments Host Offshore Energy Knowledge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles DOE to Host a Booth at Offshore WINDPOWER Wind Program Newsletter: Second Quarter 2012 DOE-DOI Strategy Seeks to Harness U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Potential...

  16. Host nutrition and infectious disease: an ecological view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Val H.; Jones II, Tyrees P.; Smith, Marilyn S.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrition is typically discussed in terms of maintaining a proper diet and avoiding nutrient deficiency diseases. However, nutrition can also be viewed from an ecological standpoint: mammalian hosts and their pathogens ...

  17. Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

  18. Radio Afterglows and Host Galaxies of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Long-Biao; Huang, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei; Li, Di; Chang, Heon-Young; Choi, Chul-Sung

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the contribution of the emission from the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to the radio afterglows, we investigate the effect of host galaxies on observations statistically. For the three types of events, e.g. low-luminosity, standard and high-luminosity GRBs, it is found that a tight correlation exists between the ratio of the radio flux (RRF) of host galaxy to the total radio peak emission and the observational frequency. Especially, toward lower frequencies, the contribution from the host increases significantly. The correlation can be used to get a useful estimate for the radio brightness of those host galaxies which only have very limited radio afterglow data. Using this prediction, we re-considered the theoretical radio afterglow light curves for four kinds of events, i.e. high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, taking into account the contribution from the host galaxies and aiming at exploring the detectability of these events by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Sp...

  19. Emerging disease dynamics in a model coupling within-host and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiuli Cen

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 2, 2014 ... Immunological models consider the within-host dynamics independent of the interactions between hosts (e.g., De Leenheer and Smith, 2003;.

  20. Expression profile of host restriction factors in HIV-1 elite controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. : Expression profile of host restriction factors inOpen Access Expression profile of host restriction factorsthat a transcriptional profile signature of CD4+ T cells is

  1. Molecular Comparison and DNA Fingerprinting of Sporisorium reilianum and Peronosclerospora sorghi Relating to Host Specificity and Host Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radwan, Ghada Lotfy Hassan Elhefny

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    on host and race specificity. MATERIALS AND METHODS Head smut isolates A total of 44 isolates of S. reilianum sorghum isolates, collected in 2004, 2006, 2009 and 2011 from different locations in Texas (Corpus Christi, Weslaco, and College Station...

  2. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to the TSPA, which uses the ASHPLUME software described and used in this model report. Thus, ASHPLUME software inputs are inputs to this model report for ASHPLUME runs in this model report. However, ASHPLUME software inputs are outputs of this model report for ASHPLUME runs by TSPA.

  3. High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications for Volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications emissions at numerous water prospection drillings in the volcanic island of Tenerife. Large concentrations region of the island (Las Can~ adas del Teide caldera). In this work we analysed CO2 concentrations

  4. Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands: the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) Joan Andújara,* , Fidel Costab , Bruno Scailleta a. Université1 Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands eruptions (ca. 1 km3 ) of the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife Island). Combined with previous

  5. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  6. Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

  7. Volcanic activity can have a profound effect on the Earth's atmosphere and environment across many spatial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    . Fink (Eds.) 117 Earth's Deep Interior: Mineral Physics and Tomography From the Atomic to the Global and the atmosphere will find this work an important resource. Volcanism and the Earth's Atmosphere Alan Robock IUGG Volumes Maurice Ewing Volumes Mineral Physics Volumes #12;105 New Perspectives on the Earth

  8. Atmospheric chemistry of a 3334 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA. 2 Department and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201­203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated

  9. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA d Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can: Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK. 2 Present address: NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

  10. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  11. The Mass Dependence Between Protoplanetary Disks and their Stellar Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Sean M; Kraus, Adam L; Wilner, David J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a substantial extension of the mm-wave continuum photometry catalog for Taurus circumstellar dust disks. Combining new Submillimeter Array data with measurements in the literature, we construct a mm-wave luminosity distribution for Class II disks that is statistically complete for stellar hosts with spectral types earlier than M8.5 and has a (3-sigma) depth of ~3 mJy. The resulting census eliminates a longstanding bias against disks with late-type hosts, and thereby reveals a strong correlation between L_mm and the host spectral type. We confirm that this corresponds to a statistically robust relationship between the masses of dust disks and the stars that host them. A Bayesian regression technique is used to characterize these relationships: the results indicate a typical 1.3 mm flux density of 25 mJy for solar mass hosts and a power-law scaling L_mm \\propto M_star^1.5-2.0. We suggest that a reasonable treatment of dust temperature in the conversion from L_mm to M_disk favors an inherently linear ...

  12. Effects of internal mineral structures on the magnetic remanence of silicate-hosted titanomagnetite inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Effects of internal mineral structures on the magnetic remanence of silicate-hosted titanomagnetite epitaxially by exsolution from their host silicate. Close examination of clinopyroxene- hosted inclusions of silicate-hosted titanomagnetite inclusions: An electron holography study, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B12S15

  13. Understanding host-acceptance behavior and larval feeding of the parasitic wasp Melittobia digitata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) to facilitate rearing on an artificial host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooperband, Miriam Faith

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , M digitata was found to oviposit on artificial hosts, Parafilm(& domes containing artificial diet. It was determined that females preferred artificial hosts containing the agar-based diet to those containing only agar. Further testing ruled out...

  14. QSO HOST GALAXIES AT Z=2.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Hutchings

    1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Images are discussed of six QSOs at z=2.3, one QSO-like IRAS source at z=2.3, and one QSO at z=1.1, taken with resolution 0.6 to 0.9 arcsec. Five of the QSOs are radio-quiet. All QSOs except one are just resolved, while the IRAS source has definite structure. In some cases, part of the QSO fuzz appears to be a close companion rather than a concentric host galaxy. The luminosities implied for the hosts or companions are typical of bright galaxies with young hot star populations. Radio-quiet QSOs appear to have host galaxies less luminous by ~2 magnitudes than radio-loud QSOs.

  15. Host galaxies of z ~ 4.7 QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Hutchings

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    2 micron broad- and narrow-band imaging with the Gemini-N telescope of five z~4.7 QSOs, has resolved both the host galaxies and [O II] emission-line gas. The resolved fluxes of the host galaxies fall within the extrapolated spread of the K-z relationship for radio galaxies at lower redshifts, and their resolved morphology is irregular. The [O II] images indicate knots coincident with many continuum features and also some bright jet-like features near the nucleus. The line emission total fluxes indicate overall equivalent widths of 5 to 10 A at rest wavelengths. Two of the QSOs are in a local environment of faint galaxies of similar magnitude to the hosts, and three have nearby galaxies with excess narrow-band flux, which would be [O II] if they are at the QSO redshift.

  16. AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Thacker

    2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  17. Blind teen-age students' expectations Focus: school-age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind teen-age students' expectations Focus: school-age Topic: What are the changing demands disabled pupils, inclusion increased significantly, particularly in high schools. Blind learners, who used. For this lecture, I will present a few blind students' opinions, which will help building the items for the case

  18. [New hosts and vectors for genome cloning]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of our project remains the development of new bacterial hosts and vectors for the stable propagation of human DNA clones in E. coli. During the past six months of our current budget period, we have (1) continued to develop new hosts that permit the stable maintenance of unstable features of human DNA, and (2) developed a series of vectors for (a) cloning large DNA inserts, (b) assessing the frequency of human sequences that are lethal to the growth of E. coli, and (c) assessing the stability of human sequences cloned in M13 for large-scale sequencing projects.

  19. Design Evolution Study - Aging Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. McDaniel

    2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new subsurface area (high cost); surface aging in the complete waste package (risk to the waste package and impact on the Waste Handling Facility); and aging in the stainless steel liner (impact on the waste package design and new high risk operations added to the waste packaging process). The selection of a design basis for aging will be made in conjunction with the other design re-evaluation studies.

  20. Center for volcanic and tectonic studies, Department of Geoscience, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV. Annual report No. 69, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report of the Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, maps, and reprints that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1991 and December 31, 1992. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that had direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics included: (1) The role of the mantle during regional extension. (2) The structural controls and emplacement mechanisms of Pliocene/Quaternary basaltic centers and dikes. (3) The detailed geochemistry of individual volcanic centers in Crater Flat, Nevada. (4) Estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruption (this topic is being studied by Dr. C-H. Ho at UNLV).

  1. Abstract The Holocene Parinacota Volcanic Debris Av-alanche (ca. 8,000 years B.P.) is located in the central An-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    that material that travelled further broke up and had an initial greater kinetic energy. Keywords Debris Andes Volcanic Zone of northern Chile (Figs. 1 and 2). Parinacota Volcano is located on the Chile­Bolivia

  2. A HOST PHASE FOR THE DISPOSAL OF WEAPONS PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WERNER LUTZE; K. B. HELEAN; W. L. GONG - UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO RODNEY C. EWING - UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted into the possible use of zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) as a host phase for storage or disposal of excess weapons plutonium. Zircon is one of the most chemically durable minerals. Its structure can accommodate a variety of elements, including plutonium and uranium. Natural zircon contains uranium and thorium together in different quantities, usually in the range of less than one weight percent up to several weight percent. Zircon occurs in nature as a crystalline or a partially to fully metamict mineral, depending on age and actinide element concentration, i.e., on radiation damage. These zircon samples have been studied extensively and the results are documented in the literature in terms of radiation damage to the crystal structure and related property changes, e.g., density, hardness, loss of uranium and lead, etc. Thus, a unique suite of natural analogues are available to describe the effect of decay of {sup 239}Pu on zircon's structure and how zircon's physical and chemical properties will be affected over very long periods of time. Actually, the oldest zircon samples known are over 3 billion years old. This period covers the time for decay of {sup 239}Pu (half-life 24,300 yr.) and most of its daughter {sup 235}U (half-life 700 million yr.). Because of its chemical durability, even under extreme geological conditions, zircon is the most widely used mineral for geochronological dating (7,000 publications). It is the oldest dated mineral on earth and in the universe. Zircon has already been doped with about 10 weight percent of plutonium. Pure PuSiO{sub 4} has also been synthesized and has the same crystal structure as zircon. However, use of zircon as a storage medium or waste form for plutonium requires further materials characterization. Experiments can either be conducted in laboratories where plutonium can be handled or plutonium can be simulated by other elements, and experiments can be done under less restricted conditions. The authors conducted work with zircon doped with thorium, uranium and cerium, respectively. They synthesized various zircon compositions and studied the solid solution properties of mixed (Zr,X)SiO{sub 4} [X represents Th, U, Ce, respectively]. They measured the dissolution rate of pure crystalline zircon at elevated temperatures and of an amorphous hydrated zircon. This final report together with two previous annual reports summarize the accomplishments made in two areas: (1) synthesis of zircon solid solutions with Th, U, and Ce; and (2) measurement of the chemical durability of zircon. The focus of the final report is on the measurement of zircon's dissolution rate in water and on the determination of volubility limits of Th, U, and Ce in zircon.

  3. Cell Host & Microbe Durable Protection from Herpes Simplex Virus-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Judy

    Cell Host & Microbe Article Durable Protection from Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Transmission Following is a problem. Intravaginal administration of small interfering RNA (siRNA) lipoplexes targeting Herpes Simplex protection against viral transmission. INTRODUCTION Genital Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) infection causes

  4. Engineering Challenge Camp Hosted by the West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    4th and 5th Grade Engineering Challenge Camp Hosted by the West Virginia University Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources and sponsored in part by Halliburton, AEP and Axiall Industries. July 28-August 1, 2014 Monday, July 28, 2014-- Up, Up and Away Day (Aerospace Engineering) Time

  5. Engineering Challenge Camp Hosted by the West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1st , 2nd , and 3rd Grade Engineering Challenge Camp Hosted by the West Virginia University Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering & Mineral Resources and sponsored in part by Halliburton, Axiall, July 28, 2014-- Up, Up and Away Day (Aerospace Engineering) Time Activity Place Led By 8:30-8:45 a

  6. Cell Host & Microbe Actin and Intermediate Filaments Stabilize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdivia, Raphael

    Cell Host & Microbe Article Actin and Intermediate Filaments Stabilize the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions within a cell leading to the highest yield of EBs (Wilson et al., 2006). The expansion of inclu- sions is likely fueled by the acquisition of membrane lipids from Golgi-derived vesicles (Carabeo et al

  7. Scleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    . Wildsoet, O.D., Ph.D.1 Enzymatically degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) were Polymer Network James Su, M.Eng.,1 Samuel T. Wall, Ph.D.,2 Kevin E. Healy, Ph.D.,2,3 and Christine FScleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable Semi-Interpenetrating

  8. and Co-Host Riverside Electric Vehicle Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Allen P.

    and Co-Host Riverside Electric Vehicle Day Where: UC Riverside | CE-CERT, 1084 Columbia Ave, 92507 renewable sourc- es, efficiently use electric transporta- tion through advanced vehicles and im- prove our million electric vehi- cles on California's roads by 2023 and to ensure that low-income communities, which

  9. Continuous Time Bayesian Networks for Host Level Network Intrusion Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton, Christian R.

    R. Shelton Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of California, Riverside continuous time Bayesian networks learned from historic non-attack data and flag future event sequences whose. In this paper, we look at the problem of detecting such attacks at the host level. Instead of constructing

  10. page 1 11 June 2008 Hosted by World Robotics 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    June 2008 Hosted by Industrial robots are meeting the changing demands of their customers Total world supply of industrial robots up to 2007 Distribution in the main regions (Americas, Asia, Europe robots operating Estimated worldwide operational stock of industrial robots 3 66 454 605 750 923 951 994

  11. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  12. Research Focus Delicious poison: genetics of Drosophila host plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Naomi E.

    perception could be a tar- get of natural selection during host specialization. Five papers using data from in the generalist sister species. Both studies also report higher rates of amino acid changing substitutions observes more gene losses and elevated rates of amino acid substitutions in specialist species. However

  13. Community Police Academy Hosted By: University of Delaware Police

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Community Police Academy Hosted By: University of Delaware Police When: Wednesdays, 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. (March 4th through April 29th , 2015) Where: 413 Academy Street Newark DE 19716 - University should I expect to learn: The Community Police Academy (CPA) is an informative learning process

  14. Host life history responses to parasitism Philip Agnewa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -specific growth, reproduction and survival [1, 2]. Life history theory aims to understand how these traits, reproduction and survival. These effects are often not immediate, but increase with time since infection and survival. This review illustrates this argument with several empirical studies showing hosts behaving

  15. Japan Denies Report It Dropped Proposal to Host Fusion Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Print Japan Denies Report It Dropped Proposal to Host Fusion Reactor June 22 (Bloomberg) -- Japan fusion reactor, a decision that would end a standoff with France to site the 4.6 billion-euro ($5 the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor in return for assurances it will manage the project in France

  16. ISO Observations of Quasars and Quasar Hosts Belinda J. Wilkes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Belinda

    ISO Observations of Quasars and Quasar Hosts Belinda J. Wilkes Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Abstract. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), launched spiral galaxies. In the near­IR, the ISO data confirm an excess due to a warm `AGN­related' dust

  17. aging society aging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Age CiteSeer Summary: Success in school can be a positive counterweight to the abuse, neglect, separation, and impermanence experienced by the more than 400,000 U.S....

  18. Accessory mineral U–Th–Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrib Mineral Petrol (2009) 158:421–446 DOIAZ, USA Contrib Mineral Petrol (2009) 158:421–446 magmabatholith. Contrib Mineral Petrol 133(1–2):169–185. doi:

  19. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  20. Analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow imbibition experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.

    1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-meter-scale imbibition experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially dry cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was saturated by contacting the ends with pressurized water. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport has a small (less than 5%) effect on the speed of the wetting front. By using experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement with measured, transient, saturation data was achieved. The sensitivity of predicted transient wetting fronts to permeability data indicates a need for more extensive measurements. We conclude that it will be difficult to characterize an entire repository - where inhomogeneities due to variations in matrix and fracture properties are not well known - solely from the results of sub-meter-scale laboratory testing and deterministic modeling. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Drying analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Eaton, R.R.; Russo, A.J.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A submeter-scale drying experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially wet cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was dried by blowing dry nitrogen over the ends. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport is unimportant in the interior of the core; the rate of drying is controlled by transport of liquid water to the ends of the core, where it can evaporate and escape into the dry environment outside. By using previous experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement between measured and calculated drying rates was achieved. However, predicted saturation profiles were much smoother that those measured experimentally, presumably because of centimeter-scale inhomogeneities in the core sample. Our results indicate that water is transported chiefly as liquid from the interior to the edges of the core, where it evaporates and escapes out the ends. Thus, liquid-phase transport controls the overall drying rate. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  3. Malcolm Guite Poets in Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Stephen

    Malcolm Guite Poets in Age or A Study of Reading Habits At first I used to wish that I were Keats passing bell is rung. But now I need the poets who grew old And wore the bottoms of their trousers rolled of pure gold. I need the poets now, who match my age, Like Coleridge I could become a sage, And I bet I

  4. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  5. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  6. Linking Short Gamma Ray Bursts and their Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminosities of short gamma ray burst host galaxies are anticorrelated with both the isotropic equivalent gamma ray energy and the gamma ray luminosity of the explosions. Observational selection effects only strengthen the significance of this correlation. The correlation may indicate that there are two physically distinct groups of SGRBs. If so, it requires that the more luminous class of explosions be associated with the younger class of progenitors. Alternatively, it could be due to a continuous distribution of burst and host properties. As one possible explanation, we find that the effect of binary neutron star masses on inspiral time and energy reservoir produces a correlation of the appropriate sign, but does not automatically reproduce the correlation slope or the full range of SGRB energy scales. Any future model of SGRB progenitors needs to reproduce this correlation.

  7. Supplement 20, Part 7, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Judith H.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Tolson, Deborah A.; Hood, Martha W.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In other words, when using the Parasite-Subject Catalogues, it wTill be necessary to consult the Author Catalogue for complete bibliographical information. The following are the parts of each supplement : Part 1, Authors: A-Z Part 2, Parasite... SUPPLEMENT 20, PART 7 PARASITE-SUBJECT CATALOGUE : HOSTS By DEBORAH A. TOLSON, Biological Laboratory Technician MARTHA W. HOOD, Zoologist JUDITH H. SHAW, Zoologist JANE D. RAYBURN, Technical Information Specialist SHIRLEY J. EDWARDS, Supervisory...

  8. THE AGE OF PLASTIC INGENUITY + RESPONSIBILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    THE AGE OF PLASTIC INGENUITY + RESPONSIBILITY An Interdisciplinary Symposium Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age...and now the Age of Plastic. The Smithsonian Institution is leveraging its collections--arguably the world's greatest repository of plastic material culture--to investigate the significance of plastic, its

  9. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  10. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin (Trinity); (Limerick)

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  11. DOE and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Co-Host First...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Co-Host First Ever Electric Vehicle Forum DOE and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Co-Host First Ever Electric Vehicle...

  12. Chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has nonamphibian hosts and releases chemicals that cause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    for a pathogen, some can serve as res- ervoir hosts. Reservoir hosts can sustain the parasite when par- ticular abandoned after Rowley et al. (17) retracted their initial report of the de- tection of B. dendrobatidis

  13. TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing...

  14. Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Poneman Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Poneman February...

  15. 4/22/08 4:15 PMCientficos estudian origen de los volcanes costarricenses -ALDEA GLOBAL -nacion.com Page 1 of 2http://nacion.com/ln_ee/2008/abril/22/aldea1502437.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, W. Steven

    volcanes y los sismos aquí PABLO FONSECA Q. | pfonseca@nacion.com Un grupo de científicos estadounidenses y

  16. April 16, 2012 GEOSHARE: Geospatial Open Source Hosting of Agriculture, Resource &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    April 16, 2012 GEOSHARE: Geospatial Open Source Hosting of the key recommendations in its recently launched report. The geospatial data

  17. Differential introgression causes genealogical discordance in host races of Acrocercops transecta (Insecta: Lepidoptera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshizawa, Kazunori

    1 Differential introgression causes genealogical discordance in host races of Acrocercops transecta@nibb.ac.jp KY: psocid@res.agr.hokudai.ac.jp Running title: Genealogical discordance in host races #12;2 Abstract the Lyonia race from the Juglnas race, whereas the Tpi, Per and Ldh genealogies did not reflect the two host

  18. Comparison of Field Galaxy and Supernovae Host Galaxy Properties Rachael Merritt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    of the thermonuclear and core collapse hosts, this project confirms that field properties fall between supernova host properties. #12;2 Introduction: In 2011, Joel Williams compared properties of thermonuclear (type I) and core Smith and Matthew Taylor, Williams' sample consisted of 34 thermonuclear and 75 core collapse hosts

  19. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. Transportation, Aging and Disposal...

  20. On the afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004: A comprehensivestudy with the Hubble Space Telescope1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.; Hjorth,J.; Pedersen, K.; Levan, A.; Burud, I.; Sahu, K.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Bergeron, E.; Kouveliotou1, C.; Tanvir, N.; Thorsett11, S.E.; Wijers,R.A.M.J.; Castro Ceron, J.M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Garnavich, P.; Holland,S.T.; Jakobsson, P.; Moller, P.; Nugent, P.; Pian, E.; Rhoads, J.; Thomsen, B.; Watson, D.; Woosley, S.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the late-time afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004 (z = 2.33).Although this gamma-ray burst (GRB) is one of the best observed so far in terms of sampling in the time domain, multi-wavelength coverage and polarimetric observations, there is large disagreement between different measurements and interpretations of this burst in the literature. We have observed the field of GRB 021004 with the HST at multiple epochs from 3 days until almost 10 months after the burst. With STI S prism and G430L spectroscopy we cover the spectral region from about 2000 Angstrom to 5700 Angstrom corresponding to 600 1700 Angstrom in the rest frame. From the limit on the flux recovery bluewards of the Lyman-limit we constrain the H I column density to be above 1 x 1018 cm-2 (5 sigma). Based on ACS and N ICMOS imaging we find that the afterglow evolved a chromatically within the errors (any variation must be less then 5 percent) during the period of HST observations. The color changes observed by other authors during the first four days must be related to a 'noisy' phenomenon superimposed on an afterglow component with a constant spectral shape. This also means that the cooling break has remained on the blue side of the optical part of the spectrum for at least two weeks after the explosion. The optical to X-ray slope OX is consistent with being the same at 1.4 and 52.4 days after the burst. This indicates that the cooling frequency is constant and hence, according to fireball models, that the circumburst medium has a constant density profile. The late-time slope of the light curve (alpha 2, F nu proportional to t-alpha2) is in the range 2 = 1.8-1.9, although inconsistent with a single power-law. This could be due to a late-time flattening caused by the transition to non-relativistic expansion or due to excess emission (a 'bump' in the light curve) about 7 days afterburst. The host galaxy is like most previously studied GRB hosts a (very) blue starburst galaxy with no evidence for dust and with strong Ly emission. The star-formation rate of the host is about 10 M solar mass yr-1 based on both the strength of the UV continuum and on the Ly alpha luminosity. The spectral energy distribution of the host implies an age in the range 30-100 Myr for the dominant stellar population.

  1. Limits to the potential distribution of light brown apple moth in Arizona–California based on climate suitability and host plant availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Mills, Nicholas J.; Ponti, Luigi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and host plant availability Andrew Paul Gutierrez • Nicholasthrough host plant availability. Outside of irrigated crops,non limiting host plant availability. A regional analysis of

  2. Monitoring and Modeling Non-Point Source Contributions of Host-Specific Fecal Contamination in San Pablo Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuertz, Stefan; Bombardelli, Fabian A; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Wang, Dan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Host-Specific Fecal Contamination in San Pablo Bay Principlelivestock sources of fecal contamination in Kenya with host-Huang. Abstract Fecal contamination from non-point sources

  3. Identifying the Volcanic Eruption Depicted in a Neolithic Painting at Catalhoyuk, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Mark

    . Lovera1 1 Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles the base of Hasan Dagi records an older explosive eruption at 28.961.5 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation

  4. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Childress, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ± 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 ± 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the ?m {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  5. Guest-host crosslinked polyimides for integrated optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Kosc, T.Z.; Singer, K.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Beuhler, A.J.; Wargowski, D.A. [Amoco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States). Amoco Research Center; Cahill, P.A.; Seager, C.H.; Meinhardt, M.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the optical and electrical characterization of aromatic, fluorinated, fully imidized, organic soluble, thermally and photochemically, crosslinkable, guest-host polyimides for integrated optics. Refractive indices and optical losses were measured to evaluate the performance of these materials for passive applications. Materials were doped with two high temperature nonlinear optical chromophores, and poled during crosslinking to produce nonlinear optical materials. Measurements of electro-optic coefficient, macroscopic second order susceptibility, and conductivity were performed to assess these materials as potential candidates for active devices.

  6. Compilation of network activity logs on a DECnet host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, M.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Log files are created for all incoming connection requests on a DECnet host. These log files contain connection data such as the requesting source, destination, and throughput. The procedures (referred to as collect software) outlined in this report, were written to collect these log files, to extract the essential information, and to condense the data into one-line records. The two VAX/VMS systems at SNLA that currently run these procedures compile network transaction logs on a weekly basis. This document is intended for VAX/VMS system managers who wish to install, and possibly modify, this software.

  7. EM Hosts Business Opportunity Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EM Highlights Advisory BoardEM Hosts Business

  8. EM Hosts Successful Visit from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories at Hanford

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EM Highlights Advisory BoardEM Hosts

  9. Hosting foreign educators | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) HarmonicbetandEnergy 2010 A FileHosting foreign

  10. KCP Field Office hosts leadership meeting | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration Field Office hosts leadership meeting

  11. KCP hosts top STEM educators to develop curriculum | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration Field Office hostsSecurity

  12. LANL hosts annual Hazmat Challenge | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration FieldSecurityAdministration hosts

  13. OREM hosts annual community budget workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 FederalTransformers |OJT!LSU/CAMDOREM hosts annual

  14. Lab hosts multi-lab cyber security games

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLS ExperimentalFive R&D awards formuonLab hosts

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory to host Robot Rodeo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwards PollutionPollutionenvironmentalLosLANL to host

  16. Petrology and geochemistry of the Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vespucci, P.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late Cenozoic rocks of Hispaniola are subdivided into two petrographically and geochemically contrasting series, a calc-alkaline series (CA-series), and a mafic alkaline series (MA-series). The CA-series are basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites occurring in several eruptive centers in the southern part of the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic. MA-series basalts are alkali-olivine basalts and limburgitic basalts occurring in the San Juan Valley of the Dominican republic and in the Cul de Sac of south central Haiti. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, mica, feldspar, and titanomagnetite were analyzed for major element chemical composition. MA-series basalts are slightly to moderately silica undersaturated, have high TiO2 (>1.5%) and MgO (>5.0%) and moderately high total alkalis (>2.0%). MA-series basalts are enriched in K, Rb, Sr, Ba, U, Th and LREEs with Ba/La ratios around 0.98. REE patterns are fractionated (chrondrite normalized La/Yb ratios around 62, and La/Sm ratios around 6). HFS elements Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are high resembling intraplate basalts. 86SR/87SR ratios are high (0.7060-0.7070) with low Rb/Sr ratios (0.03 to 0.15). Basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites of the CA-series show low MgO (<5.0%) and TiO2(<2.0%), and moderately high total alkali contents (2 to 7%). Enrichment is seen in K Rb, Sr, Ba, Th, U, and LREEs with Ba/La ratios as high as 5.6 REE patterns are fractionated to a lesser degree compared to the MA-series (chondrite normalized La/Yb around 23, and La/Sm ratios less than 5). HFS elements are lower resembling typical island arc volcanic rocks. CA-series have 87Sr/86Sr ratios (.7043-.7053), with low Rb/Sr ratios as in the MA-series.

  17. Development of a Phosphate Ceramic as a Host for Halide-contaminated Plutonium Pyrochemical Reprocessing Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, Brian; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Donald, Ian W.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of halide anions in four types of wastes arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium required an immobilization process to be developed in which not only the actinide cations but also the halide anions were immobilized in a durable waste form. At AWE, we have developed such a process using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Successful trials of the process with actinide- and Cl-bearing Type I waste were carried out at PNNL where the immobilization of the waste in a form resistant to aqueous leaching was confirmed. Normalized mass losses determined at 40°C and 28 days were 12 x 10-6 g?m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g?m-2 for Pu and Cl, respectively. Accelerated radiation-induced damage effects are being determined with specimens containing 238Pu. No changes in the crystalline lattice have been detected with XRD after the 239Pu equivalent of 400 years ageing. Confirmation of the process for Type II waste (a oxyhydroxide-based waste) is currently underway at PNNL. Differences in the ionic state of Pu in the four types of waste have required different surrogates to be used. Samarium chloride was used successfully as a surrogate for both Pu(III) and Am(III) chlorides. Initial investigations into the use of HfO2 as the surrogate for Pu(IV) oxide in Type II waste indicated no significant differences.

  18. June 17, 2013 Symposium on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    to forestall and treat diseases of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Today

  19. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  20. advanced grandparental age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In most animals, advancing age is accompanied by the deteriorative process of aging (senescence). Aging is the main cause of severe illness and death in humans aging is...

  1. advancing paternal age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In most animals, advancing age is accompanied by the deteriorative process of aging (senescence). Aging is the main cause of severe illness and death in humans aging is...

  2. advanced paternal age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In most animals, advancing age is accompanied by the deteriorative process of aging (senescence). Aging is the main cause of severe illness and death in humans aging is...

  3. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE...

  4. Welding tritium aged stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

  5. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voloshin, Tali [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel); Voest, Emile E. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Shaked, Yuval, E-mail: yshaked@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  6. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  7. An endosymbiont positively modulates ornithine decarboxylase in host trypanosomatids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frossard, Mariana Lins [Laboratorio de Ultraestrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Seabra, Sergio Henrique [Laboratorio de Ultraestrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Matta, Renato Augusto da [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Tecidual, Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Avenida Alberto Lamego, 2000, 28013-600 Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Wanderley de [Laboratorio de Ultraestrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia de Mello, Fernando [Laboratorio de Neuroquimica, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Motta, Maria Cristina Machado [Laboratorio de Ultraestrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: motta@biof.ufrj.br

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary: Some trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia deanei, are endosymbiont-containing species. Aposymbiotic strains are obtained after antibiotic treatment, revealing interesting aspects of this symbiotic association. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promotes polyamine biosynthesis and contributes to cell proliferation. Here, we show that ODC activity is higher in endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids than in aposymbiotic cells, but isolated endosymbionts did not display this enzyme activity. Intriguingly, expressed levels of ODC were similar in both strains, suggesting that ODC is positively modulated in endosymbiont-bearing cells. When the aposymbiotic strain was grown in conditioned medium, obtained after cultivation of the endosymbiont-bearing strain, cellular proliferation as well as ODC activity and localization were similar to that observed in the endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids. Furthermore, dialyzed-heated medium and trypsin treatment reduced ODC activity of the aposymbiont strain. Taken together, these data indicate that the endosymbiont can enhance the protozoan ODC activity by providing factors of protein nature, which increase the host polyamine metabolism.

  8. Three regimes of extrasolar planets inferred from host star metallicities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchhave, Lars A; Latham, David W; Sasselov, Dimitar; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Isaacson, Howard; Juncher, Diana; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Understanding the transition from the gaseous planets to Earth-like rocky worlds is important to estimate the number of potentially habitable planets in our Galaxy and provide constraints on planet formation theories. Here we report the abundances of heavy elements (that is, the metallicities) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (~ 4.5{\\sigma}) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1...

  9. Aging phenomena in polystyrene thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Fukao; Hiroki Koizumi

    2008-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The aging behavior is investigated for thin films of atactic polystyrene through measurements of complex electric capacitance. During isothermal aging process the real part of the electric capacitance increases with aging time, while the imaginary part decreases with aging time. This result suggests that the aging time dependence of the real and imaginary parts are mainly associated with change in thickness and dielectric permittivity, respectively. In thin films, the thickness depends on thermal history of aging even above the glass transition. Memory and `rejuvenation' effects are also observed in the thin films.

  10. Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz and M. A l t a f Mubaraki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a t approximately 0.4 Tg S y-l, emissions from biomass burning a t approximately 2 Tg S Y-' and volcanic emissions localized i n the highly populated and industrialized regions i n Eastern North America, and across Europe from the United Kingdom over Central Europe t o the Donbas region #12;in Russia (Benkovitz et a!., 1996

  11. Host Plant Influences on Performance and Haplotype Diversity of Dalbulus maidis, a Specialist Herbivore of Zea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila-Flores, Amanda

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    host plants, followed by planned, a priori contrasts (with Sidak?s correction; Abdi and Williams 2010) to evaluate whether corn leafhopper overall performance was affected by transitions in Zea: (i) life history, i.e. perennial teosinte vs. Balsas... preference for any of the host plants if denied a choice of host plant (Bellota-Villafuerte 2012). When warranted by the ANOVA (P Abdi and Williams 2010) to evaluate whether individual...

  12. HOST GALAXIES, CLUSTERING, EDDINGTON RATIOS, AND EVOLUTION OF RADIO, X-RAY, AND INFRARED-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Brodwin, Mark; Narayan, Ramesh; Kenter, Almus; Caldwell, Nelson; Anderson, Michael E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T.; Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Brown, Michael J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Victoria (Australia); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cool, Richard J. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)], E-mail: rhickox@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the connection between different classes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the evolution of their host galaxies, by deriving host galaxy properties, clustering, and Eddington ratios of AGNs selected in the radio, X-ray, and infrared (IR) wavebands. We study a sample of 585 AGNs at 0.25 < z < 0.8 using redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). We select AGNs with observations in the radio at 1.4 GHz from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, X-rays from the Chandra XBooetes Survey, and mid-IR from the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey. The radio, X-ray, and IR AGN samples show only modest overlap, indicating that to the flux limits of the survey, they represent largely distinct classes of AGNs. We derive host galaxy colors and luminosities, as well as Eddington ratios, for obscured or optically faint AGNs. We also measure the two-point cross-correlation between AGNs and galaxies on scales of 0.3-10 h {sup -1} Mpc, and derive typical dark matter halo masses. We find that: (1) radio AGNs are mainly found in luminous red sequence galaxies, are strongly clustered (with M {sub halo} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), and have very low Eddington ratios {lambda} {approx}< 10{sup -3}; (2) X-ray-selected AGNs are preferentially found in galaxies that lie in the 'green valley' of color-magnitude space and are clustered similar to the typical AGES galaxies (M {sub halo} {approx} 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), with 10{sup -3} {approx}< {lambda} {approx}< 1; (3) IR AGNs reside in slightly bluer, slightly less luminous galaxies than X-ray AGNs, are weakly clustered (M {sub halo} {approx}< 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), and have {lambda}>10{sup -2}. We interpret these results in terms of a simple model of AGN and galaxy evolution, whereby a 'quasar' phase and the growth of the stellar bulge occurs when a galaxy's dark matter halo reaches a critical mass between {approx}10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M {sub sun}. After this event, star formation ceases and AGN accretion shifts from radiatively efficient (optical- and IR-bright) to radiatively inefficient (optically faint, radio-bright) modes.

  13. Aging of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltz, M F

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a relatively sensitive explosive used in many electroexplosive devices as well as in medicine. Of primary interest to LLNL is its use in items such as exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding bridge foil initiators (EFI). In these devices the crystalline powder is pressed into a granular, low-density compact that can be initiated by an exploding wire or foil. The long-term stability of this pressed compact is of interest to weapon stockpile lifetime prediction studies. Key points about potential aging mechanisms can be summarized as follows: (1) There are a number of factors that can contribute to PETN instability. These include particle size, polymorphic phase transitions, crystal structure, impurities, moisture, occlusions, chemical incompatibility and biological (microorganism) action. of these factors the most important for long-term aging of high surface area powders used in detonators appears to be that of particle size growth. (2) There is a great deal of literature on the thermal degradation kinetics of PETN, unfortunately much of it with little bearing on ambient temperature aging during long-term storage. PETN is very stable with respect to thermal decomposition. Low-temperature thermal studies have not revealed evidence of chemical degradation products in archived PETN. Data extrapolated to 30 C predicts a half-life of 12 million years. (3) Moisture seems to lower the activation energy for and accelerate the decomposition of PETN. (4) External drivers affecting stability include temperature, moisture, radiation fields, and stress, while internal drivers include residual solvents, and impurities. Temperature affects kinetic processes of crystal growth such as adsorption, desorption, and diffusion rates of molecules on the surface of PETN crystals. A low-level radiation field may induce unexpected changes in the chemical makeup of PETN and its homologue impurities. Stress at high pressure points caused by crystalline surface irregularities may cause a decrease in surface area over time due to smoothing of contact points and sintering. PETN has been found to contain a number of impurities, including homologues, pentaerythryl ethers with a mixture of hydroxyl and nitrate functional groups, and organic salts, that can alter its physical and chemical properties. (5) The processes of sublimation/recrystallization and surface diffusion are important processes that can cause changes in PETN crystal morphology, particle size distribution and specific surface area. Sublimation feeds a process called Ostwald ripening, which involves the spontaneous growth of larger crystals from those of smaller size. This process proceeds with age regardless of storage conditions unless the crystals are treated to retard growth. The coarsening mechanisms include Ostwald ripening, 'sintering', and surface diffusion. The latter has not been experimentally observed, but a molecular modeling approach has attempted to investigate this phenomenon theoretically. (6) Threshold test fire, particle size distribution, specific surface area, thermal analysis, chemical analysis, powder compact specific surface area and density are approaches that have been used in the attempt to assess changes attributable to aging of PETN, with varying results. The biggest problem lies in the aging mechanism itself, which likely influences small changes in morphology, both internal and external, and particle size distribution changes on a scale too small to reliably monitor. Other aspects, such as subtle changes in density profiles within pressed powder compacts, may be beyond the capability of current technology to assess. Crystal growth significant enough to affect the PETN particle size distribution is expected to impact detonator performance. (7) Factors relevant to stabilizing particle size growth include crystal morphology, powder surface area and particle size distribution; crystal density and internal defects; and powder compact density and density gradients.

  14. New Technologies for Repairing Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for a technique to repair aging cables that have been subjected to degradation associated with long-term thermal and radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. The physical degradation of the aging cables manifests itself primarily as cracking and increased brittleness of the polymeric electrical insulation. Therefore, the proposed cable-repair concept comprises development of techniques to impart a softening agent within the deteriorated polymer insulation jacket so as to regain the ability of the insulation to stretch without failing and possibly to heal existing cracks in the insulation. Our approach is to use commercially available ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) as the relevant test material, demonstrate the adsorption of chemical treatments in the EPR and quantify changes in resulting physical and mechanical properties. EPR cable samples have been thermally treated in air to produce specimens corresponding to the full range of cable age-performance points from new (>350% elongation at break) to end-of-life (<50% elongation at break). The current focus is on two chemical treatments selected as candidates for restoring age-related cable elasticity loss: a rubber plasticizer and a reactive silane molecule. EPR specimens of 200, 150, 100, and 50% elongation at break have been soaked in the candidate chemical treatments and the kinetics of chemical uptake, measured by change in mass of the samples, has been determined. Mechanical properties as a function of aging and chemical treatment have been measured including ultimate tensile strength, tensile modulus at 50% strain, elongation at break, and storage modulus. Dimensional changes with treatment and changes in glass transition temperature were also investigated. These ongoing experiments are expected to provide insight into the physical-chemical nature of the effect of thermal degradation on EPR rejuvenation limits and to advance novel methods for restoring the ability of degraded EPR to be compliant and resist fracture. The results of this research reveal that absorption of chemical treatments can lower the glass transition temperature and modulus of EPR. Chemical treatments pursued thus far have proven ineffective at restoring EPR strength and elongation at break. Future work will combine the plasticizer modalities found to successfully increase the volume of the EPR, reduce EPR glass transition temperature and reduce EPR modulus with promising chemistries that will repair the damage of the polymer, potentially using the plasticizer as a host for the new chemistry.

  15. SNF AGING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.L. Swanson

    2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) aging system and associated bases, which will allow the design effort to proceed. This SDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD is an engineering tool for design control; accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This SDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flow down of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The SDD follows the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in the SDD reflects the current results of the design process. Throughout this SDD, the term aging cask applies to vertical site-specific casks and to horizontal aging modules. The term overpack is a vertical site-specific cask that contains a dual-purpose canister (DPC) or a disposable canister. Functional and operational requirements applicable to this system were obtained from ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' (F&OR) (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557]). Other requirements that support the design process were taken from documents such as ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (PDC) (BSC 2004 [DES 171599]), ''Site Fire Hazards Analyses'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172174]), and ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512]). The documents address requirements in the ''Project Requirements Document'' (PRD) (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275]). This SDD includes several appendices. Appendix A is a Glossary; Appendix B is a list of key system charts, diagrams, drawings, lists and additional supporting information; and Appendix C is a list of procedures that will be used to operate the system.

  16. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of roofing surfaces Hugo Destaillats, Ph.D.

  17. Neurobiology of Aging xxx (2006) xxxxxx Age-related changes in brain activation during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurobiology of Aging xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Age-related changes in brain activation during a delayed. / Neurobiology of Aging xxx (2006) xxx­xxx impairment in several different memory variables [78], including WM [9

  18. MEDIA ADVISORY: REAC/TS hosts 5th International Symposium on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REACTS hosts 5th International Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 27, 2011 FY11-35 Who: Radiation Emergency...

  19. TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin Pritts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin by Marianne Krasny (Natural Resources), Helene Dillard (CCE), and Marvin Pritts (Horticulture). #12;

  20. Radiofrequency field absorption by carbon nanotubes embedded in a conductive host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, George

    Radiofrequency field absorption by carbon nanotubes embedded in a conductive host Mikhail V. Shuba centimeters depth penetration of visible and infrared radiation in tissue. Thermoacoustic imaging refers

  1. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook answers basic questions about plug-in electric vehicles, charging stations, charging equipment, and considerations for station owners, property owners, and station hosts.

  2. Chloride Depletion in Aged Sea Salt Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chloride Depletion in Aged Sea Salt Particles Chloride Depletion in Aged Sea Salt Particles Print Wednesday, 06 February 2013 00:00 Particles or aerosols can be directly released...

  3. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- 61876 Dark Energy in the Dark Ages Eric V. LinderUniversity of California. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages Eric2008) Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts

  4. Utah Commission on Aging June 6, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Institutions Norma Matheson Chair Anne Peterson University of Utah Mayor JoAnn Seghini Midvale City Sara to the Commission for consideration. · Aging SMART: Denise Brooks distributed Aging SMART Sourcebook. Website is up

  5. age randomised controlled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  6. aged rat erectile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  7. age factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  8. aged interleukin-18 deficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  9. age stratigraphic relationships: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  10. 6, 39453963, 2006 Methanol inside aged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACPD 6, 3945­3963, 2006 Methanol inside aged tropical biomass burning plumes G. Dufour et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions First space-borne measurements of methanol inside aged tropical biomass. Dufour (gaelle.dufour@lmd.polytechnique.fr) 3945 #12;ACPD 6, 3945­3963, 2006 Methanol inside aged

  11. Host galaxy spectra and consequences for supernova typing from the SDSS SN survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sako, Masao; Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bassett, Bruce; Kunz, Martin [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6 Melrose Road, Muizenberg, 7945 (South Africa); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett L. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Campbell, Heather [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB4 0HA (United Kingdom); D'Andrea, Chris B.; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Galbany, Lluís [Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysics, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W., E-mail: olmstead@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  12. Confirming HD 23478 as a new magnetic B star hosting an H$\\alpha$-bright centrifugal magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikora, James; Bohlender, David; Neiner, Coralie; Oksala, Mary; Shultz, Matt; Cohen, David; ud-Doula, Asif; Grunhut, Jason; Monin, Dmitry; Owocki, Stan; Petit, Véronique; Rivinius, Thomas; Townsend, Richard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report 23 magnetic field measurements of the B3IV star HD 23478: 12 obtained from high resolution Stokes $V$ spectra using the ESPaDOnS (CFHT) and Narval (TBL) spectropolarimeters, and 11 from medium resolution Stokes $V$ spectra obtained with the DimaPol spectropolarimeter (DAO). HD 23478 was one of two rapidly rotating stars identified as potential "centrifugal magnetosphere" hosts based on IR observations from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We derive basic physical properties of this star including its mass ($M=6.1^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\\,M_\\odot$), effective temperature ($T_{\\rm eff}=20\\pm2\\,$kK), radius ($R=2.7^{+1.6}_{-0.9}\\,R_\\odot$), and age ($\\tau_{\\rm age}=3^{+37}_{-1}\\,$Myr). We repeatedly detect weakly-variable Zeeman signatures in metal, He and H lines in all our observations corresponding to a longitudinal magnetic field of $\\langle B_z\\rangle\\approx-2.0\\,$kG. The rotational period is inferred from Hipparcos photometry ($P_{\\rm rot}=1.0498(4)\\,$d). Und...

  13. Development of a Phosphate Ceramic as a Host for Halide-Contaminated Plutonium Pyrochemical Reprocessing Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, Brian; Fong, Shirley; Gerrard, Lee; Donald, Ian [MSRD, AWE plc, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Strachan, Denis; Scheele, Randall [PNNL, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of halide anions in four types of wastes arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium required an immobilization process to be developed in which not only the actinide cations but also the halide anions were immobilized in a durable, leach resistant form. AWE has developed such a process using Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as the host material. Successful trials of the process using actinide-doped Type I waste (essentially a chloride-based waste) were carried out at PNNL where the immobilization of the waste in a form resistant to aqueous leaching was confirmed. Normalized mass losses determined using a modified MCC-1 test at 40 deg. C/28 days were 12 x 10{sup -6} g.m{sup -2} and 2.7 x 10{sup -3} g.m{sup -2} for Pu and Cl, respectively. Accelerated radiation-induced damage effects are being determined with specimens containing {sup 238}Pu. No changes in the crystalline lattice have been detected with XRD after the {sup 239}Pu equivalent of 400 years ageing. Confirmation of the process for Type II waste (an oxyhydroxide-based waste) is currently underway at PNNL. Differences in the ionic state of plutonium in the four types of waste have required different surrogates to be used. Samarium chloride was used successfully as a surrogate for both Pu(III) and Am(III) chlorides. Early investigations into the use of HfO{sub 2} as the surrogate for Pu(IV) oxide in Type II waste showed some apparent differences in the phase assemblages of the surrogate and actinide-based products. However XRD examination of the products at higher resolution has demonstrated there is no significant difference and that for this work HfO{sub 2} is a suitable surrogate for PuO{sub 2}. (authors)

  14. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Thai Viet

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  15. Mineral paragenesis and textures associated with sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, NW China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayek, Mostafa

    Mineral paragenesis and textures associated with sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, NW Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposit Research, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, People, Wuyiyi and Shihongtan sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwest China. The mineralization

  16. Isotope systematics of ore-bearing granites and host rocks of the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Isotope systematics of ore-bearing granites and host rocks of the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining district and Spokoinoe granite massifs and their host rocks in the Orlovka- Spokoinoe mining district, Eastern Transbaikalia, Russia. Pb isotope analyses indicate one common Pb source for all three granite massifs

  17. GUEST-HOST ENCOUNTERS IN DIASPORA-HERITAGE TOURISM: THE TAGLIT-BIRTHRIGHT ISRAEL MIFGASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    understanding. A specialized form of educational travel, heritage tourism entails visits to places of historical1 GUEST-HOST ENCOUNTERS IN DIASPORA-HERITAGE TOURISM: THE TAGLIT-BIRTHRIGHT ISRAEL MIFGASH Sasson, Philadelphia PA. #12;2 GUEST-HOST ENCOUNTERS IN DIASPORA-HERITAGE TOURISM: THE TAGLIT-BIRTHRIGHT ISRAEL MIFGASH

  18. ECOLOGY AND POPULATION BIOLOGY Effects of Aggregation Size and Host Plant on the Survival of an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Diane

    -Tended Membracid (Hemiptera: Membracidae): Potential Roles in Selecting for Generalized Host Plant Use JENNIFER S membracid Publilia modesta (Uhler) (Hemiptera: Membracidae) that feeds on host species Chry- sothamnus, Billick and Tonkel 2003) and other Hemiptera (Addicott 1979, Offenberg 2001). In these associations

  19. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMOCHROMIC PROPERTIES OF POLYTHIOPHENES DISPERSED IN HOST POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euler, William B.

    INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMOCHROMIC PROPERTIES OF POLYTHIOPHENES DISPERSED IN HOST POLYMERS Brett L films or in solution. However, the utilization of conjugated polymers in many electronic applications requires them to be dispersed in a host polymer matrix.2 There have been few investigations

  20. HoBIDS: A Data Mining Approach to Host Based Intrusion Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershkop, Shlomo

    HoBIDS: A Data Mining Approach to Host Based Intrusion Detection Department of Computer Science of a host based IDS built on a data mining framework. This framework allows the system to detect both known and lightweight sensor system with the capabilities of sophisticated data-mining techniques to build a powerful

  1. Metallicities of M Dwarf Planet Hosts from Spectral Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob L. Bean; G. Fritz Benedict; Michael Endl

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first spectroscopic metallicities of three M dwarfs with known or candidate planetary mass companions. We have analyzed high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of these stars which we obtained at McDonald Observatory. Our analysis technique is based on spectral synthesis of atomic and molecular features using recently revised cool-star model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis code. The technique has been shown to yield results consistent with the analyses of solar-type stars and allows measurements of M dwarf [M/H] values to 0.12 dex precision. From our analysis, we find [M/H] = -0.12, -0.32, and -0.33 for GJ 876, GJ 436, and GJ 581 respectively. These three M dwarf planet hosts have sub-solar metallicities, a surprising departure from the trend observed in FGK-type stars. This study is the first part of our ongoing work to determine the metallicities of the M dwarfs included in the McDonald Observatory planet search program.

  2. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, C1428EHA-Buenos Aires (Argentina); Brown, B. P. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Soderblom, D. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henry, T. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States); Hall, J. C. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  3. Lithium abundances in exoplanet-host stars : modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present superficial chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The aim of this paper is to obtain constraints on possible models able to explain this difference, in the framework of overmetallic models compared to models with solar abundances. Methods. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses and metallicities. The results show different behaviour for the lithium destruction according to those parameters. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium. Results. Our models show that the observed lithium differences between EHS and NEHS are not directly due to the overmetallicity of the EHS: some extra mixing is needed below the convective zones. We discuss possible explanations for the needed extra mixing, in particular an increase of the mixing efficiency associated with the development of shear instabilities below the convective zone, triggered by angular momentum transfer due to the planetary migration.

  4. Kuiper belt structure around nearby super-Earth host stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Grant M; Marmier, Maxime; Greaves, Jane S; Wyatt, Mark C; Bryden, Geoffrey; Holland, Wayne; Lovis, Christophe; Matthews, Brenda C; Pepe, Francesco; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Udry, Stéphane

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new observations of the Kuiper belt analogues around HD 38858 and HD 20794, hosts of super-Earth mass planets within 1 au. As two of the four nearby G-type stars (with HD 69830 and 61 Vir) that form the basis of a possible correlation between low-mass planets and debris disc brightness, these systems are of particular interest. The disc around HD 38858 is well resolved with Herschel and we constrain the disc geometry and radial structure. We also present a probable JCMT sub-mm continuum detection of the disc and a CO J=2-1 upper limit. The disc around HD 20794 is much fainter and appears marginally resolved with Herschel, and is constrained to be less extended than the discs around 61 Vir and HD 38858. We also set limits on the radial location of hot dust recently detected around HD 20794 with near-IR interferometry. We present HARPS upper limits on unseen planets in these four systems, ruling out additional super-Earths within a few au, and Saturn-mass planets within 10 au. We consider the disc st...

  5. Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

    1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000{degrees} F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effect of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to that obtained using catalytically modified host oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments.

  6. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Bassett, Bruce; /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Foley, Ryan J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  7. aged korean adults: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AGING & SOCIETY Engineering Websites Summary: DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, AGING & SOCIETY Monthly Speaker Series Dr. Ellen B. Ryan DATE TIME ROOM Department of Health, Aging, &...

  8. Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterized field-aged exhaust gas recirculation...

  9. Local Land-Use Controls and Aging-Friendliness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. 2001. “Aging and Smart Growth: Building Aging-Sensitivebuilding such product exclusively, or predominantly, because it creates homogenous-age zones, defeats smart-

  10. Aging behavior and lifetime modeling for polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahlen, S. [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Wallner, G.M. [Institute of Materials Science and Testing of Plastics, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef Strasse 18, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Lang, R.W. [Institute for Polymeric Materials and Testing, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, Linz 4040 (Austria)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, polycarbonate (PC) as a material candidate for solar absorber applications is investigated as to the aging behavior at different temperatures in air and water. The aging conditioning was performed in air in the temperature range from 120 to 140 C and in water between 70 and 95 C. Tensile tests were performed on unaged and aged PC film specimens at ambient temperature using strain-to-break values as a performance indicator for the degree of aging. For PC the effect of aging was found to strongly depend on the aging conditions. Activation energy based lifetime prediction models according to various methods described in the literature were applied. The activation energies and corresponding lifetime predictions for the temperature range from 40 to 60 C in water and from 90 to 110 C in air derived from these models are compared and interpreted as to their practical relevance. (author)

  11. Evaluation of Potato Psyllid, Bactericera Cockerelli (Sulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), Host Preferences, Adaptation, Behavior, and Transmission of 'Candidatus Liberibacter Solanacearum' among Wild and Cultivated Solanaceous Hosts in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thinakaran, Jenita

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF POTATO PSYLLID, BACTERICERA COCKERELLI (ŠULC) (HEMIPTERA: TRIOZIDAE), HOST PREFERENCES, ADAPTATION, BEHAVIOR, AND TRANSMISSION OF ‘CANDIDATUS LIBERIBACTER SOLANACEARUM’ AMONG WILD AND CULTIVATED SOLANACEOUS HOSTS IN THE LOWER..., BACTERICERA COCKERELLI (SULC) (HEMIPTERA: TRIOZIDAE), ON SOLANACEOUS HOSTS UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS .................................... 19 Introduction...

  12. Materials Research in the Information Age

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 | Tags: Materials...

  13. Quantitative analysis of the hydrothermal system in Lassen Volcanic National Park and Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lassen hydrothermal system is in the southern Cascade Range, approximately 70 kilometers east-southeast of Redding, California. The conceptual model of the Lassen system is termed a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system with a parasitic vapor-dominated zone. The essential feature of this model is that steam and steam-heated discharge at relatively high elevations in Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and liquid discharge with high chloride concentrations at relatively low elevations outside LVNP in the Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) are both fed by an upflow of high-enthalpy, two-phase fluid within the Park. Liquid flows laterally away from the upflow area towards the areas of high-chloride discharge, and steam rises through a vapor-dominated zone to feed the steam and steam-heated features. The geometric model corresponds to an areally restricted flow regime that connects the Bumpass Hell area in LVNP with regions of chloride hot springs in the Mill Creek canyon in the KGRA south of LVNP. Simulations of thermal fluid withdrawal in the Mill Creek Canyon were carried out in order to determine the effects of such withdrawal on portions of the hydrothermal system within the Park. 19 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  15. age reconsidering ovarian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    age-length key to estimate age Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Optimal sampling design for using the age-length key to estimate age composition of a fish...

  16. Infection outcomes under genetic and environmental variation in a host-parasite system: Implications for maintenance of polymorphism and the evolution of virulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira do Vale, Pedro Filipe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virulence (the harm to the host during infection) is the outcome of continuous coevolution between hosts and parasites. This thesis adds to a growing body of work on host-parasite interactions, and describes experiments ...

  17. New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

  18. sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar age calibration of the litho- and paleomagnetic stratigraphies of the Ngorora Formation, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deino, A.; Drake, R. (Institute of Human Origins, Berkeley, CA (USA)); Tauxe, L. (Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Monaghan, M. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise eruptive ages have been determined by the laser-fusion, single-crystal {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar method for juvenile volcanic feldspars from reworked and contaminated volcaniclastic rocks of the middle Miocene Ngorora Formation, Kenya Rift Valley. These ages range from 13.06 Ma at the base to 10.51 Ma toward the top of the type section near Kabarsero. Correlation of the local paleomagnetic stratigraphies with the geomagnetic reversal time scale yields magnetochronologic age estimates that are younger than the isotopic ages by an average of 0.18 Ma. Much of the discrepancy can be eliminated if an inferred change in sea-floor spreading rate occurred at 13 Ma or earlier, rather than at 10.42 Ma as previously suggested. Sedimentation rates at Kabarsero calculated from the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results decrease from initial values of {approximately}25 cm/1,000 yr to {approximately}5 cm/1,000 yr toward the top of the section. The initial rapid sedimentation rates characterize the first 0.1 to 0.3 m.y. following emplacement of the underlying, voluminous, basin-filling Tiim Phonolites, indicating that the Baringo Basin at this time may not have existed as a rift valley created by extensional tectonics, but instead may have been a subsidence feature formed in response to removal of large volumes of magma from the lithosphere. A premolar tentatively identified as Proconsul sp. indet. found in the Ngorora Formation near the village of Bartabwa has been dated at {approximately}12.42 Ma, representing perhaps the last known occurrence of this genus in the fossil record.

  19. Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SandiaNew Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2030. Zero Waste is generally accepted to mean greater than 90% of waste...

  20. NERSC Hosts HS Students on Job Shadow Day- NERSC Center News...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cardo, Richard Gerber, Jason Hick and Jim Mellander of NERSC hosted Aaron Allen, Edward Gong, Dan Li, Darshan Parajuli and Patrick Xu at the Oakland Scientific Facility. John Bell...

  1. MODELING THE GRB HOST GALAXY MASS DISTRIBUTION: ARE GRBs UNBIASED TRACERS OF STAR FORMATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocevski, Daniel

    We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low-metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the ...

  2. Characterization of host lymphoid cells in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, S.A.; Griffith, I.J.; Gambel, P.; Francescutti, L.H.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have produced stable murine antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras by the simultaneous injection of P1 bone marrow cells and anti-P2 monoclonal antibody into normal (unirradiated) adult (P1 X P2)F1 recipients. These AF chimeras are healthy, long-lived, and exhibit no overt signs of graft-versus-host disease. They are immunocompetent and tolerant of host, P2-encoded alloantigens. Donor cell engraftment and takeover, monitored by glucosephosphate isomerase isozyme patterns, is usually complete (greater than 95%) in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and hemopoietic stem cell compartments of long-term (greater than 3 months posttransplantation) AF chimeras. The authors report here, however, that splenic, lymph node, and thymic leukocytes of AF chimeras represent donor/host chimeric populations. Spleen cell populations of AF chimeras exhibit substantial chimera-to-chimera variation in the preponderant residual host cell type(s) present. Interpretations of the implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Platforms for exploring host-pathogen interactions in hepatitis C virus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trehan, Kartik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Afflicting almost 200 million worldwide, hepatitis C virus (HCV) mounts a chronic infection of liver hepatocytes that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. An understanding of host-virus interactions will drive the ...

  4. U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Transition of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    586 4940 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Transition of Legacy Cleanup Work at Los Alamos National Laboratory WASHINGTON- On Wednesday, December 3, 2014, the Office...

  5. BMB Dept Seminar Schedule (Fall 2012) _v8 Dates Speakers (& their homepages), Seminar Title, and Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Rudenko, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan. (http://www.lsi.umich.edu/facultyresearch/labs/rudenko) (http://www.chembio.umich.edu/people/rudenko.html) Title: Host: Ladislau Kovari Dec 4, 2012 Speaker

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLES Evolutionary Origins of a Novel Host Plant Detoxification Gene in Butterflies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheat, Christopher

    RESEARCH ARTICLES Evolutionary Origins of a Novel Host Plant Detoxification Gene in Butterflies of Biological Sciences, Pennsylvania State University Chemical interactions between plants and their insect as a coevolutionary key innovation. By generating and sequencing expressed sequence tags, genomic libraries

  7. Influenza type C virus biology, interaction with the host, and epidemiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, William Wyatt

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    glycoprotein, HEF, which is responsible for attachment to the sialic acid host cell receptor, receptor destruction, and viral-cell fusion (similar to the HN glycoprotein of Paramyxoviruses). RNA segment 5 codes for the nucleoprotein (NP) which is the backbone...

  8. Genome analysis of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 reveals metabolic pathways for host-derived

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Genome analysis of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 reveals metabolic pathways for host,214,650-bp genome of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010, a strain isolated from infant stool, revealed

  9. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  10. Host identity impacts rhizosphere fungal communities associated with three alpine plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becklin, Katie M.; Hertweck, Kate L.; Jumpponen, Ari

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fungal diversity and composition are still relatively unknown in many ecosystems; however, host identity and environmental conditions are hypothesized to influence fungal community assembly. To test these hypotheses we ...

  11. Emplacing Displacement: Cultural Landscapes of Refugee-hosting in Ukwimi, Zambia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Angela M.

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to calls for increased understanding of and solutions to the issue of protracted refugee situations, this dissertation examines the social and spatial implications of a long history of refugee-hosting in Eastern ...

  12. Caught in the Crossfire: Strategies of Multinationals in Host Countries at War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Li

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the strategic choices of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in host countries that become engaged in war. By combining the resource-based view and resource management theory, and drawing additional insights from research...

  13. Anti-inflammatory drugs for modulation of host response to biomaterials and application in diabetes therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang, Thuy Tram, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Host response to implanted biomaterials and medical devices poses tremendous challenges to their clinical applications. Today, the quest to mitigate this immunological attack for improved longevity of these devices remains ...

  14. DOE Hosts Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Testing Program Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a workshop on October 27, 2006, to introduce the DOE SSL Commercial Product Testing Program. The workshop, held in Washington, D.C., drew over 40...

  15. Biological and biomedical implications of the co-evolution of pathogens and their hosts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolhouse, Mark EJ; Webster, Joanne P; Domingo, Esteban; Charlesworth, Brian; Levin, Bruce R

    Co-evolution between host and pathogen is, in principle, a powerful determinant of the biology and genetics of infection and disease. Yet co-evolution has proven difficult to demonstrate rigorously in practice, and ...

  16. Effect of the hepatoma growth period on host plasma and liver lipid concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, Martha Frances

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF THE HEPATOMA GROWTH PERIOD ON HOST PLASMA AND LIVER LIPID CONCENTRATIONS A Thesis by MARTHA FRANCES MATOCHA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Niajor Sub ect: Biochem. 'stry EFFECT OF THE HEPATOMA GROWTH PERIOD ON HOST PLASMA AND LIVER LIPID CONCENTRATIONS A Thesis MARTHA FRANCES MATOCHA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Mern...

  17. Neurobiology of Aging 32 (2011) 669679 Age-related trends in saccade characteristics among the elderly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz, Douglas Perry

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurobiology of Aging 32 (2011) 669­679 Age-related trends in saccade characteristics among of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada e CIHR Group in Sensory-Motor Systems, Queen in reaction time also correlated positively with age in both saccade tasks. Voluntary saccade control

  18. HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Nearby Supernova Factory. Combining Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV data with optical and near-infrared photometry, we employ stellar population synthesis techniques to measure SN Ia host galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and reddening due to dust. We reinforce the key role of GALEX UV data in deriving accurate estimates of galaxy SFRs and dust extinction. Optical spectra of SN Ia host galaxies are fitted simultaneously for their stellar continua and emission lines fluxes, from which we derive high-precision redshifts, gas-phase metallicities, and H{alpha}-based SFRs. With these data we show that SN Ia host galaxies present tight agreement with the fiducial galaxy mass-metallicity relation from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for stellar masses log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) > 8.5 where the relation is well defined. The star formation activity of SN Ia host galaxies is consistent with a sample of comparable SDSS field galaxies, though this comparison is limited by systematic uncertainties in SFR measurements. Our analysis indicates that SN Ia host galaxies are, on average, typical representatives of normal field galaxies.

  19. The Optically Unbiased Gamma-Ray Burst Host (TOUGH) Survey. VII. The Host Galaxy Luminosity Function: Probing the Relationship Between GRBs and Star Formation to Redshift $\\sim6$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, S; Hjorth, J; Levan, A J; Jakobsson, P; Björnsson, G; Perley, D A; Krühler, T; Gorosabel, J; Tanvir, N R; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Fynbo, J P U; Milvang-Jensen, B; Møller, P; Watson, D J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a route to characterizing star-forming galaxies and quantifying high-$z$ star-formation that is distinct from the approach of traditional galaxy surveys: GRB selection is independent of dust and probes even the faintest galaxies that can evade detection in flux-limited surveys. However, the exact relation between GRB rate and Star Formation Rate (SFR) throughout all redshifts is controversial. The TOUGH survey includes observations of all GRB hosts (69) in an optically unbiased sample and we utilize these to constrain the evolution of the UV GRB-host-galaxy Luminosity Function (LF) between $z=0$ and $z=4.5$, and compare this with LFs derived from both Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) surveys and simulation modeling. At all redshifts we find the GRB hosts to be most consistent with a Luminosity Function derived from SFR weighted models incorporating GRB production via both metallicity-dependent and independent channels with a relatively high level of bias towards low metallicity hosts. In...

  20. DISCOVERY OF A 1.6 YEAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {iota} HOROLOGII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Judge, P. G.; Knoelker, M.; Mathur, S.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Henry, T. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States); Soderblom, D. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mount Wilson Ca HK survey revealed magnetic activity variations in a large sample of solar-type stars with timescales ranging from 2.5 to 25 years. This broad range of cycle periods is thought to reflect differences in the rotational properties and the depths of the surface convection zones for stars with various masses and ages. In 2007, we initiated a long-term monitoring campaign of Ca II H and K emission for a sample of 57 southern solar-type stars to measure their magnetic activity cycles and their rotational properties when possible. We report the discovery of a 1.6 year magnetic activity cycle in the exoplanet host star {iota} Horologii and obtain an estimate of the rotation period that is consistent with Hyades membership. This is the shortest activity cycle so far measured for a solar-type star and may be related to the short-timescale magnetic variations recently identified in the Sun and HD 49933 from helioseismic and asteroseismic measurements. Future asteroseismic observations of {iota} Hor can be compared to those obtained near the magnetic minimum in 2006 to search for cycle-induced shifts in the oscillation frequencies. If such short activity cycles are common in F stars, then NASA's Kepler mission should observe their effects in many of its long-term asteroseismic targets.

  1. The Evolution of Host Specialization in the Vertebrate Gut Symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frese, Steven A. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Benson, Andrew K. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Tannock, Gerald W. [University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; Loach, Diane M. [University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; Kim, Jaehyoung [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Zhang, Min [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Oh, Phaik Lyn [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Heng, Nicholas C. K. [University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; Patil, Prabhu [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Juge, Nathalie [Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom; MacKenzie, Donald A. [Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom; Pearson, Bruce M. [Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Walter, Jens [University of Nebraska, Lincoln

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research has provided mechanistic insight into the important contributions of the gut microbiota to vertebrate biology, but questions remain about the evolutionary processes that have shaped this symbiosis. In the present study, we showed in experiments with gnotobiotic mice that the evolution of Lactobacillus reuteri with rodents resulted in the emergence of host specialization. To identify genomic events marking adaptations to the murine host, we compared the genome of the rodent isolate L. reuteri 100-23 with that of the human isolate L. reuteri F275, and we identified hundreds of genes that were specific to each strain. In order to differentiate true host-specific genome content from strain-level differences, comparative genome hybridizations were performed to query 57 L. reuteri strains originating from six different vertebrate hosts in combination with genome sequence comparisons of nine strains encompassing five phylogenetic lineages of the species. This approach revealed that rodent strains, although showing a high degree of genomic plasticity, possessed a specific genome inventory that was rare or absent in strains from other vertebrate hosts. The distinct genome content of L. reuteri lineages reflected the niche characteristics in the gastrointestinal tracts of their respective hosts, and inactivation of seven out of eight representative rodent-specific genes in L. reuteri 100-23 resulted in impaired ecological performance in the gut of mice. The comparative genomic analyses suggested fundamentally different trends of genome evolution in rodent and human L. reuteri populations, with the former possessing a large and adaptable pan-genome while the latter being subjected to a process of reductive evolution. In conclusion, this study provided experimental evidence and a molecular basis for the evolution of host specificity in a vertebrate gut symbiont, and it identified genomic events that have shaped this process.

  2. June 18, 2012 Symposium on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    , anemia, muscular dystrophy, and diabetes. The reasons for accelerating research into the molecular diseases of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Today's attendees come not only

  3. HYGROTHERMAL AGING OF POLYIMIDE MATRIX COMPOSITE LAMINATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    . The time to initiate water-induced microcracks, tm, (in minutes), was log .t T m = + 3423 1 35 (1) #12-ply laminates and supplied to us by the Boeing Company. For hygrothermal aging experiments, a series

  4. Aging of polymeric composites : a literature review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treviño-Garrido, Margie N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their increased use in today's society, an extensive survey was undertaken in this report to condense what's been, thus far, discovered as to the effects of aging on polymeric composites. Special emphasis was placed ...

  5. Age determination of 15 old to intermediate-age small Magellanic cloud star clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Piatti, A. E. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Leiton, R. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Carraro, G. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Costa, E. [Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Grocholski, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sarajedini, A., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: andres@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: roger.leiton@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: gcarraro@eso.org, E-mail: costa@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present color-magnitude diagrams in the V and I bands for 15 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on data taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT, Chile). We selected these clusters from our previous work, wherein we derived cluster radial velocities and metallicities from calcium II infrared triplet (CaT) spectra also taken with the VLT. We discovered that the ages of six of our clusters have been appreciably underestimated by previous studies, which used comparatively small telescopes, graphically illustrating the need for large apertures to obtain reliable ages of old and intermediate-age SMC star clusters. In particular, three of these clusters, L4, L6, and L110, turn out to be among the oldest SMC clusters known, with ages of 7.9 ± 1.1, 8.7 ± 1.2, and 7.6 ± 1.0 Gyr, respectively, helping to fill a possible 'SMC cluster age gap'. Using the current ages and metallicities from Parisi et al., we analyze the age distribution, age gradient, and age-metallicity relation (AMR) of a sample of SMC clusters measured homogeneously. There is a suggestion of bimodality in the age distribution but it does not show a constant slope for the first 4 Gyr, and we find no evidence for an age gradient. Due to the improved ages of our cluster sample, we find that our AMR is now better represented in the intermediate/old period than we had derived in Parisi et al., where we simply took ages available in the literature. Additionally, clusters younger than ?4 Gyr now show better agreement with the bursting model of Pagel and Tautvaišien?, but we confirm that this model is not a good representation of the AMR during the intermediate/old period. A more complicated model is needed to explain the SMC chemical evolution in that period.

  6. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrea, Chris B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); et al.

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  7. Detection of the host galaxy of S5 0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nilsson; T. Pursimo; A. Sillanpää; L. O. Takalo; E. Lindfors

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have acquired a deep i-band image of the BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 while the target was in an low optical state. Due to the faintness of the nucleus, we were able to detect the underlying host galaxy. The host galaxy is measured to have an I-band magnitude of 17.5 +- 0.5 and an effective radius of (2.7 +- 0.8) arcsec. Using the host galaxy as a ``standard candle'', we derive z = 0.31 +- 0.08 (1 sigma error) for the host galaxy of S5 0716+714. This redshift is consistent with the redshift z = 0.26 determined by spectroscopy for 3 galaxies close to S5 0716+714. The effective radius at z = 0.31 would be 12 +- 4 kpc, which is consistent with values obtained for BL Lac host galaxies. An optical spectrum acquired during the same epoch shows no identifiable spectral lines.

  8. Combining [3 He] cosmogenic dating with UTh/He eruption ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Dietrich b a Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 of their high uranium concentration. For the U­Th/He method to be a significant new tool for volcanic studies

  9. Globular Cluster Ages and Stromgren CCD Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Grundahl

    1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Stromgren uvby CCD photometry can be used in a variety of ways to constrain the absolute and relative ages of globular clusters. The reddening corrected (v-y, c1) diagram offers the means to derive ages that are completely independent of distance. Very precise differential ages for clusters of the same chemical composition may also be determined from such 2-color plots, or from measurements of the magnitude difference, Delta_u, between the subgiant and horizontal branches on the $u-y, u$ plane (where both of these features are flat and well-defined, even for clusters like M13 that have extremely blue HBs on the (B-V, V) diagram). Based on high-quality photometry we find that: (1) M92 is 15 Gyr old, (2) M3 and M13 differ in age by < 1 Gyr, and (3) NGC 288, NGC 362, and NGC 1851 are coeval to within ~1.5 Gyr. These results strongly suggest that age cannot be the only ``second parameter''. Finally, we suggest that the observed variations in c1 among giant branch stars in all the metal-poor clusters that we have studied so far are likely due to star-to-star C and N abundance variations, and potentially indicate that most (if not all) globular clusters have ``primordial'' variations in at least these elements.

  10. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erin Koos; Wolfgang Kannowade; Norbert Willenbacher

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1 % and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing.

  11. adult age groups: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    young (aged 18-35) adults and 10 older (aged 60-80) adults were tested. There was a... James, Vairi A. W. 2009-07-03 16 The Influence of Self-Perceptions of Aging on Older Adults'...

  12. Effects of Age on Meiosis in Budding Yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boselli, Monica

    In humans, the frequency with which meiotic chromosome mis-segregation occurs increases with age. Whether age-dependent meiotic defects occur in other organisms is unknown. Here, we examine the effects of replicative aging ...

  13. Design of a Host Traffic Management system for Hard Real Time networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Moorthy, Jayasankar

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODEL A. What Is NetEx? . B. NetEx Block Schematic . . C. The Host Traffic Manager D. The Network Traffic Manager (NTM) III DESIGN OF THE HOST TRAFFIC MANAGER A. Design Requirements B. Design Methodology C. HTM ? System Layout D. Design... of Future Work REFERENCES . 7 7 9 10 12 12 13 16 17 22 25 27 29 32 32 32 36 37 39 39 41 43 45 CHAPTER Page VITA 47 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Decomposition of Connection into Servers ISO OSI Model NetEx Block Schematic I...

  14. The Host Galaxies of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I review our knowledge of the properties of the host galaxies of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, both in comparison to each other and in the context of the general galaxy population. It is now clear that the hosts of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars with M_V 10^9 solar masses appears to be a necessary (although perhaps not sufficient) condition for the production of radio jets of sufficient power to produce an FRII radio source within a massive galaxy halo.

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the area of host-pathogen interactions as well as policy makers from federal agencies. The main objectives of the workshop are: (1) to assess the current national needs, capabilities, near-term technologies, and future challenges in applying various diagnostics tools to public health and bio-defense; (2) to evaluate the utility and feasibility of host-response and pathogen biomarker profiling in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases; and (3) to create a comprehensive developmental strategy from proof-of-concept, through validation, to deployment of appropriate advanced technology for the clinical/public health and bio-defense environments.

  16. DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Host Two-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Boston

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over 100 attendees gathered in Boston, MA to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 16-17, 2007. The workshop, hosted by DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), was the second DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The first workshop, hosted by DOE and Southern California Edison, was held in Pasadena in April 2007. In both workshops, a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – shared insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  17. Seasonal Abundance and Dispersal of the Cotton Fleahopper as Related to Host Plant Phenology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almand, Lyndon K.; Sterling, W.L.; Green, C.L.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occurred. Croton served as a host plant both for overwintering eggs and throughout the growing season. Seasonal Abundance and Dispersal of the Cotton Fleahopper as Related to Host Plant Phenology *L. K. Almand W. L. Sterling C. L. Green... to various wind speeds also was de rmined in a wind tunnel with a testing area of about 3 lhic feet. Nymphs ;less than 24 hours old which had ltched from overwintering eggs (procedure developed I Sterling and Plapp, 1972) were collected for testing Id...

  18. [New hosts and vectors for genome cloning]. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of our project remains the development of new bacterial hosts and vectors for the stable propagation of human DNA clones in E. coli. During the past six months of our current budget period, we have (1) continued to develop new hosts that permit the stable maintenance of unstable features of human DNA, and (2) developed a series of vectors for (a) cloning large DNA inserts, (b) assessing the frequency of human sequences that are lethal to the growth of E. coli, and (c) assessing the stability of human sequences cloned in M13 for large-scale sequencing projects.

  19. The Investigation on Fibrous Veins and Their Host from Mt. Ida, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jae Won

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of the host is given by: ?* = 3b/(16kBV0B) (2) where b is the radius of rock sphere containing one vein or spherical crystal, ?* is the critical value of surrounding host rock viscosity, k is a constant in kinetic law for precipitation/dissolution... goal to test some of these implications. 7 2. GEOLOGY Samples of fibrous veins were collected from Paleozoic Womble Shale around Mt. Ida, Arkansas (Fig. 2). The study area lies within the Benton Uplift of eastern Arkansas. The Benton Uplift...

  20. Relationship between microstructures and grain-scale trace element distribution in komatiite-hosted magmatic sulphide ores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 Available online 6 November 2013 Keywords: Komatiite hosted Ni sulphides EBSD Laser ablation ICP) have been studied by electron backscatter diffraction and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma

  1. age horizontal branch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stars as an Age Indicator Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Surface temperature distribution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars is very sensitive to age in old stellar systems,...

  2. aging female sencar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should increase with age after puberty. To test this, we examined age Pierce, Graham 57 Perception of Conspecific Female Pheromone Stimulates Female Calling in an Arctiid Moth,...

  3. age estimation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    face Wiskott, Laurenz 7 OPTIMUM ALWCATION FOR ESTIMATING AGE COMPOSITION USING AGE-LENGTH KEY Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: OPTIMUM ALWCATION FOR...

  4. Diagnostic and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging based on Kinetic and Thermodynamic Principles Diagnostic and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging based on...

  5. american children ages: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    july 2004 Age-Specific Demography in Plantago: Uncovering Roach,. Deborah 17 Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's Biology and Medicine Websites...

  6. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased...

  7. aging aircraft nondestructive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Early Ages An Experimental and Numerical Analysis by Dr for Nondestructive Testing of Cement-Based Materials at Early Ages - An Experi- mental and Numerical Analysis...

  8. aging tumor growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1983), provide valuable data on the age 85 AGE AND GROWTH OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, AND YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, AS INDICATED Environmental Sciences and...

  9. age site south: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Ohio Department of Aging, The Aging Network, The Ohio State University, The United States Department of Agriculture and County Commissioners Cooperating. Engineering Websites...

  10. Feedback between Volcanism and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    and Simkin (2002) and a compilation by Bryson, Bryson and Reuter (2006). #12;Eruption frequency (events

  11. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, S.B. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (United States); Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  12. Coronal Temperature as an Age Indicator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwankyung Sung; M. S. Bessell; Hugues Sana

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray spectra of late type stars can generally be well fitted by a two temperature component model of the corona. We fnd that the temperature of both components are strong functions of stellar age, although the temperature of the hotter plasma in the corona shows a larger scatter and is probably affected by the activity of stars, such as flares. We confirm the power-law decay of the temperature of the hot plasma, but the temperature of the cool component decays linearly with log (age).

  13. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  14. Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

  15. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  16. A Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in an uncertain world. Robert Johns (CTS director), Rebecca Jasper (Council of Supply Chain ManagementA Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host, transportation infrastructure, ports, railroads, biofuels and agricultural byproducts, and transportation

  17. Plant Disease / October 2001 1113 Effect of Host Plant Resistance and Reduced Rates and Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Plant Disease / October 2001 1113 Effect of Host Plant Resistance and Reduced Rates and Frequencies. These include the use of fungicides with less active ingredient, re- duced application rates, longer application. The frequent fungicide spray intervals and rates currently used by growers to control late blight are expensive

  18. Neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts: propagation of cosmic rays in their host galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are proposed as candidate sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We study the possibility that the PeV neutrinos recently observed by IceCube are produced by GRB cosmic rays interacting with the interstellar gas in the host galaxies. By studying the relation between the X-ray absorption column density N_H and the surface star-formation rate of GRB host galaxies, we find that N_H is a good indicator of the surface gas density of the host galaxies. Then we are able to calculate the neutrino production efficiency of CRs for GRBs with known N_H. We collect a sample of GRBs that have both measurements of N_H and accurate gamma-ray fluence, and attempt to calculate the accumulated neutrino flux based on the current knowledge about GRBs and their host galaxies. When the CR intensity produced by GRBs is normalized with the observed UHECR flux above $10^{19}{\\rm eV}$, the accumulated neutrino flux at PeV energies is estimated to be about $(0.3\\pm0.2)\\times10^{-8} \\rm{GeV\\ cm^{-2}\\ s...

  19. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey - I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, D A; Schulze, S; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Hjorth, J; Berger, E; Cenko, S B; Chary, R; Cucchiara, A; Ellis, R; Fong, W; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Greiner, J; Jakobsson, P; Laskar, T; Levan, A J; Micha?owski, M J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Tanvir, N R; Thöne, C C; Wiersema, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey ("SHOALS"), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host-galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly-deep, multi-color optical/NIR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without pre-existing redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host-galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust-obscured, and at most 2% originate from z>5.5. Using this sample we estimate the redshift-depen...

  20. Host/parasite interactions between Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Thelohania solenopsae (Microsporida: Thelohaniidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Michael Walker

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    mounds and adoption rates, how T. solenopsae spores are affected by different stable temperatures. This study also examined the effects on T. solenopsae spores due to centrifugation out of the host cell, pH of the solution the spores are kept, and food...

  1. Host-IP Clustering Technique for Deep Web Characterization Denis Shestakov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Host-IP Clustering Technique for Deep Web Characterization Denis Shestakov Department of Media databases. This part of the Web, known as the deep Web, is to date relatively unexplored and even major are aimed at more accurate estimation of main parameters of the deep Web by sampling one national web domain

  2. Children's School May 2011 Children's School Co-Hosts NALS Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Children's School May 2011 Children's School Co-Hosts NALS Conference Thanks to all the educators Affiliated Schools! We were honored by the presence and encouragement of H&SS Dean John Lehoczky, Psychology school's approach to early childhood education through offering tours, sharing a poster and presentations

  3. Hostile Takeover by Plasmodium: Reorganization of Parasite and Host Cell Membranes during Liver Stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    MalaR (European Virtual Institute for Malaria Research) and Malsig (Signalling in life cycle stages of malaria is transmitted by female Anopheles mosquitoes and undergoes obligatory development within a parasitophorous to mask itself from the host immune system and bypass the numerous Kupffer cells on its way

  4. The relationship between host selection behaviour and offspring tness in a koinobiont parasitoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivero, Ana

    . Introduction A classic problem in parasitoid behavioural ecology is the prediction of which hosts a female foraging bout, depending both on the female's previous experience and hence perception of the environment-mail: Ana.Rivero@ed.ac.uk # 2000 Blackwell Science Ltd 467 Ecological Entomology (2000) 25, 467

  5. The metallicity and dust content of a redshift 5 gamma-ray burst host galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparre, M.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Watson, D. J.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hartoog, O. E.; Kaper, L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wiersema, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); D'Elia, V. [INAF/Rome Astronomical Observatory, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Roma) (Italy); Zafar, T. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Afonso, P. M. J. [Physics and Astronomy Department, American River College, 4700 College Oak Drive, Sacramento, CA 95841 (United States); Covino, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Flores, H. [Laboratoire GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UMR8111, Universite Paris Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Goldoni, P. [APC, Astroparticule et Cosmologie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10, Rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris, Cedex 13 (France); Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Klose, S. [Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Levan, A. J., E-mail: sparre@dark-cosmology.dk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the study of star-forming galaxies across most of cosmic history. Here we present observations of GRB 111008A, from which we can measure metallicity, chemical abundance patterns, dust-to-metals ratio (DTM), and extinction of the GRB host galaxy at z = 5.0. The host absorption system is a damped Ly? absorber with a very large neutral hydrogen column density of log?N(H I)/cm{sup ?2}=22.30±0.06 and a metallicity of [S/H] = –1.70 ± 0.10. It is the highest-redshift GRB with such a precise metallicity measurement. The presence of fine-structure lines confirms the z = 5.0 system as the GRB host galaxy and makes this the highest redshift where Fe II fine-structure lines have been detected. The afterglow is mildly reddened with A{sub V} = 0.11 ± 0.04 mag, and the host galaxy has a DTM that is consistent with being equal to or lower than typical values in the Local Group.

  6. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  7. Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine Shoemaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine and environmental groups. The Shale Gas Roundtable of the Institute of Politics at the University of Pittsburgh produced a report with several recommendations dealing especially with shale gas research, water use

  8. TOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    TOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen DATE fracturing of shale formations (shale gas) is projected by the Energy Information Administration to become the nation's energy landscape. However, the environmental impacts associated with ``fracking'' for shale gas

  9. Assessing Guest Diffusivities in Porous Hosts from Transient Concentration Profiles Lars Heinke,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    deviate from the ideal textbook structure, with the possibility that these devia- tions (pore blockageAssessing Guest Diffusivities in Porous Hosts from Transient Concentration Profiles Lars Heinke,1 of mutual passages of the guest molecules in the chains of pore segments, thus quantifying departure from

  10. USFS Administrative Tour The Aspen FACE site hosted a visit of some 36 senior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 USFS Administrative Tour The Aspen FACE site hosted a visit of some 36 senior USFS administrators (USFS) welcomed the group to the site and Dave Karnosky (MTU) gave a brief overview of the Aspen FACE Global Change Program Director Rich Birdsey. Aspen FACE in the News On May 16, 2003, the Aspen FACE

  11. Infections and allergy --helminths, hygiene and host immune Rick M Maizels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    Infections and allergy -- helminths, hygiene and host immune regulation Rick M Maizels influence the development of allergies and other immunopathologies -- known as the `hygiene hypothesis to allergic disease [2]. The original `hygiene hypothesis' centred around the role of Th1-inducing microbial

  12. International Support On Hosting or Hiring Internationals Since 9/11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    -Mail: isfs@sc.edu Website: http://hr.sc.edu/international.html #12;Hosting or Hiring Internationals | Page 2. Instructions are on the ISFS website; Best practice is to submit form both to Immigration & to International Support. State law sets special requirements for issuance of a S.C. driver's license E-Verify/FAR rules

  13. Communities of fungal endophytes in tropical forest grasses: highly diverse host-and habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Communities of fungal endophytes in tropical forest grasses: highly diverse host- and habitat: Charles W. Bacon Keywords: Barro Colorado Island Biodiversity Community assembly Fungal endophytes Poaceae- studied endophytes in the lowland forests of Panama. We used sequence data for 402 isolates from two

  14. Culturing and direct PCR suggest prevalent host generalism among diverse fungal endophytes of tropical forest grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Culturing and direct PCR suggest prevalent host generalism among diverse fungal endophytes examining endophytic fungi associated with grasses (Poaceae) have focused on agronomically important species and forest-edge communities. To provide a broader context for understanding grass-endophyte associations we

  15. The Endophytic System of Mediterranean Cytinus (Cytinaceae) Developing on Five Host Cistaceae Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    The Endophytic System of Mediterranean Cytinus (Cytinaceae) Developing on Five Host Cistaceae in the genus Cytinus, a holoparasite whose vegetative body is reduced to an endophytic system living within its scrublands. The aim of this work is to describe the endophytic systems of C. hypocistis and C. ruber

  16. Hosting Dynamic Data in the Cloud with Isis2 and the Ida DHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Hosting Dynamic Data in the Cloud with Isis2 and the Ida DHT Ken Birman and Heesung Sohn Dept, cloud storage and access technologies must be reexamined. Isis2 aims at such scenarios, offering a base called the Isis2 interactive data analysis infrastructure: Ida. Ida is a strongly-consistent distributed

  17. Discovery of the eucalypt pathogen Quambalaria eucalypti infecting a non-Eucalyptus host in Uruguay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discovery of the eucalypt pathogen Quambalaria eucalypti infecting a non-Eucalyptus host in Uruguay, Paysandú, Uruguay. C Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Forestry and Agricultural Agropecuaria, Ruta 48, km 10, Canelones, Uruguay. E Corresponding author. Email: caperez@fagro.edu.uy Abstract

  18. Automated, Retargetable Back-Annotation for Host Compiled Performance and Power Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstlauer, Andreas

    and back- annotation of basic code blocks with all possible predeces- sors. Results from applying ourAutomated, Retargetable Back-Annotation for Host Compiled Performance and Power Modeling Suhas typical front- and back-end optimiza- tions by working at the compiler-generated intermediate rep

  19. DAX: A Widely Distributed Multi-tenant Storage Service for DBMS Hosting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboulnaga, Ashraf

    DAX: A Widely Distributed Multi-tenant Storage Service for DBMS Hosting Rui Liu University data management needs that are best served by a SQL-based relational DBMS. It is not difficult to run a DBMS in the cloud, and in many cases one DBMS instance is enough to support an application's workload

  20. Scintillator having a MgAI.sub.2O.sub.4 host lattice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ching-Fong (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A scintillator having a host lattice of MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 was prepared by hot pressing under a vacuum environment a powder mixture of MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4, CeO.sub.2, and LiF.

  1. Library Hosted Catalogs Job Aid PURCH12/23/13L.Tran Page1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , enter in the applicable search terms, and click the Go button. 2. The search results are shown items from preferred suppliers at University-specific pricing. Use Advanced Search options to enter, and then enter the applicable search item and the click Search button #12; Library Hosted Catalogs ­ Job

  2. A Comprehensive Collection of Systems Biology Data Characterizing the Host Response to Viral Infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese RW; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale L.; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  3. orbit their host star at distances closer than Mercury's orbit around the Sun (Fig. 1) --is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    ) -- is notunusualforanextrasolarplanetarysystem. Many similar dense configurations have been detected by the radial-velocity (Doppler) technique ofthe dynamical effect of the planets on their host stars (obtained through Doppler and transit. The Doppler technique measures tiny Doppler shifts in a parent star's light that are caused

  4. The Rockefeller Foundation to Host Bellagio Center Conference on Humanitarian Logistics: Networks for Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    The Rockefeller Foundation to Host Bellagio Center Conference on Humanitarian Logistics: Networks to the Rockefeller Foundation; http://rockfound.org to organize a conference on "Humanitarian Logistics: Networks some of the underlying themes that will be discussed in depth. Logistics networks, in times of need

  5. allowing a longer period of infection within an individual host and by facilitating re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    T cells and neutralizing antibodies. It augments viral load and thus accelerates the destruc- tion of CD4 cells. There is a highly dynamic balance of power between HIV and the immune system, which is slowly, dis- cussing genetic differences among hosts in theirimmuneresponsesandimmunemem- ory profiles

  6. -News Home Help EU offers 'sweetener' to Japan to let France host nuclear project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to host a revolutionary nuclear fusion project. news web sites "I cannot elaborate on the sweetener, but I Wednesday after talks in Vienna on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). news web ( - ) -- which have supported the Japanese bid -- plus Russia and China, which back the EU bid.news web sites

  7. Phyllody of faba bean in the Sudan. I. Progress of symptom expression, host range and transmis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Phyllody of faba bean in the Sudan. I. Progress of symptom expression, host range and transmis bean phyllody was followed in a local susceptible cultivar, Hudeiba 72, graft-inoculated from naturally and slow development of disease, sometimes partial recovery. Symptom expression in faba bean plants

  8. Wild birds as possible hosts and vectors of mammalian strains of Chlamydia psittaci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Mark Caylor

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of eucaryot1c cells but does not affect procaryotic cells such as chlamydiae (1, 68). Nith inhibit1on of the host cell's growth, the cytoplasmic pools of amino ac1ds and nucleos1des are ava1lable to the chlamyd1ae. The organisms have a negative Gram...

  9. Are Your Hosts Trading or Plotting? Telling P2P File-Sharing and Bots Apart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    performed by the infected hosts (e.g., spam forwarding, DDoS), but rather that are basic properties. In both cases, status information about available peers needs to be maintained constantly to ensure publicized and well-studied P2P botnet, Storm, built its communication protocol based on the Overnet network

  10. Are Your Hosts Trading or Plotting? Telling P2P File-Sharing and Bots Apart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Michael

    on particular attack activities performed by the infected hosts (e.g., spam forwarding, DDoS), but rather file-sharing, making it difficult to separate these two types of traffic. In both cases, status- tuated by the fact that one highly publicized and well- studied P2P botnet, Storm, built its

  11. Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

  12. FORUM REVIEW ARTICLE Alternative Perspectives on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gems, David

    mechanisms at the heart of the aging process are a long-standing mystery. An influential theory has that limit lifespan (4, 5). We will first briefly outline the crisis in the oxidative damage theory, then de, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The Oxidative Damage Theory in Crisis Many studies that have used C

  13. Characterizing mechanical effects of aging damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sewell, T.D.; Chen, S.P.; Schoonover, J.R.; Trent, B.C.; Howe, P.M.; Hjelm, R.P.; Browning, R.V.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal was to develop and apply several different experimental and theoretical/computational tools to better understand physical and chemical aging phenomena in plastic-bonded high explosives, and to develop a methodology for predicting the likely effects of aging on the mechanical properties of the composite based on input from these fundamental studies. Initial comparisons were done for spectra of fresh and aged Esane, as well as PBX-9501, and the authors found differences in the carbonyl region of the spectrum, which possibly reflect differences in hydrogen bonding due to aging phenomena. The micromechanical model of composites was extended to study various volume fractions of HMX with binders. The results showed that, as the binder fraction increases, there is a decrease in the maximum stress that can be supported but an increase in the percent strain at final fracture. A more realistic microstructural model was obtained through the use of a phase field model. Using this model, the authors have studied the microstructural evolution as a function of the grain boundary energy vs. misorientation relationship. The initial results indicate that there are some changes in the grain growth rate when the grain-boundary energy dependence on the angle is not constant. They also find that solute tends to segregate at the grain boundary and slows the grain growth kinetics.

  14. Bitcoin and the Age of Bespoke Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Bitcoin and the Age of Bespoke Silicon Michael B. Taylor Associate Professor University of California, San Diego #12;This Talk Introduction An Overview of the Bitcoin Cryptocurrency Bitcoin's Computing Evolution Bespoke Silicon #12;Interesting Facts about Bitcoin The most successful digital

  15. Thermal aging of nitroplasticized Estane 5703

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orler, E. B. (E. Bruce); Wrobleski, Debra A.; Cooke, D. W. (D. Wayne); Bennett, B. L. (Bryan L.); Smith, M. E. (Mark E.); Jahan, M. S. (M. Shan)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Lifetime Prediction modeling effort, we have been investigating the aging processes that could impact the lifetime of PBX 9501. PBX 9501 is composed of 95% HMX and 5% polymeric binder. The polymeric binder is composed of 50% nitroplasticizer (NP) and 50% Estane{reg_sign} 5703 with a small quantity of stabilizer. Estane{reg_sign} 5703 is a segmented poly(ester urethane) with mechanical properties derived from phase separation of hard and soft segments along the polymer backbone. Since the binder has a significant effect on the composite mechanical properties, it is essential to know how the binder changes with time. Typically, polymer lifetime predictions are determined from extrapolation of properties after the material has been exposed to elevated temperatures and/or reactive environments for varying periods of time. For multiphase polymers, this accelerated aging methodology is very difficult to interpret since elevated temperatures alter the physical structure of the polymer, as well as, accelerate the chemical degradation reactions. Accelerated aging studies of nitroplasticized Estane have shown an increase in the molecular weight. The increase in molecular weight is most likely due to polymer chain branching reactions that eventually leads to formation an insoluble cross-linked gel. The decreased chain mobility caused by branching may also affect phase separation, which in turn, may change the mechanical properties. In this paper we report results of thermal aging studies on the properties, morphology and chemistry of nitroplasticized Estane.

  16. Eligibility: Cancer Survivor ages 35-75

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    Eligibility: · Cancer Survivor ages 35-75 · Patient has completed treatment within last two years for non-metastic solid tumor · Patient's cancer is currently considered stable or in remission · At least. Please contact Missy Buchanan 415-353-7019 for more information. Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer

  17. Aging and Place: Building Health Promotion into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Aging and Place: Building Health Promotion into Long-Term Care IHRP Brownbag May 21, 2013 Naoko-being in social contexts. ­ To improve quality of services by building health promotion into long-term care. #12 ­ U.S. 3. Building health promotion into long-term care ­ Why important? ­ Challenges

  18. Utah Commission on Aging June 16, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    is focusing on fall prevention, end of life care, and elder abuse issues, all of which fall under the auspices Cherie Brunker Health Care Shauna O'Neil Area Agencies on Aging Robert Archuleta Ethnic Minorities Helen-Michele Church Department of Human Services Kent Alderman Legal Profession Gary Kelso Long-Term Care Jo

  19. FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS USING ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Chaplin, William J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Handberg, Rasmus; Karoff, Christoffer; Lund, Mikkel N.; Lundkvist, Mia [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Fischer, Debra A.; Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hekker, Saskia [Astronomical Institute ''Anton Pannekoek'', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Latham, David W., E-mail: daniel.huber@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used asteroseismology to determine fundamental properties for 66 Kepler planet-candidate host stars, with typical uncertainties of 3% and 7% in radius and mass, respectively. The results include new asteroseismic solutions for four host stars with confirmed planets (Kepler-4, Kepler-14, Kepler-23 and Kepler-25) and increase the total number of Kepler host stars with asteroseismic solutions to 77. A comparison with stellar properties in the planet-candidate catalog by Batalha et al. shows that radii for subgiants and giants obtained from spectroscopic follow-up are systematically too low by up to a factor of 1.5, while the properties for unevolved stars are in good agreement. We furthermore apply asteroseismology to confirm that a large majority of cool main-sequence hosts are indeed dwarfs and not misclassified giants. Using the revised stellar properties, we recalculate the radii for 107 planet candidates in our sample, and comment on candidates for which the radii change from a previously giant-planet/brown-dwarf/stellar regime to a sub-Jupiter size or vice versa. A comparison of stellar densities from asteroseismology with densities derived from transit models in Batalha et al. assuming circular orbits shows significant disagreement for more than half of the sample due to systematics in the modeled impact parameters or due to planet candidates that may be in eccentric orbits. Finally, we investigate tentative correlations between host-star masses and planet-candidate radii, orbital periods, and multiplicity, but caution that these results may be influenced by the small sample size and detection biases.

  20. THE RELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND HOST SPHEROID STELLAR MASS OUT TO z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennert, Vardha N.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Woo, Jong-Hak [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Malkan, Matthew A., E-mail: vbennert@calpoly.edu, E-mail: tt@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: mauger@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: malkan@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine Hubble Space Telescope images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey with archival Very Large Telescope and Keck spectra of a sample of 11 X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei in the redshift range 1 < z < 2 to study the black-hole-mass-stellar-mass relation out to a look-back time of 10 Gyr. Stellar masses of the spheroidal component (M{sub sph,*}) are derived from multi-filter surface photometry. Black hole masses (M{sub BH}) are estimated from the width of the broad Mg II emission line and the 3000 A nuclear luminosity. Comparing with a uniformly measured local sample and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution in the form M{sub BH}/M{sub sph,*}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 1.96{+-}}0{sup .55}, in agreement with our earlier studies based on spheroid luminosity. However, this result is more accurate because it does not require a correction for luminosity evolution and therefore avoids the related and dominant systematic uncertainty. We also measure total stellar masses (M{sub host,*}). Combining our sample with data from the literature, we find M{sub BH}/M{sub host,*}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 1.15{+-}0.15}, consistent with the hypothesis that black holes (in the range M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8-9} M{sub Sun }) pre-date the formation of their host galaxies. Roughly, one-third of our objects reside in spiral galaxies; none of the host galaxies reveal signs of interaction or major merger activity. Combined with the slower evolution in host stellar masses compared to spheroid stellar masses, our results indicate that secular evolution or minor mergers play a non-negligible role in growing both BHs and spheroids.

  1. The 2006 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    diseases of aging, such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. A recent study1 concluded

  2. Variational Implicit-Solvent Modeling of Host-Guest Binding: A Case Study on Cucurbit[7]uril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo

    of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-5820, United States 5 Department of Mathematics, University of the individual VISM free-energy contributions shows that the major driving forces are water-mediated hydrophobic[n]uril hosts thanks to its good balance between the number of water molecules confined in the host cavity

  3. Managing Energy and Server Resources in Hosting Centers Jeffrey S. Chase, Darrell C. Anderson, Prachi N. Thakar, Amin M. Vahdat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirer, Emin Gun

    of delivered performance. The system continuously moni- tors load and plans resource allotments by estimating bandwidth) to insulate its customers from demand surges and capital costs for excess capacity. HostingManaging Energy and Server Resources in Hosting Centers Jeffrey S. Chase, Darrell C. Anderson

  4. New Approaches to Improved Animal Health: Systems Biology and Modeling of Real Interactions of Pathogens and their Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decade or sousing comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced are using computational systems biology methods to create interactome models of the actual host responses

  5. The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice high into the air and rained fine volcanic ash as far away as Winnemucca, Nevada, 200 miles to the east. In this photograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice of volcanic rock, called lava domes, were created by eruptions of lava too viscous to flow readily away from its source. Eruptions about 27,000 years ago formed Lassen Peak, probably in only a few years

  6. AGES: THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Eisenstein, D. J.; Caldwell, N.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Forman, W. R.; Green, P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cool, R. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Assef, R. J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Jannuzi, B. T.; Dey, A. [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Brown, M. J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, Bryant Space Science Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) is a redshift survey covering, in its standard fields, 7.7 deg{sup 2} of the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. The final sample consists of 23,745 redshifts. There are well-defined galaxy samples in 10 bands (the B{sub W} , R, I, J, K, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m, and MIPS 24 {mu}m bands) to a limiting magnitude of I < 20 mag for spectroscopy. For these galaxies, we obtained 18,163 redshifts from a sample of 35,200 galaxies, where random sparse sampling was used to define statistically complete sub-samples in all 10 photometric bands. The median galaxy redshift is 0.31, and 90% of the redshifts are in the range 0.085 < z < 0.66. Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) were selected as radio, X-ray, IRAC mid-IR, and MIPS 24 {mu}m sources to fainter limiting magnitudes (I < 22.5 mag for point sources). Redshifts were obtained for 4764 quasars and galaxies with AGN signatures, with 2926, 1718, 605, 119, and 13 above redshifts of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. We detail all the AGES selection procedures and present the complete spectroscopic redshift catalogs and spectral energy distribution decompositions. Photometric redshift estimates are provided for all sources in the AGES samples.

  7. Age-dependent decay in the landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winitzki, Sergei [Department of Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The picture of the 'multiverse' arising in diverse cosmological scenarios involves transitions between metastable vacuum states. It was pointed out by Krauss and Dent that the transition rates decrease at very late times, leading to a dependence of the transition probability between vacua on the age of each vacuum region. I investigate the implications of this non-Markovian, age-dependent decay on the global structure of the spacetime in landscape scenarios. I show that the fractal dimension of the eternally inflating domain is precisely equal to 3, instead of being slightly below 3, which is the case in scenarios with purely Markovian, age-independent decay. I develop a complete description of a non-Markovian landscape in terms of a nonlocal master equation. Using this description I demonstrate by an explicit calculation that, under some technical assumptions about the landscape, the probabilistic predictions of our position in the landscape are essentially unchanged, regardless of the measure used to extract these predictions. I briefly discuss the physical plausibility of realizing non-Markovian vacuum decay in cosmology in view of the possible decoherence of the metastable quantum state.

  8. 3D climate modeling of Earth-like extrasolar planets orbiting different types of host stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godolt, M; Hamann-Reinus, A; Kitzmann, D; Kunze, M; Langematz, U; von Paris, P; Patzer, A B C; Rauer, H; Stracke, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential habitability of a terrestrial planet is usually defined by the possible existence of liquid water on its surface. The potential presence of liquid water depends on many factors such as, most importantly, surface temperatures. The properties of the planetary atmosphere and its interaction with the radiative energy provided by the planet's host star are thereby of decisive importance. In this study we investigate the influence of different main-sequence stars upon the climate of Earth-like extrasolar planets and their potential habitability by applying a 3D Earth climate model accounting for local and dynamical processes. The calculations have been performed for planets with Earth-like atmospheres at orbital distances where the total amount of energy received from the various host stars equals the solar constant. In contrast to previous 3D modeling studies, we include the effect of ozone radiative heating upon the vertical temperature structure of the atmospheres. The global orbital mean results o...

  9. The Hydroxyl-Water Megamaser Connection. I. Water Emission Toward OH Megamaser Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Brandon K; Smidt, Joseph M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though megamasers are used to probe extragalactic phenomena, questions remain regarding their production and connection to galactic processes. The observation that water and hydroxyl megamasers rarely coexist in the same galaxy has given rise to the hypothesis that the two megamaser species appear in different phases of nuclear activity or that somehow their presence distinguishes different physical conditions in the medium. However, simultaneous hydroxyl and water megamaser emission has recently been detected in IC 694. Studies of this object are underway but, because many megamasers have not been surveyed for emission in the other molecule, it remains unclear whether IC 694 occupies a narrow phase of galaxy evolution or whether the relationship between megamaser species and galactic processes is more complicated than previously believed. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a systematic search for 22 GHz water maser emission among OH megamaser hosts to identify additional objects hosting both me...

  10. THE HOMOGENEOUS STUDY OF TRANSITING SYSTEMS (HoSTS). I. THE PILOT STUDY OF WASP-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Cargile, Phillip; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Faedi, Francesca; Pollacco, Don [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Doyle, Amanda P.; Smalley, Barry [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Ghezzi, Luan; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua Gal. Jose Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Sousa, Sergio; Santos, Nuno C. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Barros, Susana C. C. [LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, F-13388 Marseille (France); Schuler, Simon C. [Stewart Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Collier Cameron, Andrew, E-mail: yilen.gomez@vanderbilt.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the fundamental stellar and planetary properties of the transiting planetary system WASP-13 within the framework of the Homogeneous Study of Transiting Systems (HoSTS). HoSTS aims to derive the fundamental stellar (T{sub eff}, [Fe/H], M{sub *}, R{sub *}) and planetary (M{sub pl}, R{sub pl}, T{sub eq}) physical properties of known transiting planets using a consistent methodology and homogeneous high-quality data set. Four spectral analysis techniques are independently applied to a Keck+HIRES spectrum of WASP-13 considering two distinct cases: unconstrained parameters and constrained log g from transit light curves. We check the derived stellar temperature against that from a different temperature diagnostic based on an INT+IDS H{alpha} spectrum. The four unconstrained analyses render results that are in good agreement, and provide an improvement of 50% in the precision of T{sub eff}, and of 85% in [Fe/H] with respect to the WASP-13 discovery paper. The planetary parameters are then derived via the Monte Carlo Markov Chain modeling of the radial velocity and light curves, in iteration with stellar evolutionary models to derive realistic uncertainties. WASP-13 (1.187 {+-} 0.065 M{sub Sun }; 1.574 {+-} 0.048 R{sub Sun }) hosts a Saturn-mass, transiting planet (0.500 {+-} 0.037 M{sub Jup}; 1.407 {+-} 0.052 R{sub Jup}), and is at the end of its main-sequence lifetime (4-5.5 Gyr). Our analysis of WASP-13 showcases that both a detailed stellar characterization and transit modeling are necessary to well determine the fundamental properties of planetary systems, which are paramount in identifying and determining empirical relationships between transiting planets and their hosts.

  11. Effects of method of wheat streak mosaic virus transmission on the resistance of selected hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Han Yong

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these hybrids, which showed resistance to infection, were frequently reclassified as a susceptible host after reinoculation. The efficiency of transmission of WSMV to wheat by the mite, artist's airbrush, and carborundum rub inoculations were 49. 2, and 41... OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I INTRODUCTION II REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE III GENERAL MATERIALS AND METHODS Plant Materials Virus and Vector Virus Mite Transmission Carborundum rub Artist's airbrush Mite transmission 10 10 11 11 11 1. 2 12 12 13...

  12. Host recognition in Muscidifurax zaraptor (Hymenoptera :Pteromalidae): a parasitoid of the house fly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Randy Russel

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 1996; Gilbert and Rayer 1985; Stamhuis et al. 1996; Walgenbach and Burkholder 1987) according to various changes in the behavior of the parasitoid as a result of the parasitoid being naive or experienced and the host being parasitized or non... the hide of animals and feeds on the blood. The feeding activity disturbs the animals and may affect weight gain and milk production of cattle (Bruce and Decker 1958; Campbell et al. 1977, 1987). Stable fly related reductions in livestock related...

  13. On the Fueling of Massive Black Holes and the Properties of their Host Spheroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Escala

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using simple models, we analyze how gas is expected to be transported in the nuclear regions of galaxies. When we couple it with the expected gas lifetime given by the Kennicutt-Schmidt Law, this naturally leads to the `M_BH - M_virial' and `M_BH - sigma' relations. We also numerically test, using AMR simulations, our simple models for the mass transport with satisfactory results.

  14. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Michael A. [Princeton University

    2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical relation between the properties of Type Ia supernovae and their host galaxies is investigated. Such supernovae are used to constrain the properties of dark energy, making it crucial to understand their physical properties and to check for systematic effects relating to the stellar populations of the progenitor stars from which these supernovae arose. This grant found strong evidence for two distinct populations of supernovae, and correlations between the progenitor stellar populations and the nature of the supernova light curves.

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON OBSCURED STAR FORMATION IN HOST GALAXIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Ohta, Kouji [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro, E-mail: hatsukade@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, the University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the 16 cm wave band continuum observations of four host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 990705, 021211, 041006, and 051022 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Radio emission was not detected in any of the host galaxies. The 2{sigma} upper limits on star formation rates derived from the radio observations of the host galaxies are 23, 45, 27, and 26 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, which are less than about 10 times those derived from UV/optical observations, suggesting that they have no significant dust-obscured star formation. GRBs 021211 and 051022 are known as the so-called dark GRBs and our results imply that dark GRBs do not always occur in galaxies enshrouded by dust. Because large dust extinction was not observed in the afterglow of GRB 021211, our result suggests the possibility that the cause of the dark GRB is the intrinsic faintness of the optical afterglow. On the other hand, by considering the high column density observed in the afterglow of GRB 051022, the likely cause of the dark GRB is the dust extinction in the line of sight of the GRB.

  16. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore »involved in cytokines, including TGF?1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGF?1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  17. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Perley, R. A., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  18. A low-luminosity type-1 QSO sample: II. Overluminous host spheroidals or undermassive black holes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busch, Gerold; Valencia-S., Mónica; Moser, Lydia; Fischer, Sebastian; Eckart, Andreas; Scharwächter, Julia; Gadotti, Dimitri A; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recognizing the properties of the host galaxies of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) is essential to understand the suspected coevolution of central supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. We selected a subsample of the Hamburg/ESO survey for bright UV-excess QSOs, containing only the 99 nearest QSOs with redshift z<=0.06, that are close enough to allow detailed structural analysis. From this "low-luminosity type-1 QSO sample", we observed 20 galaxies and performed aperture photometry and bulge-disk-bar-AGN-decomposition with BUDDA on near-infrared J, H, K band images. From the photometric decomposition of these 20 objects and visual inspection of images of another 26, we find that ~50% of the hosts are disk galaxies and most of them (86%) are barred. Stellar masses, calculated from parametric models based on inactive galaxy colors, range from 2x10^9 M_sun to 2x10^11 M_sun. Black hole masses measured from single epoch spectroscopy range from 1x10^6 M_sun to 5x10^8 M_sun. In comparison to higher ...

  19. City of San Jose to host Renewable Energy From Waste Conference 2014 November 18-20, 2014, Double Tree by Hilton, San Jose, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    City of San Jose to host Renewable Energy From Waste Conference 2014 for the second Renewable Energy From Waste Conference, to be hosted by the City of San, California. Following the overwhelming success of the 2013 event, Renewable Energy

  20. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  1. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University] [Cornell University

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  2. On the seismic age of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Houdek; D. O. Gough

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use low-degree acoustic modes obtained by the BiSON to estimate the main-sequence age $t_\\odot$ of the Sun. The calibration is accomplished by linearizing the deviations from a standard solar model the seismic frequencies of which are close to those of the Sun. Formally, we obtain the preliminary value $t_\\odot=4.68\\pm0.02 $Gy, coupled with an initial heavy-element abundance $Z=0.0169\\pm0.0005$. The quoted standard errors, which are not independent, are upper bounds implied under the assumption that the standard errors in the observed frequencies are independent.

  3. Asian Age Enterprise Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftwareAsian Age Enterprise Ltd Place:

  4. Age Dating of Mixed SNM--Preliminary Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, D., Guss, P. P., Yfantis, E., Klingensmith, A., Emer, D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we investigated the nuclear forensics problem of age determination for mixed special nuclear material (SNM). Through limited computational mixing experiments and interactive age analysis, it was observed that age dating results are generally affected by the mixing of samples with different assays or even by small radioactive material contamination. The mixing and contamination can be detected through interactive age analysis, a function provided by the Decay Interaction, Visualization and Analysis (DIVA) software developed by NSTec. It is observed that for mixed SNM with two components, the age estimators typically fall into two distinct clusters on the time axis. This suggests that averaging or other simple statistical methods may not always be suitable for age dating SNM mixtures. Instead, an interactive age analysis would be more suitable for age determination of material components of such SNM mixtures. This work was supported by the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS).

  5. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  6. aged primary coolant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    problem.(1,2 with a variety of functions that often span the different hypotheses of aging.(2) It is unsurprising senescence, is a primary mechanism of organismal aging.(9-13)...

  7. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded ­ II ­ Asphalt Pavements ­ Effect of Aging ­ Simulations ­ Concluding Remarks #12;3 Objectives Develop) Correspondence Principle based formulation Application: Asphalt concrete pavements (Part II) #12;4 Asphalt

  8. Exercise training modulates apoptotic signaling in the aging rat heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Hyo Bum

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in cardiac function. A critical contributor to the age-related impairment in heart function is the loss of cardiac myocytes through ??apoptosis??, or programmed cell death. A dramatic increase...

  9. Microstructural Features in Aged Erbium Tritide Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Brewer, L. N.; Kotula, Paul G.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Busick, C. C.; Snow, C. S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aged erbium tritide foil specimens are found to contain five distinctly different microstructural features. The general structure was of large columnar grains of ErT2. But on a fine scale, precipitates believed to be erbium oxy-tritides and helium bubbles could be identified. The precipitate size was in the range of ~10 nm and the bubbles were of an unusual planar shape on {111} planes with an invariant thickness of ~1 nm and a diameter on the order of 10 nm. Also, an outer layer containing no fine precipitate structure and only a few helium bubbles was present on foils. This layer is best described as a denuded zone which probably grew during aging in air. Finally, large embedded Er2O3 particles were found at low density and non-uniformly distributed, but sometimes extending through the thickness of the foil. A failure mechanism allowing the helium to escape is suggested by observed cracking between bubbles closer to end of life.

  10. Monazite Th-Pb age depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, M.; Harrison, T.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significant capabilities of the ion microprobe for thermochronometric investigations of geologic materials remain largely unexploited. Whereas {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th spot analysis allows {approximately} 10-mm-scale imaging of Pb loss profiles or overgrowths in sectioned monazite grains, the spatial resolution offered by depth profiling into the surface region of natural crystals is more than two orders of magnitude higher. The authors document here the ability of the high-resolution ion microprobe to detect {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th age differences of < 1 m.y. with better than 0.05 {micro}m depth resolution in the outer micron of Tertiary monazites from the hanging wall of the Himalayan Main Central thrust. Age gradients on this scale are inaccessible to ion microprobe spot analysis or conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Interpretation of the near-surface {sup 208}Pb distributions with available monazite Pb diffusion data illustrates the potential of the approach for recovering continuous, high-temperature thermal history information not previously available.

  11. The 2008 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Thus, a major goal in the coming years

  12. The 2007 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    are regulated, leading to novel medicines to forestall and treat diseases of aging such as diabetes, cancer

  13. The 2009 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Thus, a major goal in the coming years

  14. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

  15. aged wild-type littermates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  16. aged 6-12 diagnosed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

  17. Another short-burst host galaxy with an optically obscured high star formation rate: The case of GRB 071227

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Schmidl, S. [Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Micha?owski, M. J.; McKenzie, M. R. G. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Savaglio, S.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hunt, L. K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Gorosabel, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Palazzi, E. [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on radio continuum observations of the host galaxy of the short gamma-ray burst 071227 (z = 0.381) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect the galaxy in the 5.5 GHz band with an integrated flux density of F {sub ?} = 43 ± 11 ?Jy, corresponding to an unobscured star-formation rate of about 24 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}, 40 times higher than what was found from optical emission lines. Among the ?30 well-identified and studied host galaxies of short bursts this is the third case where the host is found to undergo an episode of intense star formation. This suggests that a fraction of all short-burst progenitors hosted in star-forming galaxies could be physically related to recent star formation activity, implying a relatively short merger timescale.

  18. UAS Placement Agreement This is an agreement between the student, the module organizer and the host organization/mentor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnor, Craig B.

    and the host organization/mentor teacher. It is a negotiated document that sets out the anticipated tasks-mail ___________________________________________________ Name of Mentor Teacher ___________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________ Mentor Teacher ___________________________________________________ Academic Adviser

  19. Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes from three major plant lineages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes Although associated with all plants, fungal endophytes (microfungi that live within healthy plant tissues, or phylogenetic relationships. We surveyed endophytic Ascomycota from healthy photosyn- thetic tissues of three

  20. Parasitism shaping host life-history evolution: adaptive responses in a marine gastropod to infection by trematodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredensborg, Brian L; Poulin, R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory predicts that hosts infected by par- asites that negatively in?uence survival andtheory is that there will be trade-offs between ?tness components such as growth, reproduction and survival (

  1. Detailed search US supports Japanese bid to host ITER as France urges Europe to go it alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support of his country for the Japanese bid to host the international thermonuclear site (ITER thermonuclear site if the French candidate is not selected for the international project. However

  2. Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyers Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Carlos A.; Drake, Kenneth L.; Siddavatam, Prasad; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E.; Gull, Tamara; Khare, Sangeeta; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Brucella melitensis causes the most severe and acute symptoms of all Brucella species in human beings and infects hosts primarily through the oral route. The epithelium covering domed villi of jejunal-ileal Peyer’s patches ...

  3. FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Ecuyer, Pierre

    1 FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL Pierre L'Ecuyer, Benoit Martin, controlled by a replacement rule based on age thresholds. We show how to estimate the expected cost­ generative simulation, maintenance models, age replacement policies. #12; 2 L'ECUYER, MARTIN, AND V ' AZQUEZ

  4. FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vázquez-Abad, Felisa J.

    FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL Pierre L'Ecuyer, Benoit Martin, controlled by a replacement rule based on age thresholds. We show how to estimate the expected cost­ generative simulation, maintenance models, age replacement policies. #12; L'ECUYER, MARTIN, AND V ' AZQUEZ

  5. Effects of two naphthoquinone compounds on wheat seedlings, germination of urediospores of Puccinia graminis tritici and the host parasite relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Campos, Enrique

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF TWO NAPHTHOQUINONE COMPOUNDS ON WHEAT SEEDLINGS, GERMINATION OF UREDIOSPORES OF PUCCINIA GRAMINIS TRITICI AND THE HOST PARASITE RELATIONSHIP A thesis Enrique Rodrigues Campos Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Ak... TRITICI AND THE HOST PARASITE RELATIONSHIP A thesis by Enrique Rodriguez Campos Approved. as to style and content by: Ch irman of Committee omm tee Member o ittee ember Committee Member ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes to acknowledge Dr. Maurice...

  6. Mutual Impacts on a Specialist Herbivore and its Host Plants: Variation in Insect Morphology and Plant Tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinchilla-Ramirez, Milena

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    MUTUAL IMPACTS IN A SPECIALIST HERBIVORE AND ITS HOST PLANTS: VARIATION IN INSECT MORPHOLOGY AND PLANT TOLERANCE A Thesis by MILENA CHINCHILLA-RAMIREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A... Subject: Entomology Copyright 2014 Milena Chinchilla-Ramirez ii ABSTRACT In one study, a suite of host plants from the genus Zea L. (Poaceae) and the specialist herbivore Dalbulus maidis (DeLong and Wolcott) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) were used...

  7. Dynamic interplay between spin-crossover and host-guest function in a nanoporous metal-organic framework material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southon, P. D.; Liu, L.; Fellows, E. A.; Price, D. J.; Halder, G. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Moubaraki, B.; Murray, K. S.; Letard, J.F.; Kepert, C. J.; Univ. Sydney; Monash Univ.; Universite Bordeaux

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nanoporous metal-organic framework [Fe(pz)Ni(CN){sub 4}], 1 (where pz is pyrazine), exhibits hysteretic spin-crossover at ambient conditions and is robust to the adsorption and desorption of a wide range of small molecular guests, both gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}) and vapors (methanol, ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, and toluene). Through the comprehensive analysis of structure, host-guest properties, and spin-crossover behaviors, it is found that this pillared Hofmann system uniquely displays both guest-exchange-induced changes to spin-crossover and spin-crossover-induced changes to host-guest properties, with direct dynamic interplay between these two phenomena. Guest desorption and adsorption cause pronounced changes to the spin-crossover behavior according to a systematic trend in which larger guests stabilize the high-spin state and therefore depress the spin-crossover temperature of the host lattice. When stabilizing the alternate spin state of the host at any given temperature, these processes directly stimulate the spin-crossover process, providing a chemisensing function. Exploitation of the bistability of the host allows the modification of adsorption properties at a fixed temperature through control of the host spin state, with each state shown to display differing chemical affinities to guest sorption. Guest desorption then adsorption, and vice versa, can be used to switch between spin states in the bistable temperature region, adding a guest-dependent memory effect to this system.

  8. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  9. Ageing of Natural Rubber under Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Clarke; F. Elias; E. M. Terentjev

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a dynamical-mechanical study of stress relaxation at small deformation in a natural (polyisoprene) rubber well above its glass transition temperature Tg. We find that an almost complete relaxation of stress takes place over very long periods of time, even though the elastic network integrity is fully retained. The relaxation rate and the long-time equilibrium modulus are sensitive functions of temperature which do not follow time-temperature superposition. Many characteristic features of non-ergodic ageing response are apparent at both short and very long times. We interpret the observed behaviour in terms of the properties of rubber crosslinks, capable of isomerisation under stress, and relate the results to recent models of soft glassy rheology.

  10. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric V. Linder

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or ``reasonable'' canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of \\la2% of total energy density at z\\gg1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5% of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently \\sigma_8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for zenergy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

  11. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J [and others

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  12. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  13. Age discrimination protection is not limited to seniors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ossi, G.J. [Vennable, LLP (United States)

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The average age of a coal miner in the USA today is over 50. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) protects individuals over 40 years of age from employment discrimination based on age. Under ADEA it is unlawful to discriminate based on an employee's age when hiring, firing, promoting, demoting, laying-off, compensating, assigning or training an employee. The author advocates that, although ADEA can be complicated, the best rule is simply to treat older workers the same as younger workers. Advice is given on considering waivers of ADEA claims.

  14. The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Modjaz, Maryam [CCPP, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Kocevski, Daniel [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities (?0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z < 0.2) core-collapse SNe, including 17 SNe Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z < 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SNe Ic-BL and z < 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar mass and star formation rate densities. Core-collapse SNe having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SNe Ic-BL, unlike those of SNe Ib/Ic and SNe II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitor systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for an SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SNe Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar mass and star formation rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  15. Confirming Fundamental Parameters of the Exoplanet Host Star epsilon Eridani Using the Navy Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baines, Ellyn K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star epsilon Eridani using the Navy Optical Interferometer. We determined its physical radius, effective temperature, and mass by combining our measurement with the star's parallax, photometry from the literature, and the Yonsei-Yale isochrones (Yi et al. 2001), respectively. We used the resulting stellar mass of 0.82 +/- 0.05 M_Sun plus the mass function from Benedict et al. (2006) to calculate the planet's mass, which is 1.53 +/- 0.22 M_Jupiter. Using our new effective temperature, we also estimated the extent of the habitable zone for the system.

  16. CONFIRMING FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI USING THE NAVY OPTICAL INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas, E-mail: ellyn.baines@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: tarmstr@crater.nrl.navy.mil [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {epsilon} Eridani using the Navy Optical Interferometer. We determined its physical radius, effective temperature, and mass by combining our measurement with the star's parallax, photometry from the literature, and the Yonsei-Yale isochrones, respectively. We used the resulting stellar mass of 0.82 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} plus the mass function from Benedict et al. to calculate the planet's mass, which is 1.53 {+-} 0.22 M{sub Jupiter}. Using our new effective temperature, we also estimated the extent of the habitable zone for the system.

  17. Natural and experimental host range of the Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leisy, Ralph Herbert

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in. adjacent to, or in the vicinity of virus infected f'elds were collected for virus assay and for experimental susceptibility studies. Virus assays were (sade by mechanically inoculating suscep- tible host plants with the extracted sap of each... with MDMV, the grasses wh'ch were collected for determination of natural susceptibility and which proved to be free of the virus were grown in isolation and mechanically inocu- lated with the extracted sap of MDfliV (isolate Tx66-BBJg-I) infected AKS 614...

  18. DOE and Northwest Partners Host Three-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 270 attendees gathered in Portland, OR to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 9-11, 2008. The workshop, hosted by DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Energy Trust of Oregon, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and Puget Sound Energy, was the third DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  19. News Release: DOE to Host Public Scoping Meetings on Uranium Leasing PEIS |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |NewStateDepartment of Energy to Host

  20. DOE Hosts Record Number of Attendees at Annual Small Business Conference |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|StatementDOEDepartment of Energy Hosts