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1

Leaning-based travel interfaces revisited: frontal versus sidewise stances for flying in 3D virtual spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we revisit the design of leaning-based travel interfaces and propose a design space to categorize existing implementations. Within the design space, frontal and sidewise stances when using a flying surfboard interface were compared through ... Keywords: 3d virtual spaces., leaning-based travel interface, navigation, stance

Jia Wang; Rob Lindeman

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

What Is Price Volatility  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Is Price Volatility? What Is Price Volatility? The term "price volatility" is used to describe price fluctuations of a commodity. Volatility is measured by the day-to-day percentage difference in the price of the commodity. The degree of variation, not the level of prices, defines a volatile market. Since price is a function of supply and demand, it follows that volatility is a result of the underlying supply and demand characteristics of the market. Therefore, high levels of volatility reflect extraordinary characteristics of supply and/or demand. Prices of basic energy (natural gas, electricity, heating oil) are generally more volatile than prices of other commodities. One reason that energy prices are so volatile is that many consumers are extremely limited in their ability to substitute other fuels when the price, of natural gas

3

Quantifying requirements volatility effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements ... Keywords: ?-ratio, ?-ratio, Compound monthly growth rate, IT dashboard, IT portfolio management, Quantitative IT portfolio management, Requirements churn, Requirements creep, Requirements metric, Requirements scrap, Requirements volatility, Requirements volatility dashboard, Scope creep, Volatility benchmark, Volatility tolerance factor

G. P. Kulk; C. Verhoef

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Volatility and commodity price dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commodity prices tend to be volatile, and volatility itself varies over time. changes in volatility can affect market variables by directly affecting the marginal value of storage, and by affecting a component of the total ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ é é , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit é é Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY ► ► Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

7

Study of cesium volatility from sodium carbonate based melts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this study was to obtain thermodynamic data on cesium volatility from sodium carbonate-based molten salts for application to the Rockwell-ETEC molten salt oxidation process. At 1073 to 1373 K, volatility tests were conducted on a horizontal and a vertical transpiration apparatus using a carrier gas composed of CO{sub 2}(g) and H{sub 2}O(g) which was passed over or bubbled through a sodium carbonate bath containing cesium carbonate and various additives. The major vapor species was identified to be CsOH(g) except when greater than 3% chloride is present in the melt, then the major vapor species is CsCl(g). The decrease in volatility of cesium as a function of cesium concentration in Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3{minus}}Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures follows Raoult`s law very closely. Thus, this system exhibits close to ideal solution behavior. Addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate decreases the cesium volatility by just under a factor of 2, and the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride increases the cesium volatility about an order of magnitude. The addition of 2.0 wt % ash, molecular sieve, or silica show little or no effect. However, the data indicate that higher concentrations of ash will decrease the cesium volatility. For the addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate the activity coefficient, {gamma}(Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sup {1/2}}, is calculated to be 0.720 {plus_minus} 0.068, and for the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride, the activity coefficient, {gamma}(CsCl), is calculated to be 8.118 {plus_minus} 2.317. Assuming that Henry`s law applies, these activity coefficients are used to extrapolate the effect on cesium retention in the molten salt oxidizer of sulfate and chloride at lower cesium concentrations.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or fission products by formation of the higher fluorides off uranium and/or plutonium is described. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first converted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treated with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sub 6/ leaving plutonium behind. Thc plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 5004DEC and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

Petroleum Outlook:.More Volatility?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook: More Volatility? Outlook: More Volatility? 3/19/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Petroleum Outlook: More Volatility? Product Price Volatility-This Year and in the Future WTI Crude Oil Price: Potential for Volatility Around Base Case OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Low Total OECD Oil Stocks* Keep Market Balance Tight Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Reflect Product Market-Based Volatility U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Winter Demand Stronger Than Temperatures Would Imply High Production Offset Lack of Inventory High Production Came From High Yields & High Inputs High Margins Bring High Imports Gasoline Price Volatility Is a Concern This Summer Gasoline Volatility

10

Implied volatility in oil markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling the implied volatility surface as a function of an option's strike price and maturity is a subject of extensive research in financial markets. The implied volatility in commodity markets is much less studied, due to a limited liquidity and ...

Svetlana Borovkova; Ferry J. Permana

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Title Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds...

12

Classification of Volatile Engine Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile particles cannot be detected at the engine exhaust by an aerosol detector. They are formed when the exhaust is mixed with ambient air downstream. Lack of a precise definition of volatile engine particles has been an impediment to engine manufacturers and regulatory agencies involved in the development of an effective control strategy. It is beyond doubt that volatile particles from combustion sources contribute to the atmospheric particulate burden, and the effect of that contribution is a critical issue in the ongoing research in the areas of air quality and climate change. A new instrument, called volatile particle separator (VPS), has been developed. It utilizes a proprietary microporous metallic membrane to separate particles from vapors. VPS data were used in the development of a two-parameter function to quantitatively classify, for the first time, the volatilization behavior of engine particles. The value of parameter A describes the volatilization potential of an aerosol. A nonvolatile particle has a larger A-value than a volatile one. The value of parameter k, an effective evaporation energy barrier, is found to be much smaller for small engine particles than that for large engine particles. The VPS instrument provides a means beyond just being a volatile particle remover; it enables a numerical definition to characterize volatile engine particles.

Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Metal price volatility : a study of informative metrics and the volatility mitigating effects of recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal price volatility is undesirable for firms that use metals as raw materials, because price volatility can translate into volatility of material costs. Volatile material costs and can erode the profitability of the ...

Fleming, Nathan Richard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measurement of plutonium and americium volatilities under thermal process conditions. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used the transpiration method to measure volatilities of Pu and Am from PuO{sub 2}(s) and PuO{sub 2}/2% AmO{sub 2}(s) in the presence of steam and oxygen at temperatures of 1230--1430 K. We find the volatile species to be PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) and AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) at vapor pressures on the order of 10{sup {minus}10} atm and 10 {sup {minus}12} atm respectively under measurement conditions. For the Pu volatilization reaction, PuO{sub 2}(s) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain a free energy of reaction of {Delta}G{sup O}{sub T} = 231.3--0.0109 T in kj/mol, and for the Am volatilization reaction, AmO{sub 2}(s.s. in PuO{sub 2}) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain AG{sup O}{sub T} = 223.9--0.0109 T in kj/mol. We apply these results to the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Incinerator to assess the amount of volatile Pu and Am produced in the secondary combustor chamber. Taking operating conditions of 550C combustor temperature, 40 kmols/h of total gas flow at 1 atm pressure, 0.1 atm 0{sub 2}(9), 0.05 atm H{sub 2}0(g), PuO{sub 2} (s) containing 200 ppm AmO{sub 2} in the bed, and 6000 h of operating time per year, gives volatilization rates of 7 {times} 10 {sup {minus}6}g Pu and 4 {times} 10 {sup {minus}9}g Am/y.

Krikorian, O.H.; Condit, R.H.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.; Magana, J.W.; Morris, W.F.; Adamson, M.G.

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sentiment proxies: computing market volatility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Macroeconomic announcements can have an influential effect on the price, and related volatility, of an object traded in financial markets. Modeling the impact of a relevant announcement on a specific commodity is of interest in building financial models ...

Stephen Kelly; Khurshid Ahmad

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Combustion of volatile matter during the initial stages of coal combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both the secondary pyrolysis and combustion of the volatiles from a bituminous coal will be studied. Devolatilization and secondary pyrolysis experiments will be conducted in a novel flow reactor in which secondary pyrolysis of the volatiles occurs after devolatilization is complete. This allows unambiguous measurements of the yields from both processes. Measurements will be made for reactor temperatures from 1500 to 1700 K, and a nominal residence time of 200 msec. These conditions are typical of coal combustion. Yields of tar, soot, H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbons will be determined as a function of reactor temperature. The yields will be reported as a function of the temperature of the reactor. The instrumentation for temperature measurements will be developed during future studies. Combustion studies will be conducted in a constant volume bomb, which will be designed and constructed for this study. Tar and soot will be removed before introducing the volatiles to the bomb, so that only the combustion of the light gas volatiles will be considered. The burning velocities of light gas volatiles will be determined both as functions of mixture stoichiometry and the temperature at which the volatiles are pyrolysed. 90 refs., 70 figs., 13 tabs.

Marlow, D.; Niksa, S.; Kruger, C.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

LABORATORY-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF THE FUSED SALT VOLATILITY PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of processing enriched irradiated zirconium--uranium alloy fuel by the fused salt-fluoride volatility procedure has been demonstrated in laboratory tests with fuel having a burnup of over 10%. Uranium recoveries were greater than 99% and decontamination factors for radioactive fission products were 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 6/. The UF/sub 6/ product contained significant quantities of nonradioactive impurities; additional work in this area is needed. (auth)

Cathers, G.I.; Jolley, R.L.; Moncrief, E.C.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Oxidation, volatilization, and redistribution of molybdenum from TZM alloy in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases. Oxidized molybdenum in turn is susceptible to losses from volatile molybdenum trioxide species, MoO{sub 3}(m), in air and the hydroxide, MoO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, formed from water vapor. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of these volatile species during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. In this report the authors present experimental results on the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800 C. These results are compared with calculations obtained from a vaporization mass transfer model using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures of MoO{sub 3}(g) over pure solid MoO{sub 3} and an expression for the vapor pressures of MoO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} from the literature. Calculations correlate well with experimental data.

Smolik, G.R.; Petti, D.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Schuetz, S.T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Volatility in natural gas and oil markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine  

SciTech Connect

The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation and recovery of uraniunn from contaminants introduced by neutron irradiation by a halogenation and volatilization method are described. The irradiated uranium is dissolved in bromine trifluoride in the liquid phase. The uranium is converted to the BrF/sub 3/ soluble urmium hexafluoride compound whereas the fluorides of certain contaminating elements are insoluble in liquid BrF/sub 3/, and the reaction rate of the BrF/sub 3/ with certain other solid uranium contamirnnts is sufficiently slower than the reaction rate with uranium that substantial portions of these contaminating elements will remain as solids. These solids are then separated from the solution by a distillation, filtration, or centrifugation step. The uranium hexafluoride is then separated from the balance of the impurities and solvent by one or more distillations.

Katz, J.J.; Hyman, H.H.; Sheft, I.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Volatile organic compound emissions from composting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is a review of the aerobic composting process and the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from this process. To understand why and (more)

Harris, Stephanie Rose Rene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Price Volatility In - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The principal drivers behind this volatility are supply and demand fundamentals, which include the weather, storage activities, and the perception of market conditions.

24

Product Price Volatility - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Product Price Volatility-This Year and in the Future. Crude Oil -- Continued tight balance leaves world on thin edge Distillate Winter Price Retrospective Why a ...

25

Forecasting future volatility from option prices, Working  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weisbach are gratefully acknowledged. I bear full responsibility for all remaining errors. Forecasting Future Volatility from Option Prices Evidence exists that option prices produce biased forecasts of future volatility across a wide variety of options markets. This paper presents two main results. First, approximately half of the forecasting bias in the S&P 500 index (SPX) options market is eliminated by constructing measures of realized volatility from five minute observations on SPX futures rather than from daily closing SPX levels. Second, much of the remaining forecasting bias is eliminated by employing an option pricing model that permits a non-zero market price of volatility risk. It is widely believed that option prices provide the best forecasts of the future volatility of the assets which underlie them. One reason for this belief is that option prices have the ability to impound all publicly available information including all information contained in the history of past prices about the future volatility of the underlying assets. A second related reason is that option pricing theory maintains that if an option prices fails to embody optimal forecasts of the future volatility of the underlying asset, a profitable trading strategy should be available whose implementation would push the option price to the level that reflects the best possible forecast of future volatility.

Allen M. Poteshman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Regen, W.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Natural Gas Has Been The Most Volatile Of Energy Prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Price volatility in the natural gas market generally exceeds volatility in markets for other energy as well as other commodity markets. In fact, ...

30

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning using activated carbon fiber media with nightly regeneration Title Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound...

31

Role of SrMoO{sub 4} in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we investigate the elemental and phase compositions during the solid-state synthesis of the promising SOFC-anode material, Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, and demonstrate that molybdenum does not notably evaporate under the normal synthesis conditions with temperatures up to 1200 {sup o}C due to the formation of SrMoO{sub 4} as an intermediate product at low temperatures, below 600 {sup o}C. However, partial decomposition of the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} phase becomes evident at the higher temperatures ({approx}1500 {sup o}C). The effect of SrMoO{sub 4} on the electrical conductivity of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is evaluated by preparing a series of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with different amounts of additional SrMoO{sub 4}. Under the reducing operation conditions of an SOFC anode the insulating SrMoO{sub 4} phase is apparently reduced to the highly conductive SrMoO{sub 3} phase. Percolation takes place with 20-30 wt% of SrMoO{sub 4} in a Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} matrix, with a notable increase in electrical conductivity after reduction. Conductivity values of 14, 60 and 160 S/cm are determined at 800 {sup o}C in 5% H{sub 2}/Ar for the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with 30, 40 and 50 wt% of added SrMoO{sub 4}, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low temperatures during the synthesis of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, which prevents the volatilization of Mo from typical precursor mixtures of this promising SOFC anode material. SrMoO{sub 4} is insulating and it is often found as an impurity in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples. It is however readily reduced to highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3}. Composites of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} and SrMoO{sub 3} show increased electrical conductivities compared to pure Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} under the reductive operation conditions of an SOFC anode. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is a promising SOFC anode material. {yields} During the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low temperatures. {yields} Formation of SrMoO{sub 4} effectively prevents volatilization of Mo at high temperatures. {yields} Insulating SrMoO{sub 4} reduces to highly conductive SrMoO{sub 3} under SOFC-anode conditions. {yields} Composites of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} and SrMoO{sub 3} show high electrical conductivities.

Vasala, S.; Yamauchi, H. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Karppinen, M., E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.f [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Removal of volatile materials from forepump oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of clearing condensable vapors from forepump oil is described. Air is bubbled though the oil reservoir removing volatile material from the oil and allowing continuous pumping of materials by non?vented pumps.

Paul P. Nicole

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

June 2003VOLATILITY IN NATURAL GAS AND OIL MARKETS * by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in volatility during the time of the Enron collapse, and whether natural gas and crude oil price volatilities are interrelated. I also measure the persistence of shocks to volatility and discuss its implications for gas- and oil-related contingent claims.

Robert S. Pindyck; Robert S. Pindyck

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Seasonal Volatility in Energy Prices: Modeling Seasonality in Natural Gas and Electricity Price Volatility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and measurement of price uncertainty are essential prerequisites to asset valuation and risk management in electric power. Practical, realistic models must take into account the systematic time patterns exhibited by price volatility. This report uses new data and techniques to reexamine the seasonal nature of energy price volatility.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

A General, Cryogenically-Based Analytical Technique for the Determination of Trace Quantities of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique for the determination of trace (sub-ppbv) quantities of volatile organic compounds in air was developed. A liquid nitrogen-cooled trap operated at reduced pressures in series with a Dupont Nafion-based drying tube and a ...

Randolph A. Coleman; Wesley R. Cofer III; Robert A. Edahl Jr.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Experimental studies and thermodynamic modelling of volatilities of uranium, plutonium, and americium from their oxides and from their oxides interacted with ash  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to identify the types and amounts of volatile gaseous species of U, Pu, and Am that are produced in the combustion chamber offgases of mixed waste oxidation processors. Primary emphasis is on the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Incinerator. Transpiration experiments have been carried out on U{sub 3}O{sub 8}(s), U{sub 3}O{sub 8} interacted with various ash materials, PuO{sub 2}(s), PuO{sub 2} interacted with ash materials, and a 3%PuO{sub 2}/0.06%AmO{sub 2}/ash material, all in the presence of steam and oxygen, and at temperatures in the vicinity of 1,300 K. UO{sub 3}(g) and UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) have been identified as the uranium volatile species and thermodynamic data established for them. Pu and Am are found to have very low volatilities, and carryover of Pu and Am as fine dust particulates is found to dominate over vapor transport. The authors are able to set upper limits on Pu and Am volatilities. Very little lowering of U volatility is found for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} interacted with typical ashes. However, ashes high in Na{sub 2}O (6.4 wt %) or in CaO (25 wt %) showed about an order of magnitude reduction in U volatility. Thermodynamic modeling studies were carried out that show that for aluminosilicate ash materials, it is the presence of group I and group II oxides that reduces the activity of the actinide oxides. K{sub 2}O is the most effective followed by Na{sub 2}O and CaO for common ash constituents. A more major effect in actinide activity lowering could be achieved by adding excess group I or group II oxides to exceed their interaction with the ash and lead to direct formation of alkali or alkaline earth uranates, plutonates, and americates.

Krikorian, O.H.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Adamson, M.G.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, RyanAGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, Ryanwake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, RyanAGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, Ryanof unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Asymptotic Behavior of the Stock Price Distribution Density and Implied Volatility in Stochastic Volatility Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the asymptotic behavior of distribution densities arising in stock price models with stochastic volatility. The main objects of our interest in the present paper are the density of time averages of the squared volatility process and the density of the stock price process in the Stein-Stein and the Heston model. We find explicit formulas for leading terms in asymptotic expansions of these densities and give error estimates. As an application of our results, sharp asymptotic formulas for the implied volatility in the Stein-Stein and the Heston model are obtained.

Gulisashvili, Archil, E-mail: guli@math.ohiou.ed [Ohio University, Department of Mathematics (United States); Stein, Elias M., E-mail: stein@math.princeton.ed [Princeton University, Department of Mathematics (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Dual volatility and dependence parameters and the copula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce some new species into the zoo of stochastic volatility and dependence parameters. We start with average absolute deviation and Gini index, which are elementary volatility parameters of first and second order in spirit of dual theory of choice ...

Dieter Denneberg; Nikola Leufer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Apartment volatility determinants across the United States markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much research has been done to examine the volatilities of return on public and private real estate investments. However, little is known about market volatility in real estate in general and in apartment real estate in ...

Luo, Mai, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

There's more to volatility than volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is widely believed that fluctuations in transaction volume, as reflected in the number of transactions and to a lesser extent their size, are the main cause of clustered volatility. Under this view bursts of rapid or slow price diffusion reflect bursts of frequent or less frequent trading, which cause both clustered volatility and heavy tails in price returns. We investigate this hypothesis using tick by tick data from the New York and London Stock Exchanges and show that only a small fraction of volatility fluctuations are explained in this manner. Clustered volatility is still very strong even if price changes are recorded on intervals in which the total transaction volume or number of transactions is held constant. In addition the distribution of price returns conditioned on volume or transaction frequency being held constant is similar to that in real time, making it clear that neither of these are the principal cause of heavy tails in price returns. We analyze recent results of Ane and Geman (2000) an...

Gillemot, L; Lillo, F; Gillemot, Laszlo; Lillo, Fabrizio

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Enhancing recommender systems under volatile userinterest drifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a systematic study of how to enhance recommender systems under volatile user interest drifts. A key development challenge along this line is how to track user interests dynamically. To this end, we first define four types of interest ... Keywords: interest drift, interest pattern, recommender system

Huanhuan Cao; Enhong Chen; Jie Yang; Hui Xiong

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Chemical States of Volatile and Corrosive Fission Products in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Chemical States of Volatile and Corrosive Fission Products in Thorium Based Fuels from Thermodynamic Studies ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

A New Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer to Measure the Volatile Sulfuric Acid Aerosol Fraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was developed with the intention to measure the fraction of sulfuric acid in marine fine aerosols (Dp < 150 nm). This work focused on the design and calibration of an aerosol conditioner ...

D. A. Orsini; A. Wiedensohler; F. Stratmann; D. S. Covert

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Influence of Lewis Acid/Base Chemistry on the Removal of Gallium by Volatility from Weapons-Grade Plutonium Dissolved in Molten Chlorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed that GaCl{sub 3} can be removed by direct volatilization from a Pu-Ga alloy that is dissolved in a molten chloride salt. Although pure GaCl{sub 3} is quite volatile (boiling point: 201 deg. C), the behavior of GaCl{sub 3} dissolved in chloride salts is quite different because of solution effects and is critically dependent upon the composition of the solvent salt (i.e., its Lewis acid/base character). In this technical note, the behavior of gallium in prototypical Lewis acid and Lewis base salts is contrasted. It is found that gallium volatility is suppressed in basic melts and promoted in acidic melts. These results have an important influence on the potential for simple gallium removal in molten salt systems.

Williams, David F.; Cul, Guillermo D. del [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Toth, Louis M. [Electrochemical Systems (United States); Collins, Emory D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

Herndon, S. C.

48

Approximating stochastic volatility by recombinant trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general method to construct recombinant tree approximations for stochastic volatility models is developed and applied to the Heston model for stock price dynamics. In this application, the resulting approximation is a four tuple Markov process. The ?first two components are related to the stock and volatility processes and take values in a two dimensional Binomial tree. The other two components of the Markov process are the increments of random walks with simple values in {-1; +1}. The resulting effi?cient option pricing equations are numerically implemented for general American and European options including the standard put and calls, barrier, lookback and Asian type pay-o?ffs. The weak and extended weak convergence are also proved.

Akyildirim, Erdinc; Soner, H Mete

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Volatility Due to Offshoring: Theory and Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing models of offshoring are not equipped to explain how global production sharing affects the volatility of economic activity. This paper develops a trade model that can account for why offshoring industries in low wage countries such as Mexico experience fluctuations in employment that are twice as large as in high wage countries such as the United States. We argue that a key to explaining this outcome is that the extensive margin of offshoring responds endogenously to shocks in demand and transmits those shocks across borders in an amplified manner. Empirical evidence supports the claim that the extensive margin of offshoring is an active margin of adjustment, and quantitative simulation experiments show that the degree of movement of this margin in the data is sufficient to explain relative employment volatility in Mexico and the U.S. JEL classification: F1, F4

Paul R. Bergin; Robert C. Feenstra; Gordon H. Hanson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel and Power Price Volatilities and Convergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As more energy is traded in competitive markets, the financial performance of generation companies will be increasingly determined by how well they understand and exploit the price behavior of those markets. How volatile are fuel and power prices? How do they correlate with one another? This report addresses these questions in several wholesale electricity and fuel markets and discusses implications of changing patterns of price behavior to fuel and asset management.

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

Recovery of semi-volatile organic compounds during sample preparation: Compilation for characterization of airborne particulate matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semi-volatile compounds present special analytical challenges not met by conventional methods for analysis of ambient particulate matter (PM). Accurate quantification of PM-associated organic compounds requires validation of the laboratory procedures for recovery over a wide volatility and polarity range. To meet these challenges, solutions of n-alkanes (nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 40}) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs (naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were reduced in volume from a solvent mixture (equal volumes of hexane, dichloromethane and methanol), to examine recovery after reduction in volume. When the extract solution volume reached 0.5 mL the solvent was entirely methanol, and the recovery averaged 60% for n-alkanes nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 25} and PAHs from naphthalene to chrysene. Recovery of higher MW compounds decreased with MW, because of their insolubility in methanol. When the walls of the flasks were washed with 1 mL of equal parts hexane and dichloromethane (to reconstruct the original solvent composition), the recovery of nC{sub 18} and higher MW compounds increased dramatically, up to 100% for nC{sub 22}-nC{sub 32} and then slowly decreasing with MW due to insolubility. To examine recovery during extraction of the components of the High Capacity Integrated Gas and Particle Sampler, the same standards were used to spike its denuders and filters. For XAD-4 coated denuders and filters, normalized recovery was > 95% after two extractions. Recovery from spiked quartz filters matched the recovery from the coated surfaces for alkanes nC{sub 18} and larger, and for fluoranthene and larger PAHs. Lower MW compounds evaporated from the quartz filter with the spiking solvent. This careful approach allowed quantification of organics by correcting for volatility- and solubility-related sample preparation losses. This method is illustrated for an ambient sample collected with this sampler during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000.

Swartz, Erick; Stockburger, Leonard; Gundel, Lara

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Volatiles trapped in coals: Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

We have been able to collect and characterize volatiles that are evolved in the grinding of coal. We have developed a very sensitive method for collecting volatiles evolved in grinding. A sealed, gas tight, grinding apparatus has been built. With this system we can collect volatiles freed from the coal matrix during grinding. To do this a 125 cm/sup 3/ sample of coal is placed in to a 1 liter sealable ball mill jar. The jar is evacuated and the coal ground for 1 hr. The jar is then removed from the ball mill and evacuated into our sample collection system. Gas from the jar is pumped through two stages of dust filtering into a liquid nitrogen cold trap charged with 5 ml of methylene chloride. After warming the trap is shaken so that any gas from the sample mixes with and dissolves in the methylene chloride. One microliter samples of the methylene chloride are injected into a Finnegan GCMS. Preliminary analysis of mass spectra from peaks in the RIC show the presence of hydrocarbons. It was possible to definitively identify cyclohexene. The total amount of hydrocarbons seen is low. The attached figure is the mass spectra of the cyclohexene that was collected from the ground coal. 1 fig.

Sutter, J.R.; Halpern, J.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

54

THE EFFECT OF H{sub 2}O ON ICE PHOTOCHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

UV irradiation of simple ices is proposed to efficiently produce complex organic species during star formation and planet formation. Through a series of laboratory experiments, we investigate the effects of the H{sub 2}O concentration, the dominant ice constituent in space, on the photochemistry of more volatile species, especially CH{sub 4}, in ice mixtures. In the experiments, thin ({approx}40 ML) ice mixtures, kept at 20-60 K, are irradiated under ultra-high vacuum conditions with a broadband UV hydrogen discharge lamp. Photodestruction cross sections of volatile species (CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}) and production efficiencies of new species (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CO, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}CHO, and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH) in water-containing ice mixtures are determined using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy during irradiation and during a subsequent slow warm-up. The four major effects of increasing the H{sub 2}O concentration are: (1) an increase of the destruction efficiency of the volatile mixture constituent by up to an order of magnitude due to a reduction of back reactions following photodissociation, (2) a shift to products rich in oxygen, e.g., CH{sub 3}OH and H{sub 2}CO, (3) trapping of up to a factor of 5 more of the formed radicals in the ice, and (4) a disproportional increase in the diffusion barrier for the OH radical compared with the CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals. The radical diffusion temperature dependencies are consistent with calculated H{sub 2}O-radical bond strengths. All the listed effects are potentially important for the production of complex organics in H{sub 2}O-rich icy grain mantles around protostars and should thus be taken into account when modeling ice chemistry.

Oeberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 42, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Linnartz, Harold [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Andersson, Stefan [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, P.O. Box 4760, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

Reboul, S

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Did Household Consumption Become More Volatile?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that after accounting for predictable variation arising from movements in real interest rates, preferences, income shocks, liquidity constraints and measurement errors, volatility of household consumption in the US increased between 1970 and 2004. For households headed by nonwhite and/or poorly educated individuals, this rise was significantly larger. This stands in sharp contrast with the dramatic fall in instability of the aggregate U.S. economy over the same period. Thus, while aggregate shocks affecting households fell over time, idiosyncratic shocks increased. This finding may lead to significant welfare implications.

Olga Gorbachev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal...

58

Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Growth...

59

Analysis of Price Volatility in Natural Gas Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article presents an analysis of price volatility in the spot natural gas market, with particular emphasis on the Henry Hub in Louisiana.

Erin Mastrangelo

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Financial distortions and the distribution of global volatility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, I study the interactions between various aspects of the financial system and macroeconomic volatility in a globally integrated environment. In Chapter 1, (more)

Eden, Maya Rachel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Price and volatility relationships in the Australian electricity market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a collection of papers that has been published, accepted or submitted for publication. They assess price, volatility and market relationships in the (more)

Higgs, Helen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Princeton and PPPL launch center to study volatile space weather...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton and PPPL launch center to study volatile space weather and violent solar storms By John Greenwald December 12, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Computer...

63

Credit Constraints, Learning and Aggregate Consumption Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper documents three empirical facts. First, consumption volatility relative to income volatility rose from 1947-1960 and then fell dramatically by 75 percent from the 1960s to the 1990s. Second, the correlation between consumption growth and personal income growth fell by about 75 percent over the same time period. Finally, absolute deviations of consumption changes from their mean exhibit two breaks in U.S. data, and the mean size of the absolute deviations has again fallen by about 75 percent. First, I find that a standard benchmark permanent income hypothesis model is unable to explain these facts. Then, I examine the ability of two hypotheses: a fall in credit constraints and changing beliefs about the permanence of income shocks to explain these facts. I find evidence for both explanations and find that these facts can be almost completely explained by a model with learning about the nature of income shocks and a reduction in credit constraints. Importantly, I find that estimated changes in beliefs about the permanence of income shocks have substantial explanatory power for consumption changes.

Daniel L. Tortorice

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Leverage Causes Fat Tails and Clustered Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build a very simple model of leveraged asset purchases with margin calls. Investment funds use what is perhaps the most basic financial strategy, called 'value investing', i.e. systematically attempting to buy underpriced assets. When funds do not borrow, the price fluctuations of the asset are normally distributed and uncorrelated across time. All this changes when the funds are allowed to leverage, i.e. borrow from a bank, to purchase more assets than their wealth would otherwise permit. When funds use leverage, price fluctuations become heavy tailed and display clustered volatility, similar to what is observed in real markets. Previous explanations of fat tails and clustered volatility depended on 'irrational behavior', such as trend following. We show that the immediate cause of the increase in extreme risks in our model is the risk control policy of the banks: A prudent bank makes itself locally safer by putting a limit to leverage, so when a fund exceeds its leverage limit, it must partially repay it...

Thurner, Stefan; Geanakoplos, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

Goodness-of-fit test for stochastic volatility models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a goodness of fit test for continuous time stochastic volatility models based on discretely sampled observations. The proposed test is constructed by measuring deviations between the empirical and true characteristic functions ... Keywords: 62E20, 62G09, 62G10, Bootstrap, Empirical characteristic function, Goodness-of-fit, Stochastic volatility models, V-statistics

Liang-Ching Lin, Sangyeol Lee, Meihui Guo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Deposition of H<sub>15sub>NO>3sub> vapour to white oak, red maple and loblolly pine foliage: experimental observations and a generalized model  

SciTech Connect

Nitric acid vapour enriched with {sup 15}N (H{sup 15}NO{sub 3}) was volatilized into the cuvette of an open-flow gas exchange system containing red maple (Acer rubrum L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), or loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling shoots to facilitate direct measurements of total foliar deposition, and subsequent assessments of the rate of HNO{sub 3} movement across the cuticle (transcuticular uptake). Total H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} vapour deposition to foliar surfaces ranged from <5 to 27 nmol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} the variability being largely accounted for by differences in HNO{sub 3} concentrations and leaf conductance. Mean whole-leaf conductance to HNO{sub 3} ranged between 0.9 and 3.4 mm s{sup -1} for hardwoods and between 6 and 34 mm s{sup -1} for loblolly pine. Of the total H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} vapour deposited to leaves, an average of 39 to 48% was immediately 'bound' into hardwood foliage whereas only 3% was bound to loblolly pine needles. This implies that rain events might extract greater amounts of HNO{sub 3}-derived nitrate in throughfall from conifer canopies as compared to hardwood canopies. Post-exposure H{sup 15}NO{sub 3} uptake rates across the leaf cuticle increased with surface nitrate concentrations, but were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower (O06 to 0.24 nmol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) than total HNO{sub 3}, deposition during exposures. A generalized leaf-level model of HNO{sub 3} deposition to foliage capable of simulating deposition pathways to sorption sites on the leaf surface, and to the metabolically active leaf interior via transcuticular or stomatal pathways is formulated and suggested for use in planning future work on HNO{sub 3} deposition.

Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Advances in Volatility Modeling for Energy Markets: Methods for Reproducing Volatility Clustering, Fat Tails, Smiles, and Smirks in Energy Price Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to develop a new model of energy price volatility. For many years, EPRI has worked with a flexible and tractable volatility model that successfully captures the term "structure of volatility," including the properties commonly referred to as "mean reversion" and "seasonality." However, that model does not capture random volatility, evidenced by volatility clustering, nor does it capture skewness and excess kurtosis i...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Pyrolysis of Sunnyside (Utah) tar sand: Characterization of volatile compound evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sunnyside (Utah) tar sand was subjected to programmed temperature pyrolysis and the volatile products were detected by tandem on-line mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in real time analyses. A heating rate of 4/degree/C/min from room temperature to 900/degree/C was employed. Evolution of hydrogen, light hydrocarbons, nitrogen-, sulfur- and oxygen-containing compounds was monitored by MS or MS/MS detection. Evolution of volatile organic compounds occurred in two regimes: 1) low temperature (maximum evolution at 150 to 175/degree C), corresponding to entrained organics, and 2) high temperature (maximum evolution at 440 to 460/degreeC), corresponding to cracking of large organic components. Pyrolysis yields were dominated by the evolution of light hydrocarbons. Alkanes and alkenes of two carbons and higher had temperatures of maximum evolution at approximately 440/degree/C, and methane at approximately 474/degree/C. Aromatic hydrocarbons had temperatures of maximum evolution slightly higher, at approximately 450/degree/C. In general, H/sub2/, CO, and CO/sub2/ exhibited evolution associated with hydrocarbon cracking reactions, and high temperature evolution associated with mineral decomposition, the water-gas shift reaction, and gasification reactions. Compared to other domestic tar sands, the gas evolution relected more mineral decomposition character for Sunnyside tar sand. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Reynolds, J.G.; Crawford, R.W.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Customer Risk from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill Volatility and Hedgability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the ?uctuations in electricity bills that are conceivable.concern about analyzing electricity bill volatility of largeat a The issue of electricity bill volatility from RTP

Borenstein, Severin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile organic compounds in residences Title The impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile organic...

72

Empirical Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Model by Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stochastic volatility model is one of volatility models which infer latent volatility of asset returns. The Bayesian inference of the stochastic volatility (SV) model is performed by the hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm which is superior to other Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in sampling volatility variables. We perform the HMC simulations of the SV model for two liquid stock returns traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and measure the volatilities of those stock returns. Then we calculate the accuracy of the volatility measurement using the realized volatility as a proxy of the true volatility and compare the SV model with the GARCH model which is one of other volatility models. Using the accuracy calculated with the realized volatility we find that empirically the SV model performs better than the GARCH model.

Takaishi, Tetsuya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

Hanley, W.R.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

75

Forecasting volatility with the multifractal random walk model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of forecasting volatility for the multifractal random walk model. In order to avoid the ill posed problem of estimating the correlation length T of the model, we introduce a limiting object defined in a quotient space; formally, this object is an infinite range logvolatility. For this object and the non limiting object, we obtain precise prediction formulas and we apply them to the problem of forecasting volatility and pricing options with the MRW model in the absence of a reliable estimate of the average volatility and T.

Duchon, Jean; Vargas, Vincent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Volatile organic compound remedial action project  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Major-element and volatile (H2O, CO2, S) compositions of glasses from the submarine flanks of Kilauea Volcano record its growth from pre-shield into tholeiite shield-stage. Pillow lavas of mildly alkalic basalt at 2600-1900 mbsl on the upper slope of the south flank are an intermediate link between deeper alkalic volcaniclastics and the modern tholeiite shield. Lava clast glasses from the west flank of Papau Seamount are subaerial Mauna Loa-like tholeiite and mark the contact between the two

78

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

79

A note on wealth in a volatile economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that if the capital accumulation dynamics is stochastic a new term, in addition to that given by accounting prices, has to be introduced in order to derive a correct estimate of the genuine wealth of an economy. In a simple model with multiplicative accumulation dynamics I show that: 1) the value function is always a decreasing function of volatility 2) the accounting prices are affected by volatility 3) the new term always gives a negative contribution to wealth changes. I discuss results for models with constant elasticity utility functions. When the elasticity of marginal utility is larger than one, accounting prices increase with volatility whereas when it is less than one accounting prices decrease with volatility. These conclusions are not altered when adopting optimal saving rates.

Marsili, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Financial distortions and the distribution of global volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I study the interactions between various aspects of the financial system and macroeconomic volatility in a globally integrated environment. In Chapter 1, I illustrate that an efficient allocation of liquidity ...

Eden, Maya Rachel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The impact of fuel price volatility on transportation mode choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the price of oil has driven large fluctuations in the price of diesel fuel, which is an important cost component in freight logistics. This thesis explores the impact of fuel price volatility on supply ...

Kim, Eun Hie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Volatility of Aerosols in the Arid Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile properties of aerosols at an isolated rural site in south-central New Mexico were measured with a light-scattering particle counter equipped with a temperature-controlled heated inlet. Intermittent measurements throughout a one-year ...

R. G. Pinnick; S. G. Jennings; G. Fernandez

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or tission products by formation of the higher fluorides of uranium and/or plutonium is discussed. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first convcrted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treatced with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sup 6/ leaving plutonium behind. The plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 500 deg C and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

The fractional volatility model: An agent-based interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on criteria of mathematical simplicity and consistency with empirical market data, a model with volatility driven by fractional noise has been constructed which provides a fairly accurate mathematical parametrization of the data. Here, some features of the model are discussed and, using agent-based models, one tries to find which agent strategies and (or) properties of the financial institutions might be responsible for the features of the fractional volatility model.

Mendes, R Vilela

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CO{sub 2} Sequestration Potential of Charqueadas Coal Field in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The I2B coal seam in the Charqueadas coal field has been evaluated as a target for enhanced coal bed methane production and CO{sub 2} sequestration. The samples were low rank coals (high volatile bituminous and sub-bituminous) obtained from the I2B seam as ?3? cores. Such properties as sorption capacity, internal structure of the samples, porosity and permeability were of primary interest in this characterization study.

Romanov, V [NETL

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

87

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

88

Volatility Effects on the Escape Time in Financial Market Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We shortly review the statistical properties of the escape times, or hitting times, for stock price returns by using different models which describe the stock market evolution. We compare the probability function (PF) of these escape times with that obtained from real market data. Afterwards we analyze in detail the effect both of noise and different initial conditions on the escape time in a market model with stochastic volatility and a cubic nonlinearity. For this model we compare the PF of the stock price returns, the PF of the volatility and the return correlation with the same statistical characteristics obtained from real market data.

Spagnolo, Bernardo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Pricing by Regulated Natural Gas Utilities, Docket No.A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger,A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A two-dimensional volatility basis set Part 2: Diagnostics of organic-aerosol evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the use of a two-dimensional volatility-oxidation space (2-D-VBS) to describe organic-aerosol chemical evolution. The space is built around two coordinates, volatility and the degree of oxidation, both of which ...

Donahue, N. M.

91

Volatility of Aqueous Acetic Acid, Formic Acid, and Sodium Acetate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing operating cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This report examines the volatility of some of the principal cycle organic corrodents: acetic acid, formic acid, and sodium acetate.

2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Low-Volatility Motor Oils. Development and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

saturated hydrocarbons. Viscosity index. 1. >0.03. <90. 80 120. 2. ?0.03. ?90 ... GOST 2079988 does not set a volatility level for this oil, which is within the limits of .... Short Handbook of the Properties of Lubricating Materials and Fuels [

93

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Pricing by Regulated Natural Gas Utilities, Docket No.a Hedge Against Volatile Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger,wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Against Volatile Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger, Ryanwake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility duringyears) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e. , what

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Against Volatile Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger, Ryanof unprecedented natural gas price volatility during thethe cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Does stock market volatility with regime shifts signal the business cycle in Taiwan?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a Switching Regime ARCH (SWARCH) model and other time series models, this paper sets out to investigate the volatility of Taiwan's monthly stock market returns, with the empirical results demonstrating that our SWARCH-L specification ... Keywords: Markov switching, Taiwan, business cycle, e-finance, electronic finance, regime shifts, stock market volatility, stock markets, stock volatility

Yih-Wen Shyu; Kuangyu Hsia

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Option Returns and the Cross-Sectional Predictability of Implied Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tive forecast of the change in implied volatility and short in straddles with a large negative forecast://www.krannert.purdue.edu/faculty/saretto/. #12;1 Introduction Volatility is central to the pricing of options as there is a one-to-one correspondence between the price of an option and the volatility of the underlying asset. In the context of Black

Kearns, Michael

98

Variations in volatiles in magma bodies based on studies of melt inclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of volatile concentrations in magmas are important in the prediction of explosive volcanism, and contribute to the understanding of the carbon dioxide budget of the atmosphere. Some important variables that are controlled by volatiles are: crystallization temperature of phases, composition of liquids minimum, and viscosity. Volatiles are also catalysts for reactions.

Vogel, T.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1989-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

QUANTIFYING THE VALUE THAT WIND POWER PROVIDES AS A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LBNL-50484 QUANTIFYING THE VALUE THAT WIND POWER PROVIDES AS A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, Ryan Wiser, and William Golove Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001 ­ have mostly been qualitative in nature

100

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR THE HYDROFLUORINATOR OF THE FLUORIDE-VOLATILITY PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel elements clad with Zr or containing Zr as a diluent can be recovered by a fluoride-volatility process. The first step consists of hydrofluorination of the elements in a bath of molten fluoride salts using an HF sparge. In this case the two salt systems considered were NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ and NaF- LiF. Materials evaluated at Battelle for possible use in the construction of this hydrofluorinator include Inconel, A'' Nickel, copper, silver, Monel, Hastelloy B, Hastelloy W, INOR-1, and INOR-8. The metals were exposed to molten fluoride salts through which HF was bubbled continuously. The data indicate that the NaF-LiF systems are much more corrosive than the NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ system. The systems are most corrosive when the alkali fluoride component is high. An elevation in temperature increases the corrosion significantly as does an increase in the HF flow rate. Hydrogen in the HF flow stream retards the corrosion of the sodiumzirconium salts significantly, but appears to have less effect on the sodium -lithium systems. The areas at the interface of the liquid and vapor phases were most seriously damaged under the exposure conditions usually used. However, appreciable reduction in attack was experienced when zirconium was actually hydrofluorinated. INOR-8 was the most promising of the materials evaluated. (auth)

Miller, P.D.; Peterson, C.L.; Stewart, O.M.; Stephan, E.F.; Fink, F.W.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Relaxation dynamics of aftershocks after large volatility shocks in the SSEC index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relaxation dynamics of aftershocks after large volatility shocks are investigated based on two high-frequency data sets of the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite (SSEC) index. Compared with previous relevant work, we have defined main financial shocks based on large volatilities rather than large crashes. We find that the occurrence rate of aftershocks with the magnitude exceeding a given threshold for both daily volatility (constructed using 1-minute data) and minutely volatility (using intra-minute data) decays as a power law. The power-law relaxation exponent increases with the volatility threshold and is significantly greater than 1. Taking financial volatility as the counterpart of seismic activity, the power-law relaxation in financial volatility deviates remarkably from the Omori law in Geophysics.

Mu, Guo-Hua

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Analysis of Realized Volatility in Two Trading Sessions of the Japanese Stock Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze realized volatilities constructed using high-frequency stock data on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. In order to avoid non-trading hours issue in volatility calculations we define two realized volatilities calculated separately in the two trading sessions of the Tokyo Stock Exchange, i.e. morning and afternoon sessions. After calculating the realized volatilities at various sampling frequencies we evaluate the bias from the microstructure noise as a function of sampling frequency. Taking into account of the bias to realized volatility we examine returns standardized by realized volatilities and confirm that price returns on the Tokyo Stock Exchange are described approximately by Gaussian time series with time-varying volatility, i.e. consistent with a mixture of distributions hypothesis.

Takaishi, Tetsuya; Zheng, Zeyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Fresh Look at Integrating Supply-Side and Demand-Side Resources Speaker(s): Bill Kelly Robert Redlinger Date: January 19, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn The restructuring of the California electricity industry has not proceeded as intended. A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices, power outages, and a political and financial crisis for the State. This crisis will not be solved through increasing electricity supply alone. Energy industry observers agree that 1.) energy efficiency, 2.) distributed on-site generation, and 3.) price

104

Perturbation Expansion for Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fit the volatility fluctuations of the S&P 500 index well by a Chi distribution, and the distribution of log-returns by a corresponding superposition of Gaussian distributions. The Fourier transform of this is, remarkably, of the Tsallis type. An option pricing formula is derived from the same superposition of Black-Scholes expressions. An explicit analytic formula is deduced from a perturbation expansion around a Black-Scholes formula with the mean volatility. The expansion has two parts. The first takes into account the non-Gaussian character of the stock-fluctuations and is organized by powers of the excess kurtosis, the second is contract based, and is organized by the moments of moneyness of the option. With this expansion we show that for the Dow Jones Euro Stoxx 50 option data, a Delta-hedging strategy is close to being optimal.

Jizba, Petr; Haener, Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Volatile oils and retrograde gases - What's the difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1 showed that at reservoir conditions, volatile oils exhibit bubble points and retrograde gases exhibit dew points. The article contained a graph of initial producing gas-oil ratio plotted against concentration of heptanes plus in the fluid. This paper reproduces a portion of that graph with the data points indicating that the fluid had a dew point or a bubble point at reservoir conditions. The scatter in the data reflects the compositional differences among the fluids and the differences in surface separation facilities and conditions. In this graph, only three fluids have dew points and initial producing gas-oil ratios less than 3,200 scf/STB, and only one fluid reaches a bubble point above this value. Therefore, a value of 3,200 scf/STB appears to be a good cutoff between volatile oils and retrograde gases.

McCain, W.D. Jr. (S.A. Holditch and Associates, College Station, TX (United States)); Bridges, B. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Perturbation Expansion for Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fit the volatility fluctuations of the S&P 500 index well by a Chi distribution, and the distribution of log-returns by a corresponding superposition of Gaussian distributions. The Fourier transform of this is, remarkably, of the Tsallis type. An option pricing formula is derived from the same superposition of Black-Scholes expressions. An explicit analytic formula is deduced from a perturbation expansion around a Black-Scholes formula with the mean volatility. The expansion has two parts. The first takes into account the non-Gaussian character of the stock-fluctuations and is organized by powers of the excess kurtosis, the second is contract based, and is organized by the moments of moneyness of the option. With this expansion we show that for the Dow Jones Euro Stoxx 50 option data, a Delta-hedging strategy is close to being optimal.

Petr Jizba; Hagen Kleinert; Patrick Haener

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

107

Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Title Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6257E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords indoor air quality, Passive Sampling, Uptake Rates, vocs Abstract Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick's Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

109

Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex real-world aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

Dr. Timothy Onasch

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Production of S{sub 2}F{sub 10}, S{sub 2}OF{sub 10} and S{sub 2}O{sub 2}F{sub 10} by spark discharges in SF{sub 6}*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of the spark yield of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} and S{sub 2}OF{sub 10} as a function of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O concentration. In addition the formation of S{sub 2}O{sub 2}F{sub 10} is reported. The spark yield of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} is reduced when either oxygen or water is added to SF{sub 6}. On the other hand the yield of S{sub 2}OF{sub 10} is increased when either oxygen or water is added, oxygen having the greater effect. A simple model is presented based on a common SF{sub 5} precursor to S{sub 2}F{sub 10} and S{sub 2}OF{sub 10} showing good agreement with the yields of both byproducts in O{sub 2}/SF{sub 6} and H{sub 2}O/SF{sub 6} mixtures. The yield of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} is found to be greatest when the spark chambers is very dry and the electrodes are well conditioned.

Sauers, I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mahajan, S.M. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Cacheiro, R.A. [Univ., of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Well Productivity in Gas-Condensate and Volatile Oil Reservoirs:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wells in gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex behaviours due to condensate deposit as the bottomhole pressure drops below the dew point. The formation of this liquid saturation can lead to a severe loss of well productivity and therefore lower gas recovery. A similar behaviour is observed in volatile oil reservoirs below the bubble point. Understanding these behaviours and extracting values of controlling parameters is necessary to evaluate well potential and design effective programmes to improve productivity. The Centre of Petroleum Studies at Imperial College London has been involved in research in these areas since 1997, sponsored mainly by consortia of oil companies. Results from this work have already greatly improved the understanding of well behaviour in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs and the ability to interpret well tests in such reservoirs. Work to-date has focused on vertical and horizontal wells in sandstone reservoirs. Much work remains to understand the behaviours of fractured wells and wells in naturally fractured reservoirs. The objective of this proposal is to complete the work performed to-date in sandstone reservoirs and to extend it to new well and reservoir characteristics, in order to develop a better understanding of near-wellbore effects in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs from well testing, and to use this understanding to develop new methods for predicting and improving well productivity in such reservoirs. The work will be performed by staff, MSc and PhD students from the Centre for Petroleum Studies at Imperial College, with input and guidance from industry partners.

Prof A. C. Gringarten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} with a growth window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO{sub 3} films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO{sub 3} films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Tight Coal Market: Volatility Spike or Trend?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spot coal market experienced a major price spike beginning in late 2000 and early 2001. This run-up in coal prices caught most producers and generators by surprise. While spot prices have declined from their peak, they remain well above historical levels. It is not clear whether this run-up in prices was merely a short-term event reflecting an increase in coal price volatility or the start of a new trend in coal pricing generally. This report analyzes possible causes of the price spike, the likelihoo...

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

115

Improvement of SOFC Electrodes through Catalyst Infiltration & Control of Cr Volatilization from FeCr Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the improvement of SOFC electrodes through catalyst infiltration and control of Cr volatilization from FeCr components.

Visco, S.J.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.; Sholklapper, T.; Lu, C.; De Jonghe, L.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Stock market volatility and price discovery : three essays on the effect of macroeconomic information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple Microstructure Model of Price Determination . . 3.11Stock Market Volatility and Price Discovery: Three Essays onConstruction Spending PRICES CPI MONETARY POLICY FFR Source:

Rangel, Jose Gonzalo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Oil consumption, pollutant emission, oil proce volatility and economic activities in selected Asian Developing Economies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is now well established in the literature that oil consumption, oil price shocks, and oil price volatility may impact the economic activities negatively. Studies (more)

Rafiq, Shuddhasattwa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

New Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Volatile Organic Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y Successes AdvAnced ReseARch To support coal and power systems development, NETL's Advanced Research Program conducts a range of pre-competitive research focused on breakthroughs in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, computational energy science, and bioprocessing-opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality. NETL also sponsors cooperative educational initiatives in University Coal Research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Other Minority Institutions. Accomplishments P Process improvement P Cost reduction P Greater efficiency

119

On the output factor measurements of the CyberKnife iris collimator small fields: Experimental determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for microchamber and diode detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To measure the output factors (OFs) of the small fields formed by the variable aperture collimator system (iris) of a CyberKnife (CK) robotic radiosurgery system, and determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for a microchamber and four diode detectors. Methods: OF measurements were performed using a PTW PinPoint 31014 microchamber, four diode detectors (PTW-60017, -60012, -60008, and the SunNuclear EDGE detector), TLD-100 microcubes, alanine dosimeters, EBT films, and polymer gels for the 5 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm iris collimators at 650 mm, 800 mm, and 1000 mm source to detector distance (SDD). The alanine OF measurements were corrected for volume averaging effects using the 3D dose distributions registered in polymer gel dosimeters. k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for the PinPoint microchamber and the diode dosimeters were calculated through comparison against corresponding polymer gel, EBT, alanine, and TLD results. Results: Experimental OF results are presented for the array of dosimetric systems used. The PinPoint microchamber was found to underestimate small field OFs, and a k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor ranging from 1.127 {+-} 0.022 (for the 5 mm iris collimator) to 1.004 {+-} 0.010 (for the 15 mm iris collimator) was determined at the reference SDD of 800 mm. The PinPoint k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor was also found to increase with decreasing SDD; k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} values equal to 1.220 {+-} 0.028 and 1.077 {+-} 0.016 were obtained for the 5 mm iris collimator at 650 mm and 1000 mm SDD, respectively. On the contrary, diode detectors were found to overestimate small field OFs and a correction factor equal to 0.973 {+-} 0.006, 0.954 {+-} 0.006, 0.937 {+-} 0.007, and 0.964 {+-} 0.006 was measured for the PTW-60017, -60012, -60008 and the EDGE diode detectors, respectively, for the 5 mm iris collimator at 800 mm SDD. The corresponding correction factors for the 15 mm iris collimator were found equal to 0.997 {+-} 0.010, 0.994 {+-} 0.009, 0.988 {+-} 0.010, and 0.986 {+-} 0.010, respectively. No correlation of the diode k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors with SDD was observed. Conclusions: This work demonstrates an experimental procedure for the determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors required to obtain small field OF results of increased accuracy.

Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Zourari, K.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Sakelliou, L.; Kilby, W.; Antypas, C.; Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Georgiou, E.; Seimenis, I. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece) and CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-MagnitikiTomografia, 54-56 Ethnikis-Antistaseos, 152 31 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athen (Greece); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, California 94089 (United States); 1st Department of Radiology, Aretaieion Hospital, Medical School, University of Athens, Vas. Sophias, 115 28 Athens (Greece) and CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-MagnitikiTomografia, 54-56 Ethnikis-Antistaseos, 152 31 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 2nd Building of Preclinical Section, University Campus, 68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Synthesis and structural investigation of the compounds containing HF{sub 2}{sup -} anions: Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6})  

SciTech Connect

Three new compounds Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) were obtained in the system metal(II) fluoride and anhydrous HF (aHF) acidified with excessive PF{sub 5}. The obtained polymeric solids are slightly soluble in aHF and they crystallize out of their aHF solutions. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} was prepared by simply dissolving CaF{sub 2} in a neutral aHF. It represents the second known compound with homoleptic HF environment of the central atom besides Ba(H{sub 3}F{sub 4}){sub 2}. The compounds Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) represent two additional examples of the formation of a polymeric zigzag ladder or ribbon composed of metal cation and fluoride anion (MF{sup +}){sub n} besides PbF(AsF{sub 6}), the first isolated compound with such zigzag ladder. The obtained new compounds were characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction method and partly by Raman spectroscopy. Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} crystallizes in a triclinic space group P1-bar with a=4.5870(2) A, b=8.8327(3) A, c=11.2489(3) A, {alpha}=67.758(9){sup o}, {beta}=84.722(12), {gamma}=78.283(12){sup o}, V=413.00(3) A{sup 3} at 200 K, Z=1 and R=0.0588. Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) at 200 K: space group P1-bar , a=4.5722(19) A, b=4.763(2) A, c=8.818(4) A, {alpha}=86.967(10){sup o}, {beta}=76.774(10){sup o}, {gamma}=83.230(12){sup o}, V=185.55(14) A{sup 3}, Z=1 and R=0.0937. Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) at 293 K: space group P1-bar, a=4.586(2) A, b=4.781(3) A, c=8.831(5) A, {alpha}=87.106(13){sup o}, {beta}=76.830(13){sup o}, {gamma}=83.531(11){sup o}, V=187.27(18) A{sup 3}, Z=1 and R=0.072. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} crystallizes in an orthorhombic Fddd space group with a=5.5709(6) A, b=10.1111(9) A, c=10.5945(10) A, V=596.77(10) A{sup 3} at 200 K, Z=8 and R=0.028. - Graphical abstract: Three new compounds Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) were obtained in the system metal(II) fluoride and anhydrous HF acidified with excessive PF{sub 5} and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction method and partly by Raman spectroscopy. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} represents the second known compound with homoleptic HF{sub 2}{sup -} environment of the central atom. Display Omitted.

Bunic, Tina; Tramsek, Melita [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Goreshnik, Evgeny [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: evgeny.goreshnik@ijs.si; Zemva, Boris [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: boris.zemva@ijs.si

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Opportunities for reducing volatile organic compound emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions: a feasibility analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions. The pollution prevention (P2) methodology as defined by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment ... Keywords: emissions, manufacturing, office furniture, pollution prevention, volatile organic compound

Frank S. Luisser; Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Asymptotic expansion for pricing options for a mean-reverting asset with multiscale stochastic volatility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates the valuation of options when the underlying asset follows a mean-reverting log-normal process with a stochastic volatility that is driven by two stochastic processes with one persistent factor and one fast mean-reverting factor. ... Keywords: Mean reversion, Multiscale asymptotic, Option pricing, Stochastic volatility

Mei Choi Chiu; Yu Wai Lo; Hoi Ying Wong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Volatility dynamics of the US business cycle: A multivariate asymmetric GARCH approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most empirical investigations of the business cycles in the United States have excluded the dimension of asymmetric conditional volatility. This paper analyses the volatility dynamics of the US business cycle by comparing the performance of various multivariate ... Keywords: Constant correlations, E32, E37, Index of industrial production, Multivariate asymmetric GARCH, US business cycle non-linearities, Varying-correlations

Kin-Yip Ho; Albert K. Tsui; Zhaoyong Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

System for loading executable code into volatile memory in a downhole tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for loading an executable code into volatile memory in a downhole tool string component comprises a surface control unit comprising executable code. An integrated downhole network comprises data transmission elements in communication with the surface control unit and the volatile memory. The executable code, stored in the surface control unit, is not permanently stored in the downhole tool string component. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the downhole tool string component comprises boot memory. In another embodiment, the executable code is an operating system executable code. Preferably, the volatile memory comprises random access memory (RAM). A method for loading executable code to volatile memory in a downhole tool string component comprises sending the code from the surface control unit to a processor in the downhole tool string component over the network. A central processing unit writes the executable code in the volatile memory.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Bartholomew, David B. (Springville, UT); Johnson, Monte L. (Orem, UT)

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Using futures prices to filter short-term volatility and recover a latent, long-term price series for oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices are very volatile. But much of this volatility seems to reflect short-term,transitory factors that may have little or no influence on the price in the long run. Many major investment decisions should be guided ...

Herce, Miguel Angel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Regulation, Volatility and Efficiency in Continuous-Time Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the efficiency of markets with friction, particularly power markets. We model the market as a dynamic system with $(d_t;\\,t\\geq 0)$ the demand process and $(s_t;\\,t\\geq 0)$ the supply process. Using stochastic differential equations to model the dynamics with friction, we investigate the efficiency of the market under an integrated expected undiscounted cost function solving the optimal control problem. Then, we extend the setup to a game theoretic model where multiple suppliers and consumers interact continuously by setting prices in a dynamic market with friction. We investigate the equilibrium, and analyze the efficiency of the market under an integrated expected social cost function. We provide an intriguing efficiency-volatility no-free-lunch trade-off theorem.

Kizilkale, Arman C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Formaldehyde and Other Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions in Four FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Michael G. Apte Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 43 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5626-5632 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THUVOC and aldehyde emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehydeconcentrations ranged from 378 µg m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 µg m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 µg m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 µg m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (µg h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and materialspecific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was theonly one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 µg m-2 h-1 in the morning and 257 to 347 µg m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 µg m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 µg/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 µg/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (materialsurface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde

129

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Explanatory Factors and Causality in the Dynamics of Volatility Surfaces Implied from OTC Asian---Pacific Currency Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatility implied from observed option contracts systematically varies with the contracts' strike price and time to expiration, giving rise to an instantaneously non-flat implied volatility surface (IVS) that exhibits substantial time variation. We ... Keywords: Causality, Factor model, Implied volatility surfaces

Georgios Chalamandaris; Andrianos E. Tsekrekos

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Preparation of U.sub.3 O.sub.8  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the preparation of U.sub.3 O.sub.8 nuclear fuel material by direct precipitation of uranyl formate monohydrate from uranyl nitrate solution. The uranyl formate monohydrate precipitate is removed, dried and calcined to produce U.sub.3 O.sub.8 having a controlled particle size distribution.

Johnson, David R. (Aiken, SC)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Final Report - Glass Formulation Testing to Increase Sulfate Volatilization from Melter, VSL-04R4970-1, Rev. 0, dated 2/24/05  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the DM100 and DM10 tests were to determine the impact of four different organics and one inorganic feed additive on sulfate volatilization and to determine the sulfur partitioning between the glass and the off-gas system. The tests provided information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data including sulfur incorporation and partitioning. A series of DM10 and DM100 melter tests were conducted using a LAW Envelope A feed. The testing was divided into three parts. The first part involved a series of DM10 melter tests with four different organic feed additives: sugar, polyethylene glycol (PEG), starch, and urea. The second part involved two confirmatory 50-hour melter tests on the DM100 using the best combination of reductants and conditions based on the DM10 results. The third part was performed on the DM100 with feeds containing vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) as an inorganic additive to increase sulfur partitioning to the off-gas. Although vanadium oxide is not a reductant, previous testing has shown that vanadium shows promise for partitioning sulfur to the melter exhaust, presumably through its known catalytic effect on the SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} reaction. Crucible-scale tests were conducted prior to the melter tests to confirm that the glasses and feeds would be processable in the melter and that the glasses would meet the waste form (ILAW) performance requirements. Thus, the major objectives of these tests were to: ? Perform screening tests on the DM10 followed by tests on the DM100-WV system using a LAW -Envelope A feed with four organic additives to assess their impact on sulfur volatilization. ? Perform tests on the DM100-WV system using a LAW -Envelope A feed containing vanadium oxide to assess its impact on sulfur volatilization. ? Determine feed processability and product quality with the above additives. ? Collect melter emissions data to determine the effect of additives on sulfur partitioning and melter emissions. ? Collect and analyze discharged glass to determine sulfur retention in the glass. ? Prepare and characterize feeds and glasses with the additives to confirm that the feeds and the glass melts are suitable for processing in the DM100 melter. ? Prepare and characterize glasses with the additives to confirm that the glasses meet the waste form (ILAW) performance requirements.

Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. A.; Pegg, I. L.; Gong, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Federal Reserve Bank of DallasTime-Varying Oil Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Aggregates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate the theoretical relation among output, consumption, investment, and oil price volatility in a real business cycle model. The model incorporates demand for oil by a firm, as an intermediate input, and by a household, used in conjunction with a durable good. We estimate a stochastic volatility process for the real price of oil over the period 1986-2011 and utilize the estimated process in a non-linear approximation of the model. For realistic calibrations, an increase in oil price volatility produces a temporary decrease in durable spending, while precautionary savings motives lead investment and real GDP to rise. Irreversible capital and durable investment decisions do not overturn this result.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante; Nora Traum; We Thank Ron Alquist; Sebnem Kalemli-ozcan; Junghoon Lee; James Murray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Large single crystal quaternary alloys of IB-IIIA-Se/sub 2/ and methods of synthesizing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New alloys of Cu/sub x/Ag/sub (1-x)/InSe/sub 2/ (where x ranges between 0 and 1 and preferably has a value of about 0.75) and CuIn/sub y/Ga/sub (1-y)/Se/sub 2/ (where y ranges between 0 and 1 and preferably has a value of about 0.90) in the form of single crystals with enhanced structure perfection, which crystals are substantially free of fissures, are disclosed. Processes are disclosed for preparing the new alloys of Cu/sub x/Ag/sub (1-x)/InSe/sub 2/. The process includes placing stoichiometric quantities of a Cu, Ag, In, and Se reaction mixture or stoichiometric quantities of a Cu, In, Ga, and Se reaction mixture in a refractory crucible in such a manner that the reaction mixture is surrounded by B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, placing the thus loaded crucible in a chamber under a high pressure atmosphere of inert gas to confine the volatile Se to the crucible, and heating the reaction mixture to its melting point. The melt can then be cooled slowly to form, by direct solidification, a single crystal with enhanced structure perfection, which crystal is substantially free of fissures.

Ciszek, T.F.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Large single crystal quaternary alloys of IB-IIIA-SE.sub.2 and methods of synthesizing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New alloys of Cu.sub.x Ag.sub.(1-x) InSe.sub.2 (where x ranges between 0 and 1 and preferably has a value of about 0.75) and CuIn.sub.y Ga.sub.(1-y) Se.sub.2 (where y ranges between 0 and 1 and preferably has a value of about 0.90) in the form of single crystals with enhanced structure perfection, which crystals are substantially free of fissures are disclosed. Processes are disclosed for preparing the new alloys of Cu.sub.x Ag.sub.(1-x) InSe.sub.2. The process includes placing stoichiometric quantities of a Cu, Ag, In, and Se reaction mixture or stoichiometric quantities of a Cu, In, Ga, and Se reaction mixture in a refractory crucible in such a manner that the reaction mixture is surrounded by B.sub.2 O.sub.3, placing the thus loaded crucible in a chamber under a high pressure atmosphere of inert gas to confine the volatile Se to the crucible, and heating the reaction mixture to its melting point. The melt can then be cooled slowly to form, by direct solidification, a single crystal with enhanced structure perfection, which crystal is substantially free of fissures.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nanosecond in situ transmission electron microscope studies of the reversible Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} crystalline <==> amorphous phase transformation  

SciTech Connect

Chalcogenide-based phase-change materials have wide use in optical recording media and are growing in importance for use in non-volatile electronic memory. For both applications, rapid switching between the amorphous and crystalline phases is necessary, and understanding the changes during rapidly driven phase transitions is of scientific and technological significance. Laser-induced crystallization and amorphization occur rapidly and changes in atomic structure, microstructure, and temperature are difficult to observe experimentally and determine computationally. We have used nanosecond-scale time-resolved diffraction with intense electron pulses to study Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} during laser crystallization. Using a unique and unconventional specimen geometry, cycling between the amorphous and crystalline phases was achieved, enabling in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of both microstructural and crystallographic changes caused by repeated switching. Finite element analysis was used to simulate interactions of the laser with the nano-structured specimens and to model the rapidly changing specimen temperature. Such time-resolved experimental methods combined with simulation of experimentally inaccessible physical characteristics will be fundamental to advancing the understanding of rapidly driven phase transformations.

Santala, M. K.; Reed, B. W.; LaGrange, T.; Campbell, G. H.; Browning, N. D. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Topuria, T. [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Raoux, S. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Meister, S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Cui, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analytical Boltzmann moments for electrons in N{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O gas mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-equilibrium gas plasmas are under study today as sources of electrically powered chemistry for the elimination of volatile organic vapors and combustion exhaust pollutants. The aim of these research efforts is to develop either non-catalytic oxidation to acids which can be ``scrubbed`` out of gas flows as salts, or non-catalytic reduction, specifically of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This work is an effort to simplify the electron kinetics so as to enable a convenient study of a wide range of mixtures and Townsend parameters, and for a reasonable sacrifice in precision. Key insights gained in this way can be honed by more accurate numerical computation as needed. In this report they present a brief description of the approximate analytical solution of the Boltzmann equation, then additional modeling of electron-molecule cross sections which simplifies the expressions for moments, and finally a number of examples and comparisons to experiment and published results.

Garcia, M.; Chang, B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

142

CF.sub.4 laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A CF.sub.4 laser for producing near 16 .mu.m radiation utilizing a line tunable CO.sub.2 laser as an optical pumping source. The device uses a cryogenically cooled optically pumped cell containing molecular CF.sub.4 gas. An optical resonant cavity formed around the optically pumped cell induces oscillations of near 16 .mu.m radiation from the .nu..sub.2 +.nu..sub.4 .fwdarw..nu..sub.2 transition in the molecular CF.sub.4 gas.

Wittig, Curt (Santa Monica, CA); Tiee, Joe J. (Los Angeles, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Predicting flammability of gas mixtures containing volatile organic compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One requirement regarding the transportation of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste containers currently limits the total concentration of potentially flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and flammable gases in the headspace of the waste container. Typical VOCs observed in the drums include aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, alcohols, cyclohexane, as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes). Flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, may be generated in the containers by radiation-induced decomposition (radiolysis) of water and hydrocarbon waste forms. An experimental program was initiated to identify an accurate means for predicting flammability for gas mixtures containing one or more of the following species: hydrogen, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, toluene, or 2-butanone. The lower flammability limits (LFL) of gas mixtures containing equimolar quantity for each species were determined in a 19-liter laboratory flammability chamber using a strong spark ignition source. The group factor contribution method was determined to be more accurate than the LeChatelier method for estimating the LFL for these gas mixtures.

Liekhus, K. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Zlochower, I. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Lab.; Djordjevic, S.; Loehr, C. [Benchmark Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Source Footprint Considerations in the Determination of Volatile Organic Compound Fluxes from Forest Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Above-canopy sampling of trace gases to determine volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions should be interpreted in terms of footprint considerations. This can be accomplished by defining the upwind canopy areas effectively sampled under the ...

S. K. Kaharabata; P. H. Schuepp; J. D. Fuentes

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A statistical analysis of the natural gas futures market : the interplay of sentiment, volatility and prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper attempts to understand the price dynamics of the North American natural gas market through a statistical survey that includes an analysis of the variables influencing the price and volatility of this energy ...

Fazzio, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nutritional Status of some Aromatic Plants Grown to Produce Volatile Oils under Treated Municipal Wastewater irrigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

any reduction in quantity and quality of volatile oils.on the quantity and quality of the essential oil for fiveon the quantity and quality of the essential oil of five

Khalifa, Ramadan Khalifa Mohamed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

Scholten, Elke

149

Currency options volatility forecasting with shift-invariant wavelet transform and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes four currency options volatility forecasting models. These models are based on shift-invariant wavelet transform and neural networks techniques. The trous algorithm is used to realize the shift-invariant wavelet transform. ...

Fan-Yong Liu; Fan-Xin Liu

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Customer Risk from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill Volatility and Hedgability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

then pay/receive the real- time price for deviations fromI assume that the retail real-time prices customers face arewould likely dampen real-time price volatility and the

Borenstein, Severin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

Fortner, E. C.

152

Volatility of hotel market fundamentals and the determinants of variations between markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How can volatility as well as other dynamics and characteristics in hotel market fundamentals affecting risk be better understood? This paper explores that fundamental question along with other more specific questions that ...

Cason, Brian (Brian Paul)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CORROSION ASSOCIATED WITH FLUORINATION IN THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

: : 9 7 7 8 6 9 : = 7 9 9used during the fluorination of fused-salt fuels and subsequent associated operations in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fluoride Volatility Process was evaluated. Corrosive attack is reported as mils per month based on molten salt residence time or mils per hour based on fluorine exposure time. Two fluorinators were used in the VPP to carry out the fluorination reactions. These vessels, Mark I and Mark II, were fabricated into right cylinders, approx 4 1/2 ft in height, from the same heat of L (low carbon nickel. The first vessel contained equimolar NaF- ZrF/sub 4/ or NaF-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (48-48-4 mole%) for approx 1250 hr at 600 to 725 deg C. Over a period of 61 hr, 57,500 standard liters of F/sub 2/ were sparged into the slats. This constituted a F/sub 2/:U mole ratio of 3:1 beyond theoretical requirements. The Mark II fluorinator contained fluoride salts of approxi-mately the same compositions plus small additions of PuF/sub 4/ during three runs. The salts were kept molten at 540 to 730 deg C for approx 1950 hr and about sixty 500 standard liters of F/sub 2/ were sparged into the Mark II melts in 92 hr. Both fluorinators sustained large corrosion losses consisting of extensive wall thinning, severe interior inter- granular attack, and a moderate exterior oxidation attack. Maximum deterioration on the Mark I vessel occurred in the middle vapor region at a calculated rate of 1.2 mils/hr, based on fluorine sparge time, or 46 mils/month, based on time of exposure to molten salts. The second vessel showed maximum attack in the salt-containing region at similarly calculated rates of 1.1 mils/hr and 60 mils/month. Some evidence was found to indicate that the intergranular attack may have resulted from sulfur in the systems. Bulk metal losses from the vessel's walls were believed to be the result of cyclic losses of NiF/sub 2/ ""protective'' films. The shift in maximum corrosion attack geometry in the two fluorinators is believed to have resulted from differences in operating conditions. The Mark II vessel experienced higher temperatures, longer fluorine exposure times, and uranium residence times in its salt baths. Specimens removed from the wall of the first fluorinator showed a variation in aversge ASTM grain-size number of 5 or 6 to >1, the largest grains being found in the middle vapor region. The second vessel had a more uniform grain-size pattern, average ASTM grain-size numbers varying from 3 to 5 to 2 to 4. The variations in grain sizes are believed to have resulted from variable heating rates during initial usage. Examinations of bench-scale reactors, where simulated fluorination environments were provided to study process variables and corrosion, showed that A nickel had the highest degree of corrosion resistance as a fluorinator materiai of construction when compared with Inconel and INOR-8. Intergranular penetration and subsequent sloughing of whole grains seemed to be the predominant mode of corrosive attack on the Inconel vessel. At the higher test temperatures, 600 deg C, INOR-8 miniature fluorinators showed large bulk metal losses plus selective losses of chromium, molybdenum, and iron from the exposed alloy surfaces. Evidence of a marked reduction in attack on nickel and INOR-8 was found during lower temperature studies at 450 to 525 deg C. Scouting corrosion tests were performed in the VPP's fluorinators using rod, sheet, or wire specimens of commercial and developmental alloys. These tests were subjected to serious limitations due to the lack of control over operating conditions and thus considerable variation in the corrosion of L nickel control specimens resulted. Those nickel-rich alloys containing iron and cobalt showed some superiority in corrosion resistsnce when com- pared with L nickel specimens. Nickel-rich alloys containing molybdenum additions showed variable behavior in the fluorination environment. Additional experimental nickelbase alloy corrosion specimens, containing magnesium,

Litman, A.P.; Goldman, A.E.

1961-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

Neutron and X-ray diffraction studies on the high temperature phase of Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}, the new isostructural compound NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} and their mixed crystals Na{sub x}Mn{sub 4.5-x/2}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0{<=}x{<=}1)  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed structure analysis (combined Rietveld analysis of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data as well as quantum mechanical calculations) of the high temperature phase of Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2} (space group I4 Macron 2d). Special attention is directed to the analysis of the local coordination around Mn{sup 2+} ions or vacancies within a stella quadrangula configuration of anions. Furthermore, the new compound NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} is described as well as a range of mixed crystals between NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2} (described by the formula Na{sub x}Mn{sub 4.5-x/2}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}, 0{<=}x{<=}1) which were synthesized by a solid state route. All compounds were shown to be isostructural to the high temperature phase Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new compound NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present neutron and X-ray diffraction studies on high temperature-Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural details of partly filled stellae quadrangulae positions are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refined structural parameters and theoretical calculations are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the mixed crystal system Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}-NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}.

Clemens, Oliver [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie und Radiochemie, Am Markt, Zeile 5, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany)] [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie und Radiochemie, Am Markt, Zeile 5, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany); Haberkorn, Robert [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Anorganische Festkoerperchemie, Am Markt, Zeile 3, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany)] [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Anorganische Festkoerperchemie, Am Markt, Zeile 3, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany); Springborg, Michael [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Campus B2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)] [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Campus B2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Beck, Horst Philipp, E-mail: hp.beck@mx.uni-saarland.de [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie und Radiochemie, Am Markt, Zeile 5, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Half-ordered State in the Anisotropic Haldane-gap Antiferromagnet Ni(C<sub>5sub>D>14sub>N>2sub>)>2sub>N>3sub>(PF>6sub>)  

SciTech Connect

Neutron diffraction experiments performed on the Haldane gap material Ni(C{sub 5}D{sub 14}N{sub 2}){sub 2}N{sub 3}(PF{sub 6}) in high magnetic fields applied at an angle to the principal anisotropy axes reveal two consecutive field-induced phase transitions. The low-field phase is the gapped Haldane state, while at high fields the system exhibits a three-dimensional long-range Neel order. In a peculiar phase found in intermediate fields only half of all the spin chains participate in the long-range ordering, while the other half remain disordered and gapped.

Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Grenier, B. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Ressouche, E. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Honda, Z. [Saitama University, Japan; Katsumada, K. [RIKEN, Japan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing  

SciTech Connect

Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

New Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path Forward for Site Closure New Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path Forward for Site Closure April 24, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Conceptual site model for evaluating soil vapor extraction system performance to determine if the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another approach. Conceptual site model for evaluating soil vapor extraction system performance to determine if the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another approach. RICHLAND, Wash. and LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Through the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI), scientists and engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation

158

Volatility of HCl and the thermodynamics of brines during brine dryout  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of liquid-vapor partitioning (volatility) of chlorides from brines to steam can be used to indicate the potential for corrosion problems in geothermal systems. Measurements of volatilities of solutes in chloride brines have established a possible mechanism for the production of high-chloride steam from slightly acidic high temperature brines. Questions concerning the fate of NaCl in the steam production process have been addressed through extensive measurements of its volatility from brines ranging in concentration from dilute solutions to halite saturation. Recent measurements of chloride partitioning to steam over brines in contact with Geysers rock samples are consistent with our concept of the process for production of high-chloride steam.

Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Transfer between the cesium 6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels induced by collisions with H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CF{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

The cross sections of spin-orbit energy exchange between the cesium 6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{r_reversible}6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states induced by collisions with N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CF{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} were obtained for pressures less than 100 Torr at room temperature by means of steady-state laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The spin-orbit energy exchange rate with N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CF{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, have been measured as {sigma}{sub 21}(6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{yields}6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2})= 16.3, 34.1, 30.0, 22.7, 21.4, 65.6, 64.8, and 137 A{sup 2} and {sigma}{sub 12}(6 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{yields}6 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2})= 1.8, 4.4, 4.1, 3.0, 2.9, 13.3, 9.7, and 16.3 A{sup 2}, respectively. Correlations of the spin-orbit transfer probabilities with rotational-energy defect and vibrational-energy defect have been shown.

Pitz, Greg A.; Fox, Charles D.; Perram, Glen P. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Labs, 3550 Aberdeen Ave. SE, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, WPAFB, Ohio 45433-7765 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cooperative Ordering of Gapped and Gapless Spin Networks in Cu<sub>2sub>Fe>2sub>Ge>4sub>O>13sub>  

SciTech Connect

The unusual magnetic properties of a novel low-dimensional quantum ferrimagnet Cu{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 13} are studied using bulk methods, neutron diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering. It is shown that this material can be described in terms of two low-dimensional quantum spin subsystems, one gapped and the other gapless, characterized by two distinct energy scales. Long-range magnetic ordering observed at low temperatures is a cooperative phenomenon caused by weak coupling of these two spin networks.

Masuda, Takatsugu [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Grenier, B. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Imai, S. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Uchinokura, K. [RIKEN, Japan; Ressouche, E. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Park, S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method for removing volatile components from a ceramic article, and related processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Waterford, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Schenectady, NY)

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sub-micron filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

Tepper, Frederick (Sanford, FL); Kaledin, Leonid (Port Orange, FL)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Integration of organic insulator and self-assembled gold nanoparticles on Si MOSFET for novel non-volatile memory cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have fabricated a hybrid non-volatile gold nanoparticle floating-gate memory metal insulator semiconductor field effect transistor (MISFET) device combining silicon technology and organic thin film deposition. The nanoparticles are deposited by chemical ... Keywords: hybrid Silicon-organic memory, nanocrystal memory, nanoparticles, non-volatile memory

S. Kolliopoulou; P. Dimitrakis; P. Normand; H.-L. Zhang; N. Cant; S. D. Evans; S. Paul; C. Pearson; A. Molloy; M. C. Petty; D. Tsoukalas

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Detection and classification of volatile organic compounds using Indium Tin Oxide sensor array and artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reveals the novel approach of fabricating Indium Tin Oxide thin films grown on glass substrate at 648 K temperatures using direct evaporation method for detection of small concentration volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their ... Keywords: ANNs, ITO thin films, VOC mixtures, VOCs, artificial neural networks, direct evaporation, indium tin oxide, sensor arrays, thin film sensors, volatile organic compounds

H. J. Pandya

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Structure and optical properties of a noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

A new noncentrosymmetric borate, RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (abbreviated as RSBO), has been grown from Rb{sub 2}O--B{sub 2}O{sub 3}--RbF flux and its crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in space group Ama2 with cell parameters of a=11.128(10) A, b=12.155(15) A, c=6.952(7) A, Z=4. The basic structural units are isolated planar BO{sub 3} groups. Second harmonic generation (SHG) test of the title compound by the Kurtz-Perry method shows that RSBO can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP). Finally, based on the anionic group approximation, the optical properties of the title compound are compared with those of the structure-related apatite-like compounds with the formula 'A{sub 5}(TO{sub n}){sub 3}X'. - Graphical abstract: RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and some other borate NLO compounds, namely Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F RCa{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O (R=Y or Gd) and Na{sub 3}La{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as the derivatives of apatite. They have similar formula composed of five cations and three anion groups (we call them 5/3 structures). The detailed SHG coefficients and optical properties of the apatite-like NLO crystals were compared and summarized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown from flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as a derivative of the apatite-like structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure and its relationship to the optical properties of RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} are compared with other NLO crystals with apatite-like structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The basic structural units are the planar BO{sub 3} groups in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}.

Xia, M.J. [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, R.K., E-mail: rkli@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Study of Li{sub 1+x}(Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9}){sub 1-x}O{sub 2} cathode materials for vehicle battery applications.  

SciTech Connect

Li{sub 1+x}(Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9}){sub 1-x}O{sub 2} with two lithium content (x = 0 and 0.05) has been synthesized using coprecipitated (Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9})(OH){sub 2} and their electrochemical properties have been investigated. Compared with the x = 0 material, the lithium-rich material (x = 0.05) exhibited superior electrochemical properties. When cycled between 2.5 and 4.4 V, the Li/Li{sub 1.05}(Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2} cells showed high first-cycle coulombic efficiency (93%), reversible discharge capacity of 187 mAh/g at C/12 with 99% capacity retention after 40 cycles, and excellent rate performance (86% of C/12 rate at 5 C discharge current). The Li{sub 1.05}(Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2} electrode also showed a full-cell pulse power characteristics (5 C discharge pulse) comparable to Li{sub 1.05}(Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2} electrode and better thermal stability at charged state (4.4 V) than charged LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} (4.2 V). Using a battery design and cost model developed in-house, calculations found battery packs with Li{sub 1.05}(Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2} as the positive electrode to be of lower cost and higher energy density than those with LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} and Li{sub 1.05}(Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2} electrodes. The experimental and modeling results obtained in this work suggest Li{sub 1.05}(Mn{sub 4/9}Co{sub 1/9}Ni{sub 4/9}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2} to be a promising cathode material for vehicle battery applications.

Kang, S.-H.; Lu, W.; Gallagher, K. G.; Park, S.-H.; Pol, V. G. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of the K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molten electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

The molten K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/V{sub 2}O{sub 5} system has recently attracted interest due to its possible use as an electrolyte in an electrolytic SO{sub x} flue gas desulfurization process. A 60 mol % K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/40 mol % V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molten salt mixture was tested for electrochemical activity to determine its propensity for sulfate transport. Results of cyclic voltammetry showed a high electrochemical activity due likely to the reduction and oxidation of bulk, as opposed to minor, species. Most reductions and oxidations did not conform to diffusion-limited theory, and indicated the presence of stripping reactions. By Raman spectroscopy V(V) polymers were identified in the melt consisting predominantly of VO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 3{minus}} and VO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} units, while VO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} units were also detected. By reduction of the eutectic mixture with SO{sub 2} a V(IV) and a V(III) compound, most probably K{sub 4}(VO){sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 5} and K{sub 3}V(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, were isolated, as evidenced from infrared and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These compounds might be involved in the electrochemically observed plating and stripping reactions.

Schmidt, D.; Winnick, J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical Engineering; Boghosian, S. [Univ. of Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Inst. of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, Patras (Greece); Fehrmann, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Combined SO sub 2 /NO sub x reduction technology  

SciTech Connect

Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments and passage of state legislation leading to more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) regulations have fueled research and development efforts on technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and NO{sub x}. The integrated removal of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Markussen, J.M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

Ho, Cliff

172

Optimising Flash non-volatile memory using machine learning: a project overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While near ubiquitous, the physical principles of Flash memory mean that its performance degrades with use. During fabrication and operation, its ability to be repeatedly programmed/erased (endurance) needs to be balanced with its ability to store information ... Keywords: Flash memory, endurance, machine learning, memory performance optimisation, non-volatile memory, retention

Tom Arbuckle; Damien Hogan; Conor Ryan

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Volatile organic compound emissions from usaf wastewater treatment plants in ozone nonattainment areas. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), this research conducts an evaluation of the potential emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from selected Air Force wastewater treatment plants. Using a conservative mass balance analysis and process specific simulation models, volatile organic emission estimates are calculated for four individual facilities--Edwards AFB, Luke AFB, McGuire AFB, and McClellan AFB--which represent a cross section of the current inventory of USAF wastewater plants in ozone nonattainment areas. From these calculations, maximum facility emissions are determined which represent the upper limit for the potential VOC emissions from these wastewater plants. Based on the calculated emission estimates, each selected wastewater facility is evaluated as a potential major stationary source of volatile organic emissions under both Title I of the 1990 CAAA and the plant's governing Clean Air Act state implementation plan. Next, the potential impact of the specific volatile organics being emitted is discussed in terms of their relative reactivity and individual contribution to tropospheric ozone formation. Finally, a relative comparison is made between the estimated VOC emissions for the selected wastewater facilities and the total VOC emissions for their respective host installations.

Ouellette, B.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

EFFECT OF O2 ON SIC VOLATILIZATION RATE. R.A. Mendybaev1,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

previous work on the volatilization rate of SiC in reducing gases [1, 2] was restricted to IW-2.8 and IW-6 us to estimate lifetimes of interstellar SiC grains (several months at 1200¡C) in a gas of solar lifetimes of inter- stellar SiC grains were significantly different from those we calculated previously

Grossman, Lawrence

175

PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS BY STRICTLY ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF GNOTOXENIC MICE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS BY STRICTLY ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF « GNOTOXENIC » MICE. INHIBITORY EFFECT ON SHIGELLA FLEXNERI Various strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria of holoxenic animals, were implanted in the digestive tract of axenic mice. The in vivo production of VFA

Recanati, Catherine

176

Linear driving force models for dynamic adsorption of volatile organic compound traces by porous adsorbent beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models for the dynamic adsorption of volatile organic compound (VOC) traces in air are considered. They are based on the linear driving force approximation associated with various adsorption isotherms characteristic of the couple VOC-adsorbent (Langmuir, ... Keywords: Comsol, Dubinin-Astakhov isotherm, Dynamic adsorption modelling, Finite element

Agns Joly; Alain Perrard

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Behavior of Aqueous Electrolytes in Steam Cycles: The Solubility and Volatility of Cupric Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncontrolled copper transport activity represents a potentially significant source of performance and reliability loss to fossil plants with mixed-metallurgy feedwater systems. Recent utility experiences with severe copper turbine fouling and other related problems identified the need for basic fundamental research to improve industry understanding of the volatility and solubility of copper and its oxides.

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

178

Oxidation, Volatilization, and Redistribution of Molybdenum from TZM Alloy in Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases. Oxidized molybdenum in turn is susceptible to losses from volatile molybdenum trioxide species, (MoO3)m, in air and the hydroxide, MoO2(OH)2, formed from water vapor. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of these volatile species during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. In this report we present experimental results on the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800C. These results are compared with calculations obtained from a vaporization mass transfer model using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures of MoO3(g) over pure solid MoO3 and an expression for the vapor pressures of MoO2(OH)2 from the literature. Calculations correlate well with experimental data.

Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Mccarthy, Kathryn Ann; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Bayesian Modelling Volatility of Growth Rate in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric gases, such as carbon dioxide, ozone, methane, nitrous oxide, and etc., create a natural greenhouse effect and cause climate change. Therefore, modelling behavior of these gases could help policy makers to control greenhouse effects. In a ... Keywords: Stochastic volatility, Smooth transition autoregressive, Markov chain Monte Carlo, methods, Bayesian, ARCH, GARCH

Esmail Amiri

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A room temperature CuO nanowire sensor for organic volatile gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CuO nanowires have been synthesised by the thermal method in 100% oxygen ambient at 600C. Gas sensing property has been examined by measuring the resistance change of the materials to 1% of butane gas and 1% of ethanol vapour separately under the ... Keywords: copper oxide (CuO) nanowires, room temperature gas sensor and organic volatile gas

C. F. Dee; T. Y. Tiong; M. M. Salleh; M. M. Yahya; B. Y. Majlis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analyzing and Forecasting Volatility Spillovers, Asymmetries and Hedging in Major Oil Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Crude oil price volatility has been analyzed extensively for organized spot, forward and futures markets for well over a decade, and is crucial for forecasting volatility and Value-at-Risk (VaR). There are four major benchmarks in the international oil market, namely West Texas Intermediate (USA), Brent (North Sea), Dubai/Oman (Middle East), and Tapis (Asia-Pacific), which are likely to be highly correlated. This paper analyses the volatility spillover and asymmetric effects across and within the four markets, using three multivariate GARCH models, namely the constant conditional correlation (CCC), vector ARMA-GARCH (VARMA-GARCH) and vector ARMA-asymmetric GARCH (VARMA-AGARCH) models. A rolling window approach is used to forecast the 1-day ahead conditional correlations. The paper presents evidence of volatility spillovers and asymmetric effects on the conditional variances for most pairs of series. In addition, the forecast conditional correlations between pairs of crude oil returns have both positive and negative trends. Moreover, the optimal hedge ratios and optimal portfolio weights of crude oil across different assets and market portfolios are evaluated in order to provide important policy implications for risk management in crude oil markets.

Chia-lin Chang; Michael Mcaleer; Roengchai Tansuchat; Chia-lin Chang; Michael Mcaleer; Roengchai Tansuchat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Volatile impurities in the ceramic form for the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP)  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal for the impurity tests performed at SRS was to determine the maximum level of volatile impurities that can be accommodated into the ceramic form without significantly affecting product properties. The properties investigated in this study are the apparent porosity and the phase assemblage.

Cozzi, A.D.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Method of preparing (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and byproducts thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy.

Spicer, Leonard D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Bennett, Dennis W. (Clemson, SC); Davis, Jon F. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}, a new lithium-rich fluorooxoborate  

SciTech Connect

The new lithium fluorooxoborate, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}, is obtained by a solid state reaction from LiBO{sub 2} and LiBF{sub 4} at 553 K and crystallizes in the acentric orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (no. 19) with the cell parameters a=4.8915(9), b=8.734(2), and c=12.301(2) A. Chains of fluorinated boroxine rings along the b axis consists of BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as BO{sub 3}F tetrahedra. Mobile lithium ions are compensating the negative charge of the anionic chain, in which the fourfold coordinated boron atoms bear a negative formal charge. Annealing Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} at temperatures above 573 K leads to conversion into Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}. The title compound is an ionic conductor with the highest ion conductivity among the hitherto know lithium fluorooxoborates, with conductivities of 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} S cm{sup -1} at 473 and 523 K, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Repetition unit of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} is the third member within the family of lithium fluorooxoborates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It shows the highest lithium ion conductivity among them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chains of interconnected fluorinated boroxine rings run along the b axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acentric space group meets the requirement for second harmonic generation.

Pilz, Thomas; Nuss, Hanne [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Jansen, Martin, E-mail: M.Jansen@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

ESR studies of two new organic superconductors: {beta}``-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}{sub L}`-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(DBCE)  

SciTech Connect

The normal-state ESR of two new organic superconductors, {beta}{double_prime}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}{sub L}{prime}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(DBCE) are reported. Both compounds showed metallic properties below 140 K. The former gave ESR line widths and g-values of 23-34 G and 2.004-2.012. The latter gave line widths and g-values of 45-58 G and 2.006-2.012. Orientation-dependent line widths and g-values of the {kappa}{sub L}{prime}-phase were found to be similar to that of the {kappa}-(ET){sub 4}Hg{sub 3}Br{sub 8} but not to the {kappa}{sub L}-phases in general.

Wang, H.H.; VanZile, M.L.; Geiser, U. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Structural and magnetic properties and superconductivity in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effects on structural and magnetic phase transitions and the emergence of superconductivity in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. We grew four series of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (TM=Ru, Mn, Co+Cr and Co+Mn) and characterized them by crystallographic, magnetic and transport measurements. We also subjected Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} to heat treatment to explore what changes might be induced.

Thaler, Alexander

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for DE-FC26-07NT43091 ??Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture?. A detailed summary is provided of the ionic liquid (IL) discovery process, synthesis and testing results, process / systems modeling, lab-scale operational testing, corrosion testing and commercialization possibilities. The work resulted in the discovery of a new class of ionic liquids (ILs) that efficiently react with CO{sub 2} in a 1:1 stoichiometry with no water present and no increase in viscosity. The enthalpy of reaction was tuned to optimize process economics. The IL was found to have excellent corrosion behavior with and without CO{sub 2} present. In lab-scale tests, the IL was able to effectively remove CO{sub 2} from a simulated flue gas stream, although mass transfer was slower than with aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) due to higher viscosities. The non-volatile nature of the solvent and its high thermal stability, however, make it an intriguing option. An independent systems analysis indicates that the economics of using the best IL discovered to date (NDIL0157), are at least comparable to ?? and potentially slightly better than -?? the Fluor Econamine FG PlusTM process (DOE Case 12). Further work should be directed at improving mass transfer / lowering viscosity and developing commercial synthesis routes to make these ILs at scale in an inexpensive manner. Demonstration of the process at larger scales is also warranted, as is the exploration of other process configurations that leverage the anhydrous nature of the solvent and its extremely low volatility.

Maginn, Edward

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Phase diagram of Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a systematic investigation of the phase diagram of the iron-based superconductor Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} from x = 0 to x = 1.0 using high-resolution neutron and x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. The polycrystalline samples were prepared with an estimated compositional variation of {Delta}x {le} 0.01, allowing a more precise estimate of the phase boundaries than reported so far. At room temperature, Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} crystallizes in a tetragonal structure with the space group symmetry of I4/mmm, but at low doping, the samples undergo a coincident first-order structural and magnetic phase transition to an orthorhombic (O) structure with the space group Fmmm and a striped antiferromagnet (AF) with the space group F{sub c}mm'm'. The transition temperature falls from a maximum of 139 K in the undoped compound to 0 K at x = 0.252, with a critical exponent as a function of doping of 0.25(2) and 0.12(1) for the structural and magnetic order parameters, respectively. The onset of superconductivity occurs at a critical concentration of x = 0.130(3), and the superconducting transition temperature grows linearly with x until it crosses the AF/O phase boundary. Below this concentration, there is microscopic phase coexistence of the AF/O and superconducting order parameters, although a slight suppression of the AF/O order is evidence that the phases are competing. At higher doping, superconductivity has a maximum T{sub c} of 38 K at x = 0.4 that falls to 3 K at x = 1.0. We discuss reasons for the suppression of the spin density wave order and the electron-hole asymmetry in the phase diagram.

Avci, S.; Chmaissem, O.; Chung, D. Y.; Rosenkranz, S.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Castellan, J. P.; Todorov, I. S.; Schlueter, J. A.; Claus, H.; Daoud-Aladine, A.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Osborn, R. (Materials Science Division); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (Rutherford Appleton Lab.); (Northwestern Univ.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Polymorphism in {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}M(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(solvent) superconductors  

SciTech Connect

A new crystallographic modification ({Kappa}{sub L}{sup `}) was found in the BEDT-TTF:M(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup -}: solvent (M=Cu, Ag, Au) system. The structure of monoclinic {Kappa}{sub L}{sup `}-(BEDT- TTF){sub 2}Cu(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(1,2-dibromo-1-chloroethane = DCBE) is reported. It differs from the orthorhombic {Kappa}{sub L}{sup `}- phase by having all BEDT-TTF molecules tilted in the same direction with respect to the conducting phase normal, whereas in {Kappa}{sub L} the tilt direction alternates between layers.

Geiser, U.; Schlueter, J.A.; Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M.; Dudek, J.D.; Kelly, M.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Naumann, D.; Roy, T. [Univ. Koln, Koln (Germany) Inst. fur anorganische Chemie

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Isopiestic Measurement of the Osmotic Coefficients of Aqueous {XH<sub>2sub>SO>4sub> + (1-X)Fe<sub>2sub>(SO>4sub>)>3sub>} Solutions at 298.15 and 323.15K  

SciTech Connect

This study measures the osmotic coefficients of {l_brace}xH{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + (1-x)Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}{r_brace}(aq) solutions at 298.15 and 323.15 K that have ionic strengths as great as 19.3 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, using the isopiestic method. Experiments utilized both aqueous NaCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as reference solutions. Equilibrium values of the osmotic coefficient obtained using the two different reference solutions were in satisfactory internal agreement. The solutions follow generally the Zdanovskii empirical linear relationship and yield values of a{sub w} for the Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}-H{sub 2}O binary system at 298.15 K that are in good agreement with recent work and are consistent with other M{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}-H{sub 2}O binary systems.

Velazquez-Rivera, Mariano [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Kettler, Richard M. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Palmer, Donald [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

PARTICULATE CHARACTERIZATION AND ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNER FOR THE CONTROL OF NO{sub x} AND PM{sub 2.5} FOR COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

In response to the serious challenge facing coal-fired electric utilities with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} and fine particulate emissions, Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc. conducted a project entitled, ''Particulate Characterization and Ultra Low-NO{sub x} Burner for the Control of NO{sub x} and PM{sub 2.5} for Coal Fired Boilers.'' The project included pilot-scale demonstration and characterization of technologies for removal of NO{sub x} and primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions. Burner development and PM{sub 2.5} characterization efforts were based on utilizing innovative concepts in combination with sound scientific and fundamental engineering principles and a state-of-the-art test facility. Approximately 1540 metric tonnes (1700 tons) of high-volatile Ohio bituminous coal were fired. Particulate sampling for PM{sub 2.5} emissions characterization was conducted in conjunction with burner testing. Based on modeling recommendations, a prototype ultra low-NO{sub x} burner was fabricated and tested at 100 million Btu/hr in the Babcock and Wilcox Clean Environment Development Facility. Firing the unstaged burner with a high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh 8 coal at 100 million Btu/hr and 17% excess air achieved a NO{sub x} goal of 0.20 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu with a fly ash loss on ignition (LOI) of 3.19% and burner pressure drop of 4.7 in H{sub 2}O for staged combustion. With the burner stoichiometry set at 0.88 and the overall combustion stoichiometry at 1.17, average NO{sub x} and LOI values were 0.14 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu and 4.64% respectively. The burner was also tested with a high-volatile Mahoning 7 coal. Based on the results of this work, commercial demonstration is being pursued. Size classified fly ash samples representative of commercial low-NO{sub x} and ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion of Pittsburgh 8 coal were collected at the inlet and outlet of an ESP. The mass of size classified fly ash at the ESP outlet was sufficient to evaluate the particle size distribution, but was of insufficient size to permit reliable chemical analysis. The size classified fly ash from the inlet of the ESP was used for detailed chemical analyses. Chemical analyses of the fly ash samples from the ESP outlet using a high volume sampler were performed for comparison to the size classified results at the inlet. For all test conditions the particulate removal efficiency of the ESP exceeded 99.3% and emissions were less than the NSPS limits of {approx}48 mg/dscm. With constant combustion conditions, the removal efficiency of the ESP increased as the ESP voltage and Specific Collection Area (SCA) increased. The associated decrease in particle emissions occurred in size fractions both larger and smaller than 2.5 microns. For constant ESP voltage and SCA, the removal efficiency for the ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.4-99.6%) was only slightly less than for the low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.7%). The decrease in removal efficiency was accompanied by a decrease in ESP current. The emission of PM{sub 2.5} from the ESP did not change significantly as a result of the change in combustion conditions. Most of the increase in emissions was in the size fraction greater than 2.5 microns, indicating particle re-entrainment. These results may be specific to the coal tested in this program. In general, the concentration of inorganic elements and trace species in the fly ash at the ESP inlet was dependent on the particle size fraction. The smallest particles tended to have higher concentrations of inorganic elements/trace species than larger particles. The concentration of most elements by particle size range was independent of combustion condition and the concentration of soluble ions in the fly ash showed little change with combustion condition when evaluated on a carbon free basis.

Ralph Bailey; Hamid Sarv; Jim Warchol; Debi Yurchison

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Millimeter size single crystals of superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of growing large, up to 1 mm size single crystals of superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x], wherein x equals from 6.5 to 7.2 is disclosed.

Damento, M.A.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

193

Millimeter size single crystals of superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub .  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of growing large, up to 1 mm size single crystals of superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x, wherein x equals from 6.5 to 7.2.

Damento, Michael A. (Ames, IA); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA)

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

Carbon K-shell excitation of gaseous and condensed cyclic hydrocarbons: C/sub 3/H/sub 6/, C/sub 4/H/sub 8/, C/sub 5/H/sub 8/, C/sub 5/H/sub 10/, C/sub 6/H/sub 10/, C/sub 6/H/sub 12/, and C/sub 8/H/sub 8/  

SciTech Connect

The carbon K-shell excitation spectra of gaseous cyclic hydrocarbons, both saturated (cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane) and unsaturated (cyclopentene, cyclohexene, and cyclooctatetraene), have been recorded by electron energy loss spectroscopy under dipole-dominated conditions. These are compared to the NEXAFS spectra of multilayers and monolayers of C/sub 4/H/sub 8/, C/sub 5/H/sub 8/, C/sub 6/H/sub 12/, and C/sub 8/H/sub 8/ on Pt(111). Multiple scattering X..cap alpha.. calculations of the spectra of cyclopropane, cyclobutane, and cyclohexane are also reported. In most cases the gas and solid spectra are essentially the same indicating that intramolecular transitions dominate in the condensed phase. The NEXAFS polarization dependence of the condensed phases has assisted spectral assignments and the determination of the molecular orientation in the monolayer phase. In the saturated species a sharp feature about 3 eV below the carbon 1s ionization threshold is identified as a transition to a state of mixed Rydberg/valence character with the ..pi..*(CH/sub 2/) valence component dominating. Except for cyclopropane the positions of the main sigma * resonances correlate with the C-C bond lengths in a manner similar to that reported previously for noncyclic aliphatic molecules. In the spectra of monolayer C/sub 6/H/sub 12/, C/sub 5/H/sub 8/, and C/sub 8/H/sub 8/ spectral broadening and weak additional features are observed which are attributed to molecule-surface interactions.

Hitchcock, A.P.; Newbury, D.C.; Ishii, I.; Stoehr, J.; Horsley, J.A.; Redwing, R.D.; Johnson, A.L.; Sette, F.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Crack resistance and atomic structure of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} single crystals  

SciTech Connect

The nature of destruction of single crystals of lithium tetraborate Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} under the action of a concentrated load is investigated. It is established that planes of easy crack propagation in Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} single crystals are the (100), (010), (001), and {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes. It is found that crack propagation occurs in each case along the atomic layers that are linked by bridge oxygen atoms between main structural units (B{sub 4}O{sub 9}) and, therefore, are most weakly bound.

Dolzhenkova, E. F., E-mail: dol@isc.kharkov.ua; Baumer, V. N.; Tolmachev, A. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Single Crystals (Ukraine)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

SEARCHING FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULE BUTATRIENYLIDENE IN REACTION C{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the reaction C{sub 2}(X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} {sub g}/a {sup 3}{Pi} {sub u}) + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} at collision energy 5.0 kcal mol{sup -1} in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus using selective photoionization. Time-of-flight and photoionization spectra of products C{sub 4}H{sub 3} and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} were measured. From the best simulation of product time-of-flight spectra, a low-energy-biased translational-energy distribution and an isotropic angular distribution are derived for product channels C{sub 4}H{sub 3} + H and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} + H{sub 2} that have average translational-energy releases of 11 and 20 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. Product C{sub 4}H{sub 3} is identified as H{sub 2}CCCCH because its ionization threshold 8.0 {+-} 0.2 eV and maximal translational-energy release 42 kcal mol{sup -1} coincide with that of product channel H{sub 2}CCCCH + H. H{sub 2}CCCC (butatrienylidene) and HCCCCH (diacetylene) might have contributions to product C{sub 4}H{sub 2}; both isomers have ionization energies near the measured ionization threshold 10.0 {+-} 0.2 eV and the maximal translational-energy release 62 kcal mol{sup -1} is within the energetic limits of both isomeric product channels. Nonetheless, channel H{sub 2}CCCC + H{sub 2} is suggested to be more dominant than channel HCCCCH + H{sub 2} because the maximal translational-energy release is in good agreement with the available energy of the former channel and the former channel is 3.8 times the branching ratio of the later channel predicted by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations. C{sub 4}H{sub 2} is identified for the first time in the barrierless reaction C{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} which has never been considered in any astronomical chemical networks. This work sheds new light on the formation of butatrienylidene/diacetylene in cold interstellar media where C{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} are abundant.

Lee, Shih-Huang; Huang, Wen-Jian; Lin, Yi-Cheng; Chin, Chih-Hao, E-mail: shlee@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method for preparation of textured YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relate to textured YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (Y-123) superconductors and a process of preparing them by directional recrystallization of compacts fabricated from quenched YBCO powders at temperatures about 100.degree. C. below the peritectic temperature to provide a superconductor where more than 75% of the YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x phase is obtained without any Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 .

Selvamanickam, Venkat (Guilderland, NY); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gov. King's stance against utilities upsets both camps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Massachusetts utilities and utility detractors all object to Governor King's position stated at a March press conference and urging regulators to deny rate increases that he claimed would be paying for utility mistakes. Boston Edison's request for a $291 million rate increase would recover the money lost when the utility abandoned its Pilgrim II nuclear plant. Boston Gas is seeking $46 million to recover money lost during last winter's shortage of natural gas. The governor's timing and mode of intervention prompted most of the criticism because of their political ramifications during an election year. Most of his statements drew upon materials from a consumer group called Fair Share, but were stated in a way that the governor's re-election is necessary to secure the desired effects. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Tilt grain boundaries in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grain boundaries in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} superconductor thin films grown on (001) MgO by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). It was found that the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} thin films were highly textured with the c axes, or (001) orientation, nearly parallel between grains and perpendicular to the MgO substrate. A majority of the grain boundaries are low-angle boundaries with a tilt angle, {theta}, less than 15{degree}. The low-angle boundaries appear to be strongly faceted on an atomic scale in such a way that the boundary planes tend to be parallel to the (100), (010), or (110) lattice planes in one of the adjacent grains. Almost all of the lattice planes, except for a number of distorted regions along the boundaries, are continuous across the boundaries from one grain to another, accommodating the misorientation with a slight bending of the lattice planes. The small-angle boundaries are shown to consist of arrays of dislocations. A domain structure, formed by the interchange of a and b axes has been observed in large grains. The domain boundaries are strongly faceted with the (100) and (010) lattice planes parallel to the boundaries. These observations on the atomic structure of boundaries, are used to discuss the effect of grain boundaries on superconductor properties in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} thin films. 15 refs., 9 figs.

Gao, Y.; Bai, G.; Chang, H.L.M.; Merkle, K.L.; Lam, D.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hydrogen Geysers: Explanation for Observed Evidence of Geologically Recent Volatile-Related Activity on Mercury's Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High resolution images of Mercury's surface, from the MESSENGER spacecraft, reveal many bright deposits associated with irregular, shallow, rimless depressions whose origins were attributed to volatile-related activity, but absent information on the nature and origin of that volatile matter. Here I describe planetary formation, unlike the cited models, and show that primordial condensation from an atmosphere of solar composition at pressures of one atmosphere or above will lead to iron condensing as a liquid and dissolving copious amounts of hydrogen, which is subsequently released as Mercury's core solidifies and escapes from the surface, yielding the observed pit-like features with associated highly-reflecting matter. The exiting hydrogen chemically reduces some iron compound, probably iron sulfide, to the metal, which accounts for the bright deposits.

J. Marvin Herndon

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Declining Volatility, a General Property of Disparate Systems: From Fossils, to Stocks, to the Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There may be structural principles pertaining to the general behavior of systems that lead to similarities in a variety of different contexts. Classic examples include the descriptive power of fractals, the importance of surface area to volume constraints, the universality of entropy in systems, and mathematical rules of growth and form. Documenting such overarching principles may represent a rejoinder to the Neodarwinian synthesis that emphasizes adaptation and competition. Instead, these principles could indicate the importance of constraint and structure on form and evolution. Here we document a potential example of a phenomenon suggesting congruent behavior of very different systems. We focus on the notion that universally there has been a tendency for more volatile entities to disappear from systems such that the net volatility in these systems tends to decline. We specifically focus on origination and extinction rates in the marine animal fossil record, the performance of stocks in the stock market, and...

Lieberman, Bruce S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The role of non-volatile memory from an application perspective  

SciTech Connect

Current, emerging, and future NVM (non-volatile memory) technologies give us hope that we will be able to architect HPC (high performance computing) systems that initially use them in a memory and storage hierarchy, and eventually use them as the memory and storage for the system, complete with ownership and protections as a HDD-based (hard-disk-drive-based) file system provides today.

Kettering, Brett M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nunez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ionic conduction mechanisms in CaF{sub 2} and CaF{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite films on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films of pure CaF{sub 2} and nanocomposite mixtures of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with CaF{sub 2} were sublimated on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. Interdigital electrodes allowed in situ measurements of the electrical conduction vs thickness, deposition rate, composition, time, and temperature. Conductivity in pure CaF{sub 2} adjacent to an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface sometimes exceeded the bulk CaF{sub 2} conductivity (i.e., value at more than 50 nm distance) by as much as a factor of 6700 at 200C. The high conductivity is characterized by an activation energy of 0.6{plus_minus}0.1 eV, significantly lower than about 1.0 eV for bulk conduction. However, this high conductivity is thermally unstable and diminishes in time. A high but stable conductivity was obtained in CaF{sub 2} films containing about 10 mole percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersed second phase. At 200C, a 2-phase film gave a factor of 360 enhancement over the measured bulk CaF{sub 2} conductivity and a factor of 7 improvement over the best previously reported conductivity for CaF{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite materials. The origin of enhanced conduction in CaF{sub 2} is attributed to ion transport along dislocations. Dislocations anneal with a characteristic log of time dependence that is recognizable in the annealing behavior of the electrical conductivity. Presumably, the addition of a dispersed second phase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to CaF{sub 2} serves both to generate and to pin dislocations; the electrical conductance is thereby enhanced and stabilized.

Modine, F.A.; Lubben, D.; Bates, J.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 4 Volatile Odor and Flavor Components Formed in Deep Frying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 4 Volatile Odor and Flavor Components Formed in Deep Frying Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioch

205

Bi[NC{sub 5}H{sub 3}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}](OH{sub 2}){sub x}F (x=1 and 2): New one-dimensional Bi-coordination materials-Reversible hydration and topotactic decomposition to {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

Two one-dimensional bismuth-coordination materials, Bi[NC{sub 5}H{sub 3}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}](OH{sub 2}){sub x}F (x=1 and 2), have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions using Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 2,6-NC{sub 5}H{sub 3}(CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}, HF, and water at 180 Degree-Sign C. Structures of the two materials were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Although they have different crystal structures, both Bi-organic materials shared a common structural motif, a one-dimensional chain structure consisting of Bi{sup 3+} cations and pyridine dicarboxylate linkers. Detailed structural analyses include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and reversible hydration reactions for the coordinated water molecules were reported. Also, thermal decomposition of the rod-shaped Bi[NC{sub 5}H{sub 3}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}](OH{sub 2})F single crystals at 800 Degree-Sign C led to {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} that maintained the same morphology of the original crystals. - Graphical abstract: Calcination of the Bi[NC{sub 5}H{sub 3}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}](OH{sub 2})F single crystals at 800 Degree-Sign C results in the {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} rods that maintain the original morphology of the crystals. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of one-dimensional chain Bi-organic frameworks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible hydration reactions of Bi[NC{sub 5}H{sub 3}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}](OH{sub 2})F. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topotactic decomposition maintaining the same morphology of the original crystals.

Jeon, Hye Rim [Department of Chemistry Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Woo [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ok, Kang Min, E-mail: kmok@cau.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

A cluster with a mixed M{sub 6}X{sub 12}/M{sub 6}X{sub 8} environment: The La{sub 6}Cl{sub 11}Co structure  

SciTech Connect

The title compound was synthesized from La, LaCl{sub 3} and Co under Ar atmosphere at 800 deg. C. It crystallizes in space group P4{sub 2}/n (no. 86) with lattice constants a=11.308(2) A and c=14.441(3) A. The structure features an isolated Co-centered La{sub 6} octahedron with all corners and edges, and 2 of its 8 triangular faces coordinated by Cl atoms. The La{sub 6}Co octahedron is significantly distorted, and the La coordination by Cl atoms deviates from the common close-packing arrangements found in other reduced rare earth metal halides. Structure, bonding and physical properties of the compound have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: La{sub 6}Cl{sub 11}Co octahedron exhibiting a mixed M{sub 6}X{sub 12}/M{sub 6}X{sub 12} coordination environment.

Zheng Chong, E-mail: czheng@niu.ed [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Mattausch, Hansjuergen; Hoch, Constantin; Simon, Arndt [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} - two new Ae-Zn-Sn polar intermetallic compounds (Ae: alkaline earth metal)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}, two closely related new polar intermetallic compounds, were obtained by high temperature reactions of the elements. Their crystal structures were determined with single crystal XRD methods, and their electronic structures were analyzed by means of DFT calculations. The Zn-Sn structure part of SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} comprises (anti-)PbO-like {l_brace}ZnSn{sub 4/4}{r_brace} and {l_brace}SnZn{sub 4/4}{r_brace} layers. Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} shows similar {l_brace}ZnSn{sub 4/4}{r_brace} layers and {l_brace}Sn{sub 4}Zn{r_brace} slabs constructed of a covalently bonded Sn scaffold capped by Zn atoms. For both phases, the two types of layers are alternatingly stacked and interconnected via Zn-Sn bonds. SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} adopts the SrPd{sub 2}Bi{sub 2} structure type, and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} is isotypic to the R{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Ge{sub 6} compounds (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd). Band structure calculations indicate that both SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} are metallic. Analyses of the chemical bonding with the electron localization function (ELF) show lone pair like basins at Sn atoms and Zn-Sn bonding interactions between the layers for both title phases, and covalent Sn-Sn bonding within the {l_brace}Sn{sub 4}Zn{r_brace} layers of Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of the new Ae-Zn-Sn polar intermetallic phases SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New polar intermetallic phases SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Obtained by high temperature reactions of the elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal XRD structure determination and DFT electronic structure calculations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Closely related crystal and electronic structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metallic conductivity coexisting with lone pairs and covalent bonding features.

Stegmaier, Saskia [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching (Germany); Faessler, Thomas F., E-mail: Thomas.Faessler@lrz.tum.de [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Infrared phonon structure in epitaxial films of Tl sub 2 Ca sub 2 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 10 at low temperatures  

SciTech Connect

We have used both bolometric and cavity techniques to obtain accurate submillimeter and microwave loss data for epitaxial thin films of Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} at low temperatures. These films have {Tc}=121.5 K, are c-axis oriented, contain some volume fraction of the 2:1:2:2 phase, and are characterized by excellent in-plane epitaxy. The absorptivity of these films at 100 cm{sup {minus}1} is a factor of five lower than that obtained by others from a reflectivity measurement on a ceramic sample. We observe strong phonon structure for frequencies between 70 and 600 cm{sup {minus}1}, which are in agreement with a lattice dynamical calculation. Our results show remarkably similar phonon structure to that observed in the ceramic sample. This is in strong contrast to the case for other high {Tc} superconductors such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, where phonon structure observed in ceramic samples in absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of the electronic screening due to the high conductivity of the a-b planes. At microwave frequencies the absorptivity follows a frequency squared dependence, and is consistent with the submillimeter results. 6 refs.

Miller, D.; Richards, P.L. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Lee, W.Y. (IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States). Almaden Research Center); Newman, N.; Garrison, S.M. (Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)); Martens, J.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electron microscopy studies of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of bulk microstructures of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} (space group: Pnma) using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) reveals the existence of thin plates of a hexagonal phase (space group: P6{sub 3}/mcm) where the stoichiometric ratio in moles between the rare earths and Si is 5 to 3, i. e the 5:3 phase. The orientation relationship between the matrix and the plates was determined as [010]{sub m} {approx} -parallel [-1010]{sub p.} This observation adds credence to the assumption that all linear features noted in alloys of the rare-earth intermetallic family R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} are of the stoichiometric ratio 5:3 and possess a common orientation relationship with the parent 5:4 alloys. - Highlights: {yields} The linear features observed in the (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} sample are hexagonal 5:3 plates. {yields} Thickness of 5:3 plates in 5:4 alloys made by tri-arc pulling is greater than made by arc-melting. {yields} The orientation relationship between 5:3 plates and the matrix is [010]{sub m} {approx} ||[-1010]{sub p}.

Cao, Q., E-mail: qcao@iastate.edu; Chumbley, L.S.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Crystal-chemistry of mullite-type aluminoborates Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} and Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9}: A stoichiometry puzzle  

SciTech Connect

Orthorhombic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich aluminoborate is an important ceramic material for which two slightly different compositions have been assumed: Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9} (5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} (9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The formula Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} (=Al{sub 4.91}B{sub 1.09}O{sub 9}) was derived from results of chemical analyses when crystal structure data were not yet available. Subsequent structural investigations indicated Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9} composition. Nevertheless, Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} was still accepted as the correct stoichiometry assuming that additional B replaces 9% Al. Powder samples of both compositions and ones with excess boron were prepared by solid state reactions between {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} at temperatures above 1100 {sup o}C and single-crystals were grown from flux at 1100 and 1550 {sup o}C. Products were investigated by single-crystal and powder XRD, {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al solid-state MAS-NMR, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy as well as Laser-ablation ICP-MS. No indication of the predicted 9% B{yields}Al substitution was found. LA ICP-MS indicated 12.36(27) wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} corresponding to Al{sub 4.97}B{sub 1.03}O{sub 9}. Hence, the suggested Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} stoichiometry can be excluded for all synthesized samples. A very low amount of Al vacancies at a five-fold coordinated site are likely, charge balanced by an additional nearby three-fold coordinated B site. All evidences indicate that the title compound should be reported as Al{sub 5-x}B{sub 1+x}O{sub 9} with x<0.038(6), which is close to Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9}. -- Graphical abstract: A chemical composition of Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33}=Al{sub 4.91}B{sub 1.09}O{sub 9}=9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:2B{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been assumed for mullite-type aluminoborate with Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9} structure. However, samples prepared by different routes showed compositions close to 5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Display Omitted

Fisch, Martin, E-mail: fisch@krist.unibe.c [Mineralogical Crystallography, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Armbruster, Thomas [Mineralogical Crystallography, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Rentsch, Daniel [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Research, Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Libowitzky, Eugen [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Kristallographie, Universitaet Wien - Geozentrum, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Pettke, Thomas [Rock-Water Interaction Group, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mechanism of plutonium metal dissolution in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An oxidation-reduction balance of the products of the dissolution of plutonium metal and alloys in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution shows that the major reactions during dissolution are the reduction of nitrate to NH/sub 3/, N/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/O by the metal, and the oxidation of H free radicals to NH/sub 3/ by N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. Reactions between HNO/sub 3/ and N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ produce varying amounts of HN/sub 3/. The reaction rate is greater for delta-Pu than alpha-Pu, and is increased by higher concentrations of HF and HNO/sub 3/. The low yield of reduced nitrogen species indicates that nitrate is reduced on the metal surface without producing a significant concentration of species that react with N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. It is conjectured that intermediate Pu valences and electron transfer within the metal are involved. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

Karraker, D G

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Processing & properties La{sub 1-x}A{sub x}Co{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3}(A = Sr, Ca) perovskites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Selected compositions within the system La{sub 1-x}A{sub x}Co{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}}(A = Sr, Ca) were prepared by combustion synthesis and characterized by XRD, TGA, electrical conductivity, and oxygen permeation measurements. Substantial weight loss (due to loss of lattice oxygen) was observed in some compositions at high temperatures. For Sr containing materials, this weight loss increased with increasing Sr content. A substantial decrease in electronic conductivity was observed at high temperatures in Sr doped materials; this decrease was related to the decreased oxygen stoichiometry at these temperatures. In Sr doped compositions, oxygen flux increased with increasing Sr content. Calculated values of ionic conductivity were greater than the conductivity of yttria stabilized zirconia. Substitution of Ca for Sr resulted in substantially lower fluxes.

Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Pederson, L.R. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Chains of centered metal clusters with a novel range of distortions: Pr[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ru, Y[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ru, and Y[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ir  

SciTech Connect

The phases R[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ru (R = La, Pr, Gd, Y, Er) and R[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ir (R = Gd, Y) are obtained from the reactions of R, RI[sub 3], and Ru or Ir for 3-4 weeks in sealed Ta tubing at 850-975C, depending on the system. The title phases have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray means at room temperature. The first phase contains quasi-infinite double chains of edge-sharing Pr[sub 6](Ru) octahedra that are sheathed and interbridged by iodine. An evidently continuous distortion of these chains parallels the a/b axial ratio (in the order listed in the first sentence) such that metal octahedra are no longer obvious in Y[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ir; rather chains of trans-edge-sharing square pyramidal Y[sub 4]Ir units bonded base-to-base are more apt. Increased R-R, R-interstitial, and interstitial-interstitial bonding appears to parallel the degree of distortion. Magnetic data for La[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ru and Pr[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ru and the results of extended Hueckel band calculations on Pr[sub 3]I[sub 3]Ru are reported. Polar covalent Pr-Ru interactions and at least a quasi-closed shell configuration are emphasized by the latter.

Payne, M.W.; Dorhout, P.K.; Kim, Sungjin; Hughbanks, T.R.; Corbett, J.D. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States) Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Optical studies of the {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}RSO{sub 3} R = CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}, CHFCF{sub 2} and CHF system: Chemical tuning of the counterion  

SciTech Connect

The authors compare the polarized optical spectra of the organic metal {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFSO{sub 3} and the {beta}{double_prime}-ET{sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material with those of the first fully organic superconductor {beta}{double_prime}-ET{sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. The small chemical modification of the counterion has a dramatic effect on the spectral and charge transport properties of these materials, and they discuss their electronic structure in terms of band structure, many-body effects, and disorder. Based on structural differences in the anion pocket of the three salts, they conclude that the unusual electronic excitations observed in the {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material are caused by disorder-related localization.

Olejniczak, I.; Jones, B. R.; Dong, J.; Pigos, J. M.; Zhu, Z.; Garlach, A. D.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Schlueter, J. A.; Ward, B. H.; Morales, E.; Kini, A. M.; Winter, R. W.; Mohtasham, J.; Gard, G. L.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Activity of tungsten and rhenium filaments in CH sub 4 /H sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 /H sub 2 mixtures: Importance for diamond CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The resistance R, spectral emissivity {epsilon}, and power consumption of W and Re filaments heated to 2500 {degree}C in mixtures of CH{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in H{sub 2} have been measured in a series of experiments focusing on the state of the filament activity, i.e., its ability to dissociate the reactant gases. It has been found that these properties of the filaments, as well as the partial pressures of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in the reaction chamber, depend critically on both the filament temperature and the reactant ratio, e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}. Specifically, both W and Re filaments show sharp jumps in power consumption at essentially the same temperature, signaling strong increases in filament activity and, hence, production of atomic hydrogen. These results are proposed to be due to the removal of non-reactive carbon from the surface of the filament via etching by atomic hydrogen and are consistent with the predictions of our thermodynamic model for the C-H system. Evidence for gas phase reactions is presented and the role of thermal diffusion is discussed. The emissivities of the W and Re filaments are observed to have significantly different temperature dependences which are attributed to differences in the phase diagrams for the W-C and Re-C systems. The implications of these results for hot-filament diamond CVD are discussed.

Sommer, M.; Smith, F.W. (Department of Physics, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, NY (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NEAC Policy Sub-Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Sub Policy Sub NEAC Policy Sub - - Committee Committee Outlook for energy and the role of Outlook for energy and the role of nuclear power nuclear power June 23, 2008 June 23, 2008 The Premise The Premise * * More than 50 years since the launch of the More than 50 years since the launch of the Atoms for Peace initiative, the implications Atoms for Peace initiative, the implications -- -- in energy, environmental, and national in energy, environmental, and national security terms security terms -- -- of our nuclear policies of our nuclear policies are greater than ever. are greater than ever. The Mission The Mission * * The next president will face fateful choices on The next president will face fateful choices on energy. energy. * * These choices will have profound energy, These choices will have profound energy,

217

On the safety of the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/ LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} lithium-ion battery system.  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to investigate the inherent safety characteristics of the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell chemistry in a real battery. For this purpose, the reactivity of the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode material with the electrolyte was first studied upon its electrochemical lithiation in a Li-metal half-cell. Results obtained by differential scanning calorimetry show that the total heat associated with this reaction increased when the lithium amount inserted in Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} increased, with no noticeable change in the onset temperature (125 C). It was also found that the total heat of the fully lithiated Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} (383 J/g) was much smaller compared to that of the fully lithiated graphite (2700 J/g), the latter having a lower onset temperature (100 C). The thermal and structural stability of Li{sub 6.5}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} and Li{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases was investigated after the chemical lithiation of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} with butylithium and the chemical delithiation of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} with nitronium tetrafluoroborate. Data from thermal gravimetric analysis show that the Li{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode released less than 2 wt % oxygen below 400 C, while the Li{sub 6.5}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode gained 4 wt % at the same temperature. The accelerated rate calorimetry test performed on 18650-cells containing Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} chemistry showed no thermal runaway, explosion, or fire. These results clearly demonstrate that the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/LiMn2O{sub 4} battery could be one of the safest Li-ion battery systems.

Belharouak, I.; Sun, Y.-K.; Lu, W.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Hanyang Univ.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The I{sub C}R{sub N} value in intrinsic Josephson tunnel junctions in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) mesas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The c-axis current-voltage I(V) characteristics have been obtained on a set of mesas of varying height sculpted on Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) crystals intercalated with HgB{sub 2}. The intercalation, along with the small number of junctions in the mesa, N = 6-30, minimizes the degree of self-heating, leading to a consistent Josephson critical current, I{sub C}, among junctions in the mesa. The Bi2212 crystals with a bulk T{sub C} = 74 K are overdoped and display negligible pseudogap effects allowing an accurate measure of the normal state resistance, R{sub N}. These properties make the mesas nearly ideal for the determination of the Josephson I{sub C}R{sub N} product. We find I{sub C}R{sub N} values consistently {approx}30% of the quasiparticle gap parameter, {Delta}/e, which was measured independently using a mechanical contact, break junction technique. The latter was necessitated by higher bias heating effects in the mesas which prevented direct measurements of the superconducting gap. These values are among the highest reported and may represent the maximum intrinsic value for I{sub C}R{sub N}. The results indicate that the c-axis transport is a mixture of coherent and incoherent tunneling.

Kurter, C.; Ozyuzer, L.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E. (Materials Science Division); (Illinois Inst. of Tech.); (Izmir Inst. of Tech.); (Univ. of Maryland)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Flux creep and critcal-current anisotropy in Bi/sub 2/Sr/sub 2/CaCu/sub 2/O/sub 8+//sub delta/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied magnetic relaxation, temperature dependence of the critical currents, magnetic irreversibility, and lower critical fields in single crystals of the high-T/sub c/ superconductor Bi/sub 2/Sr/sub 2/CaCu/sub 2/O/sub 8+//sub delta/ (idealized composition) through magnetization measurements. The results are analyzed within the framework of the critical state and a thermally activated flux-creep model. The results indicate three different critical curents and flux-creep rates depending on the relative orientation of the current, the field, and the Cu-O planes. The flux-creep rate for flux lines moving perpendicular to the planes, was found to be unobservably low. Similarly, the critical current density perpendicular to the planes was very low. However the critical current density in the plane and the flux-pinning well depth U/sub 0/, for fluxon motion parallel to the planes, are similar to the values found in Y-Ba-Cu-O. Implications of insulating layers between the Cu-O planes are discussed.

Biggs, B.D.; Kunchur, M.N.; Lin, J.J.; Poon, S.J.; Askew, T.R.; Flippen, R.B.; Subramanian, M.A.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Sleight, A.W.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

X-ray diffraction study of (TlInSe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TlGaTe{sub 2}){sub x} crystal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystallographic and dynamic characteristics of TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals have been studied by X-ray diffraction in the temperature range of 85-320 K. The temperature dependences of the unit-cell parameters a of TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals, as well as their coefficients of thermal expansion along the [100] direction, are determined. The concentration dependences of the unit-cell parameters a and c for (TlInSe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TlGaTe{sub 2}){sub x} crystals are measured. Anomalies are found in the temperature dependences of the unit-cell parameters a and, correspondingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion, indicating the existence of phase transitions in TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals.

Sheleg, A. U., E-mail: sheleg@ifttp.bas-net.by; Zub, E. M.; Yachkovskii, A. Ya. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, State Scientific and Production Association, Scientific and Practical Materials Research Center (Belarus); Mustafaeva, S. N.; Kerimova, E. M. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Structural phase transitions in the Ag{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}-Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} solid solution  

SciTech Connect

The phase transitions between various structural modifications of the natrotantite-structured system xAg{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}-(1-x)Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} have been investigated and a phase diagram constructed as a function of temperature and composition. This shows three separate phase transition types: (1) paraelectric-ferroelectric, (2) rhombohedral-monoclinic and (3) a phase transition within the ferroelectric rhombohedral zone between space groups R3c and R3. The parent structure for the entire series has space group R3{sup Macron }c. Compositions with x>0.75 are rhombohedral at all temperatures whereas compositions with x<0.75 are all monoclinic at room temperature and below. At x=0.75, rhombohedral and monoclinic phases coexist with the phase boundary below room temperature being virtually temperature-independent. The ferroelectric phase boundary extends into the monoclinic phase field. No evidence was found for the R3-R3c phase boundary extending into the monoclinic phase field and it is concluded that a triple point is formed. - Graphical abstract: Phase diagram for xAg{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}-(1-x)Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} solid solution showing changes in crystal symmetry as a function of temperature and composition. The crystal structure is depicted. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Ferroelectric, rhombohedral Ag{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} in solid solution with monoclinic Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Three phase boundaries were studied as a function of composition and temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Both rhombohedral and monoclinic variants exhibit ferroelectricity. The parent phase of the series has space group R3{sup Macron }c.

Woodward, David I., E-mail: d.i.woodward@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lees, Martin R.; Thomas, Pam A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Texture analysis of smooth in situ laser ablated YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 thin films on (100) SrTiO sub 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The texture of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films on (100) SrTiO{sub 3}, grown by {ital in} {ital situ} laser ablation, was investigated by x-ray diffraction. The surface morphology is smooth with only 10{sup 5} cm{sup {minus}2} particulates of about 0.1 {mu}m in diameter. High-resolution x-ray diffraction shows that the {ital c}-axis of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} is epitaxially aligned with the (001) direction of SrTiO{sub 3} irrespective of the misorientation. The {l brace}018{r brace} pole figure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} shows a fourfold symmetry which indicates that the films are ordered with respect to the substrate lattice. Moreover, the alignment in the {l brace}018{r brace} pole figure of the (220) reflections of SrTiO{sub 3} and the (018) reflections of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} indicates that over the whole surface of the film the {ital a}- and {ital b}-axes of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} are aligned along the (100) and (010) direction of SrTiO{sub 3}. The epitaxial nature of the films, the low density of particulates, and the lack of interdiffusion as concluded from secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, allows for the preparation of heteroepitaxial stacks containing high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors.

Cillessen, J.F.M.; de Leeuw, D.M.; Kinneging, A.J.; Zalm, P.C.; Bongers, P.F. (Philips Research Laboratories, P.O. Box 80 000, 5600 JA Eindhoven, The Netherlands (NL))

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

CO{sub 2} SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. There were three main objectives for this reporting period, which related to obtaining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and modeling reservoir performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The first objective was to collect and desorb gas from 10 sidewall core coal samples from an Anadarko Petroleum Corporation well (APCL2 well) at approximately 6,200-ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. The second objective was to measure sorptive capacities of these Wilcox coal samples for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}. The final objective was to contract a service company to perform pressure transient testing in Wilcox coal beds in a shut-in well, to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal. Bulk density of the APCL2 well sidewall core samples averaged 1.332 g/cc. The 10 sidewall core samples were placed in 4 sidewall core canisters and desorbed. Total gas content of the coal (including lost gas and projected residual gas) averaged 395 scf/ton on an as-received basis. The average lost gas estimations were approximately 45% of the bulk sample total gas. Projected residual gas was 5% of in-situ gas content. Six gas samples desorbed from the sidewall cores were analyzed to determine gas composition. Average gas composition was approximately 94.3% methane, 3.0% ethane, and 0.7% propane, with traces of heavier hydrocarbon gases. Carbon dioxide averaged 1.7%. Coal from the 4 canisters was mixed to form one composite sample that was used for pure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} isotherm analyses. The composite sample was 4.53% moisture, 37.48% volatile matter, 9.86% ash, and 48.12% fixed carbon. Mean vitrinite reflectance was 0.54%. Coal rank was high-volatile C to B bituminous. Comparison of the desorbed gas content (395 scf/ton, as received) at reservoir pressure (2,697 psi) with the sorption isotherm indicates that Lower Calvert Bluff coal at this well site is oversaturated, but lost gas may have been overestimated. This high gas content suggests that little or no depressurization would be required to initiate methane production. Sorption isotherms results indicate that the sorptive capacity of CO{sub 2} is about 2.5 times that of CH{sub 4} at 1,000 psia. This ratio is similar to that of higher rank bituminous coals from other basins (e.g., Carroll, and Pashin, 2003), and it is very low in comparison to results of other low-rank coals and to the values that we used in our preliminary reservoir modeling. If this value from the APCL2 well is representative, Wilcox coals in this area will sequester less CO{sub 2} on a per ton basis than we had earlier inferred. However, because measured methane contents are higher, enhanced coalbed methane production potential is greater than we earlier inferred. Pressure transient testing for determining coal fracture permeability will be conducted soon by Pinnacle Technologies. The data from these analyses will be used to finalize our coal model for the reservoir simulation phase of the project.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

New hypodiphosphates of the alkali metals: Synthesis, crystal structure and vibrational spectra of the hypodiphosphates(IV) M{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (M=Rb and Cs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new hypodiphosphates(IV) Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (1) and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (2) were synthesized by soft chemistry reactions from aqueous solutions of hypophosphoric acid and the corresponding heavy alkali-metal carbonates. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize isotypic in the triclinic space group P-1 with one formula unit in the unit cell. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units in staggered conformation for the P{sub 2}O{sub 6} skeleton and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. In the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} ion the hydrogen atoms are in a 'trans-trans' conformation. O{center_dot}H-O hydrogen bonds between the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups consolidate the structures into a three-dimensional network. The FT-Raman and {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H and MAS NMR spectra of the title compounds have been recorded and interpreted, especially with respect to their assignment to the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups. Thermogravimetric data of 2 have been interpreted in terms of a thermal decomposition model. - Graphical Abstract: The layered compounds Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] have been synthesized and investigated. Both crystallize isotypic. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and single-crystal structure of new alkali hypodiphosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures are characterized by [(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})]{sup 2-} units and M{sup +} cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units are linked by short hydrogen bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds are characterized by {sup 31}P MAS-NMR spectra.

Wu, Peng [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wiegand, Thomas; Eckert, Hellmut [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstr. 28/30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstr. 28/30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Gjikaj, Mimoza, E-mail: mimoza.gjikaj@tu-clausthal.de [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie der TU Clausthal, Paul-Ernst-Strasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Isothermal calorimetry investigation of Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-y}Al{sub z}O{sub 4} spinel.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat generation of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Li{sub 1.156}Mn{sub 1.844}O{sub 4}, and Li{sub 1.06}Mn{sub 1.89}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 4} spinel cathode materials in a half-cell system was investigated by isothermal micro-calorimetry (IMC). The heat variations of the Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell during charging were attributed to the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase transition and order/disorder changes. This heat variation was largely suppressed when the stoichiometric spinel was doped with excess lithium or lithium and aluminum. The calculated entropy change (dE/dT) from the IMC confirmed that the order/disorder change of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which occurs in the middle of the charge, was largely suppressed with lithium or lithium and aluminum doping. The dE/dT values obtained did not agree between the charge and the discharge at room temperature (25 C), which was attributed to cell self-discharge. This discrepancy was not observed at low temperature (10 C). Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) results showed that the fully charged spinel with lithium doping has better thermal stability.

Lu, W.; Belharouak, I.; Park, S. H.; Sun, Y. K; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Hanyang Univ.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

226

SOME AB$sub 3$ COMPOUNDS OF THE TRANSITION METALS  

SciTech Connect

Crystal structure data for fifteen AB/sub 3/ compounds of the transition metals were studied. The alloys were made by arc melting 3 to 5 of the elements in a water-cooled copper crucible. AB/sub 3/ compounds with the Cu/sub 3/Au- structure, Ll/sub 2/, space group Pm/sub 3/m included: ScRh/sub 3/, ScPd/sub 3/, ScPt/sub 3/, YPd/sub 3/, YPt/sub 3/, LaPd/sub 3/, HoPd/sub 3/, HoPt/sub 3/, ThRh/ sub 3/, URh/sub 3/, and Ulr/sub 3/. AB /sub 3/ compounds with close-packed ordered structures included ThPd/sub 3/, VPd/sub 3/, VPt/sub 3/, and HfAl/sub 3/. (M.C.G.)

Dwight, A.E.; Downey, J.W.; Conner, R.A. Jr.

1961-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Raman characterization of the BEDT-TTF(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} salt  

SciTech Connect

The major Raman scattering peaks of BEDT-TTF(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} have been assigned by comparison to the isotopically labeled {sup 13}C(4)-BEDT-TTF(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} and {sup 13}C(6)-BEDT-TTF(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} salts. The {upsilon}{sub 2}, {upsilon}{sub 3}, and {upsilon}{sub 6} A{sub g} modes are associated with the C{double_bond}C vibrations and the Raman shifts are found to decrease with increasing oxidation state of the ET molecules. The {upsilon}{sub 9} and {upsilon}{sub 10} A{sub g} modes are associated with the sulfur (C{single_bond}S) related vibrations and the Raman shifts are observed to increase with increasing oxidation state of the ET molecules.

Wang, H.H.; Kini, A.M.; Williams, J.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fuel cell sub-assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

Chi, Chang V. (Brookfield, CT)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydrothermal synthesis and the crystal structure of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent prismatic single crystals of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O are prepared through hydrothermal crystallization. The parameters of the hexagonal unit cell and intensities of 10806 reflections are measured on an Enraf-Nonius CAD4 automated diffractometer. The compound crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system with the unit cell parameters a = 12.745(4) A, c = 5.180(2) A, V = 728.6(4) A{sup 3}, and space group P6{sub 3}. The structure is determined by direct methods and refined using the full-matrix least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms. The refinement of the structure is performed to the final discrepancy factor R{sub 1} = 0.027 for 2889 unique reflections with I > 2 {sigma} (I). In the structure of the borate cancrinite, the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra form a zeolite-like framework in which twelve-membered hexagonal channels are occupied by sodium atoms and BO{sub 3} groups, whereas six-membered channels are filled with sodium and calcium atoms and water molecules. The mean interatomic distances are found to be as follows: (Si-O){sub mean} = 1.614 A and (Al-O){sub mean} = 1.741 A in the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, (Na-O){sub mean} = 2.542 A in the seven-vertex sodium polyhedra, and [(Na,Ca)-O]{sub mean} = 2.589 A in the ditrigonal bipyramids.

Shirinova, A. F. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)], E-mail: afashf@rambler.ru; Khrustalev, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds (Russian Federation); Samedov, H. R. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Chemical Problems (Azerbaijan); Chiragov, M. I. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Structural and topographical analysis of Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods  

SciTech Connect

Nanocrystalline form of pure and Nd doped gadolinium hydroxide [Nd:Gd(OH({sub 3}] nanorods were successfully synthesized at 60 Degree-Sign C through simple co-precipitation method of Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O and Nd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O solutions with a specified pH, adjusted using NH{sub 3} as buffer solution. The dopant percentage was maintained at 5%. The as-synthesized Gd(OH){sub 3} and Nd:Gd(OH({sub 3} nanorods were annealed at 500 Degree-Sign C for 1 h to form the respective Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analyses were used to characterize these as-synthesized [Gd(OH){sub 3} and Nd:Gd(OH({sub 3}] and annealed [Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}] nanorods.

Boopathi, G.; Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600 005 (India); Raj, S. Gokul [Department of Physics, Vel Tech, Dr. RR and Dr. SR Technical University, Avadi, Chennai 600 062 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering Arni, Anna University Chennai, Arni 632 317 (India)

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

Scintillator having a MgAI.sub.2O.sub.4 host lattice  

SciTech Connect

A scintillator having a host lattice of MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 was prepared by hot pressing under a vacuum environment a powder mixture of MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4, CeO.sub.2, and LiF.

Chen, Ching-Fong (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Magnetic properties of (Sm,Y){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} melt-spun ribbons  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the synthesis of the (Sm{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} (x = 0 to 0.5) phase and its magnetic properties is presented. (Sm{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} (x = 0 to 0.5) melt-spun ribbons that fully or mainly consisted of the amorphous phase and which showed low coercivity were prepared. Heat treatment of the melt-spun ribbons resulted in the formation of the (Sm,Y){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} phase. The highest remanence, 50 emu/g, was achieved in the annealed (Sm{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} melt-spun ribbon. However,the annealed (Sm{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} (x = 0.4 to 0.5) melt-spun ribbons did not contain the (Sm,Y){sub 5}Fe{sub 17} phase and showed low coercivity values.

Saito, Tetsuji [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Polarized IR and Raman spectra of Ca{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Ca{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Sr{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} single crystals: Temperature-dependent studies of commensurate to incommensurate and incommensurate to normal phase transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IR and Raman spectra of Ca{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Ca{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Sr{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} oriented single crystals and powders have been measured. The temperature dependence of phonons has been established in the 4-650 K range. Discussion of the results has been performed on the basis of factor group approach for the tetragonal P4-bar 2{sub 1}m (D{sub 2d}{sup 3}) space group with Z=2. The assignment of the bands observed to the internal and external modes has been made on their polarization behaviour, phonon energy calculations and literature data. The evidences of the LO-TO splitting and commensurate (C) to incommensurate (IC) as well as incommensurate (IC) to normal (N) phase transitions have been found. As a representative example, the results obtained for the spontaneous Raman scattering have also been used in the discussion of the stimulated Raman spectra of Ca{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Raman and IR spectra of Ca{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Ca{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Sr{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been measured. The temperature dependence of phonons has been established in the 4-650 K range. The evidences of the LO-TO splitting and commensurate (C) to incommensurate (IC) as well as incommensurate (IC) to normal (N) phase transitions have been found. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polarized IR and Raman spectra of pyrosilicates single crystals have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature dependence of the phonon bands and LO-TO splitting have been analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Commensurate to incommensurate and to normal phase have been evidenced in the spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phonon calculations have been used in assignment of the normal modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stimulated Raman spectra of Ca{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystal have been measured and analysed.

Hanuza, J. [Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, Wroclaw (Poland); Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry and Food Technology, Wroclaw University of Economics, 118/120 Komandorska str., Wroclaw (Poland); Ptak, M., E-mail: m.ptak@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, Wroclaw (Poland); Maczka, M.; Hermanowicz, K. [Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, Wroclaw (Poland); Lorenc, J. [Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry and Food Technology, Wroclaw University of Economics, 118/120 Komandorska str., Wroclaw (Poland); Kaminskii, A.A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Volatile organic compound concentrations and emission rates measured over one year in a new manufactured house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

living area. The subfloor is plywood; 17 % of the floor areafiberboard passage doors, and plywood sub flooring underA possible source is the plywood subfloor. However, terpene

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nabinger, Steven J.; Persily, Andrew K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Visual representation of carbon dioxide adsorption in a low-volatile bituminous coal molecular model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide can be sequestered in unmineable coal seams to aid in mitigating global climate change, while concurrently CH{sub 4} can be desorbed from the coal seam and used as a domestic energy source. In this work, a previously constructed molecular representation was used to simulate several processes that occur during sequestration, such as sorption capacities of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}-induced swelling, contraction because of CH{sub 4} and water loss, and the pore-blocking role of moisture. This is carried out by calculating the energy minima of the molecular model with different amounts of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O. The model used is large (>2000 atoms) and contains a molecular-weight distribution, so that it has the flexibility to be used by other researchers and for other purposes in the future. In the low-level molecular modeling presented here, it was anticipated that CO{sub 2} would be adsorbed more readily than CH{sub 4}, that swelling would be anisotropic, greater perpendicular to the bedding plane because of the rank of this coal, and finally, that, with the addition of moisture, CO{sub 2} capacity in the coal would be reduced. As expected with this high-rank coal, there was swelling when CO{sub 2} perturbed the structure of approximately 5%. It was found that, on the basis of the interconnected pore structure and molecular sizes, CO{sub 2} was able to access 12.4% more of the pore volume (as defined by helium) than CH{sub 4}, in the rigid molecular representation. With water as stationary molecules, mostly hydrogen bound to the coal oxygen functionality, pore access decreased by 5.1% of the pore volume for CO{sub 2} accessibility and 4.7% of the pore volume for CH{sub 4} accessibility. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Marielle R. Narkiewicz; Jonathan P. Mathews [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Department of Energy and Minerals Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Oxidation of volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. Final technical report, September 1980-February 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to measure, through the use of laboratory combustors, those conditions which promote complete combustion of wood volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. The conditions of interest are combustion temperature, residence time, stoichiometry, and air mixing. The project objectives are met through two laboratory approaches: (1) model compound studies: in order to measure the overall rates of oxidative pyrolysis of biomass volatiles, and to determine the types of intermediate organic species which are likely to form as part of this process, model compounds have been reacted in a specialized jet-stirred reactor, which has been developed as part of this research. (2) high-intensity wood combustion: in order to study the clean combustion of wood, that is, to investigate the conceptual design features required for clean burning, and to ascertain the levels and types of pollutant and condensible species which are most difficult to oxidize, a high-intensity, research wood combustor has been developed and examined for the different phases of the wood burning cycle. Although the objectives of the project have been met, it has not been possible, because of support limitations, to thoroughly explore several interesting aspects which have arisen because of this research. For example, a third laboratory system in which wood pyrolysis gas is injected directly into the a well characterized reactor, so that the kinetics and mechanisms of the gas-phase reaction of the actual biomass volatiles can be studied, could not be thoroughly developed. Refinements in the high-intensity wood combustor, which would bring its design features closer to practicality for the industry, could not be considered. 32 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

Malte, P.C.; Thornton, M.M.; Kamber, P.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Freeway Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting by Considering Traffic Volatility Dynamics and Missing Data Situations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term traffic flow forecasting is a critical function in advanced traffic management systems (ATMS) and advanced traveler information systems (ATIS). Accurate forecasting results are useful to indicate future traffic conditions and assist traffic managers in seeking solutions to congestion problems on urban freeways and surface streets. There is new research interest in short-term traffic flow forecasting due to recent developments in ITS technologies. Previous research involves technologies in multiple areas, and a significant number of forecasting methods exist in literature. However, forecasting reliability is not properly addressed in existing studies. Most forecasting methods only focus on the expected value of traffic flow, assuming constant variance when perform forecasting. This method does not consider the volatility nature of traffic flow data. This paper demonstrated that the variance part of traffic flow data is not constant, and dependency exists. A volatility model studies the dependency among the variance part of traffic flow data and provides a prediction range to indicate the reliability of traffic flow forecasting. We proposed an ARIMA-GARCH (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average- AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity) model to study the volatile nature of traffic flow data. Another problem of existing studies is that most methods have limited forecasting abilities when there is missing data in historical or current traffic flow data. We developed a General Regression Neural Network(GRNN) based multivariate forecasting method to deal with this issue. This method uses upstream information to predict traffic flow at the studied site. The study results indicate that the ARIMA-GARCH model outperforms other methods in non-missing data situations, while the GRNN model performs better in missing data situations.

Zhang, Yanru

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Volatilized tritiated water vapor in the vicinity of exposed tritium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor tritium concentrations in air above a known source of tritiated water can be estimated. Estimates should account for the mechanisms of evaporation and condensation at the water surface and water species exchange, and are typically applicable under a broad range of wind, temperature and humidity conditions. An estimate of volatilized tritium water vapor was made for a known outcropping of tritium contaminated groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) old F-Area effluent stream. In order to validate this estimate and the associated dose calculation, sampling equipment was fabricated, tested, and installed at the effluent stream. The estimate and the dose calculation were confirmed using data from samples collected.

Dunn, D.L.; Carlton, B.; Hunter, C.; McAdams, T.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Degradation of properties of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x superconductors sintered in CO sub 2 -containing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Stability of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) superconductor toward reacting with CO{sub 2} in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixtures during sintering was investigated as a function of the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} and temperature. The transport critical current density, J{sub c}, of the superconductor decreased drastically with increasing partial pressure of CO{sub 2} was increased, J{sub c} became zero (at 77 K) even though the major phase of the sample was still a superconductor as determined by magnetic susceptibility measurements. Microstructures and compositions of the samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Two types of grain boundaries were observed: {approximately}10% of the grain boundaries contained a second phase; the regions near the remaining grain boundaries were tetragonal. At high partial pressures of CO{sub 2}, the YBCO completely decomposed to BaCO{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}, and CuO. 11 refs., 3 figs.

Balachandran, U.; Zhang, C.; Xu, D.; Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.; Mundy, J.N.; Veal, B.W.; Poeppel, R.B. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Selvaduray, G. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Materials Engineering); Mason, T.O. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Crystal structure of (Li{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} by neutron powder diffraction analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The crystal structure of (Li{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} was determined by neutron powder diffraction. A final weighted R-factor of 4.54% was obtained for the refinement of 2,373 reflections by the Rietveld method from a sample synthesized using {sup 7}Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (99.9% pure). Slight distortion of the CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} units in the monoclinic cell was observed; the O(1)-C-O(2) angle and C-O(3) length are larger than those for the other C-O bonds and O-C-O angles. These local-structure characteristics can be explained by the difference in the ionic size of Li{sup +} and K{sup +}, and the different electrostatic interactions between the cations and CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} units. (Li{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} is important as a material for molten carbonate fuel cells.

Idemoto, Yasushi [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Intense Pulsed Neutron Source]|[Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Loong, C.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Koura, Nobuyuki; Kohara, Shinji [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide mixing ratios on the emission of Volatile organic compounds from Corymbia citriodora and Tristaniopsis laurina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bibliography: p. 120-124. Introduction Environmental factors affecting the emission of biogenic Volatile organic compounds Materials and experimental procedures Quantification using sold-phase microextraction (more)

Camenzuli, Michelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Photoluminescence in the Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}WO{sub 4} system at room temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a study was undertaken about the structural and photoluminescent properties, at room temperature, of powder samples from the Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}WO{sub 4} (x=0-1.0) system, synthesized by a soft chemical method and heat treated between 400 and 700 deg. C. The material was characterized using Infrared, UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy and XRD. The most intense PL emission was obtained for the sample calcined at 600 deg. C, which is neither highly disordered (400-500 deg. C), nor completely ordered (700 deg. C). Corroborating the role of disorder in the PL phenomenon, the most intense PL response was not observed for pure CaWO{sub 4} or SrWO{sub 4}, but for Ca{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}WO{sub 4}. The PL emission spectra could be separated into two Gaussian curves. The lower wavelength peak is placed around 530 nm, and the higher wavelength peak at about 690 nm. Similar results were reported in the literature for both CaWO{sub 4} and SrWO{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: The structural and room temperature photoluminescence of Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}WO4 synthesized by a soft chemical method was studied. The most intense PL emission was obtained for the sample calcined at 600 deg. C, that is neither highly disordered (400-500 deg. C), nor completely ordered (700 deg. C). Corroborating the role of disorder in the PL phenomenon, the most intense PL response was not observed for pure CaWO{sub 4} or SrWO{sub 4}, but for Ca{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}WO{sub 4}.

Porto, S.L. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); Longo, E. [CMDMC/LIEC, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP-Araraquara, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni s/n, Araraquara, SP, CEP 14800-900 (Brazil); Pizani, P.S.; Boschi, T.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luiz km 235, SP, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Simoes, L.G.P. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Desenvolvimento de Materiais Ceramicos (LIEC/DQ), Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luiz km 235, Sao Carlos, SP, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Lima, S.J.G. [Laboratorio de Solidificacao Rapida, Departamento de Tecnologia Mecanica (LSR/DTM/CT), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); Ferreira, J.M. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); COAMA, Area de Meio Ambiente, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba, Av. 1o de Maio 720, Jaguaribe, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58015-430 (Brazil); Soledade, L.E.B.; Espinoza, J.W.M.; Cassia-Santos, M.R.; Maurera, M.A.M.A. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); Paskocimas, C.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, CEP 59072-970 (Brazil); Santos, I.M.G. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil)], E-mail: ieda@quimica.ufpb.br; Souza, A.G. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

The determination of UO/sub 2/ and UF/sub 4/ in fused fluoride salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of uranium oxide solubilities in fused fluoride salts is important in the electrolytic preparation of uranium metal. This project was initiated to develop a method for the determination of UO/sub 2/ separately from UF/sub 4/ in UF/sub 4/-CaF/sub 2/-LiF fused salts. Previous methods used for the determination of UO/sub 2/ in fused fluoride salts involved inert gas fusions where oxygen was liberated as CO/sub 2/, and hydrofluorination where oxygen was released as H/sub 2/O; but the special equipment used for these procedures was no longer available. These methods assumed that all of the oxygen liberated was due to UO/sub 2/ and does not consider impurities from reagents and other oxygen sources that amount to a bias of approximately 0.3 wt %. This titrimetric method eliminates the bias by selectively extracting the UF/sub 4/ with a Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution. The remaining uranium oxide residue is treated and titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint with NBS standard K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/. An aliquot of the Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ extract is also titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint, this uranium component is determined and calculated as UF/sub 4/. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Batiste, D.J.; Lee, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Synthesis and structural characterization of the ternary Zintl phases AE{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} and AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten new ternary phosphides and arsenides with empirical formulae AE{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} and AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As) have been synthesized using molten Ga, Al, and Pb fluxes. They have been structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction to form with two different structures-Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4} crystallize with the Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} structure type (space group C2/c, Z=4); Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} adopt the Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} structure type (space group Pnma, Z=4). The polyanions in both structures are made up of TrPn{sub 4} tetrahedra, which share common corners and edges to form {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-} layers in the phases with the Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} structure, and {sup 1}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-} chains in Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} with the Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} structure type. The valence electron count for all of these compounds follows the Zintl-Klemm rules. Electronic band structure calculations confirm them to be semiconductors. - Graphical abstract: AE{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} and AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As) crystallize in two different structures-Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4}, are isotypic with the previously reported Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} (space group C2/c (No. 15)), while Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} adopt a different structure known for Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} (space group Pnma (No. 62). The polyanions in both structures are made up of TrPn{sub 4} tetrahedra, which by sharing common corners and edges, form {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-}layers in the former and {sup 1}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-} chains in Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As) are new ternary pnictides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} adopt the Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} structure type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Sr- and Ca-compounds crystallize with the Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} structure type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The valence electron count for all title compounds follows the Zintl-Klemm rules.

He, Hua; Tyson, Chauntae; Saito, Maia [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Electrical conduction in CaF[sub 2] and CaF[sub 2]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] nanocomposite films on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] substrates  

SciTech Connect

Thin films of pure CaF[sub 2] and nanocomposite mixtures of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] with CaF[sub 2] were evaporated on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] substrates. Interdigital electrodes on some of the substrates allowed [ital in] [ital situ] measurements of the electrical conduction in the films during and subsequent to film growth. Electrical conduction was studied as a function of film thickness, film deposition rate, composition, time, and temperature. The electrical conductivity in pure CaF[sub 2] adjacent to an Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] interface sometimes exceeded the bulk CaF[sub 2] conductivity (i.e., value at more than 50 nm distance) by as much as a factor of 6700 at 200 [degree]C. The high conductivity is characterized by an activation energy of 0.6[plus minus]0.1 eV, which is significantly lower than the activation energy of about 1.0 eV for conduction in the bulk. However, this high conductivity is thermally unstable and diminishes in time. A high but stable conductivity was obtained in CaF[sub 2] films containing about 10 mol % Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] as a dispersed second phase. At 200 [degree]C, a two-phase film gave a factor of 360 enhancement over the measured bulk CaF[sub 2] conductivity and a factor of 7 improvement over the best previously reported conductivity for CaF[sub 2]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] composite materials. The origin of enhanced conduction in CaF[sub 2] is attributed to ion transport along dislocations. Dislocations anneal with a characteristic log of time dependence that is recognizable in the annealing behavior of the electrical conductivity. Presumably, the addition of a dispersed second phase of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] to CaF[sub 2] serves both to generate and to pin dislocations; the electrical conductance is thereby enhanced and stabilized.

Modine, F.A.; Lubben, D.; Bates, J.B. (Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6030 (United States))

1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

CONTINUOUS PROCESS FOR THE CONVERSION OF UF$sub 6$ TO UF$sub 4$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for reducing UF/sub 6/ to UF/sub 6/ with hydrogen. A preheated mixture of UF/sub 6/ and fluorine is contacted with a stoichiometric excess of preheated hydrogen in a reaction chamber thereby producing UF/sub 6/. The UF/sub 6/ reacts quantitatively and the UF/sub 6/ produced is of high purity and high density.

Smiley, S.H.; Brater, D.C.; Nimmo, R.H.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High-throughput and in situ EDXRD investigation on the formation of two new metal aminoethylphosphonates - Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) and Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

The system Ca{sup 2+}/2-aminoethylphosphonic acid/H{sub 2}O/NaOH was systematically investigated using high-throughput methods. The experiments led to one new compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2} H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) (1) and the crystal structure was determined using in house X-ray powder diffraction data (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=9.7753(3), b=6.4931(2), c=8.4473(2) A, {beta}=106.46(2) Degree-Sign , V=514.20(2) A{sup 3}, Z=4). The formation of 1 was investigated by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements (EDXRD) at beamline F3 at HASYLAB (light source DORIS III), DESY, Hamburg. An intermediate, Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), was observed and could be isolated from the reaction mixture at ambient temperatures by quenching the reaction. The crystal structure of 2 was determined from XRPD data using synchrotron radiation (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.2193(7), b=7.1488(3), c=5.0635(2) A, {beta}=100.13(4) Degree-Sign , V=399.78(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2). - Graphical abstarct: The detailed in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) investigation on the formation of the new inorganic-organic hybrid compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) leads to the discovery of a new crystalline intermediate phase. Both crystal structures were elucidated using X-ray powder diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-throughput investigation led to new metal aminoethylphosphonate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) was followed by in situ EDXRD measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystalline intermediate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was discovered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was accomplished by quenching experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures were determined using X-ray powder diffraction data.

Schmidt, Corinna; Feyand, Mark [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany); Rothkirch, Andre [HASYLAB, DESY Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Stock, Norbert, E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article examines the long-term consequences of the introduction of the printing press in the 19th century on newspaper readership and other civic attitudes in sub-Saharan Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, Protestant missionaries were the first both to import the printing press technology and to allow the indigenous population to use it. We build a new geocoded dataset locating Protestant missions in 1903. This dataset includes, for each mission station, the geographic location and its characteristics, as well as the educational and health related investments undertaken by the mission. We show that proximity to a historical missionary settlement endowed with a printing press significantly increases newspaper readership today within regions located close to historical mission settlements. We also find a positive impact on political participation at the community level. Results are robust to a variety of identification strategies that attempt to address the potential

Julia Cag; Valeria Rueda; Julia Cag

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sub-Metering Scoping Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a scoping study conducted to identify options and approaches to sub-metering of residential loads, distributed generation, and storage. Utility interest in this subject has increased, driven by the employment of residential solar photovoltaic systems as well as the potential for significant consumer adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in the near future and battery storage options in the longer term. For a variety of reasons, some utilities may find ...

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Crystal structure of new synthetic Ca,Na carbonate-borate Ca{sub 2}Na(Na{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5-x})[B{sub 3}{sup t}B{sub 2}{sup {delta}}O{sub 8}(OH)(O{sub 1-x}OH{sub x})](CO{sub 3})  

SciTech Connect

New Ca,Na carbonate-borate Ca{sub 2}Na(Na{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5-x}) [B{sub 3}{sup t}B{sub 2}{sup {Delta}}O{sub 8}(OH)(O{sub 1-x}OH{sub x})](CO{sub 3}) crystals (x {approx} 0.4) have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-NaCl-system at t = 250 Degree-Sign C and P = 70-80 atm; the structure parameters are found to be a = 11.1848(3) Angstrom-Sign , b = 6.4727(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 25.8181(7) Angstrom-Sign , {beta} = 96.364(3) Degree-Sign , V = 1857.60(9) Angstrom-Sign {sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, and {rho}{sub calcd} = 2.801 g/cm{sup 3} (Xcalibur S autodiffractometer (CCD), 2663 reflections with I > 2{sigma} (I), direct solution, refinement by the least-squares method in the anisotropic approximation of thermal atomic vibrations, hydrogen localization, R{sub 1} = 0.0387). The structure is based on boron-oxygen layers of pentaborate radicals 5(2{Delta} + 3T). Ca and Na polyhedra and CO{sub 3} triangles are located between the layers. A crystallochemical analysis of the new Ca,Na carbonate-borate has established its similarity to natural Na,Ca pentaborates (heidornite and tuzlaite) and synthetic Na,Ba-decaborate.

Yamnova, N. A., E-mail: natalia-yamnova@yandex.ru; Borovikova, E. Yu.; Gurbanova, O. A.; Dimitrova, O. V.; Zubkova, N. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Conditional Correlations and Volatility Spillovers Between Crude Oil and Stock Index Returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper investigates the conditional correlations and volatility spillovers between crude oil returns and stock index returns. Daily returns from 2 January 1998 to 4 November 2009 of the crude oil spot, forward and futures prices from the WTI and Brent markets, and the FTSE100, NYSE, Dow Jones and S&P500 index returns, are analysed using the CCC model of Bollerslev (1990), VARMA-GARCH model of Ling and McAleer (2003), VARMA-AGARCH model of McAleer, Hoti and Chan (2008), and DCC model of Engle (2002). Based on the CCC model, the estimates of conditional correlations for returns across markets are very low, and some are not statistically significant, which means the conditional shocks are correlated only in the same market and not across markets. However, the DCC estimates of the conditional correlations are always significant. This result makes it clear that the assumption of constant conditional correlations is not supported empirically. Surprisingly, the empirical results from the VARMA-GARCH and VARMA-AGARCH models provide little evidence of volatility spillovers between the crude oil and financial markets. The evidence of asymmetric effects of negative and positive shocks of equal magnitude on the conditional variances suggests that VARMA-AGARCH is superior to VARMA-GARCH and

Roengchai Tansuchat; Chia-lin Chang; Michael Mcaleer; Roengchai Tansuchat; Chia-lin Chang; Michael Mcaleer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Summary Short?Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often noted that energy prices are quite volatile, reflecting market participants adjustments to new information from physical energy markets and/or markets in energyrelated financial derivatives. Price volatility is an indication of the level of uncertainty, or risk, in the market. This paper describes how markets price risk and how the marketclearing process for risk transfer can be used to generate price bands around observed futures prices for crude oil, natural gas, and other commodities. These bands provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty regarding the range in which markets expect prices to trade. The Energy Information Administrations (EIA) monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) publishes base case projections for a variety of energy prices that go out 12 to 24 months (every January the STEO forecast is extended through December of the following year). EIA has recognized that all price forecasts are highly uncertain and has described the uncertainty by identifying the market factors that may significantly move prices away from their expected paths, such as economic growth, Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) behavior, geo-political events, and hurricanes.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Quantile Forecasting of Commodity Futures' Returns: Are Implied Volatility Factors Informative?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study develops a multi-period log-return quantile forecasting procedure to evaluate the performance of eleven nearby commodity futures contracts (NCFC) using a sample of 897 daily price observations and at-the-money (ATM) put and call implied volatilities of the corresponding prices for the period from 1/16/2008 to 7/29/2011. The statistical approach employs dynamic log-returns quantile regression models to forecast price densities using implied volatilities (IVs) and factors estimated through principal component analysis (PCA) from the IVs, pooled IVs and lagged returns. Extensive in-sample and out-of-sample analyses are conducted, including assessment of excess trading returns, and evaluations of several combinations of quantiles, model specifications, and NCFC's. The results suggest that the IV-PCA-factors, particularly pooled return-IV-PCA-factors, improve quantile forecasting power relative to models using only individual IV information. The ratio of the put-IV to the call-IV is also found to improve quantile forecasting performance of log returns. Improvements in quantile forecasting performance are found to be better in the tails of the distribution than in the center. Trading performance based on quantile forecasts from the models above generated significant excess returns. Finally, the fact that the single IV forecasts were outperformed by their quantile regression (QR) counterparts suggests that the conditional distribution of the log-returns is not normal.

Dorta, Miguel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Gd/sub 2/ (MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ longitudinal electrooptic modulator at 6328 A  

SciTech Connect

A Gd/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ light modulator operating at low frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 1 MHz, is examined. Experimental results concerning the thermal behavior and stability, frequency response, and linearity performance characteristics of the system are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the modulator are discussed.

Theophanous, N.G.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Simple chemical assays for presence of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} in decomposed SF{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

Disulfur decafluoride (S{sub 2}F{sub 10}; also referred to as sulfur pentafluoride) is a highly toxic gas which can be produced by electrical discharges in SF{sub 6}. It would be very useful, both for safety in handling decomposed SF{sub 6} and for diagnosis of fault conditions, to have a convenient, rapid and sensitive field assay for the presence of S{sub 2}F{sub 10}. A number of different assays for S{sub 2}F{sub 10} with varying levels of sensitivity have been developed in the course of a CRADA initiative ``Investigation of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} Production and Mitigation in Compressed SF{sub 6}-Insulated power Systems.`` These techniques include GC-MS, cryogenic GC enrichment and IR absorption. Although all of these procedures have been shown to have utility in detecting S{sub 2}F{sub 10}, and some have great sensitivity, they do not, in general, lend themselves to rapid field analyses. Ideally, one might wish to have an assay modeled after the ``Draeger Tubes,`` where a gas sample is drawn through some chemical compound, and the resulting color change can be used to quantify the gas of interest. Disulfur decafluoride had been rather extensively studied in World War II as a candidate chemical warfare agent, and along with biological studies of its toxicity, chemical detection techniques had also been developed. Of the chemical assays described, two were particularly promising, one involving reaction of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} with NaI to produce free I{sub 2} which could be titrated with sodium thiosulfate, and the other involving reaction of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} with p-phenylenediamine to produce a pink/red color. This second assay appeared to hold some promise, and accordingly, experiments were carried out to see if this assay could be useful for detecting S{sub 2}F{sub 10} in electrically decomposed SF{sub 6} samples.

Griffin, G.D.; Baker, M.R.; Sauers, I.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mechanochemical transformation of mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} or P{sub 2}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed comparative study of the mechanochemical transformation of two mixtures: Ca(OH){sub 2}-(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, milled in a mortar dry grinder for different periods of time was carried out. The phase transformations obtained at each milling stage were studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The transformations taking place during the first periods of milling are very different for both mixtures. However, prolonged milling, over nearly the same period, causes amorphization of both mixtures. DSC analysis of the milled powders showed the temperature of crystallization of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP). Calcinations of all the different milled powders at 800 deg. C for 2 h, results in the formation of hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP.

Gonzalez, G. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.ve; Sagarzazu, A. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Villalba, R. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Magnetoelastic coupling in the phase diagram of Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}.  

SciTech Connect

We report a high resolution neutron diffraction investigation of the coupling of structural and magnetic transitions in Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The tetragonal-orthorhombic and antiferromagnetic transitions are suppressed with potassium doping, falling to zero at x {approx}< 0.24. However, unlike Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, the two transitions are first order and coincident over the entire phase diagram, with a biquadratic coupling of the two order parameters. The phase diagram is refined showing that the onset of superconductivity is at x=0.133 with all three phases coexisting until x {approx}> 0.24.

Avci, S.; Chmaissem, O.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Rosenkranz, S.; Castellan, J.-P.; Chung, D. Y.; Todorov, I. S.; Schlueter, J. S.; Claus, H.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Daoud-Aladine, A.; Khalyavin, D.; Osborn, R. (Materials Science Division); ( PNS); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (Northwestern Univ.); (Rutherford Appleton Lab.)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Solar reduction of CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The red shift of the absorption spectrum of CO.sub.2 with increasing temperature permits the use of sunlight to photolyze CO.sub.2 to CO. The process of the present invention includes: preheating CO.sub.2 to near 1800 K; exposing the preheated CO.sub.2 to sunlight, whereby CO, O.sub.2 and O are produced; and cooling the hot product mix by rapid admixture with room temperature CO.sub.2. The excess thermal energy may be used to produce electricity and to heat additional CO.sub.2 for subsequent process steps. The product CO may be used to generate H.sub.2 by the shift reaction or to synthesize methanol.

Jensen, Reed J. (121 La Vista Dr., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); King, Joe D. (Los Alamos, NM); Guettler, Robert D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Band offsets in HfO{sub 2}/InGaZnO{sub 4} heterojunctions  

SciTech Connect

The valence band discontinuity ({Delta}E{sub V}) of sputter deposited HfO{sub 2}/InZnGaO{sub 4} (IGZO) heterostructures was obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The HfO{sub 2} exhibited a bandgap of 6.07 eV from absorption measurements. A value of {Delta}E{sub V} = 0.48 {+-} 0.025 eV was obtained by using the Ga 2p{sub 3/2}, Zn 2p{sub 3/2}, and In 3d{sub 5/2} energy levels as references. This implies a conduction band offset {Delta}E{sub C} of 2.39 eV in HfO{sub 2}/InGaZnO{sub 4} heterostructures and a nested interface band alignment.

Cho, Hyun [Department of Nanomechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Gyeongnam 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Douglas, E. A.; Gila, B. P.; Craciun, V.; Lambers, E. S.; Pearton, S. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Ren Fan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Adsorption sites in zeolites A and X probed by competitive adsorption of H{sub 2} with N{sub 2} or O{sub 2} : implications for N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} separation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We determine details of the adsorption of O{sub 2} or N{sub 2} in Na{sup +} and Li{sup +} exchanged zeolites by way of their effect on coadsorbed H{sub 2} molecules using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) techniques. Adsorption site occupancies are deduced with the aid of MC simulations. The expected stronger binding of N{sub 2} (compared with O{sub 2}) in LiX is evident in coadsorption spectra of N{sub 2} or O{sub 2} with H{sub 2}.

Eckert, J.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effective passivation of In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As by HfO{sub 2} surpassing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via in-situ atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

High {kappa} gate dielectrics of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on molecular beam epitaxy-grown In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As pristine surface using in-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) without any surface treatment or passivation layer. The ALD-HfO{sub 2}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface showed notable reduction in the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}), deduced from quasi-static capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage (G-V) at room temperature and 100 Degree-Sign C. More significantly, the midgap peak commonly observed in the D{sub it}(E) of ALD-oxides/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As is now greatly diminished. The midgap D{sub it} value decreases from {>=}15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {approx}2-4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-HfO{sub 2}. Further, thermal stability at 850 Degree-Sign C was achieved in the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As, whereas C-V characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As degraded after the high temperature annealing. From in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectra, the AsO{sub x}, which is not the oxidized state from the native oxide, but is an induced state from adsorption of trimethylaluminum and H{sub 2}O, was found at the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface, while that was not detected at the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface.

Chang, Y. H.; Chiang, T. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Liu, Y. T.; Lin, H. Y.; Huang, M. L.; Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pi, T. W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solar reduction of CO{sub 2}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The red shift of the absorption spectrum of CO{sub 2} with increasing temperature, along with CO stabilization are the foundation of a process for direct solar reduction of CO{sub 2} to liquid fuels. The result is a process capable of using renewable solar energy to directly reduce CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere or stationary sources for recycle as a liquid fuel resulting in a net decrease in CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and decreased demand on fossil fuel. The process includes in sequence: preparation of adequately pure CO{sub 2} feed; preheating CO{sub 2} to near 1,800 K; breaking the CO{sub 2} bonds to produce CO, O{sub 2} and O; quenching the hot product mix by rapid admixture with room temperature CO{sub 2}; removing excess thermal energy to produce electricity, heat new CO{sub 2} and enable subsequent process steps; removing the remaining CO{sub 2} from the gas; removing oxygen from the gas; converting part of the product CO to H{sub 2} by the shift reaction; and, finally, catalytically synthesizing methanol from the synthetic gas.

Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; King, Joe D.; Guettler, Robert D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Drift velocity of electrons in quantum wells of selectively doped In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As and In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures in high electric fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field dependence of drift velocity of electrons in quantum wells of selectively doped In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As and In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The influence of varying the molar fraction of Al in the composition of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As and Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As barriers of the quantum well on the mobility and drift velocity of electrons in high electric fields is studied. It is shown that the electron mobility rises as the fraction x of Al in the barrier composition is decreased. The maximum mobility in the In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/In{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}As quantum wells exceeds the mobility in a bulk material by a factor of 3. An increase in fraction x of Al in the barrier leads to an increase in the threshold field E{sub th} of intervalley transfer (the Gunn effect). The threshold field is E{sub th} = 16 kV/cm in the In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/Al{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}As heterostructures and E{sub th} = 10 kV/cm in the In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As heterostructures. In the heterostructures with the lowest electron mobility, E{sub th} = 2-3 kV/cm, which is lower than E{sub th} = 4 kV/cm in bulk InGaAs.

Pozela, J., E-mail: pozela@pfi.lt; Pozela, K.; Raguotis, R.; Juciene, V. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Semiconductor Physics Institute (Lithuania)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ca{sub 3-x}La{sub x}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}} (x=0, 0.3): New cobaltite materials as cathodes for proton conducting solid oxide fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Misfit-type Ca{sub 3-x}La{sub x}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}} (x=0, 0.3) oxides were synthesised to be evaluated as possible cathode materials for proton conducting fuel cells (PCFCs) based on BaCe{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCY10) dense ceramic electrolyte. The electrical conductivity value of Ca{sub 2.7}La{sub 0.3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}} ({sigma}{approx}53 S cm{sup -1} at 600 deg. C) is in the range of usually required value for a cathode application (about 50-100 S cm{sup -1}). In order to test the performance of each compound as cathode material, impedance measurements were carried out on Ca{sub 3-x}La{sub x}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}}/BaCe{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ca{sub 3-x}La{sub x}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}} symmetrical half cells over the temperature range 400-800 deg. C under wet air. A promising electrocatalytic activity has been observed with both compounds Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}} and Ca{sub 2.7}La{sub 0.3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}}. Factually, the area specific resistance obtained was about 2.2 {Omega} cm{sup 2} at 600 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: Arrehnius plots of the ASR for Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}} and Ca{sub 2.7}La{sub 0.3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+{delta}}.

Ben Yahia, Hamdi [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87, Avenue A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Mauvy, Fabrice, E-mail: mauvy@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.f [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87, Avenue A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Grenier, Jean Claude [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87, Avenue A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Crystal structure, physical properties and electronic structure of a new organic conductor B"-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}.  

SciTech Connect

A new organic conductor, {beta}'-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}So{sub 3}[BEDT-TTF, hereafter abbreviated ET, refers to bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene], was prepared by electrocrystallization. The crystal structure of this salt was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 298 and 150 K, its physical properties were examined by electrical resistivity, Raman spectroscopy and EPR measurements, and its electronic structure was calculated and compared with that of the analogous salt {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. Whereas {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} has disordered anions and undergoes a metal-to-insulator transition at {approx}190 K, {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} has ordered anions and is semiconducting down to {approx}100 K, metallic below {approx}100 K, and superconducting below 5 K. At room temperature both {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {beta}'(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} have similar electronic band structures and physical properties. When the temperature is lowered, each donor molecule stack becomes dimerized in both salts. However, the interdimer interaction within each donor stack nearly vanishes in {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}, but remains substantial in {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}.

Schlueter, J. A.; Ward, B. H.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H. H.; Kini, A. M.; Parakka, J.; Morales, E.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Winter, R. W.; Mohtasham, J.; Gard, G. L.; Materials Science Division; North Carolina State Univ.; Portland State Univ.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electrochemical studies of Mg-doped Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anodes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial lithium-ion batteries use carbon as the material of choice for the anode. However, because lithiated carbon has a voltage very close to the potential of metallic lithium, there are concerns about the safety of fully-charged carbon electrodes. The safety issue can be addressed by using a material that intercalates lithium at a higher voltage. A promising material is the lithium-titanium-oxide spinel material Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} which can accommodate 3 Li{sup +} ions per formula unit (corresponding to 175 mAh/g) in a two-phase reaction at approximately 1.5 V versus lithium. One of the drawbacks of this system is that the end-member Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} is electronically insulating, which limits electron transfer at the electrode surface. By doping this material with magnesium, Li{sub 4{minus}x}Mg{sub x}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, we introduced mixed-valent Ti{sup 4+}/Ti{sup 3+} into the stoichiometric spinel structure and thereby increased the electronic conductivity by several orders of magnitude without sacrificing electrochemical performance. In this presentation we will provide data on the extent of the solid solution in Li{sub 4{minus}x}Mg{sub x}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, the variation of electronic conductivity as a function of dopant concentration and the rate capability of the doped material.

Chen, C. H.; Jansen, A. N.; Vaughey, J.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

K{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}: A transparent nonlinear optical crystal with frustrated magnetism  

SciTech Connect

A new noncentrosymmetric ferroborate crystal, K{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, has been grown from high temperature melt. Structure solution from single crystal X-ray diffraction shows that the title compound crystallizes in a trigonal space group P321 with cell dimensions of a=8.7475(12) A and c=8.5124(17) A. In the structure, FeO{sub 4} tetrahedron shares its three basal oxygen atoms with BO{sub 3} triangles forming a two-dimensional layer in the ab plane and the layers are connected by the apical Fe-O bonds along the c direction. The crystal is transparent in the visible and near infrared region from 500 to 2000 nm with three pronounced absorption bands ascribed to d-d transitions of tetrahedrally coordinated Fe{sup 3+} ions. Though, structurally analog to K{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the further twisting of the BO{sub 3} groups between adjacent layers reduces its optical nonlinearity to a second-harmonic generation intensity of about 0.4 times that of KDP. Spin-glass behavior is observed at 20 K which is probably due to geometrically magnetic frustration of the triangular Fe net in the ab plane. - Graphical abstract: Single crystal of a new ferroborate K{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, space group P321, a=8.7475(3) A, c=8.5124(3) A, was obtained and characterized. It exhibits considerable SHG efficiency and frustrated magnetism originated from the triangular Fe net in the ab plane.

Wang Yonggang [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, R.K., E-mail: rkli@mail.ipc.ac.c [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Position Paper on Practicable Performance Criteria for the Removal Efficiency of Volatile Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

As a result of fuel reprocessing, volatile radionuclides may be released from the facility stack if no processes are put in place to remove them. The radionuclides that are of concern in this document are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. The question we attempted to answer is how efficient must this removal process be for each of these radionuclides? To answer this question, we examined the three regulations that may impact the degree to which these radionuclides must be reduced before process gases can be released from the facility. These regulations are 40 CFR 61 (EPA 2010a), 40 CFR 190(EPA 2010b), and 10 CFR 20 (NRC 2012). These regulations apply to the total radionuclide release and to a particular organ - the thyroid. Because these doses can be divided amongst all the radionuclides in different ways and even within the four radionuclides in question, we provided several cases. We first looked at the inventories for these radionuclides for three fuel types (PWR UOX, PWR MOX, and AHTGR), several burn-up values, and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. We calculated doses to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) with the EPA code CAP-88 (Rosnick 1992). Finally, we looked at two dose cases. Allocating all of the allowable dose to be used by the volatile radionuclides is one case, but, perhaps, unrealistic. In lieu of this, we arbitrarily selected a value of 10% of the allowable dose to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. We calculated the required decontamination factors (DFs) for both of these cases, including the case for the thyroid dose for which 14C and 129I were the main contributors. With respect to 129I doses, we found that the highest dose was calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scaled as the fraction of the total 129I that was particulate. Therefore, we assumed for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I was particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs.

R. T. Jubin; N. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

CHANGES IN MOISTURE, CARBON, NITROGEN, SULPHUR, VOLATILES, AND CALORIFIC VALUE OF MISCANTHUS DURING TORREFACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Torrefaction tests were carried out on miscanthus samples in order to understand the changes in chemical composition at temperatures of 250350C and residence times of 30120 minutes. The raw material chemical composition was moisture content 7.97%, moisture-free carbon (C) 47.73%, hydrogen (H) 5.85%, nitrogen (N) 0.28%, sulphur (S) 0.02%, volatiles (V) 83.29% for volatiles, and moisture and ash-free (MAF) calorific value (CV) 8423 BTU/lb (19.59 MJ/kg). Torrefaction at temperatures of 250C and residence time of 30 minutes resulted in a significant decrease in moisture by about 82.68%, but the other components, C, H, N, S, and V changed only marginally. Increasing the torrefaction temperature to 350C and residence time to 120 minutes further reduced the moisture to a final value of 0.54% (a 93.2% reduction compared to original) and also resulted in a significant decrease in the other components, H, N, and V by 58.29%, 14.28%, and 70.45%, respectively. The carbon content at 350C and 120 minutes increased by about 4% and sulfur values were below detection limits. The calorific values increased by about 5.59% at 250C and 30 minutes, whereas at 350C and 120 minutes, the increase was much greater (about 75.61%) and resulted in a maximum degree of carbonization of 1.60. The H/C ratio decreased with an increase in torrefaction temperature, where a minimum value of 0.6 was observed at 350C and 120 minutes. The regression equations developed with respect to torrefaction temperature and times have adequately described the changes in chemical composition. The surface plots developed based on the regression equations indicate that torrefaction temperatures of 300350C and residence times of 30120 minutes residence time can help to increase carbon content, calorific value, and degree of carbonization to > 49.4%, >11,990 BTU/lb (27 MJ/kg), and 1.4, and reduce moisture, nitrogen, volatile, and the H/C ratio to 0.5250.725, 2.93.9, 0.2250.235, and <1.4.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard Boardman; Christopher Wright; John Heintzelman

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Comparative thermal-expansion study of {beta}"-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} : uniaxial pressure coeffcients of T{sub c} and upper critical fields.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report high-resolution measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion, {alpha}=l{sup -1}x({partial_derivative}l/{partial_derivative}T), on single crystals of the organic superconductors {beta}'-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}. For both salts we find large and highly anisotropic phase-transition anomalies at T{sub c}. Combining these data with literature results on the specific heat via the Ehrenfest relation, the uniaxial pressure coefficients of T{sub c} can be determined. Most remarkably, a strikingly similar in-plane vs out-of-plane anisotropy is found for both compounds: the strong suppression of T{sub c} observed in hydrostatic-pressure experiments is dominated by a huge negative uniaxial stress effect perpendicular to the conducting planes. Therefore we expect that an increase of T{sub c} in this class of superconductors can be obtained by enlarging the distance between the conducting layers. Application of magnetic fields perpendicular to the planes for the {beta}''-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} salt were found to result in pronounced superconducting fluctuation effects and scaling behavior in {alpha}(T,B). Owing to the pronounced phase-transition anomalies in {alpha}(T,B) at T{sub c}, our measurements allow for an accurate determination of the upper critical fields. We find B{sub c{sub 2}}{sup {perpendicular}}(0)=(1.4{+-}0.2)T and B{sub c{sub 2}}{sup {parallel}}(0)=(10.4{+-}0.5)T for fields perpendicular and parallel to the conducting planes, respectively.

Muller, J.; Lang, M.; Steglich, F.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.; Geiser, U.; Nixon, P. G.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.; Sasaki, T.; Toyota, N.; Max-Planck Inst. for Chemical Physics of Solids; Portland State Univ.; Tohoku Univ.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cathode encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks  

SciTech Connect

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (25 deg. C) have been tested as water vapor permeation barriers for organic light emitting diode devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiN{sub x}:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition served as reference and were used to develop Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks. On the basis of Ca test measurements, a very low intrinsic water vapor transmission rate of {<=} 2 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and 4 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} (20 deg. C/50% relative humidity) were found for 20-40 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 300 nm a-SiN{sub x}:H films, respectively. The cathode particle coverage was a factor of 4 better for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films compared to the a-SiN{sub x}:H films and an average of 0.12 defects per cm{sup 2} was obtained for a stack consisting of three barrier layers (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

Keuning, W.; Weijer, P. van de; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, P.O. Box WAG12, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

EVALUATION OF FUSED UO$sub 2$  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The density and purity of fused UO/sub 2/ from several suppliers was evaluated. Densities of large pieces varied widely, but variations in pycnometer and bulk densities of crushed UO/sub 2/ powder were small. Average oxygen- touranium ratios ranged from 1.94 to 2.14. Impurities visible as microscopic inclusions were U/sub 4/O/sub 9/, metallic uranium, UC, and UN/sub 2/. The chief trace metallic contaminants were aluminum, iron, and silicon. Hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide were evolved during vacuum extraction. (auth)

Cole, G.R.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 040512 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inventory Sub Guide 040512 IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 040512 IGCAInventorySubGuide040512.pdf More Documents & Publications OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT & ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT O:...

275

Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 More Documents & Publications Job Counting...

276

Method of producing hydrogen. [KNO/sub 3/ and I/sub 2/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Water is thermochemically decomposed to produce hydrogen by the following sequence of reactions. KNO/sub 3/ and I/sub 2/ are reacted to produce KI, NO and O/sub 2/, the NO and O/sub 2/ thus produced are reacted with water to form HNO/sub 3/, a hydrogen-containing iodide--NH/sub 4/I or HI--is formed from the HNO/sub 3/, and this iodide is thermally decomposed to produce hydrogen, all products of the reactions being recycled except hydrogen and oxygen. 2 claims, no drawings.

Abraham, B.M.; Schreiner, F.

1975-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Synthesis and crystal structure of a new open-framework iron phosphate (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}]: Novel linear trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra  

SciTech Connect

A new iron phosphate (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}] has been synthesized hydrothermally at HF concentrations from 0.5 to 1.2 mL. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals its three-dimensional open-framework structure (monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n (No. 14), a=6.2614(13) A, b=9.844(2) A, c=14.271(3) A, {beta}=92.11(1){sup o}, V=879.0(3) A{sup 3}). This structure is built from isolated linear trimers of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra, which are linked by (PO{sub 4}) groups to form ten-membered-ring channels along [1 0 0]. This isolated, linear trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra, [(FeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}], is new and adds to the diverse linkages of Fe polyhedra as secondary building units in iron phosphates. The trivalent iron at octahedral sites for the title compound has been confirmed by synchrotron Fe K-edge XANES spectra and magnetic measurements. Magnetic measurements also show that this compound exhibit a strong antiferromagnetic exchange below T{sub N}=17 K, consistent with superexchange interactions expected for the linear trimer of ferric octahedra with the Fe-F-Fe angle of 132.5{sup o}. -- Graphical abstract: The three-dimensional open-framework structure of (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}] is built from a novel isolated, linear (FeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2} trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra linked by PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Display Omitted

Mi, Jin-Xiao, E-mail: jxmi@xmu.edu.c [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Cheng-Xin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chen, Ning [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2 (Canada); Li, Rong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2 (Canada); Pan, Yuanming [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2 (Canada)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Alkali/TX sub 2 catalysts for CO/H sub 2 conversion to C sub 1 -C sub 4 alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to investigate and develop novel catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols by a highly selective process. Therefore, the variations of catalyst activity and selectivity for the synthesis of alcohols from H{sub 2}/CO {le}1 synthesis gas for a series of A/TX{sub 2} compounds, where A is a surface alkali dopant, T is a transition metal, and X is a S, Se, or Te, will be determined. The alkali component A, which is essential for C-O and C-C bond forming reactions leading to alcohols, will be highly dispersed on the TX{sub 2} surfaces by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical complexation/anchoring (CCA) methods. Catalysts that have been prepared during this quarter include RuS{sub 2}, NbS{sub 2}, K/MoS{sub 2}, and K/Crown either/MoS{sub 2}. Catalysts tested include KOH/MoS{sub 2} and K/Crown ether/MoS{sub 2}. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Brimer, A.; Richards, M.; Kieke, M.; Bastian, R.D.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mercury oxidation over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(WO{sub 3})/TiO{sub 2} commercial SCR catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Mercury oxidation by hydrochloric acid over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(WO{sub 3})/TiO{sub 2} commercial SCR catalyst was investigated. Both fresh and aged catalysts with honeycomb structure, which were exposed to a coal combustion flue gas in a coal-fired boiler for over 71 000 h. were examined. The aged catalysts were characterized by X-ray and SEM-EDX analysis to examine the presence of ash deposition on the surface. The mercury oxidation rate was enhanced by increasing HCl concentrations and inhibited strongly by the presence of NH{sub 3}. This behavior could be explained by a kinetic model assuming that HCl competes for the catalyst active sites against NH{sub 3}. As the catalyst operation time increased, the mercury oxidation rate was observed to decrease considerably in the presence of NH{sub 3} while NO reduction rate was apparently nearly unchanged. By examining aged catalysts, deposits stemming from fly ash and SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} were observed to accumulate continuously on the catalyst surface. The ash deposited on the surface may partially block the active catalyst sites and decrease their number. The decrease of the number of active sites on the catalyst surface caused NH{sub 3} to remain unreacted in the honeycomb catalyst. The decrease of the Hg{sup 0} oxidation rate was caused by the inhibition effect of NH{sub 3} remaining in the catalyst.

Kamata, H.; Ueno, S.; Naito, T.; Yukimura, A [IHI Corp, Kanagawa (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Formation, characterization, and application of sputtered Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and gamma-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thin films  

SciTech Connect

One reason to study Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ film formation is that it may be used as an insulating layer of a thin film inductive transducer for magnetic recording. Another reason is that Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ could serve as an effective replacement of SiO/sub 2/ as a gate insulation in MOSFET's (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor devices). RF diode sputtering is used as the method of forming Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and ..gamma..-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thin films. The effects of oxygen partial pressure, substrate bias, substrate spacing, and residual gas, etc. on the formation of oxide thin films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, SEM, STEM, TEM, ellipsometry, alpha-step scan, EDX, AES, XPS, capacitance bridge, and VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer). It was found that Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ films sputtered at 400 watts RF power, 10 mtorr total gas pressure, and 6.35 cm target-to-substrate spacing will exhibit the optimum physical properties under the condition of -40 VRF substrate bias and 1 x 10/sup -4/ torr oxygen partial pressure. The effects of oxygen partial pressure and substrate bias are found to be the most important factors in determining the properties of sputtered oxide films.

Chen, G.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Electrochemical lithium insertion in the solid solution Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}-Sb{sub 2}WO{sub 6} with Aurivillius framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the structural evolution of the Aurivillius crystalline framework in the solid solution Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}-Sb{sub 2}WO{sub 6} we have carried out an electrochemical lithium insertion study in this system. A slight loss of the specific capacity of the electrochemical cell was observed as amount of Sb was increased. In general, the different compositions within solid solution Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x}WO{sub 6} (0.25 {<=} x {<=} 0.75) exhibited a similar behaviour featured mainly by two semiconstant potential regions located at 1.7 and 0.8 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup o}. The oxide Sb{sub 2}WO{sub 6} with Autivillius structure but without Bi was tested as cathode too. The maximum amount of lithium inserted, 13.5 lithium atoms per formula, is the same amount inserted in its homologous bismuth oxide Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}.

Martinez-de la Cruz, A. [Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL (Mexico)], E-mail: azmartin@gama.fime.uanl.mx; Longoria Rodriguez, F.E. [Departamento de Quimica, Campus Universitario Los Guaritos, Universidad de Oriente, Av. Universidad, CP 6203 Monagas (Venezuela)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3·1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing possible differences in Waste Matrix Code Group (WMCG) for RH TRU that could potentially impact the weighting factors. Please provide data characterizing the differences in emissions between the two types of waste, in support of the assertion that modeling data from CH TRU waste adequately

283

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Title Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3979e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ortiz, Anna C., Marion L. Russell, Wen-Yee Lee, Michael G. Apte, and Randy L. Maddalena Pagination 29 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 μg/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to >500 μg/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~ 15 μg/m2/h while the new wood material emitted > 100 μg/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs

284

Modeling Volatile Species Retention Experiments: Interim Progress Report (M3FT-12LA0202053)  

SciTech Connect

Metal nuclear fuel is a candidate transmutation fuel form for advanced fuel cycles. One constituent of the fuel, americium, has a high vapor pressure, and there is a concern that excessive volatility losses of americium will occur during casting of the metal. A number of experiments have been performed using americium and surrogate metals, including experiments slated for FY12, to address the concern. The present task is to model and numerically simulate these experiments. This report describes a system-level model of the relevant experiments that has been developed together with some results. It also describes some initial 3D, full-physics simulations of portions of the experiments that have been performed.

Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

EVALAUATION OF THE COMPONENTS AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF VOLATILE OIL FROM ZANTHOXYLUMLIMONELLA FRUIT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essential oils constitute a relatively common group of natural products present in aromatic medicinal plants. They are volatile liquids usually with pleasant and sometimes intensive odors (aroma).Essential oils are well known for its activity in lungs related diseases.They maintained the ventilation and drainage of the sinuses, had an antiinflammatory effect on the trachea 5 and reduced asthma.The essential oil isolated from Zanthoxylumlimonellawere proved a large number of compounds. Many compounds were detected and proved by previous workers, some of them yet to be identified and screened.Traditional usage of the plant indicates various uses even some are contradictory.In the present study showed that the oil is moderately active against grampositive and significantly no action against gram-negative. KEY WORDS:,Gram-positive, Zanthoxylumlimonella,Gram-negative Essential oil.

Arunkumark. V; M. Paridhavi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX  

SciTech Connect

Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

Levi, A.; Podolak, M. [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sasselov, D., E-mail: amitlevi.planetphys@gmail.com [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

MARUSICH, R.M.

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Magnetoresistance of Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4}: Ferromagnetic semiconductor (abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic semiconductors are an interesting class of materials. The first one, CrBr{sub 3} was discovered only in 1960. Magnetic semiconductors usually show a prominent peak in the resistivity and a very large negative magnetoresistance (MR) in the vicinity of T{sub c}, which is not well understood. Recently, we have reported Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4} to be a ferromagnetic semiconductor with a T{sub c} of 10 K. To our knowledge, this is the first Ce system of this type and is a further addition to the rich varieties of ground states exhibited by Ce systems. Here, we report the MR studies on Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4} in magnetic fields up to 8 T in the temperature range 4.2{endash}300 K. The resistivity of Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4} shows a rise with decrease in temperature from 300 K exhibiting a peak at 19 K followed by a drastic fall at low temperatures. An activation type fit to the data gives a band-gap energy of 84 K. The resistivity peak is broadened considerably in a field of 8 T and the peak is found to shift to higher temperatures by about 10 K. The MR is small and negative ({lt}0.5{percent}) down to about 60 K and then gradually peaks to a large value of {minus}30{percent} at 12 K. The increased conduction in the vicinity of T{sub c} shows that the conduction band is influenced by the magnetic spins presumably due to s{endash}f interactions. The band-gap energy is found to remain constant even in a field as high as 8 T. This may rule out the magnetic polarons to be the cause of activation type of resistivity behavior. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Paulose, P.L.; Patil, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (Mumbai)-5 (India)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Comparison of sampling methods for semi-volatile organic carbonAssociated with PM2.5  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the influence of denuder sampling methods and filter collection media on the measurement of semi-volatile organic carbon (SVOC) associated with PM2.5. Two types of collection media, charcoal (activated carbon) and XAD, were used both in diffusion denuders and impregnated back-up filters in two different samplers, the VAPS and the PC-BOSS. The two organic diffusion denuders were XAD-coated glass annular denuders and charcoal-impregnated cellulose fiber filter(CIF) denuders. In addition, recently developed XAD-impregnated quartz filters were compared to CIF filters as back-up filter collection media. The two denuder types resulted in equivalent measurement of particulate organic carbon and particle mass. The major difference observed between the XAD and charcoal BOSS denuders is the higher efficiency of charcoal for collection of more volatile carbon. This more volatile carbon does not contribute substantially to the particle mass or SVOC measured as OC on quartz filters downstream of the denuders. This volatile carbon does result in high OC concentrations observed in charcoal filters placed behind quartz filters downstream of the XAD denuders and would result in overestimating the SVOC in that configuration.

Lewtas, Joellen; Booth, Derrick; Pang, Yanbo; Reimer, Steve; Eatough, Delbert J.; Gundel, Lara A.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractions of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little is known about the relative health hazards presented by emissions from in-use gasoline and diesel engines. Adverse health effects have been ascribed to engine emissions on the basis of: (1) the presence of known toxic agents in emissions; (2) high-dose animal and bacterial mutagenicity tests; and (3) studies indicating gradients of health effects with proximity to roadways. Most attention has been given to the particulate fraction of emissions; little attention has been given to the semi-volatile organic fraction. However, the semi-volatile fraction overlaps the particulate fraction in composition and is always present in the vicinity of fresh emissions. Although the potential health effects of diesel emissions have been frequently studied and debated during the past 20 years (EPA, 2002), relatively little attention has been given to the toxicity of emissions from gasoline engines. In view of the considerable progress in cleaning up diesel emissions, it would be useful to compare the toxicity of emissions from contemporary on-road diesel technology with that of emissions from the in-use gasoline fleet that is well-accepted by the public. It would also be useful to have a set of validated tests for rapid, cost-effective comparisons of the toxicity of emission samples, both for comparisons among competing technologies (e.g., diesel, gasoline, natural gas) and for determining the impacts of new fuel, engine, and after-treatment strategies on toxicity. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has sponsored research aimed at developing and applying rapid-response toxicity tests for collected emission samples (Seagrave et al., 2000). This report presents selected results from that work, which is being published in much greater detail in the peer-reviewed literature (Seagrave et al., 2002).

Mauderly, Joe; Seagrave, JeanClare; McDonald, Jacob; Gigliotti,Andrew; Nikula, Kristen; Seilkop, Steven; Gurevich, Michael

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

Methodology for Formulating Diesel Surrogate Fuels with Accurate Compositional, Ignition-Quality, and Volatility Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a novel approach was developed to formulate surrogate fuels having characteristics that are representative of diesel fuels produced from real-world refinery streams. Because diesel fuels typically consist of hundreds of compounds, it is difficult to conclusively determine the effects of fuel composition on combustion properties. Surrogate fuels, being simpler representations of these practical fuels, are of interest because they can provide a better understanding of fundamental fuel-composition and property effects on combustion and emissions-formation processes in internal-combustion engines. In addition, the application of surrogate fuels in numerical simulations with accurate vaporization, mixing, and combustion models could revolutionize future engine designs by enabling computational optimization for evolving real fuels. Dependable computational design would not only improve engine function, it would do so at significant cost savings relative to current optimization strategies that rely on physical testing of hardware prototypes. The approach in this study utilized the state-of-the-art techniques of {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the advanced distillation curve to characterize fuel composition and volatility, respectively. The ignition quality was quantified by the derived cetane number. Two well-characterized, ultra-low-sulfur No.2 diesel reference fuels produced from refinery streams were used as target fuels: a 2007 emissions certification fuel and a Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel fuel. A surrogate was created for each target fuel by blending eight pure compounds. The known carbon bond types within the pure compounds, as well as models for the ignition qualities and volatilities of their mixtures, were used in a multiproperty regression algorithm to determine optimal surrogate formulations. The predicted and measured surrogate-fuel properties were quantitatively compared to the measured target-fuel properties, and good agreement was found.

Mueller, C. J.; Cannella, W. J.; Bruno, T. J.; Bunting, B.; Dettman, H. D.; Franz, J. A.; Huber, M. L.; Natarajan, M.; Pitz, W. J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Wright, K.

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of nonstoichiometry on the electrophysical properties of the layered compounds Ge{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and GeBi{sub 2}Te{sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of deviation from stoichiometry on the electrophysical properties (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermoelectric power, and carrier concentration) of the ternary layered semiconducting compounds Ge{sub 3{plus_minus}{delta}1}Bi{sub 2+{delta}2}Te{sub 6+{delta}3} and Ge{sub 1{plus_minus}{delta}3}, which are promising for use in thermoelectric converters.The electrophysical properties were measured at 300 K. The Ge{sub 1-{delta}1}Bi{sub 2+{delta}3} alloys were studied by powder X-ray diffraction analysis on a DRON UM-1 diffractometer (CoK{sub {alpha}} radiation). It was found that Ge{sub 3{plus_minus}{delta}1} Bi{sub 2+{delta}2}Te{sub 6{plus_minus}{delta}3} is a nonstoichiometric phase with p-type conductivity throughout the {delta}{sub 1}, {delta}{sub 2}, and {delta}{sub 3} ranges examined. Our results suggest that cation vacancies are likely to be the dominant nonstoichiometric defects responsible for the high concentration of holes. The conductivity of Ge{sub 1{plus_minus}{delta}1}Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 4} changes from the p-type in the Ge-deficient alloys to the n-type in the Gerich alloys.

Shelimova, L.E.; Karpinskii, O.G.; Avilov, E.S.; Kretova, M.A.; Lubman, C.U. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydrothermal synthesis and crystal structure of a new inorganic/organic hybrid of scandium sulfate: (H{sub 2}en)Sc{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.72}  

SciTech Connect

The first organically templated layered structure of scandium sulfate, (H{sub 2}en)Sc{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.72}, (en=ethylenediamine) was synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the title compound, scandium ions are bridged by sulfate groups with a ratio of 1:2 into a 4{sub 3}{sup 6} layer structure. These layers are parallel packed and separated from each other by ethylenediammonium dications and water molecules. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/c, with cell parameters a=8.5966(13)A, b=5.1068(8)A, c=18.847(3)A, {beta}=91.210(3){sup o}, V=827.2(2)A{sup 3} and Z=2. Refinement gave R{sub 1}[I>2{sigma}(I)]=0.0354 and wR{sub 2}[I>2{sigma}(I)]=0.0878. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that this material is thermally stable to above 400 deg. C.

Lu Jianjiang [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: j.lu@anl.gov; Schlueter, John A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Geiser, Urs [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Adsorption sites in zeolites A and X probed by competitive adsorption of H{sub 2} with N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}: Implications for N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors determine details of the adsorption of O{sub 2} or N{sub 2} in Li{sup +} exchanged zeolites by way of their effect on coadsorbed H{sub 2} molecules using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) techniques. The results clearly show, for example, the absence of type III cations in Li-A and the expected stronger binding of N{sub 2} (compared with O{sub 2}) and thereby provide insight into the relative efficacy of Li-X for O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation.

Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Trouw, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bug, A.L.R. [Swarthmore Coll., PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Synthetic trends for BiVO{sub 4} photocatalysts: Molybdenum substitution vs. TiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} heterojunctions  

SciTech Connect

The influence of hydrothermal synthesis, thermal post-treatment at 500 Degree-Sign C and Mo content on a series of Bi{sub 1-x/3}V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.02sub 2} evolution. Mo incorporation stabilizes the tetragonal scheelite phase of BiVO{sub 4}, thereby inducing a small blue shift of the band gap. This adverse effect can be partially compensated by incorporation of lower Mo amounts (up to ca. 4%), which stabilizes the particle morphology upon calcination. Both BiVO{sub 4}-TiO{sub 2} and BiVO{sub 4}:Mo-TiO{sub 2} heterojunction composites with TiO{sub 2} particle coatings in the 10 nm range were newly synthesized and displayed promising photocatalytic performance in MB degradation. Comparative studies with SnO{sub 2} heterojunctions revealed a superior influence of TiO{sub 2} deposition over SnO{sub 2} coating on both BiVO{sub 4} and Bi{sub 1-x/3}V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} oxide substrates. Different synthetic guidelines for BiVO{sub 4}-based solid solutions and heterojunctions in photocatalytic wastewater treatment and water oxidation are discussed. - Graphical Abstract: The influence of Mo substitution on the structure, morphology and surface area of BiVO{sub 4} photocatalysts was investigated through hydrothermal synthesis of nanoscale Bi{sub 1-x/3}V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} mixed oxides. Their catalytic activity in organic dye degradation and water oxidation was compared to the newly synthesized Bi{sub 1-x/3}V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}-MO{sub 2} (M=Ti, Sn) heterojunctions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New hydrothermal approach to nanoscale Bi{sub 1-x/3}V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} photocatalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of molybdenum substitution on organic dye degradation and water oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic activity of novel Bi{sub 1-x/3}V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}-MO{sub 2} (M=Ti, Sn) heterojunctions.

Kontic, Roman [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Patzke, Greta R., E-mail: greta.patzke@aci.uzh.ch [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of the high-brightness Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) red phosphors  

SciTech Connect

A series of red-emitting phosphors Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) have been successfully synthesized at 850 Degree-Sign C by solid state reaction. The excitation spectra of the two phosphors reveal two strong excitation bands at 396 nm and 466 nm, respectively, which match well with the two popular emissions from near-UV and blue light-emitting diode chips. The intensity of the emission from {sup 5}D{sub 0} to {sup 7}F{sub 2} of M{sub 2}(Gd{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} phosphors with the optimal compositions of x=0.85 for Li or x=0.70 for Na is about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 396 nm and 466 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The experimental results indicate that the Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) phosphors are promising red-emitting phosphors pumped by near-UV and blue light. - Graphical Abstract: The intensity of the red emission of M{sub 2}(Gd{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) phosphors with the optimal compositions is about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel Eu{sup 3+}-doped red phosphors (Na{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}, Li{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7}) were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their emission intensities are about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their quantum efficiencies are higher than that of commercial red phosphor Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+}.

Zhao Chengchun [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yin Xin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang Fuqiang, E-mail: huangfq@mail.sic.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hang Yin, E-mail: yhang@siom.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Optimization of annealing conditions for controlling composition of (Pb{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 1-{delta}}Te{sub 1+{delta}} crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One common way of controlling the composition of semiconductor materials is by two- or three-zone annealing. Compared to doping during growth, such anneals ensure more uniform distribution of impurities and better reproducibility of galvanomagnetic and photoelectric properties. For (A{sub 1{minus}x}B{sub x}){sub 1{minus}{delta}}C{sub 1+{delta}} chalcogenide solid solutions, the A/B ratio can be controlled by introducing an additional source of B or A, whereas off-stoichiometry {Delta} can be varied using a source of chalcocren C. The purpose of this work was to optimize the conditions for preparing homogeneous crystals of (Pb{sub 1{minus}}x Ge{sub x}){sub 1{minus}{delta}}Te{sub 1+{delta}} (0sub 0.93}Sn{sub 0.07}{sub 1{minus}{delta}} solid solution showed that, under conditions commonly used for annealing IV-VI materials, mass transport to the cold zone is insignificant. This information is, however, insufficient for choosing optimal process parameters since the minimum annealing time remains to be determined. In this work, we calculated the optimal annealing parameters for preparing homogeneous crystals of Pb{sub 1{minus}x}Ge{sub x}Te (O < x <{le}0.05). In calculations we used kinetic equations describing mass transport in the solid and vapor phases and the measured temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient for germanium in PbTe.

Yahsina, L.V.; Bobruiko, V.B.; Zlomanov, V.P. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Alkali/TX[sub 2] catalysts for CO/H[sub 2] conversion to C[sub 1]-C[sub 4] alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to determine the patterns of variations of catalyst activity and selectivity for the synthesis of alcohols from H[sub 2]/CO synthesis gas. Since the source of carbon can be coal-derived synthesis gas, this research makes a contribution to the technology for high quality clean transportation fuels and for basic chemicals from coal. Catalysts prepared were principally based on MoS[sub 2], RuS[sub 2], TaS[sub 2], and NbS[sub 2]. Catalytic testing of these materials was carried out both before and after surface doping with Cs. In alcohol synthesis activation of hydrogen by the catalyst surface is essential. Knowledge of transition metal disulfide surface properties is important before the mechanism of hydrogen dissociation can be addressed. The electronic structures of MoS[sub 2], RuS[sub 2], and NbS[sub 2] were studied both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental valence bands were obtained by high resolution electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (HR-ESCA, also referred to as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and theoretical valence bands were calculated using solid state extended Hueckel theory. Comparison of two-dimensional (2-D) MoS[sub 2] theoretical valence bands with the experimental HR-ESCA valence bands of polycrystalline MoS[sub 2] led to parametrization of the S 3s, S 3p, and Mo 4d atomic ionization potentials and Slater-type coefficients and exponents. The S 3s and S 3p parameters obtained for MoS[sub 2] were used to obtain the NbS[sub 2] and RuS[sub 2] theoretical valence bands.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Richards-Babb, M.; Bastian, R.; Kieke, M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and physical properties of the new lanthanum copper telluride La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 7}  

SciTech Connect

The new lanthanum copper telluride La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} has been obtained by annealing the elements at 1073 K. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the title compound crystallizes in a new structure type, space group Pnma (no. 62) with lattice dimensions of a=8.2326(3) A, b=25.9466(9) A, c=7.3402(3) A, V=1567.9(1) A{sup 3}, Z=4 for La{sub 3}Cu{sub 4.86(4)}Te{sub 7}. The structure of La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} is remarkably complex. The Cu and Te atoms build up a three-dimensional covalent network. The coordination polyhedra include trigonal LaTe{sub 6} prisms, capped trigonal LaTe{sub 7} prisms, CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra, and CuTe{sub 3} pyramids. All Cu sites exhibit deficiencies of various extents. Electrical property measurements on a sintered pellet of La{sub 3}Cu{sub 4.86}Te{sub 7} indicate that it is a p-type semiconductor in accordance with the electronic structure calculations. -- Graphical abstract: Oligomeric unit comprising interconnected CuTe{sub 3} pyramids and CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} adopts a new structure type. {yields} All Cu sites exhibit deficiencies of various extents. {yields} The coordination polyhedra include trigonal LaTe{sub 6} prisms, capped trigonal LaTe{sub 7} prisms, CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra and CuTe{sub 3} pyramids. {yields} La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} is a p-type semiconductor.

Zelinska, Mariya; Assoud, Abdeljalil [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kleinke, Holger, E-mail: kleinke@uwaterloo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Optical transitions in MnGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dependence of the absorption coefficient on incident photon energy in a MnGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} single crystal has been investigated in the temperature range 110-295 K. Using group-theory analysis of the electron state symmetry and comparison of the symmetry of the energy spectrum of MnGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and its isoelectronic analogs, a conclusion about the character of optical transitions has been drawn. It is shown that the features observed at 2.31 and 2.45 eV are related to the intracenter transitions {sup 6}A{sub 1}{sup 1} {yields} {sup 4}T{sub 2}({sup 4}G) and {sup 6}A{sub 1}{sup 2} {yields} {sup 4}T{sub 2}({sup 4}G). The {sup 6}A{sub 1} state is split by the crystal field.

Tagiev, B. G.; Kerimova, T. G., E-mail: ktaira@physics.ab.az; Tagiev, O. B.; Asadullayeva, S. G.; Mamedova, I. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

New ambient pressure organic superconductors:. alpha. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 (NH sub 4 )Hg(SCN) sub 4 ,. beta. m-(BEDO-TTF) sub 3 Cu sub 2 (NCS) sub 3 , and. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than one hundred and twenty conducting salts based on the organic donor-molecule BEDT-TTF are known, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene (abbreviated herein as ET). Several of the early salts possessed tetrahedral and octahedral anions, such as (ET){sub 2}ClO{sub 4}(TCE), (ET){sub 2}PF{sub 6}, (ET){sub 2}ReO{sub 4}, and (ET){sub 2}BrO{sub 4}. The perchlorate salt is metallic to 1.4 K,{sup 1} and the perrenate derivative was the first ET based organic superconductor ({Tc} 2 K, 4.5 kbar). Since the discovery of ambient pressure superconductivity in {beta}-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} ({Tc} 1.4 K),{sup 5} other isostructural {beta}-(ET){sub 2}X salts have been prepared with higher {Tc}'s. A structure-property correlation for the {beta}-type salts has been reviewed in this volume; it predicts that {Tc}'s higher than 8K are possible if {beta}-salts with linear anions longer than I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} can be synthesized. During the search for new linear anions, a variety of compounds with discovered with polymeric anions. The report of superconductivity in {kappa}-(ET){sub 4}Hg{sub 3}X{sub 8} (X = Cl, {Tc} 5.4 K 29 kbar and X = Br, {Tc} 4.3 K ambient pressure and 6.7 K 3.5 kbar) and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} ({Tc} 10.4 K) further stimulated the search for novel polymeric anions. A general synthetic strategy for preparing new salts containing polymeric anions is to couple a coordinatively unsaturated neutral transition metal halide/pseudohalide with a simple halide or pseudohalide during an electrocrystallization synthesis. In this article, the authors discuss three new ambient pressure organic superconductors with novel polymeric anions, {alpha}-(ET){sub 2}(NH{sub 4})Hg(SCN){sub 4}, {beta}m-(BO){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}(NCS){sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br. 48 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Wang, H.H.; Beno, M.A.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A.M.; Montgomery, L.K.; Thompson, J.E.; Williams, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Synthesis, crystal structure and photoluminescence of a new Eu-doped Sr containing sialon (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

Colorless transparent platelet single crystals of a novel Eu{sup 2+}-doped strontium silicon aluminum oxynitride, (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6}, were prepared at 1800 Degree-Sign C and 0.92 MPa of N{sub 2}. Fundamental reflections of electron and X-ray diffraction of the crystals were indexed with a face-centered orthorhombic unit cell (a=5.8061(5) A, b=37.762(3) A, c=9.5936(9) A). Diffuse streaks elongated in the b-axis direction were observed around the fundamental reflections hkl with h=2n+1 of the electron and X-ray diffraction, indicating stacking faults of (0 1 0)[1 0 0]/2. A crystal structure model without the stacking faults was obtained using the X-ray diffraction data of the fundamental reflections with the space group Fdd2. A SiN{sub 4}-tetrahedron double layer of [SiN{sub 2}]{sub 2} and a Sr/Eu double layer of [(Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})Al{sub 1.2}Si{sub 0.8}N{sub 0.8} O{sub 1.2}]{sub 2} are stacked alternately along the b-axis direction. The title compound showed an emission with a peak wavelength of 490 nm under 334 nm excitation at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of a novel Eu{sup 2+}-doped strontium silicon aluminum oxynitride, (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6}, having stacking faults on the (0 1 0) plane of an orthorhombic cell, were prepared at 1800 Degree-Sign C and 0.92 MPa of N{sub 2}. The compound showed emission with a peak wavelength of 490 nm under 334 nm excitation at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new compound Eu{sup 2+}-doped (Sr{sub 0.94}Eu{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}){sub 4}(N{sub 0.8}O{sub 0.2}){sub 6} was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stacking faults in the compound were clarified by electron and X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A basic crystal structure model was obtained based on the X-ray diffraction data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An emission of 490 nm under 334 nm excitation at room temperature was observed.

Yamane, Hisanori, E-mail: yamane@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shimooka, Satoshi; Uheda, Kyota [Mitsubishi Chemical Group, Science and Technology Research Center, Inc. 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama 227-8502 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Magnetic and electrical properties of UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} single crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystals of UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} have been grown by flux method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, magnetic, heat capacity and electrical transport measurements. The compound exhibits weakly temperature-dependent, moderately exchange-enhanced Pauli paramagnetism and shows regular metallic conductivity. - Graphical abstract: Pauli-like temperature dependence of the molar magnetic susceptibility of single-crystalline UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}. Inset: field variation of the magnetization in UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} taken at 1.8 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High quality single crystals of UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} have been grown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} has been refined from the single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic, heat capacity and electrical transport data have been collected for single crystalline UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Previous literature report on UCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} has been corrected and supplemented with new data.

Swatek, P., E-mail: P.Swatek@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland); Kaczorowski, D., E-mail: D.Kaczorowski@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Phase diagram, chemical stability and physical properties of the solid-solution Ba{sub 4}Nb{sub 2-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 9}  

SciTech Connect

Through the construction of the Ba{sub 4}Nb{sub 2-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 9} phase diagram, it was discovered that the unique high-temperature {gamma} phase is a thermodynamic intermediate between the low-temperature {alpha} phase (Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 9}-type) and a 6H-perovskite. Refined site occupancies for the {gamma} phase across the Ba{sub 4}Nb{sub 2-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 9} solid-solution indicate that Nb preferentially occupies the tetrahedral sites over the octahedral sites in the structure. When annealed in a CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere, all of the phases studied absorb large amounts of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures between {approx}700 and 1300 K. In situ controlled-atmosphere diffraction studies show that this behaviour is linked to the formation of BaCO{sub 3} on the surface of the material, accompanied by a Ba{sub 5}(Nb,Ta){sub 4}O{sub 15} impurity phase. In situ diffraction in humid atmospheres also confirms that these materials hydrate below {approx}1273K, and that this plays a critical role in the various reconstructive phase transitions as well as giving rise to proton conduction. - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic phase diagram of Ba{sub 4}Nb{sub 2-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 9}. Highlights: > {gamma}-Ba{sub 4}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase is a structural intermediate between the {alpha} and 6H-perovskite phases. > Ba{sub 4}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Ba{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} decompose at high temperatures in the presence of CO{sub 2}. > These materials all absorb between 5% and 6% of CO{sub 2} by mass between {approx}800 and 1200 K.

Dunstan, Matthew T., E-mail: m.dunstan@chem.usyd.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Southon, Peter D.; Kepert, Cameron J. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hester, James [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai 2234 (Australia); Kimpton, Justin A. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, VIC 3168 (Australia); Ling, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electron diffraction studies of short-range order parameters in amorphous Yb{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x}As{sub 2}S{sub 4} films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dependence of the intensity of electron scattering on the scattering angle for amorphous Yb{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x}As{sub 2}S{sub 4} films is obtained. The curve for radial distribution of atoms is plotted. The radii of coordination shells and partial coordination numbers for atoms in Yb{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x}As{sub 2}S{sub 4} are determined.

Hajiyev, E. Sh.; Madadzade, A. I. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of A{sub 5}Si{sub 3}Z{sub x} intermetallics for use as high temperature structural materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refractory intermetallic silicides are receiving increasing consideration for use as high temperature structural materials. A{sub 5}Si{sub 3} compositions are particularly interesting due to their ability to incorporate a variety of interstitial ternary additions. These ternary additions present a unique opportunity to potentially tailor physical properties. Previous experimental work has shown that these additions can decrease the inherent thermal expansion anisotropy of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. This paper reviews some of the literature with respect to binary and ternary silicides of the form A{sub 5}Si{sub 3}Z{sub x}. Recent experimental work by the authors on two promising compositions, Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, is discussed. Interstitial additions substantially improve the isothermal oxidation resistance of both Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. The lattice parameter of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} is significantly changed by ternary interstitial additions, indicating the extensive solubility of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for such additions. The level of similar additions affects the phase assemblage of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Hardness and toughness values from indentation measurements for selected compositions are given.

Kim, Y.; Thom, A.J.; Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen production using fusion energy and thermochemical cycles. [Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/-FeO, CrCl/sub 3/-CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/-UCl/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical cycles for the production of synthetic fuels would be especially suited for operation in conjunction with controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors because of the very high temperature energy which such reactors could supply. Furthermore, fusion energy when developed is considered to be an inexhaustable supply of energy. Several high-temperature two-step thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen are examined. A thermodynamic analysis of the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO, CrCl/sub 3/--CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/--UCl/sub 3/ pairs reveals the feasibility of the process. A more detailed process analysis is given for the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO system using steam as the heat transfer medium for decomposing the higher valent metal oxide for oxygen production, and hydrolysing the lower oxide for hydrogen production. The steam could be heated to high temperatures by refractory materials absorbing the 14-MeV neutrons in the blanket region of a fusion reactor. Process heat transfer and recovery could be accomplished by regenerative reactors. Proposed operating conditions, the energy balance and the efficiency of the water decomposition process are presented. With a fusion blanket temperature of 2500/sup 0/K, thermal efficiencies for hydrogen production of 74.4% may be obtained.

Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

No-thermal plasma processing of VOCs and NO{sub x} at LLNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past few years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive research program on the application of non-thermal plasmas for air pollution control and abatement. This program combines an extensive modeling effort with an experimental facility and test program. We believe that there are two major issues to be addressed in order to apply non-thermal plasma processing to air pollution control; these are electrical energy consumption and byproduct identification. The thrust of our work has been to understand the scalability of the non-thermal process by focusing on the energy efficiency of the non-thermal process and to identify the byproducts to ensure that effluent gases from a non-thermal processor are benign. We have compared different types of electrical discharge reactors both theoretically and experimentally. Our interests in the application of non-thermal plasmas vary from the destruction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to NO{sub x} reduction for mobile applications. This paper will discuss the processing of both NO{sub x} and VOCs by non-thermal plasmas at LLNL.

Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Remote Operated Vehicle with CO{sub 2} Blasting (ROVCO{sub 2}). Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first phase of the Remote Operated Vehicle with CO{sub 2} Blasting (ROVCO{sub 2}) Program. The ROVCO{sub 2} Program`s goal is to develop and demonstrate a tool to improve the productivity of concrete floor decontamination. The first phase adapted and tested the critical subsystems: the CO{sub 2} blasting, the workhead manipulation, the controls, and the base vehicle. The testing documented the performance of the subsystems and preformed a concept demonstration of the integrated ROVCO{sub 2} system. This testing and demonstration verified that the ROVCO{sub 2} development exceeded it Phase 1 success criteria.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Synthesis of Bi{sub 1.8}Pb{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two-powder processes for the synthesis of superconducting (Bi, Pb)-2223/Ag-clad wires by the oxide-powder-in-the-robe are provided. The first precursor powder, of nominal stoichiometry CaCuO{sub x}, is a solution-synthesized mixture of Ca{sub 0.45}Cu{sub 0.55}O{sub 2} and CaO. Using these oxide precursor mixtures, superconducting tapes with well-aligned grains and reproducible critical current densities J{sub c} in the range of 20,000 to 26,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 75 K in self-field after annealing less than 200 hours were obtained. 2 figs.

Smith, M.G.

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

Synthesis of Bi.sub.1.8 Pb.sub.0.4 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two-powder processes for the synthesis of superconducting (Bi, Pb)-2223/Ag-clad wires by the oxide-powder-in-the-robe are provided. The first precursor powder, of nominal stoichiometry CaCuO.sub.x, is a solution-synthesized mixture of Ca.sub.0.45 Cu.sub.0.55 O.sub.2 and CaO. Using these oxide precursor mixtures, superconducting tapes with well-aligned grains and reproducible critical current densities J.sub.c in the range of 20,000 to 26,000 A/cm.sup.2 at 75 K in self-field after annealing less than 200 hours were obtained.

Smith, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Room temperature metathetic synthesis and characterization of {alpha}-hopeite, Zn{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis of crystalline zinc phosphates ({alpha}-hopeite phase) through the metathetic pathway has been investigated. The reaction has been carried out by room-temperature grinding. High lattice energy of the by-product NaCl has driven the reaction in the forward direction, and as a result, stable phosphate phases have been synthesized. Reaction of a different phosphorus source (like Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}) with ZnCl{sub 2} has been attempted. The structural, vibrational, thermal, optical, and chemical properties of synthesized powders are determined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and diffused reflectance spectra (DR) in the UV-vis range. The direct band gap of the title compound was determined to be 3.6 {+-} 0.2 eV.

Parhi, Purnendu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Manivannan, V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States)], E-mail: mani@engr.colostate.edu; Kohli, Sandeep; McCurdy, Patrick [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Algebraic sub-structuring for electromagnetic applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Li, I. Malik, W. M i , C. Ng, and M . Wolf. ElectromagneticP. Husbands, and E. G. Ng. An Alge- braic Sub-structuring

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

REPROCESSING OF ARE FUEL, VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT RUNS E-1 AND E-2  

SciTech Connect

After two batches ( approximately 340 kg) of fluoride salt from the ARE were reprocessed, a pilot plant operations were terminated because of a leak through which an estimated 780 g of uranium (as UF/sub 6/ escaped. Of the 21 kg of highly enriched uranium in the feed, 93.12% was collected as UF/sub 6/ product, 0.13% represented measured losses, and 3.72% was unaccounted for (leak). An additional 3.03% was reclaimed from NaF beds and equipment washes. The produce met both chemical purity and activity specifications for product level UF/ sub 6/. Decontamination from fission products was essentially complete. A gross gamma decontamination factor was apparently limited by the low activity of the feed salt. (auth)

Whitmarsh, C.L.

1959-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

Structural and conductivity studies of CsK(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.32}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.68}Te(OH){sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

The compound CsK(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.32}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.68}Te(OH){sub 6} crystallizes in the monoclinic P2{sub 1}/n space group. It was analyzed, at room temperature, using X-ray diffractometer data. The main feature of these atomic arrangements is the coexistence of three and different anions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and TeO{sub 6}{sup 6-}groups) in the unit cell, connected by hydrogen bonds which make the building of the crystal. The thermal analysis of the title compound shows three distinct endothermal peaks at 435, 460 and 475 K. Complex impedance measurements are performed on this material as a function of both temperature and frequency. The electric conduction has been studied. The temperature dependence on the conductivity indicates that the sample became an ionic conductor at high temperature. - Graphical abstract: Projection of crystal structure CsK(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.32}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.68}Te(OH){sub 6} on the ab plane. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have studied the results of the crystal structure of the new mixed compound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have characterized the phase transition observed in DSC curve. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protonic conduction in our material is probably due to a hopping mechanism.

Djemel, M., E-mail: jmal_manel@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Abdelhedi, M., E-mail: m_abdelhedi2002@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Laboratoire Leon Brouillon, CE/Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Zouari, N., E-mail: bizrirl@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de l'Etat solide, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Dammak, M., E-mail: meddammak@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Kolsi, A.W., E-mail: kolsi_abdelhwaheb@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

High-pressure synthesis, crystal structure, and structural relationship of the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}  

SciTech Connect

Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus at 7.5 GPa and 1100 deg. C, representing the first known ytterbium fluoride borate. The compound exhibits isolated BO{sub 3}-groups next to ytterbium cations and fluoride anions, showing a structure closely related to the other known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}. Monoclinic Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} crystallizes in space group C2/c with the lattice parameters a=2028.2(4) pm, b=602.5(2) pm, c=820.4(2) pm, and beta=100.63(3){sup o} (Z=4). Three different ytterbium cations can be identified in the crystal structure, each coordinated by nine fluoride and oxygen anions. None of the five crystallographically independent fluoride ions is coordinated by boron atoms, solely by trigonally-planar arranged ytterbium cations. In close proximity to the above mentioned compounds RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}, Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} can be described via alternating layers with the formal compositions 'YbBO{sub 3}' and 'YbF{sub 3}' in the bc-plane. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure/high-temperature synthesis (multianvil technique) led to the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}, built up from isolated BO{sub 3}-groups. The compound shows structural relations to the known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}.

Haberer, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Improved Predictions of Carbon Tetrachloride Contaminant Flow and Transport: Implementation of Kinetic Volatilization and Multicomponent NAPL Behavior  

SciTech Connect

Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was discharged to waste sites that are included in the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit in Hanford 200 West Area. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is conducting a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit. The RI/FS process and remedial investigations for the 200-PW-1, 200 PW-3, and 200-PW-6 Operable Units are described in the Plutonium/Organic-Rich Process Condensate/Process Waste Groups Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. As part of this overall effort, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to improve the STOMP simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006) by incorporating kinetic volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL) and multicomponent flow and transport. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to characterize the nature and distribution of CT in the 200 West Area and subsequently select an appropriate final remedy. Previous numerical simulation results with the STOMP simulator have overestimated the effect of soil vapor extraction (SVE) on subsurface CT, showing rapid removal of considerably more CT than has actually been recovered so far. These previous multiphase simulations modeled CT mass transfer between phases based on equilibrium partitioning. Equilibrium volatilization can overestimate volatilization because mass transfer limitations present in the field are not considered. Previous simulations were also conducted by modeling the NAPL as a single component, CT. In reality, however, the NAPL mixture disposed of at the Hanford site contained several non-volatile and nearly insoluble organic components, resulting in time-variant fluid properties as the CT component volatilized or dissolved over time. Simulation of CT removal from a DNAPL mixture using single-component DNAPL properties typically leads to an overestimation of CT removal. Other possible reasons for the discrepancy between observed and simulated CT mass removal during SVE are differences between the actual and simulated (1) SVE flow rates, (2) fluid-media properties, and (3) disposal history (volumes, rates, and timing). In this report, numerical implementation of kinetic volatilization and multicomponent DNAPL flow and transport into the STOMP simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006) is described. The results of several test cases are presented and explained. The addition of these two major code enhancements increases the ability of the STOMP simulator to model complex subsurface flow and transport processes involving CT at the Hanford site.

Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Methodology for Formulating Diesel Surrogate Fuels with Accurate Compositional, Ignition-Quality, and Volatility Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a novel approach was developed to formulate surrogate fuels having characteristics that are representative of diesel fuels produced from real-world refinery streams. Because diesel fuels typically consist of hundreds of compounds, it is difficult to conclusively determine the effects of fuel composition on combustion properties. Surrogate fuels, being simpler representations of these practical fuels, are of interest because they can provide a better understanding of fundamental fuel-composition and property effects on combustion and emissions-formation processes in internal-combustion engines. In addition, the application of surrogate fuels in numerical simulations with accurate vaporization, mixing, and combustion models could revolutionize future engine designs by enabling computational optimization for evolving real fuels. Dependable computational design would not only improve engine function, it would do so at significant cost savings relative to current optimization strategies that rely on physical testing of hardware prototypes. The approach in this study utilized the stateof- the-art techniques of 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the advanced distillation curve to characterize fuel composition and volatility, respectively. The ignition quality was quantified by the derived cetane number. Two wellcharacterized, ultra-low-sulfur #2 diesel reference fuels produced from refinery streams were used as target fuels: a 2007 emissions certification fuel and a Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel fuel. A surrogate was created for each target fuel by blending eight pure compounds. The known carbon bond types within the pure compounds, as well as models for the ignition qualities and volatilities of their mixtures, were used in a multiproperty regression algorithm to determine optimal surrogate formulations. The predicted and measured surrogate-fuel properties were quantitatively compared to the measured target-fuel properties, and good agreement was found. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our friend and colleague Jim Franz. Funding for this research was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Vehicle Technologies, and by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) and the companies that employ the CRC members. The study was conducted under the auspices of CRC. The authors thank U.S. DOE program manager Kevin Stork for supporting the participation of the U.S. national laboratories in this study.

Mueller, Charles J.; Cannella, William J.; Bruno, Thomas J.; Bunting, Bruce G.; Dettman, Heather; Franz, James A.; Huber, Marcia L.; Natarajan, Mani; Pitz, William J.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Wright, Ken

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microscopy for Sub-ngstrom Nano-Metrology Michael A. OMicroscopy for Sub-ngstrom Nano-Metrology Michael A. Owhat we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Magnetic ordering of Nd in (Nd,Ce) sub 2 CuO sub 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron-diffraction techniques have been used to study the magnetic ordering of the Nd ions in semiconducting Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and superconducting Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}. For the Ce-doped system a sharp transition to long-range antiferromagnetic order occurs at {ital T}{sub {ital N}}{approx}1.2 K, with a simple magnetic unit cell which is double the chemical unit cell along the {ital a} and {ital b} directions. The same magnetic structure is observed in the parent system Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, in which the Cu spins are also ordered magnetically, but strong coupling between the Nd and Cu sublattices is indicated.

Lynn, J.W.; Sumarlin, I.W.; Skanthakumar, S.; Li, W. (Center for Superconductivity Research, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (US) National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (USA)); Shelton, R.N.; Peng, J.L. (Department of Physics, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (USA)); Fisk, Z. (MS K764, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA)); Cheong, S. (MS K764, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA) Department of Physics, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

PREPARATION OF HIGH DENSITY UO$sub 2$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for the preparation of highdensity UO/sub 2/ from UF/sub 6/. In accordance with the invention, UF/sub 6/ is reacted with water and concentrated ammonium hydroxide is added to the resulting aqueous solution of UO/ sub 2/F/sub 2/. The resulting precipitate is calcined to U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ an d the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is reduced to UO/sub 2/ with a gaseous mixture comprised of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from 1600 to 1900 deg C.

Googin, J.M.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Doped Y.sub.2O.sub.3 buffer layers for laminated conductors  

SciTech Connect

A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the metallic substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising Y.sub.2O.sub.3 and a dopant for blocking cation diffusion through the Y.sub.2O.sub.3, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans (Knoxville, TN); Schoop, Urs (Westborough, MA); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans (Westborough, MA); Verebelyi, Darren T. (Oxford, MA); Rupich, Martin W. (Framingham, MA)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Low Loss Composition of BA{sub X}SR{sub Y}CA{sub 1-X-Y}TIO{sub 3}:BA{sub 0.12-0.25}SR{sub 0.35-0.47}CA{sub 0.32-0.53}TIO{sub 3}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dielectric thin-film material for microwave applications, including use as a capacitor, the thin-film comprising a composition of barium strontium calcium and titanium of perovskite type (Ba{sub x}Sr{sub y}Ca{sub 1-x-y})TiO{sub 3}. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of that formula over a wide compositional range through a single deposition process.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Takeuchi, Ichiro

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Modeling, synthesis and characterization of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report on an integrated program to understand the fundamentals of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} performance as a cathode for lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Specifically, this program is designed to address the effects of doping on the crystal chemistry, lattice constants, and electrochemical performance. The work is being expanded to include studies on LiCoO{sub 2} and LiNiO{sub 2}.

Doughty, D.H.; Ingersoll, D.; Cygan, R.T.; Westrich, H.R.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Voigt, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, B.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States). Specialty Chemicals Div.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Full differentiation and assignment of boron species in the electrolytes Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The syntheses of two new fluorooxoborates, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}, which possess considerable ion conductivity at higher temperatures, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the characterisation of these compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. The complex central-transition MAS spectra, resulting from overlap of sub-spectra contributed by the individual boron species in the crystal structures, could be clearly separated by acquisition and analysis of 3QMAS spectra. By numerical fit of these sub-spectra, the isotropic chemical shift {delta}{sub iso}, the quadrupolar coupling constant {chi}, and the asymmetry {eta} were determined. Using known relations between boron coordination and chemical shift as well as quadrupolar coupling, the individual {sup 11}B NMR resonances have been ascribed to boron species in tetrahedral or trigonal environment. To remove remaining assignment ambiguities, the response of the {sup 11}B resonances to {sup 19}F decoupling was qualitatively analysed. Thus, by using the combined information conveyed by chemical shift, quadrupolar and dipolar interaction, a complete assignment of the complex {sup 11}B line shapes exhibited by the fluorooxoborates has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Structure and solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectrum of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of title compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-spectra of boron species separated by evaluation of 3QMAS spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotropic chemical shift and quadrupolar interaction parameters determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full boron assignment based on NMR parameters and response to {sup 19}F decoupling.

Braeuniger, Thomas, E-mail: T.Braeuniger@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Pilz, Thomas; Chandran, C. Vinod; Jansen, Martin [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method of forming a dielectric thin film having low loss composition of Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.y Ca.sub.1-x-y TiO.sub.3 : Ba.sub.0.12-0.25 Sr.sub.0.35-0.47 Ca.sub.0.32-0.53 TiO.sub.3  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dielectric thin-film material for microwave applications, including use as a capacitor, the thin-film comprising a composition of barium strontium calcium and titanium of perovskite type (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.y Ca.sub.1-x-y)TiO.sub.3. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of that formula over a wide compositional range through a single deposition process.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Alameda, CA); Chang, Hauyee (Berkeley, CA); Takeuchi, Ichiro (Albany, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mechanochemical synthesis of nonstoichiometric nanocrystals La{sub 1-y}Ca{sub y}F{sub 3-y} with a tysonite structure and nanoceramic materials from CaF{sub 2} and LaF{sub 3} crystals  

SciTech Connect

The nonstoichiometric phases La{sub 1-y}Ca{sub y}F{sub 3-y} (y = 0.15, 0.20) with a tysonite (LaF{sub 3}) structure have been prepared for the first time by the mechanochemical synthesis from CaF{sub 2} and LaF{sub 3} crystals. The average size of coherent scattering regions is approximately equal to 10-30 nm. It has been shown that the compositions of the phases prepared by the mechanochemical synthesis are inconsistent with the phase diagram of the CaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3} system. The 'mechanohydrolysis' of the La{sub 1-y}Ca{sub y}F{sub 3-y} phase has been observed for the first time. Under these conditions, the La{sub 1-y}Ca{sub y}F{sub 3-y} phase partially transforms into lanthanum calcium oxyfluoride for a milling time of 180 min with intermediate sampling. The La{sub 1-y}Ca{sub y}F{sub 3-y} nanoceramic materials have been prepared from a powder of the mechanochemical synthesis product by pressing under a pressure of (2-6) x 10{sup 8} Pa at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the synthesized materials at a temperature of 200 deg. C is equal to 4.9(6) x 10{sup -4} S/cm, and the activation energy of electrical conduction is 0.46(2) eV. These data for the nanoceramic materials coincide with those obtained for migration of fluorine vacancies in single-crystal tysonite fluoride materials.

Sobolev, B. P., E-mail: fluorides@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Sviridov, I. A.; Fadeeva, V. I. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Sul'yanov, S. N.; Sorokin, N. I.; Zhmurova, Z. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Khodos, I. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation); Avilov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Growth kinetics and micromorphology of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth kinetics and elementary growth processes on the surface of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} heterogeneous crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system are experimentally studied. It is found that a change in the composition of complexes in an NH{sub 4}Cl crystal from Mn(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O to MnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2CONH{sub 3} leads to the occurrence of a local maximum in the kinetic curve and a change in the shape of dislocation growth centers from flat to conical. The growth kinetics of {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of heterogeneous NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals is described within the Bliznakov model using the Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption isotherm, which takes into account the lateral interaction of adsorbed particles.

Pyankova, L. A., E-mail: lyuba_pyan@mail.ru; Punin, Yu. O.; Bocharov, S. N.; Shtukenberg, A. G. [Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

/sup 11/B study of spin dynamics in Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. [RE = Gd, Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been intense interest in re-entrance and coexistence in ternary rare earth magnetic superconductors of the form RE Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. Of particular interest in this investigation is the effect of the superconducting state on the RKKY (Yosida, 1957) coupling between RE ions. Since one expects the conduction electron spin susceptibility chi/sup e/(q) to be cut off for q < 1/xi in the superconducting state, a depression f the RKKY coupling should follow. Such an effect would both depress the magnetic ordering temperature and result in slower relaxation rates tau/sub m//sup -1/ for the RE moments in the superconducting state. This paper reports on the spin dynamics of the RE ions using the /sup 11/B nuclear magnetic relaxation rate T/sub 1//sup -1/ in dilute Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ (RE = Gd and Er).

Kumagai, K.; Fradin, F.Y.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Optimal Transportation on Sub-Riemannian Manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Transportation on Sub-Riemannian Manifolds Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis (Joint work with A. Figalli) Ludovic Rifford Optimal Transportation on Sub-Riemannian Manifolds #12;Monge's Optimal Transportation Problem Let M be a separable metric space equipped with its Borel

Rifford, Ludovic

334

Optimal Transportation on Sub-Riemannian Manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Transportation on Sub-Riemannian Manifolds Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis (Joint work with A. Figalli) Ludovic Rifford Optimal Transportation on Sub-Riemannian Manifolds #12;Outline I. Statement of our optimal transportation problem II. Sketch of proof of the Mc

Rifford, Ludovic

335

CO/sub 2/-laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The basic concept of laser fusion is described, with a set of requirements on the laser system. Systems and applications concepts are presented and discussed. The CO/sub 2/ laser's characteristics and advantages for laser fusion are described. Finally, technological issues in the development of CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion applications are discussed.

Stark, E.E. Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Crystal structure of thallium triborate, TlB{sub 3}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thallium triborate, TlB{sub 3}O{sub 5} (TBO), crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with unit cell dimensions a = 5.2099(3) {angstrom}, b = 8.248(1) {angstrom}, and c = 10.206(2) {angstrom}; Z = 4. The structure was solved from 1340 independent reflections to R = 0.038 and R{sub w} = 0.041. The borate anion of the structure forms a three-dimensional framework built up from B{sub 3}O{sub 3} rings; its shorthand notation is 3:{infinity}{sup 3}(2{del}+T), where {del} is a BO{sub 3} triangle and T is a BO{sub 4} tetrahedron. This compound is isostructural with CsB{sub 3}O{sub 5} (CBO) but some differences exist in the oxygenated surroundings of cesium and thallium cations due to the larger size of Cs{sup +}. Like CBO, TBO may be a good candidate for nonlinear optical applications as a second harmonic generator.

Touboul, M.; Betourne, E. [URA CNRS, Amiens (France)] [URA CNRS, Amiens (France); Nowogrocki, G. [URA CNRS 452, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France)] [URA CNRS 452, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Recovery of UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for converting PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the U0{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} to metals while converting Li metal to Li{sub 2}O. Li{sub 2}O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting 0{sub 2} out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li{sub 2}O to disassociate to 0{sub 2} and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl{sub 2}.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Recovery of UO.sub.2 /Pu O.sub.2 in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO.sub.2 and PuO.sub.2 to metals while converting Li metal to Li.sub.2 O. Li.sub.2 O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O.sub.2 out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li.sub.2 O to disassociate to O.sub.2 and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl.sub.2.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Recovery of UO[sub 2]/PuO[sub 2] in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to metals while converting Li metal to Li[sub 2]O. Li[sub 2]O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O[sub 2] out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li[sub 2]O to disassociate to O[sub 2] and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl[sub 2].

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

340

CF[sub 3] chemistry: Potential implications for stratospheric ozone  

SciTech Connect

The authors address questions about the chemistry of CF[sub 3] bearing compounds in the atmosphere, and the impact that the existence of and reaction rate constants for such species may have on stratospheric ozone. Species considered include CF[sub 3], CF[sub 3]O, CF[sub 3]O[sub 2], CF[sub 3]OH, CF[sub 3]OOH, CF[sub 3]ONO[sub 2], CF[sub 3]O[sub 2]NO[sub 2], and CF[sub 3]OOCl. Based on their calculational results, the authors suggest a number of experimental measurements which should substantially decrease uncertainties associated with the role of CF[sub 3] species in atmospheric chemistry related to ozone.

Ko, M.K.W.; Sze, N.D.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Weistenstein, D.K.; Heisey, C.W. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Wayne, R.P.; Biggs, P.; Canosa-Mas, C.E. (Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sidebottom, H.W.; Treacy, J. (Univ. College, Dublin (Ireland))

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Mass transport of volatile organic compounds between the saturated and vadose zones. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in the saturated zone are transported into the vadose zone primarily by gaseous phase diffusion. If the saturated zone is remediated, VOCs present in the vadose zone may become a secondary source of contamination for the groundwater. The amount of VOCs that remain in the vadose zone is dependent on site hydrology, soil properties, and the chemical properties of the contaminants. The purpose of this study was to determine what conditions caused VOC concentrations in the vadose zone to significantly recontaminate the saturated zone. A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the transport of a VOC, trichioroethylene, between the saturated and vadose zones under a variety of conditions. The model featured steady-state unsaturated water flow and transient contaminant transport. Transport mechanisms included aqueous phase advection-dispersion and gaseous phase diffusion. Partitioning between the water, gas, and soil compartments were modeled as equilibrium processes. Sensitivity analyses were performed on several variables including soil type (homogeneous and heterogeneous profiles), water infiltration rate and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant rate, and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant in the presence of heterogeneous soils, low infiltration rates and deep vadose zones.

Harner, M.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advocates of renewable energy have long argued that wind power and other renewable technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that wind and other renewables provide. This paper attempts to quantify this benefit by equating it with the cost of achieving price stability through other means, particularly gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps). We find that over the past two years, natural gas consumers have had to pay a premium of roughly 0.50 cents/kWh over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost is potentially large enough to tip the scales away from new investments in natural gasfired generation and in favor of investments in wind power and other renewable technologies.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

1 QUANTIFYING THE VALUE THAT WIND POWER PROVIDES AS A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advocates of renewable energy have long argued that wind power and other renewable technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001 have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that wind and other renewables provide. This paper attempts to quantify this benefit by equating it with the cost of achieving price stability through other means, particularly gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps). We find that over the past two years, natural gas consumers have had to pay a premium of roughly 0.50/kWh over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost is potentially large enough to tip the scales away from new investments in natural gasfired generation and in favor of investments in wind power and other renewable technologies.

Mark Bolinger; Ryan Wiser; William Golove; Mark Bolinger; Ryan Wiser; William Golove

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Summary Report on the Volatile Radionuclide and Immobilization Research for FY2011 at PNNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2011, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogen-based aerogels (i.e., chalcogels). A silica aerogel was tested at ORNL for total I2 sorption capacity. It was determined to have 48 mass% capacity while having little physisorbed I2 (I2 not taken up in the aerogel pores). For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated and a new MOF with about 8 mass% capacity for Xe and Kr. The selectivity can be changed from Xe > Kr to Xe < Kr simply by lowering the temperature below 0 C. A patent disclosure has been filed. Lastly, silicon carbide (SiC) was loaded with Kr. The diffusion of Kr in SiC was found to be less than detectable at 500 C.

Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Matyas, Josef; Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Membrane System for Recovery of Volatile Organic Compounds from Remediation Off-Gases.: Phase 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used methods of remediating soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration, the most common methods of treating these gas streams, suffer from significant drawbacks. This report covers the first phase of a two-phase project. The first phase involved the laboratory demonstration of the water separation section of the unit, the production and demonstration of new membrane modules to improve the separation, the design studies required for the demonstration system, and initial contacts with potential field sites. In the second phase, the demonstration system will be built and, after a short laboratory evaluation, will be tested at two field sites.

Wijmans, J.G.; Goakey, S.; Wang, X.; Baker, R.W.; Kaschemekat, J.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

BIOFILTRATION OF VOLATILE POLLUTANTS: Fundamental Mechanisms for Improved Design, Long-term Operation, Prediction, and Implementation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofiltration systems can be used for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs); however, the systems are poorly understood and are normally operated as ''black boxes''. Common operational problems associated with biofilters include fouling, deactivation, and overgrowth, all of which make them ineffective for continuous, long-term use. The objective of this investigation was to develop generic methods for long-term stable operation, in particular by using selective limitation of supplemental nutrients while maintaining high activity. As part of this effort, we have provided a deeper fundamental understanding of the important biological and transport mechanisms in biodestruction of sparingly soluble VOCs and have extended this approach and mathematical models to additional systems of high priority EM relevance--direct degradation and cometabolic degradation of priority pollutants such as BTEX and chlorinated organics. Innovative aspects of this project included development of a user-friendly two-dimensional predictive model/program for MS Windows 95/98/2000 to elucidate mass transfer and kinetic limitations in these systems, isolation of a unique microorganism capable of using sparingly soluble organic and chloroorganic VOCs as its sole carbon and energy source, and making long-term growth possible by successfully decoupling growth and degradation metabolisms in operating trickle bed bioreactors.

Davison,Brian H.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Spectroscopic determination of C{sub 2} in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas for nanocrystalline diamond synthesis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have measured the steady state concentration of gas phase C{sub 2} in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas used for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films. High sensitivity white light absorption spectroscopy is used to monitor the C{sub 2} density using the d{sup 3}II {l_arrow} A{sup 3}II (0,0) vibrational band of C{sub 2} as chamber pressure, microwave power, substrate temperature and feed gas mixtures are varied in both chemistries. Understanding how these parameters influence the C{sub 2} density in the plasma volume provides insight into discharge mechanisms relevant to the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond.

Goyette, A. N.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Gruen, D. M.; McCauley, T. G.; Zhou, D.; Krauss, A. R.

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

In vivo evaluation of a new method for chemical analysis of volatile components in the respiratory gas of mechanically ventilated patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the volatile anaesthetic isoflurane as a marker substance a gas chromatographic method for analysis of exhaled gas in mechanically ventilated patients was evaluated. Twelve patients with and 10 patients without preceding isoflurane exposure ... Keywords: breath analysis, isoflurane, mechanical ventilation

J. K. Schubert; I. Esteban-Loos; K. Geiger; J. Guttmann

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evolution and Transport of Pollutants over a Mediterranean Coastal Area: The Influence of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions on Ozone Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational simulation of a typical sea-breeze situation and the transport and evolution of photochemical pollutants on the Spanish east coast is performed, and the influence of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions on the ozone ...

Spyros Andronopoulos; Artemis Passamichali; Nikos Gounaris; John G. Bartzis

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Reducing volatilization of heavy metals in phosphate-pretreated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigated the feasibility of reducing volatilization of heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium) in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals via phosphate pre-treatment. To evaluate the evaporation characteristics of three heavy metals from phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash, volatilization tests have been performed by means of a dedicated apparatus in the 100-1000 deg. C range. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and BCR sequential extraction procedure were applied to assess phosphate stabilization process. The results showed that the volatilization behavior in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash could be reduced effectively. Pyromorphite-like minerals formed in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash were mainly responsible for the volatilization reduction of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash at higher temperature, due to their chemical fixation and thermal stabilization for heavy metals. The stabilization effects were encouraging for the potential reuse of MSWI fly ash.

Sun Ying; Zheng Jianchang [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zou Luquan [Shanghai Center of Solid Waste Disposal, Shanghai (China); Liu Qiang; Zhu Ping [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Qian Guangren, E-mail: grqian@mail.shu.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

The first ambient pressure organic superconductor containing oxygen in the donor molecule,. beta. sub m -(BEDO-TTF) sub 3 Cu sub 2 (NCS) sub 3 , T sub c = 1. 06 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of superconductivity in an organic charge-transfer salt containing an oxygen-bearing organic-donor molecule is reported. The synthesis of the compound, {beta}{sub m}-(BEDO-TTF){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}(NCS){sub 3} BEDO-TTF = bis(ethylenedioxy) tetrafulvalene, is described. Its crystal structure, its characteristic ESR properties, results of inductive measurements of its superconducting transition, and its band electronic structure are all reported. 18 refs., 3 figs.

Beno, M.A.; Wang, H.H.; Kini, A.M.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Kwok, W.K.; Thompson, J.E.; Williams, J.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Ren, Jingquing; Whangbo, Myunghwan (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

Leptonic CP Phase in {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the case of large 1-3 mixing angle as sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}{>=}0.03, we investigate the possibility for measuring the leptonic CP phase by using only {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations independently of {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} oscillations. As the result, we find that the CP phase can be measured best around the energy E = 0.43 GeV and the baseline length L = 5000 km without depending on the uncertainties of other parameters too much. In this region, the CP phase effect remains even after averaging over neutrino energy.

Kimura, Keiichi; Yoshikawa, Tadashi [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan); Takamura, Akira [Department of Mathematics, Toyota National College of Technology Eisei-cho 2-1, Toyota-shi, 471-8525 (Japan)

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

353

W{sub {gamma}} and Z{sub {gamma}} production at Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results from CDF and D0 on W{sub {gamma}} and Z{sub {gamma}} productions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The goal of the analyses is to test the non-abelian self-couplings of the W, Z and photon, one of the most direct consequences of the SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(l){sub Y} gauge symmetry. We present direct measurements of WW{sub {gamma}} couplings and limits on ZZ{sub {gamma}} and Z{sub {gamma}{gamma}} couplings, based on p{bar p} {r_arrow} l{nu}{gamma} + X and p{bar p} {r_arrow} ll{gamma} + X events, respectively, observed during the 1992--1993 run of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

Aihara, H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Low NO.sub.x multistage combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency, Vortex Inertial Staged Air (VIStA) combustor provides ultra-low NO.sub.X production of about 20 ppmvd or less with CO emissions of less than 50 ppmvd, both at 3% O.sub.2. Prompt NO.sub.X production is reduced by partially reforming the fuel in a first combustion stage to CO and H.sub.2. This is achieved in the first stage by operating with a fuel rich mixture, and by recirculating partially oxidized combustion products, with control over stoichiometry, recirculation rate and residence time. Thermal NO.sub.X production is reduced in the first stage by reducing the occurrence of high temperature combustion gas regions. This is achieved by providing the first stage burner with a thoroughly pre-mixed fuel/oxidant composition, and by recirculating part of the combustion products to further mix the gases and provide a more uniform temperature in the first stage. In a second stage combustor thermal NO.sub.X production is controlled by inducing a large flow of flue gas recirculation in the second stage combustion zone to minimize the ultimate temperature of the flame. One or both of the first and second stage burners can be cooled to further reduce the combustion temperature and to improve the recirculation efficiency. Both of these factors tend to reduce production of NO.sub.X.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Breault, Ronald W. (Newington, NH); Litka, Anthony F. (Hanover, MA); McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Shukla, Kailash (Boxborough, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

/sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse-/sup 12/CO/sub 2/ chase analyses of C/sub 4/-acid metabolism in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate species of Flaveria at the CO/sub 2/ compensation concentration (r). [Flaveria floridana; Flaveria anomala  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photosynthetic C/sub 4/-acid metabolism in leaves of C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate Flaveria species was examined by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse-/sup 12/CO/sub 2/ chase experiments conducted at external CO/sub 2/-levels approximating air and ..gamma... Analysis of the percent distribution of /sup 14/C after a 10-s pulse showed an enhanced labeling of malate and aspartate at ..gamma.. in the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ species. This stimulation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation by PEP carboxylase ranged from 1.7-(F. floridana) to 3.6-fold (F. anomala). A /sup 12/CO/sub 2/-chase at ..gamma.. revealed a significant turnover of C/sub 4/ acids for only F. floridana. C/sub 4/-acid labeling in C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ Flaveria species was relatively unresponsive to changes in pCO/sub 2/. These data imply that the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate Flaveria species with less advanced C/sub 4/ attributes have a greater capacity for increased CO/sub 2/ fixation via PEP carboxylase at ..gamma.. versus air. Thus, labeling of C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ leaves at ..sigma.. may be an effective tool for assessing the degree of true C/sub 4/-photosynthesis as well as the potential mechanism involved in reducing photorespiration.

Chastain, C.J.; Chollet, R.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The aptitude of barium and bismuth to form layered cuprates: Bi sub 2 Ba sub 2 minus x La sub x CuO sub 6+. delta. , a 2201-type structure. [Title compound is not a superconductor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bismuth barium cuprate, Bi{sub 2}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}La{sub x}CuO{sub 6 + {delta}} with a layered structure has been synthesized for the first time for 0.50 {le} x {le} 1. This oxide is isotypic with 2201 Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 6} superconductor, i.e., corresponds to the intergrowth of single BaCuO{sub 3} perovskite layers with triple ((BiO){sub 2}BaO) {proportional to} layers. The modulated character of the structure is documented and the possibility of inducing superconductivity in this structural type is discussed.

Pham, A.Q.; Hervieu, M.; Michel, C.; Raveau, B. (Lab CRISMAT-Associe au CNRS, Caen (France))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

High pressure synthesis and crystal structure of a ternary superconductor Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4} containing layer structured calcium sub-network isomorphous with black phosphorus  

SciTech Connect

The Zintl compound CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is peritectically decomposed to a mixture of Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4} and aluminum metal at temperatures above 600 Degree-Sign C under a pressure of 5 GPa. The new ternary compound Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Sl{sub 4} crystalizes with the space group Cmc2{sub 1} and the lattice parameters a=5.8846(8), b=14.973(1), and c=7.7966(5) A. The structure is composed of aluminum silicide framework [Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4}] and layer structured [Ca{sub 2}] network interpenetrating with each other. The electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) shows the formation of solid solutions Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3-x}Si{sub 4+x} (x<0.6). The layer structured [Ca{sub 2}] sub-network is isomorphous with black phosphorus. The new ternary compound shows superconductivity with a transition temperature (T{sub c}) of 6.4 K. The band structure calculation suggests that the superconductivity should occur through the conduction bands mainly composed of 3p orbitals of the aluminum silicide framework. - Graphical abstract: A new ternary superconductor Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4} has been prepared under high pressure and high temperature conditions, which includes layer structured calcium sub-network isomorphous with black phosphorus. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A typical Zintl compound CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} melts congruently at ambient pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under high pressure CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} decomposes to Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4} and Al at {approx}600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4} contains Ca sub-network isomorphous with black phosphorus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 4} shows superconductivity with a transition temperature of 6.4 K.

Tanaka, Masashi; Zhang, Shuai; Tanaka, Yuki; Inumaru, Kei [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Yamanaka, Shoji, E-mail: syamana@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wheat grain quality under enhanced tropospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} concentrations  

SciTech Connect

It is expected that the progressive increase of tropospheric trace gases such as CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} will have a significant impact on agricultural production. The single and combined effects of CO{sub 2} enrichment and tropospheric O{sub 3} on grain quality characteristics in soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were examined in field studies using 3 m in diam. open-top chambers. Wheat cultivars {open_quotes}Massey{close_quotes} (1991) and {open_quotes}Saluda{close_quotes} (1992) were exposed to two CO{sub 2} concentrations (350 vs. 500 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}; 12 h d{sup {minus}1}) in combination with two O{sub 3} regimes (charcoal-filtered air vs. ambient air + 40 {plus_minus} 20 nmol O{sub 3} mol{sup {minus}1}, 7 h d{sup {minus}1}; Monday to Friday) from late March until maturity in June. Grain quality characteristics investigated included: test weight, milling and baking quality, flour yield, protein content, softness equivalent, alkaline water retention capacity, and cookie diameter. In general, exposure of plants to either elevated CO{sub 2} or weekly chronic O{sub 3} episodes caused only small changes in grain quality. Milling and baking quality score were not significantly changed in response to treatments in both years. Flour yield was increased by elevated CO{sub 2} but this increase was counteracted when elevated CO{sub 2} was combined with chronic O{sub 3} exposure. Flour protein contents were increased by enhanced O{sub 3} under elevated CO{sub 2}. Although the single effect of either CO{sub 2} enrichment or chronic O{sub 3} exposure had some impact o grain quality characteristics, it was noted that the combined effect of these gases was minor. It is likely that the concomitant increase of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} in the troposphere will have no significant impact on wheat grain quality. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Rudorff, B.F.T. [National Space Research Inst., Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Mulchi, C.L. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fenny, P. [USDA-ARS Soft Wheat Quality Lab., Wooster, OH (United States)] [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Crystal structure and chemical bonding of novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}  

SciTech Connect

A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} has been synthesized using the high-temperature reaction method and characterized by both powder and single-crystal X-ray diffractions. The title compound crystallized in the orthorhombic crystal system (space group Immm, Z=2, Pearson symbol oI78) with fifteen crystallographically unique atomic positions in the asymmetric unit, and the lattice parameters are refined as a=4.5244(4) A, b=6.9932(6) A, and c=53.043(5) A. The complex crystal structure of the title compound can be described as a 2:1 intergrowth of two closely related compounds: La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (Ce{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}-type) and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} (Zr{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}Si{sub 4}-type) acting like 'building-blocks' along the c-axis. Six La sites are categorized into three distinct types based on the local coordination environment showing the coordination numbers of 12-14. Three unique Li sites are placed in the centers of local tetrahedra formed by four Ge atoms which eventually construct Ge{sub 2} dimers or 1-dimensional cis-/trans-Ge chains. Theoretical investigations using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method provide rationales for an improved structural stability and for unique local coordination geometries established by anionic elements including [LiGe{sub 4}] tetrahedra, cis-/trans-Ge chain and Ge{sub 2} dimers. - Graphical abstract: Reported is a novel ternary Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}. The complex crystal structure can be viewed as a simple combination of two closely related known compounds acting as 'building-blocks', La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}G{sub 3} and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}, in a 2:1 stoichiometric ratio. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex crystal structure was easily explained as a combination of two known compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculations indicated that the Fermi level was located near the pseudogap.

Jung, Yaho; Nam, Gnu; Jeon, Jieun; Kim, Youngjo [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); You, Tae-Soo, E-mail: tsyou@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Enhanced microwave dielectric properties of Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} ceramics doping by metal Fe powders  

SciTech Connect

Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} ceramics by adding mental Fe powders have been fabricated via the solid-state reaction method. The microstructures and optical properties of samples are systematically studied in order to establish the effects of Fe powder additives on microwave dielectric properties of Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} ceramics by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical reflective spectrum. The results show the coexistence of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} ceramics, the decrease of O vacancy concentrations, and their incorporation into the B-site (Ti) of the Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} host lattice give rise to excellent microwave dielectric properties. All samples have a higher Q value above 290 while maintaining relatively high tunability above 16.6%. In particular, the sample with the composition of x = 0.035 mol has the dielectric constant of 889, Q Multiplication-Sign f value of 826 (at 1.370 GHz), and tunability of 24%, which are very promising for high power tunable devices. In comparison, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide doped Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} ceramics with the same molar ratios of Fe exhibit inferior microwave properties. It indicates that additives of the metal Fe powders can more effectively improve dielectric properties of Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} system than Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide.

Zhang Qiwei [Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); School of Rare Earth, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Zhai Jiwei; Yao Xi [Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ben Qianqian [Institute of Quality Inspection of Electronic and Electrical Appliances and Household Electrical Appliances Presentation, 627 Yong Jia Road, Shanghai 200031 (China); Yu Xian [Agilent Technologies Co., Ltd, 690 Bibo Road, Shanghai 201203 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies  

SciTech Connect

Initial tests with CO{sub 2} pellet blasting as a decontamination technique were completed in 1993 at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1996, a number of additional CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies with Alpheus Cleaning Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pennsylvania State University were conducted. After the testing with Alpheus was complete, an SDI-5 shaved CO{sub 2} blasting unit was purchased by the ICPP to test and determine its capabilities before using in ICPP decontamination efforts. Results of the 1996 testing will be presented in this report.

Archibald, K.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effect of a high electric field on the conductivity of MnGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}, MnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4}, and MnGaInS{sub 4} single crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of studying the effect of a high electric field on the conductivity of MnGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}, MnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4}, and MnGaInS{sub 4} single crystals are reported. The activation energy is determined in high and low electric fields. It is established that the decrease in the activation energy with increasing the external voltage is associated with decreasing the depth of the potential well, in which the electron is located.

Niftiev, N. N. [Azerbaijan State Pedagogical University (Azerbaijan); Tagiev, O. B. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

REPROCESSING OF ARE FUEL, VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT RUNS E-3 THROUGH E-6  

SciTech Connect

Reprocessing of the ARE fuel was resumed after extensive leak testing in the pilot plant. This was considered necessary to assure no recurrence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ leaks as experienced in Run E-2. In the four additional runs required to complete the program, about 641 kg of fluoride salt containing 40.64 kg of fully enriched uranium was reprocessed. Recovery as UF/sub 6/ product represented 97.97% of the feed, with 0.01% measured losses. An additional 2.14% was reclaimed from NaF beds. The product was of sufficient purity to meet specifications for material designated for reduction to uranium metal. Decontamination from fission products was essentially complete. Calculations based on the entire ARE program indicated 96.38% product recovery, with 0.06% measured losses. An additional 2.50% was reclaimed from NaF beds and equipment washes. (auth)

Whitmarsh, C.L.

1959-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics  

SciTech Connect

Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced {approximately}7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe{reg_sign} rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The system was tested in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC. The contaminant plume there is approximately 10 m deep, 50 m wide and contains up to 4 {micro}g/L total BTEX and 75 {micro}g/L dissolved iron. An extensive pilot test was first performed to estimate the zone of influence for a single well. At this site an air injection rate of 1.2 L/min resulted in a water flow rate of 1 to 2 L/min based on bromide dilution tests in the GCW. The GCW increased the dissolved oxygen concentration in the discharge water to between 6 and 8 {micro}g/L and reduced contaminant concentrations to less than 20 {micro}g/L total BTEX. Monitoring results from a 73 day pilot test were then used to define the zone of influence for a single DP-GCW and to design a full scale barrier system.

Borden, R.C.; Cherry, R.S.

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics  

SciTech Connect

Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced ~7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The system was tested in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC. The contaminant plume there is approximately 10 m deep, 50 m wide and contains up to 4 g/L total BTEX and 75 g/L dissolved iron. An extensive pilot test was first performed to estimate the zone of influence for a single well. At this site an air injection rate of 1.2 L/min resulted in a water flow rate of 1 to 2 L/min based on bromide dilution tests in the GCW. The GCW increased the dissolved oxygen concentration in the discharge water to between 6 and 8 g/L and reduced contaminant concentrations to less than 20 g/L total BTEX. Monitoring results from a 73 day pilot test were then used to define the zone of influence for a single DP-GCW and to design a full scale barrier system.

Borden, R. E.; Cherry, Robert Stephen

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

p-type conduction induced by N-doping in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A p-type N-doped {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was developed by magnetron sputtering of a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in a plasma containing N{sub 2} and Ar followed by postannealing. Photoelectrochemical measurement under visible light irradiation (>410 nm) showed that N-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits a typical cathodic photocurrent originated from the p-type conduction. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy indicated that the atomic N incorporated substitutionally at O sites was responsible for the p-type conduction. The concentration of acceptors was very close to that for Zn-doped Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a typical p-type {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This finding would stimulate further research on p-type Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} for solar fuel generation, etc.

Morikawa, Takeshi; Kitazumi, Kousuke; Takahashi, Naoko; Arai, Takeo; Kajino, Tsutomu [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mechanochemical Synthesis of Nonstoichiometric Fluorite Ca{sub 1-x} La{sub x} F{sub 2+x} Nanocrystals from CaF{sub 2} and LaF{sub 3} Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonstoichiometric Ca{sub 1-x} La{sub x}F{sub 2+x} phase (x {>=} 0.1) is obtained by mechanochemical synthesis from CaF{sub 2} and LaF{sub 3} single crystals. This phase is the first representative of fluorite fluorides obtained by mechanochemical synthesis in the MF{sub m}-RF{sub n} systems (m fluoride ions in the crystal bulk. Mechanochemical synthesis of a multicomponent fluoride material with nanometer grains opens a new chapter in the chemistry of inorganic fluorides. A decrease of the sintering temperature of the powders with nanometer grains is very important for preparing dense fluoride ceramics of complicated compositions and other polycrystalline forms of fluoride materials.

Sobolev, B.P.; Sul'yanov, S.N.; Sorokin, N.I.; Zhmurova, Z.I. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr. 59, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation); Sviridov, I.A.; Fadeeva, V.I. [Moscow State University, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Herrero, P.; Landa-Canovas, A.; Rojas, R.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively share'' the substantial capital investment associated with the system's reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively ``share`` the substantial capital investment associated with the system`s reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Concentrating aqueous volatile fatty acid salt solutions using a tertiary amine mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lee (1993) has shown that tertiary amines are able to hics. extract water from low-concentration calcium acetate and sodium acetate solutions. This thesis extends the previous work to include calcium propionate and butyrate. Amine extraction may be used to selectively remove water from a fermentation broth thus concentrating calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Compared to competing technologies that extract undissociated acids from a volatile fatty acid fermentation broth, extracting water with tertiary amines allows for higher pH levels in the broth resulting in greater productivity. Specifically, triethylamine and N,N-diethyl-methylamine in a 1:2 volumetric mixture are superior to any other examined mixture or single amine for extracting water at 40[]C, the proposed fermentation temperature (Lee, 1993; Davison et al., 1966, 1967). Once the acid salts have been concentrated, a variety of techniques are available to convert the concentrated salts into other products such as ketones, alcohols, and acids. At low temperatures, the low-molecular-weight amine mixture has a high affinity for water. By raising the temperature 20 to 25[]C, the water separates from the amine allowing for convenient solvent regeneration of the amine. The distribution coefficients, [] , measure the selectivity of concentrating calcium salts in the aqueous phase. The distribution coefficients generally vary as follows: [] thus, there is less selectivity as the aliphatic group increases in size. The amine mixture was used to extract water from actual fermentation broth to determine whether possible surfactants in the broth interfere with the extraction. Prior to extraction, the fermentation broth was adjusted to pH 11.5 by adding a small amount of lime. The high pH precipitate protein which can be recycled to the fermentor or collected for animal feed. Through 15 extraction runs, no degradation of the amine was observed.

Gaskin, David J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Isotopic separation of D.sub.2 O from H.sub.2 O using ruthenium adsorbent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enrichment of D.sub.2 O in solutions of D.sub.2 O in H.sub.2 O by contacting said solutions in the steam phase with hexagonal crystalline to produce enriched D.sub.2 O. The passages may be repeated to achieve a desired amount of D.sub.2 O.

Thiel, Patricia A. (Ames, IA)

1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Second order incommensurate phase transition in 25L-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}  

SciTech Connect

A new structural state 25L-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, obtained from sintering and annealing treatments of a Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} powder, is identified both by electron diffraction and high resolution imaging on a transmission electron microscope (TEM). According to general rules for the different L-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} structures proposed by Grey et al. (J. Solid State Chem. 178 (2005) 3308), a structural model is derived from their crystallographic data on 19L-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. This model yields simulated images in agreement with high resolution TEM observations of the structure oriented along its [001] zone axis, but only for a very thin crystal thickness of less than 1.2 nm. Such a limitation is shown to be due to a modulation of the structure along its [001] axis. Actually, from an analysis of a diffuse scattering and of its evolution into satellites reflections as a function of the cooling rate, a second order incommensurate phase transition can be assumed to occur in this compound. The property of single phase samples observed by TEM is also verified by X-ray powder diffraction. In a discussion about studies performed by different authors on incommensurate structures in the system Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}, it is noticed that TEM results, similar to ours, indicate that phase transitions could be expected in these structures. - Graphical Abstract: Electron diffraction patterns of [100] zone axis, showing a structural change of the 25L-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase through a variation of the cooling rate from 1000 {sup o}C.

Audier, M., E-mail: Marc.Audier@grenoble-inp.f [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique, UMR CNRS 5628, Minatec - INP Grenoble, 3 parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Chenevier, B.; Roussel, H. [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique, UMR CNRS 5628, Minatec - INP Grenoble, 3 parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Lintanf Salauen, A. [Tyndall National Institute Lee Maltings prospect row, Cork (Ireland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microstructural stability in LPE Ga{sub x}In{sub (1{minus}x)}As{sub y}Sb{sub (1{minus}y)}/GaSb heterostructures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The morphological and structural characteristics associated with the growth of lattice matched In{sub x}Ga{sub (1{minus}x)}As{sub y}Sb{sub (1{minus}y)}/GaSb (100) heterostructures is presented. The experiments focused on studying the effect of growth on vicinal surfaces tilted from the exact (100) orientation as well as variations in epilayer chemistry. It was found that variations in these process parameters had very strong effects on both the nucleation characteristics of the epilayer and the atomistic scale homogeneity of the alloy. The <100> and <110> variants in compositional modulation/phase separation were detected, as well as the evolution of weak (110) ordering. These results are discussed in the context of other studies on phase stability in III-V epitaxial structures, especially in terms of surface reconstruction and kinetic effects near conditions of spinodal decomposition.

Chen, C.Y.; Bucklen, V.; Rajan, K. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Freeman, M.; Cardines, R.P. [Lockheed-Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Oxygen transport in the Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 3{minus}x}Co{sub x}O{sub y} system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixed-conducting Sr-Fe-Co oxide has potential use as a gas separation membrane. Its superior oxygen transport reveals the feasibility of using oxide membranes in large-scale oxygen separation. Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 3{minus}x}Co{sub x}O{sub y} (with x = 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0) samples were made by solid state reaction. To understand the oxygen transport mechanism in this system, conductivity and thermogravimetry experiments were conducted at high temperature in various oxygen partial pressure environments. The oxygen diffusion coefficient was determined from the time relaxation transient behavior of the specimen after switching the surrounding atmosphere. Mobility of the charge carrier was derived from relative conductivity and weight changes. X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out on these samples to determine their crystal structures.

Ma, B.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Communication: Rovibrationally selected absolute total cross sections for the reaction H{sub 2}O{sup +}(X{sup 2}B{sub 1}; v{sub 1}{sup +}v{sub 2}{sup +}v{sub 3}{sup +}= 000; N{sup +}{sub Ka+Kc+)}+ D{sub 2}: Observation of the rotational enhancement effect  

SciTech Connect

By employing the newly established vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) double quadrupole-double octopole ion guide apparatus, we have measured the rovibrationally selected absolute total cross sections of the ion-molecule reaction H{sub 2}O{sup +}(X{sup 2}B{sub 1}; v{sub 1}{sup +}v{sub 2}{sup +}v{sub 3}{sup +}= 000; N{sup +}{sub Ka+Kc+)}+ D{sub 2}{yields} H{sub 2}DO{sup +}+ D in the center-of-mass collision energy (E{sub cm}) range of 0.05-10.00 eV. The pulsing scheme used for the generation of PFI-PIs has made possible the preparation of reactant H{sub 2}O{sup +}(X{sup 2}B{sub 1}; v{sub 1}{sup +}v{sub 2}{sup +}v{sub 3}{sup +}= 000) ions in single N{sup +}{sub Ka+Kc+} rotational levels with high kinetic energy resolutions. The absolute total cross sections observed in different N{sup +}{sub Ka+Kc+} levels with rotational energies in the range of 0-200 cm{sup -1} were found to exhibit a significant rotational enhancement on the reactivity for the titled reaction. In contrast, the measured cross sections reveal a decreasing trend with increasing E{sub cm}, indicating that the rotational enhancement observed is not a total energy effect, but a dynamical effect. Furthermore, the rotational enhancement is found to be more pronounced as E{sub cm} is decreased. This experiment provided evidence that the coupling of the core rotational angular momentum with the orbital angular momentum could play a role in chemical reactivity, particularly at low E{sub cm}.

Xu Yuntao; Xiong Bo; Chang, Yih Chung; Ng, C. Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Zeolite encapsulation of H/sub 2/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments with H/sub 2/ have shown that it is possible to encapsulate gases in the structure of certain molecular sieves. This method may offer a better means of temporarily storing and disposing of tritium over some others presently in use. The method may also prove safer, and may enable isotope separation, and removal of /sup 3/He. Initial experiments were performed with H/sub 2/ to screen potential candidates for use with tritium.

Cooper, S.; Lakner, J.F.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sub-Grade Corrosion Inspection Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry maintains an immense number of transmission and distribution structures that are subject to sub-grade corrosion. As this vast fleet ages, the inspection, assessment, and maintenance of existing facilities have become increasingly important topics. This report is a comprehensive summary of corrosion basics as they apply to sub-grade corrosion in tubular structures. Coverage includes the electrochemical mechanisms of corrosion, types of corrosion, laboratory methods for measurin...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mechanical after-effect studies of oxygen relaxation in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-. delta  

SciTech Connect

YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} has an anelastic relaxation involving motion of an oxygen atom or defect. This relaxation has been studied with good agreement by more than seven investigating teams over the temperature range from 200 to 550{degrees}C using internal friction techniques. We have extended measurements of this relaxation to a new regime of temperature and relaxation time using the mechanical after-effect method. Our results cover an additional three orders of magnitude in relaxation time over the temperature range from 50 to 110{degrees}C. The Arrhenius plot, when combined with internal friction results, now covers eleven orders of magnitude in relaxation time. The fit gives an activation energy, Q=1.12 ({plus minus}0.015) and pre-exponential, {tau}{sub 0}=1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} s. The isothermal mechanical relaxation curves we measured always spanned longer times than predicted for a simple exponential relaxation. This indicates that the process is controlled by a relatively wide spectrum of relaxation times. We have calculated best approximations of this spectrum by deconvoluting the mechanical after-effect curves. The resulting distribution is symmetrical in logarithm of the relaxation time with a width at half-height which is a factor of 20 in relaxation time. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of our understanding of oxygen mobility in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}. 16 refs., 5 figs.

Cost, J.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Stanley, J.T. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Spiral growth of topological insulator Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates  

SciTech Connect

Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates synthesized by vapor phase deposition method have been systemically investigated employing atomic force microscopy, which exhibit regular spiral structures on the surface. The height of spiral steps is determined to be 1 nm corresponding to one quintuple layer, with an inter-step separation ranging from 500 nm to 1 {mu}m. Growth mechanism of spiral structures on the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplate surface is elucidated, which can be applied to other layered materials with van der Waals epitaxy growth. The electrostatic properties of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates with spiral structures are also simultaneously characterized.

Hao Guolin; Qi Xiang; Fan Yinping; Xue Lin; Peng Xiangyang; Wei Xiaolin; Zhong Jianxin [Hunan Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China) and Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Hunan Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China) and Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Brittle fracture in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B intermetallic magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts to understand and improve the fracture toughness of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnets require an understanding of the fracture process itself. Cleavage plane orientations in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B were identified by X-ray diffraction and found to be rather random. Cleavage fracture surfaces often exhibited smooth curvatures with no evidence for cleavage steps. The small grain sizes of less than 100 nm in Magnequench MQ material preclude an easy assessment of the fracture mode by scanning electron microscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that much of the surface is covered with a 1 nm thick layer of a neodymium-rich phase presumably the 70Nd-30Fe eutectic phase suggesting that the hard Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains do not cleave but instead failure is at or in the grain boundary phase.

Horton, J.A.; Heatherly, L.; Specht, E.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Li, D.; Herchenroeder, J.W. [Magnequench International, Inc., Anderson, IN (United States); Canfield, P.C. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "volatile sub stances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Reactions of C{sub 2}(a {sup 3} product {sub u}) with selected saturated alkanes: A temperature dependence study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a temperature dependence study on the gas phase reactions of the C{sub 2}(a {sup 3} product {sub u}) radical with a selected series of saturated alkanes (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, and n-C{sub 6}H{sub 14}) by means of pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence technique. The bimolecular rate constants for these reactions were obtained between 298 and 673 K. A pronounced negative temperature effect was observed for n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, and n-C{sub 6}H{sub 14} and interpreted in terms of steric hindrance of the more reactive secondary or tertiary C-H bonds by less reactive CH{sub 3} groups. Detailed analysis of our experimental results reveals quantitatively the temperature dependence of reactivities for the primary, secondary, and tertiary C-H bonds in these saturated alkanes and further lends support to a mechanism of hydrogen abstraction.

Hu Renzhi; Zhang Qun; Chen Yang [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Solvothermal synthesis and luminescence properties of monodisperse Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}SiO{sub 2} nanospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of uniform, monodispersed Gd(OH){sup 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanospheres less than 100 nm were successfully synthesized with iron ions as catalyst and DMF as solvent under the solvothermal condition. Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were performed as co-surfactant during this facile procedure should be changed as A series of uniform, monodisperse Gd(OH){sup 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanospheres less than 100 nm in diameter were successfully synthesized with solvothermal method. Iron ion was used as catalyst and Dimethylformamide (DMF) as solvent, Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were performed as surfactants. Further calcination process was applied to prepare Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoshpheres during this facile procedure. -- Graphical abstract: Uniform and monodisperse Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}SiO{sub 2} monodisperse were synthesized by annealed relative parent's Gd(OH){sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} and Gd(OH){sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}SiO{sub 2}, respectively. Their morphology and luminescence properties all strongly depended on the iron concentration. Display Omitted

Wang, Yu; Bai, Xue; Liu, Tong; Dong, Biao; Xu, Lin; Liu, Qiong [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Hongwei, E-mail: hwsong2005@yahoo.com.c [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Temperature programmed desorption from LiAlO sub 2 treated with H sub 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements have been made of H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} desorption from LiAlO{sup 2} treated at 923 K with He-H{sub 2} mixtures containing 990, 495, and 227 vppm H{sub 2}. Desorptions were into sweep gases of pure He and into He-H{sub 2} mixtures. The H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} desorption peaks were shown to be the sums of first order subpeaks which had reproducible desorption activation energy and pre-exponential terms. For H{sub 2}O desorption, the activation energies were 96, 117, 134 kJ/mol (23, 28, and 32 kcal/mol). (Earlier work had identified an additional peak with an activation energy of 75 kJ/mol (18 kcal/mol).) Enhancement of desorption of H{sub 2}O by H{sub 2} in the sweep gas was confirmed. The enhancement results not from modifying the activation energies and pre-exponential terms for the various sites but from changes in the populations of sites participating in the desorption process so that sites with lower activation energies are increasingly involved. For those runs with He as the sweep gas, desorption of H{sub 2} could be observed. The subpeaks involved had activation energies within approximately 4 kJ/mol (1 kcal/mol) higher than the analogous peaks for H{sub 2}O desorption. 2 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Fischer, A.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Indonesia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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