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Sample records for voc true read

  1. Customizing a VOC control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enneking, J.C.

    1998-12-31

    An extremely important but very difficult element in applying an emission control device to an exhaust stream is to chose the proper technology. Once it has been determined that recovery, rather than destruction, is appropriate, there are still several process choices available. The type of process is generally dictated by the VOC concentration and total air flow rate. Adsorption is usually chosen for low concentrations and high flow rates while refrigeration is usually best for high concentrations and low flow rates. This paper describes six applications. Adsorption was applied to two of them and condensation to the other four. Solvent vapors from a tape coating operation are recovered in an activated carbon adsorption process and reused. VOC`s from soil vapor extraction operations are captured by activated carbon which is regenerated by a mobile unit. VOC`s displaced from filling tank cars at a refinery are condensed at low temperatures in a high pressure system which uses a pressure swing dryer to remove water. Two different processes were installed to prevent VOC emissions from pharmaceutical processing plants. They both use a thermal swing dryer to remove moisture and low temperature condensation to recover the solvent. With very high concentrations of solvent in an inert gas stream, indirect condensation is used to purify the nitrogen and recover the solvent for reuse. Process flow diagrams and operating results are presented.

  2. Laboratory and Field Demonstration of Energy Efficient VOC Removal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficient VOC Removal Using a Manganese Oxide Catalyst at Room Temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory and Field Demonstration of Energy Efficient VOC ...

  3. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-11-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY Responsible DOE Office: Office of Science Plume Name: OU I VOC Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement 1,1,1-TCA 3

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    III VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of Science Plume Name: OU III VOC Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement CCI4 64 Yes

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU V VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    V VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU V VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of Science Plume Name: OU V VOC Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 2.9 Yes 5

  7. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  8. TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TrueWind Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: TrueWind Solutions Place: Albany, NY Website: www.awstruepower.com References: TrueWind Solutions1 Information About...

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VI VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of Science Plume Name: OU VI VOC Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No

  10. EPA proposes to control automotive VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    US Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a vehicle control system for reducing gasoline vapors that can escape into the environment during refueling of motor vehicles. It has also has been proposed that gasoline refiners lower the volatility of commercial fuels in summer to reduce vehicle evaporative emissions. EPA said nationwide emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a major contributor to the formation of urban ozone, could be reduced as much as 10% under the proposed pollution-control measures.

  11. Estimating emissions of 20 VOCs. 2: Diffused aeration (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Estimating emissions of 20 VOCs. 2: Diffused aeration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating emissions of 20 VOCs. 2: Diffused aeration A relationship developed in a companion paper to estimate emissions from surface-aerated reactors that accounts for both gas- and liquid-phase mass-transfer resistances is extended to reactors with diffused-aeration systems. The method accurately predicts the observed stripping rate of 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with

  12. NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For example, if a TIC meets the criteria in the Permit for ... acute exposure to a waste worker underground, causing ... the proper recording and management of relevant VOC ...

  13. HYDROGEN AND VOC RETENTION IN WASTE BOXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE ME; MARUSICH RM

    2008-11-21

    The Hanford Waste Management Project Master Documented Safety Analysis (MDSA) (HNF-14741, 2003) identifies derived safety controls to prevent or mitigate the risks of a single-container deflagration during operations requiring moving, venting or opening transuranic (TRU)-waste containers. The issue is whether these safety controls are necessary for operations involving TRU-waste boxes that are being retrieved from burial at the Hanford Site. This paper investigates the potential for a deflagration hazard within these boxes and whether safety controls identified for drum deflagration hazards should be applied to operations involving these boxes. The study evaluates the accumulation of hydrogen and VOCs within the waste box and the transport of these gases and vapors out of the waste box. To perform the analysis, there were numerous and major assumptions made regarding the generation rate and the transport pathway dimensions and their number. Since there is little actual data with regards to these assumptions, analyses of three potential configurations were performed to obtain some indication of the bounds of the issue (the concentration of hydrogen or flammable VOCs within a waste box). A brief description of each of the three cases along with the results of the analysis is summarized.

  14. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by the Gas Technology ...

  15. NICS report links VOCs to respiratory problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-04-22

    Children who live near the chemical plants of Kanawha Valley, WV, suffer more acute and chronic respiratory aliments than those farther away, says a Harvard University School of Public Health report. In the $1-million, five-year study commissioned by the National Institute for Chemical Studies (NICS:Charleston, WV) and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, proximity to chemical plants that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was linked to higher incidence of asthma, acute eye irritation, shortness of breath, and chronic cough. The researchers say they adjusted for most other factors, such as parental smoking and petroleum. {open_quotes}The research hypothesis was whether children in the valley had more symptoms,{close_quotes} says NICS president Paul Hill. {open_quotes}Yes, there is a difference.{close_quotes} The study showed that some ailments were up to 28% more prevalent in children in the valley than in other Kanawha County children.

  16. Reading Room

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Electronic Reading Room for the Department of Energy at Headquarters.

  17. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy(trihexyl)phosphonium dicyanamide as the RTIL. It was determined that it has good absorption properties for methanol and α-pinene, is thermally stable, and is relatively easy to synthesize. It has a density of 0.89 g/mL at 20°C and a molecular weight of 549.9 g/mol. Trials were conducted with a small absorption system and a larger absorption system. Methanol, formaldehyde, and other HAPs were absorbed well, nearly 100%. Acetaldehyde was difficult to capture. Total VOC capture, while satisfactory on methanol and α-pinene in a lab system, was less than expected in the field, 60-80%. The inability to capture the broad spectrum of total organics is likely due to difficulties in cleaning them from the ionic liquid rather than the ability of the ionic liquid to absorb. It’s likely that a commercial system could be constructed to remove 90 to 100% of the gas contaminates. Selecting the correct ionic liquid would be key to this. Absorption may not be the main selection criterion, but rather how easily the ionic liquid can be cleaned is very important. The ionic liquid absorption system might work very well in a system with a limited spectrum of pollutants, such as a paint spray line, where there are not very high molecular weight, non volatile, compounds in the exhaust.

  18. Pulsed Laser Imager for Detecting Hydrocarbon and VOC Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ALPIS is operated at a safe distance of 50 to 150 meters above the inspection site. Once a volatile organic compound (VOC) is detected, the GPS coordinates are recorded and an ...

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I/IV VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I/IV VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I/IV VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office Science Plume Name: OU I/IV VOC Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? Yes Explosives Present?

  20. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.

  1. Characterization of low-VOC latex paints: Volatile organic compound content, VOC and aldehyde emissions, and paint performance. Final report, January 1997--January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortmann, R.; Lao, H.C.; Ng, A.; Roache, N.

    1999-04-01

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as `low-odor,` `low-VOC (volatile organic compound),` or `no-VOC.` Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints and to identify the predominant VOCs and aldehydes in the emissions following application to test substrates. The performance of the paints was evaluated and compared to that of commonly used conventional latex paints by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods that measured parameters such as scrubbability, cleanability, and hiding power. The report describes the paints that were tested, the test methods, and the experimental data. Results are presented that can be used to evaluate the low-odor/low-VOC paints as alternatives to conventional latex wall paints that contain and emit higher concentrations of VOCs.

  2. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  3. Microsoft Word - Tad True QER Testimony (2).docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    My grandfather, H.A. "Dave" True, started the True Companies in 1954 as a one---rig drilling company. Since that time, the companies expanded into exploration, pipe supply, ...

  4. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slice True-Up 101 pptx.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ted Barham, Janice Johnson and many others Content Organized and Presented by Craig Larson Slice History A Review of Subscription and RD(Regional Dialogue) Slice distinctions...

  6. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011 | Department of Energy Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions - Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011 Presentation on Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions, given by David Cygan of the Gas Technology Institute, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio

  7. Paso del Norte ozone study VOC measurements, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seila, R.L.; Main, H.; Arriaga, J.L.; Martinez, G.V.; Ramadan, A.B.

    1999-11-01

    The results of VOC determinations of ambient air samples collected at surface air quality monitoring sites and near sources of interest on the US and Mexican side of the border during six weeks of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study are reported. Carbonyl samples were collected on DNPH impregnated cartridges at three surface sites and analyzed by HPLC to quantify 13, C-1 to C-8 species. Whole air samples were collected in electro-polished stainless steel canisters which were returned to laboratory for determination of C-2 to C-10+ hydrocarbons by cryogenic preconcentration capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (gc-fid). Several sources were sampled: rush hour traffic, propane-powered bus exhaust, automobile paint shop emissions, propane fuel, petroleum refinery, and industrial manufacturing site. Spatial and temporal characteristics of VOC species concentrations and compositions are presented. Overall surface TNMOC values ranged from 0.1 to 3.4 ppmC with the highest concentrations recorded in the morning at three vehicle-dominated sites, two in Cuidad Juarez and one in downtown El Paso. Toluene in El Paso samples and propane, which is used as a cooking and transportation fuel in Cuidad Juarez, were the most abundant hydrocarbons.

  8. Paso del Norte ozone study VOC measurements, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seila, R.L.; Main, H.; Arriaga, J.L.; Martinez, G.V.; Ramadan, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    The results of VOC determinations of ambient air samples collected at surface air quality monitoring sites and near sources of interest on the US and Mexican side of the border during six weeks of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study are reported. Carbonyl samples were collected on DNPH impregnated cartridges at three surface sites and analyzed by HPLC to quantify 13, C-1 to C-8 species. Whole air samples were collected in electro-polished stainless steel canisters which were returned to laboratory for determination of C-2 to C-10+ hydrocarbons by cryogenic preconcentration capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (gc-fid). Several sources were sampled: rush hour traffic, propane-powered bus exhaust, automobile paint shop emissions, propane fuel, petroleum refinery, and industrial manufacturing site. Spatial and temporal characteristics of VOC species concentrations and compositions are presented. Overall surface TNMOC values ranged from 0.1 to 3.4 ppmC with the highest concentrations recorded in the morning at three vehicle-dominated sites, two in Cuidad Juarez and one in downtown El Paso. Toluene in El Paso samples and propane, which is used as a cooking and transportation fuel in Cuidad Juarez, were the most abundant hydrocarbons.

  9. True: Order (2015-CE-42049) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE ordered True Manufacturing Co., Inc., to pay a 36,400 civil penalty after finding ... Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those ...

  10. Decomposing VOCs with an electron-beam plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, S.A.; Hadidi, K.; Cohn, D.R.; Bromberg, L.; Falkos, P.

    1996-04-01

    Several emerging technologies are being tested for decomposing VOCs. Among these are bioreactors, catalytic oxidation, photoinduced decomposition, thermal plasma processes, and nonequilibrium plasma processes. For a new technology to be successfully offered for commercial use, it must be reliable, economically competitive, and ready for use on an industrial scale. The authors have been working on an electron-beam-generated plasma reactor that now meets these prerequisites. The reactor can decompose halogenated organic compounds in dilute concentrations 1--3,000 ppm in airstreams at atmospheric pressure. The technology is more energy efficient than thermal technologies and thus represents lower electricity costs for the overall process. The reactor can easily be scaled to industrial needs and was tested successfully in Hanford, WA, to treat the offgas from the remediation of soils contaminated with CCl{sub 4}.

  11. Field demonstration and transition of SCAPS direct push VOC in-situ sensing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William M. Davis

    1999-11-03

    This project demonstrated two in-situ volatile organic compound (VOC) samplers in combination with the direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometer (DSITMS). The technologies chosen were the Vadose Sparge and the Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) sensing systems. Tests at two demonstration sites showed the newer VOC technologies capable of providing in situ contaminant measurements at two to four times the rate of the previously demonstrated Hydrosparge sensor. The results of this project provide initial results supporting the utility of these new technologies to provide rapid site characterization of VOC contaminants in the subsurface.

  12. NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3*1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing

  13. TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer In-Situ Sensors Provide Real-Time Measurements Enabling Better Control and Process Optimization Current chemical process controls use few in-situ sensors, relying instead on analytic techniques that require sample conditioning and transport, and significant turnaround time. With few exceptions, these techniques lack speed of measurement, accuracy of measurement, sensitivity of measurement, and economical measurement. In-situ sensors

  14. WIPP - Public Reading Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Reading Facilities/Electronic Reading Facilities The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Electronic FOIA (E-FOIA) require that various specific types of records, as well as various other records, be maintained in public reading facilities. Before you submit a FOIA request, we recommend you contact or visit the appropriate public reading facility to determine if the records you are seeking have already been released. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as other related DOE

  15. VOC-Arid Integrated Demonstration guide to preparation of demonstration documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, E.J.; Brouns, T.M.; Koegler, K.J.; McCabe, G.H.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-06-01

    This guide has been prepared by Demonstration Operations of the Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). Its purpose is to describe demonstration documents, designate responsibilities for these documents, and guide the Principal Investigator (PI) and others in their preparation. The main emphasis of this guide is to describe the documentation required of the PI. However, it does cover some of the responsibilities of other members of the VOC-Arid ID team. The VOC-Arid ID is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the demonstration of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. The principal objective of the VOC-Arid ID is to identify, develop, and demonstrate new and innovative technologies for environmental restoration at arid or semiarid sites containing volatile organic compounds with or without associated contamination (e.g., radionuclides and metals).

  16. Treatment of VOCs in high strength wastes using an anaerobic expanded-bed GAC reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanian, B.; Suidan, M.T.; Gelderloos, A.B.; Brenner, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential of the expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) anaerobic reactor in treating a high strength waste containing RCRA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied. A total of six VOCs, methylene chloride, chlorobenzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, toluene and tetrachloroethylene, were fed to the reactor in a high strength matrix of background solvents. Performance was evaluated. The reactor was found to effect excellent removal of all VOCs (97%). Chloroform, while itself removed at levels in excess of 97%, was found to inhibit the degradation of acetate and acetone, two of the background solvents. Without any source of chloroform in the feed, excellent COD removals were obtained in addition to near-complete removal of all the VOCs.

  17. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Introduction A combined heat and power (CHP) system can be a financially attractive energy option for many industrial and commercial facilities. This is particularly the case in areas of the country with high electricity rates. However, regions with air quality concerns often have strict limits on criteria pollutants, such as nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and

  18. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 The Gas Technology Institute, in collaboration with Cannon Boiler Works, Integrated CHP Systems Corp., Capstone Turbine Corporation, Johnston Boiler Company, and Inland Empire Foods has developed a Flexible Combined Heat and Power (FlexCHP) system that incorporates a supplemental Ultra-Low-NOx (ULN) burner into a 65 kW microturbine

  19. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This brief details how to calculate the true cost of steam, which is important for monitoring and managing energy use in a plant, evaluating proposed design changes to the generation or distribution infrastructure and the process itself, and for continuing to identify competitive advantages through steam system and plant efficiency improvements.

  20. Method of measurement of VOCs in the off-gas and wastewater of wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min Wang; Keener, T.C.; Orton, T.L.; Zhu, H.; Bishop, P.; Pekonen, S.; Siddiqui, K.

    1997-12-31

    VOCs need to be controlled according to Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), so an accurate estimation of the total VOC emissions must be attained. This paper reports on a study where EPA method 624 was revised so that this method could be used for VOC analysis both in the water and off-gas of wastewater treatment plants. The revised method uses the same approach and equipment as water and soil analyses, thereby providing a great time and cost advantage for anyone needing to perform this type of analysis. Without using a cryogenic preconcentration step, gas samples from Tedlar bags are easily analyzed to concentrations of approximately 20 ppb using scan mode in a GC-MS unit. For the wastewater, scan mode was still used for the identification, but Selected Ion Monitoring (SIM) mode was used for quantitative analysis because of lower VOC concentration in the water. The results show that this method`s detection limit (MDL) was lowered 2--3 orders of magnitude when compared with scan mode. The modified method has been successfully applied to the identification and quantitative analysis of wastewater and off-gas VOCs from a publicly owned treatment works (POTW) aeration basin (120 MGD).

  1. Modeling the VOC emissions from interior latex paint applied to gypsum board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Fortmann, R.; Marfiak, S.; Tichenor, B.; Sparks, L.

    1997-09-01

    The paper discusses modeling volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from indoor latex paint applied to gypsum board. An empirical source model for a porous substrate was developed that takes both the wet- and dry-stage emission into consideration. Tests in the U.S. EPA`s Source Characterization Laboratory showed that common interior surfaces such as gypsum board and carpet could absorb significant amounts of latex paint VOCS from the air, and that they were re-emitted very slowly. An indoor air quality model incorporating the source model, an irreversible sink model, and the air movement data obtained from tracer gas tests made satisfactory predictions for the VOC levels in a test house.

  2. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  3. Method for lowering the VOCS emitted during drying of wood products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sujit (1832 Jacksons Creek Point, Marietta, GA 30068); Boerner, James Robert (154 Junedale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45218); Su, Wei (2262 Orleans Ave., Marietta, GA 30062)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for removal of VOCs from wood products prior to drying the wood products. The method of the invention includes the steps of providing a chamber having an opening for receiving wood and loading the chamber with green wood. The wood is loaded to an extent sufficient to provide a limited headspace in the chamber. The chamber is then closed and the wood is heated in the chamber for a time and at a temperature sufficient to saturate the headspace with moisture and to substantially transfer VOCs from the wood product to the moisture in the headspace.

  4. Public Reading Room | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Reading Room Welcome to the U.S. Department of Energy Public Reading Room. In the Reading Room, you will find a host of technical and non-technical reports about Jefferson Lab and its operations. These reports include the lab's performance report card, environmental impact studies and more. Paper copies of these documents may be read at Jefferson Lab's Public Reading Area, located in CEBAF Center (Building 12), 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606. The reading area is located in

  5. TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2006-07-06

    This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected calibrating agent overestimate the value of the VOCs in a sample. By overestimating the VOC content of a sample, we want to minimize false negatives. A false negative is defined as incorrectly estimating the VOC content of the sample to be below programmatic action limits when, in fact, the sample,exceeds the action limits. The disadvantage of overestimating the flammable VOC content of a sample is that additional cost may be incurred because additional sampling and GC-MS analysis may be required to confirm results over programmatic action limits. Therefore, choosing an appropriate calibration standard for the Ar-PDHID is critical to avoid false negatives and to minimize additional analytical costs.

  6. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  7. Control of VOC emissions from ink and paint manufacturing processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMinn, B.W.; Marsosudiro, P.J.

    1992-04-01

    The document presents the results of a study to collect and report information on processes used to manufacture paint and ink, volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions generated during these operations, emission control techniques and their effectiveness, and costs associated with process changes and emission control options.

  8. SchemaOnRead Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    SchemaOnRead provides tools for implementing schema-on-read including a single function call (e.g., schemaOnRead("filename")) that reads text (TXT), comma separated value (CSV), raster image (BMP, PNG, GIF, TIFF, and JPG), R data (RDS), HDF5, NetCDF, spreadsheet (XLS, XLSX, ODS, and DIF), Weka Attribute-Relation File Format (ARFF), Epi Info (REC), Pajek network (PAJ), R network (NET), Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), SPSS (SAV), Systat (SYS), and Stata (DTA) files. It also recursively reads folders (e.g., schemaOnRead("folder")), returning a nested list of the contained elements.

  9. Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1992-07-01

    One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

  10. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  11. Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, J.Z.; Sleigh, S.; Cotherman, R.

    1996-12-31

    Natural gas fired stationary internal combustion engines (IC engines) emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) as part of their normal operations. VOC and HAP emissions are coming under increased scrutiny with the advent of such Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 regulations as Title I`s Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT), Title III`s Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) and Title V`s Operating Permit Program (Title V). In addition, many states are imposing more stringent emission limits on these sources. These emissions may also contribute to the reportable chemicals from the total facility under SARA Title III. Numerous facilities nationwide are interested in reducing these emissions in order to comply with current requirements, to opt out of requirements or to reduce reportable chemicals. This paper will examine the source of these emissions, and discuss combustion control technologies and system operating flexibility, end-of-pipe control technologies, and system tuning opportunities which have the potential to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from IC engines. Data will be presented on potential emission reduction efficiencies achievable using the various control options. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Reading Enterprise Hub | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Reading Enterprise Hub Place: United Kingdom Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic Research foundation ) References: Reading...

  13. LOW TEMPERATURE VOC COMBUSTION OVER MANGANESE, COBALT AND ZINC ALPO4 MOLECULAR SIEVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosemarie Szostak

    2003-03-06

    The objective of this project was to prepare microporous aluminophosphates containing magnesium, manganese, cobalt and zinc (MeAPOs) and to evaluate their performance as oxidation catalysts for the removal of low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gas streams. The tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) To develop reliable synthesis methods for metal aluminophosphates containing manganese, cobalt and zinc in their framework; (2) To characterize these materials for crystallinity, phase purity, the location and nature of the incorporated metal in the framework; and (3) To evaluate the materials for their catalytic activities in the oxidation of volatile organic environmental pollutants.

  14. Reading Room | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reading Room Reading Room Welcome to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Electronic Reading Room for the Department of Energy at Headquarters. The FOIA requires certain kinds of documents to be made available to the public for inspection and copying. This is a requirement for agencies of the executive branch of the federal government. The documents that are required to be made available by the FOIA are: Final Opinions [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](A) final opinions, including concurring and dissenting

  15. READ_BLT.DLL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-12-14

    Preprocessor for the integration of the BLT-MS (Breach Leach Transport-Multi Species) code with GoldSim. The program is intended as a DLL for use with a goldSim model file. The code reads a standard BLT-MS input file and allocated parameters to memory for subsequent input to a GoldSim model file and writes output files used for performing Monte Carlo analyses. The software is used as part of a modeling package that consists of BLTMS.EXE, GoldSim, Read_BLT.DLLmore » and Launch_BLTMS.DLL. The modeling package is used to run Monte Carlo analyses for performance assessment of Low Level Radioactive Waste Repositiores. This DLL incorporates some subroutines of a public domain FORTRAN code that was originally developed by Brookhaven National Laboratories and their contractors, with funding from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission back in the mid-1990's [NUREG/CR-6492 BNL-NUREG-52509, BLT-MS (Breach, Leach, and Transport-Multiple Species)].« less

  16. Reading Room | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reading Rooms, Government Information Department Zimmerman Library University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 Contact: Dan Barkley Phone: 505-277-7180 Email:...

  17. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  18. Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Environmental documents and reports are available online. Hard copies...

  19. Test methods for determining short and long term VOC emissions from latex paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, K.; Lao, H.C.; Fortmann, R.; Tichenor, B.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses an evaluation of latex paint (interior, water based) as a source of indoor pollution. A major objective of the research is the development of methods for predicting emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over time. Test specimens of painted gypsumboard are placed in dynamic flow-through test chambers. Samples of the outlet air are collected on Tenax sorbents and thermally desorbed for analysis by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. These tests produce short- and long-term data for latex paint emissions of Texanol, 2-2(-butoxyethoxy)-ethanol, and glycols. Evaluation of the data shows that most of the Texanol emissions occur within the first few days, and emissions of the glycols occur over several months. This behavior may be described by an evaporative mass transfer process that dominates the short-term emissions, while long-term emissions are limited by diffusion processes within the dry paint-gypsumboard.

  20. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radars. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. An ultra-compact optical true time delay device is demonstrated that can support 112 antenna elements with better than six bits of delay in a volume 16-inch x 5-inch x 4-inch including the box and electronics. Free-space beams circulate in a White cell,

  1. Reading File Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reading File Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208-3621 POWER SERVICES In reply refer to: PG-5 Ms. Renata Kurschner Director, Generation Resource...

  2. Steam Technical Brief: How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This BestPractice Steam Technical Brief helps you calculate the true cost of steam. Knowing the correct cost is important for many reasons and all of them have to do with improving the company's bottom line.

  3. True Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting Program technology fact sheet on LEDs and the relationship between CCT, CRI, optical safety, material degradation, and photobiological stimulation

  4. Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Environmental documents and reports are available online. Hard copies are available at the Laboratory's Public Reading Room in Pojoaque, New Mexico. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Online Annual Environmental Report Electronic Public Reading

  5. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hnninen, Kari

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ? VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ? 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ? Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvink and at the optic separation plant in Hmeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m{sup 3} which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m{sup 3}. In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m{sup 3}. High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m{sup 3}, a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most problematic factor was endotoxins whose average measured concentrations was 4853 EU/m{sup 3}.

  6. Biofiltration control of VOC and air toxic emissions: n-Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    n-Butane and benzene vapors are routinely observed in urban atmospheres. Their presence in urban airsheds is of concern because of their ozone production potential as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and/or potential toxicity. Also, these saturated hydrocarbons are representative of airborne aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Separate laboratory studies have been conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) from airstreams using treated compost biofilters. The removal efficiencies were found to exceed 90% for a conditioned biofilter medium and pollutant low concentrations (< 25 ppm) and zeroth order kinetics at higher concentrations (> 100 ppm), whereas benzene vapor elimination followed zeroth order kinetics at concentrations up to 200 ppm. The maximum n-butane and benzene elimination capacities observed for the compost biofilters and conditions employed were 25 and 70 g pollutant m{sup -3} h{sup -1}, respectively. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  8. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  9. Stratification of particulate and VOC pollutants in horizontal-flow-paint spray booths. Report for September 1988-October 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses stratification of particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants in horizontal flow paint spray booths, as part of a joint U.S. Air Force/EPA research and development program on emissions from paint spray booths. The test program discussed in the paper was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control strategies are being developed. The results of one series of tests indicate that the pollutants, both particulate and VOC, fall to the lower level of the booth or stratify at the level at which they were generated. This might be expected since the densities of typical pollutants found in spray booths are greater than air. The results showed, however, that the concentration of pollutants in the lower level prior to exiting the booth was significantly greater than expected. Data indicated that, for the 16 ft (4.9 m) high booth tested, the concentration at the exit of the booth below the 8 ft (2.4 m) level was 5-25 times greater than the concentration above that level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The concentrated zone could be directed to a proportionally smaller VOC control system of significantly less capital and operating cost.

  10. TruRead | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TruRead Jump to: navigation, search Name: TruRead Place: Cheshire, United Kingdom Zip: SK9 5AG Sector: Services Product: Provides integrated services for end-to-end collection and...

  11. Energize Your Students to Read

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Grade K-3 Energy art choo Overvie� for Activity One This activity introduces younger students to the basic concept of energy and its impact on the environment. Terms like stored energy, working energy, electricity, energy efficiency, renewable energy, nonrenewable energy, and global climate change are briefly explored through an in-class presentation. These concepts are reinforced in a bookmark coloring project. eve Grades K-3 u ect * Reading * Science once t * Energy is the ability to do

  12. Commissioning of the Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator: A multi-institutional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Bellon, M.; Wen, N.; Zhao, B.; Chetty, I. J.; Foster, R.; Speiser, M.; Solberg, T.; Altunbas, C.; Westerly, D.; Miften, M.; Altman, M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Latest generation linear accelerators (linacs), i.e., TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and its stereotactic counterpart, TrueBeam STx, have several unique features, including high-dose-rate flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon modes, reengineered electron modes with new scattering foil geometries, updated imaging hardware/software, and a novel control system. An evaluation of five TrueBeam linacs at three different institutions has been performed and this work reports on the commissioning experience. Methods: Acceptance and commissioning data were analyzed for five TrueBeam linacs equipped with 120 leaf (5 mm width) MLCs at three different institutions. Dosimetric data and mechanical parameters were compared. These included measurements of photon beam profiles (6X, 6XFFF, 10X, 10XFFF, 15X), photon and electron percent depth dose (PDD) curves (6, 9, 12 MeV), relative photon output factors (Scp), electron cone factors, mechanical isocenter accuracy, MLC transmission, and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG). End-to-end testing and IMRT commissioning were also conducted. Results: Gantry/collimator isocentricity measurements were similar (0.27-0.28 mm), with overall couch/gantry/collimator values of 0.46-0.68 mm across the three institutions. Dosimetric data showed good agreement between machines. The average MLC DLGs for 6, 10, and 15 MV photons were 1.33 {+-} 0.23, 1.57 {+-} 0.24, and 1.61 {+-} 0.26 mm, respectively. 6XFFF and 10XFFF modes had average DLGs of 1.16 {+-} 0.22 and 1.44 {+-} 0.30 mm, respectively. MLC transmission showed minimal variation across the three institutions, with the standard deviation <0.2% for all linacs. Photon and electron PDDs were comparable for all energies. 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beam quality, %dd(10){sub x} varied less than 0.3% for all linacs. Output factors (Scp) and electron cone factors agreed within 0.27%, on average; largest variations were observed for small field sizes (1.2% coefficient of variation, 10 MV, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 cm{sup 2}) and small cone sizes (<1% coefficient of variation, 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 cm{sup 2} cone), respectively. Conclusions: Overall, excellent agreement was observed in TrueBeam commissioning data. This set of multi-institutional data can provide comparison data to others embarking on TrueBeam commissioning, ultimately improving the safety and quality of beam commissioning.

  13. Stratification of particulate and VOC pollutants in paint spray booths, June 1990. Report for April 1988-April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.; Ayer, J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses flow management as part of a joint EPA/U.S. Air Force program on emissions from paint spray booths. The goal of the program is to identify and develop efficient and economical emissions control concepts for this source. Flow management is one potential solution that reduces the volume of gases that must be processed in a control system. Although it will not itself control pollution, it can influence the economic and technical viability of subsequent control systems. The test program discussed here was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control and flow management strategies are being developed. Study results indicate that both particulate and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) fall to the lower level of the booth or, at most, stratify at the level at which they were generated. Results indicate that the concentration at the lower level of the booth near the exhaust was from 5 to 25 times greater than that at the upper level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The enriched lower zone could then be directed to a proportionately smaller VOC control system, of lower capital and operating costs.

  14. Unlocking Short Read Sequencing for Metagenomics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodrigue, Sébastien; Materna, Arne C.; Timberlake, Sonia C.; Blackburn, Matthew C.; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Alm, Eric J.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Gilbert, Jack Anthony

    2010-07-28

    We describe an experimental and computational pipeline yielding millions of reads that can exceed 200 bp with quality scores approaching that of traditional Sanger sequencing. The method combines an automatable gel-less library construction step with paired-end sequencing on a short-read instrument. With appropriately sized library inserts, mate-pair sequences can overlap, and we describe the SHERA software package that joins them to form a longer composite read.

  15. Electronic FOIA Reading Room - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Freedom of Information and Privacy Act DOE Headquarters FOIA Web Page A Citizen's Guide to the FOIA and Privacy Act Making a Privacy Act Request Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. Freedom of Information Act Regulations Privacy Act Regulations DOE Public Reading Room PNNL Technical Library Electronic FOIA Reading Room FOIA EDocuments Freedom of Information Act & Privacy Act Contacts Records Previously Disclosed Helpful Links FOIA Home FOIA Portal Electronic FOIA Reading Room Email Email

  16. Public Reading Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Public Reading Facilities The FOIA and E-FOIA require that specific types of records as well as various other records be maintained in public reading facilities. The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Electronic Reading Room for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The FOIA requires certain kinds of documents to be made available to the public for inspection and copying. This is a requirement for agencies of the executive branch of the federal government. The documents that are

  17. NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA Reading Room Welcome to the National Nuclear Security Administration's NEPA Reading Room. This site serves as a focal point for NNSA NEPA implementation and contains information about past and current NNSA NEPA actions as well as other resources for NEPA practitioners and members of the public. Welcome to the National Nuclear Security Administration's NEPA Reading Room. This site serves as a focal point for NNSA NEPA implementation and contains information about past and current NNSA NEPA

  18. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Public Reading Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Reading Facility NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Public Reading Facility Photograph of the Public Reading Facility The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office maintains information relating to this nation's nuclear testing program, the Nevada National Security Site, environmental monitoring and restoration, and waste management. Much of this information is already publicly available through use of the Nuclear

  19. North Reading, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map North Reading is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts.1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects...

  20. Reading, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Reading is a town in Windsor County, Vermont. It falls under Vermont's At-large congressional...

  1. Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with Electronic Ballasts: 100fixture De-lamping: 4 - 9lamp Lighting Sensors: 20sensor LED Exit Signs: 20fixture Summary Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers...

  2. Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide Extensive calculations revealed that the calcium-iridium-oxygen compound CaIrO3 is a Slater-type insulator, putting to rest the debate of whether the insulating nature of the metal oxide is Mott-type or Slater-type. While both types are insulators, the insulating properties in Mott types arise from electron repulsion while in Slater types magnetic ordering plays a prominent role. Through a series of calculations, the team described the types of

  3. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  4. Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriac, R.; De Araujos Morais, J.; Carre, J.; Bayard, R.; Chovelon, J.M.; Gourdon, R.

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

  5. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, María V.; Falco, Lorena R.; Peluso, Miguel A.; Sambeth, Jorge E.; Thomas, Horacio J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  6. Town of Reading, Massachusetts (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reading, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Reading Town of Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: (781) 942-6598 Website: www.rmld.com Outage Hotline:...

  7. Reading, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Reading is a city in Hamilton County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 1st congressional...

  8. Laboratory's Electronic Public Reading room training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October » Electronic Public Reading Room Training Laboratory's Electronic Public Reading room training WHEN: Oct 14, 2015 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM WHERE: J. Robert Oppenheimer Study Center, Room JRO 1&2 West Jemez Road at Casa Grande CATEGORY: Community Environment INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), are holding training on the contents and use of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Electronic Public

  9. Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Reading List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geophysical Experience Reading List Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Reading List A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Keller, R., Khan, M. A., Morgan, P., et al., 1991, A Comparative Study of the Rio Grande and Kenya rifts, Tectonophys.,

  10. De Novo Sequencing with Short Reads: Does the Read Length Matter? (2009 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezner, Pavel A

    2009-03-26

    Pavel Pevzner of UC San Diego spoke about "De Novo Sequencing with Short Reads" on March 26, 2009 during the 4th Annual User Meeting

  11. De Novo Sequencing with Short Reads: Does the Read Length Matter? (2009 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pezner, Pavel A

    2011-04-25

    Pavel Pevzner of UC San Diego spoke about "De Novo Sequencing with Short Reads" on March 26, 2009 during the 4th Annual User Meeting

  12. Work plan for support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek east end VOC plumes well installation project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 guidelines and requirements from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the Y-12 Plant initiated investigation and monitoring of various sites within its boundaries in the mid-1980s. The entire Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was placed on the National Priorities List of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites within the ORR require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) or an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) of potential remedial actions. Data from monitoring wells at the east end of the Y-12 Plant have identified an area of groundwater contamination dominated by the volatile organic compound (VOC) carbon tetrachloride; other VOCs include chloroform, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene.

  13. Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs. Changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-12-12

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form and transform SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx. The effects of chemical aging on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state OSC) and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSmore » C ranged from -0.29 to 0.45 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  14. SU-E-T-585: Commissioning of Electron Monte Carlo in Eclipse Treatment Planning System for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X; Lasio, G; Zhou, J; Lin, M; Yi, B; Guerrero, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) for TrueBeam Linacs, including the evaluation of dose calculation accuracy for small fields and oblique beams and comparison with the existing eMC model for Clinacs. Methods: Electron beam percent-depth-dose (PDDs) and profiles with and without applicators, as well as output factors, were measured from two Varian TrueBeam machines. Measured data were compared against the Varian TrueBeam Representative Beam Data (VTBRBD). The selected data set was transferred into Eclipse for beam configuration. Dose calculation accuracy from eMC was evaluated for open fields, small cut-out fields, and oblique beams at different incident angles. The TrueBeam data was compared to the existing Clinac data and eMC model to evaluate the differences among Linac types. Results: Our measured data indicated that electron beam PDDs from our TrueBeam machines are well matched to those from our Varian Clinac machines, but in-air profiles, cone factors and open-filed output factors are significantly different. The data from our two TrueBeam machines were well represented by the VTBRBD. Variations of TrueBeam PDDs and profiles were within the 2% /2mm criteria for all energies, and the output factors for fields with and without applicators all agree within 2%. Obliquity factor for two clinically relevant applicator sizes (1010 and 1515 cm{sup 2}) and three oblique angles (15, 30, and 45 degree) were measured for nominal R100, R90, and R80 of each electron beam energy. Comparisons of calculations using eMC of obliquity factors and cut-out factors versus measurements will be presented. Conclusion: eMC algorithm in Eclipse TPS can be configured using the VTBRBD. Significant differences between TrueBeam and Clinacs were found in in-air profiles and open field output factors. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated for a wide range of cut-out factors and oblique incidence.

  15. Balance Calibration A Method for Assigning a Direct-Reading Uncertainty to an Electronic Balance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Stears

    2010-07-01

    Paper Title: Balance Calibration A method for assigning a direct-reading uncertainty to an electronic balance. Intended Audience: Those who calibrate or use electronic balances. Abstract: As a calibration facility, we provide on-site (at the customers location) calibrations of electronic balances for customers within our company. In our experience, most of our customers are not using their balance as a comparator, but simply putting an unknown quantity on the balance and reading the displayed mass value. Manufacturers specifications for balances typically include specifications such as readability, repeatability, linearity, and sensitivity temperature drift, but what does this all mean when the balance user simply reads the displayed mass value and accepts the reading as the true value? This paper discusses a method for assigning a direct-reading uncertainty to a balance based upon the observed calibration data and the environment where the balance is being used. The method requires input from the customer regarding the environment where the balance is used and encourages discussion with the customer regarding sources of uncertainty and possible means for improvement; the calibration process becomes an educational opportunity for the balance user as well as calibration personnel. This paper will cover the uncertainty analysis applied to the calibration weights used for the field calibration of balances; the uncertainty is calculated over the range of environmental conditions typically encountered in the field and the resulting range of air density. The temperature stability in the area of the balance is discussed with the customer and the temperature range over which the balance calibration is valid is decided upon; the decision is based upon the uncertainty needs of the customer and the desired rigor in monitoring by the customer. Once the environmental limitations are decided, the calibration is performed and the measurement data is entered into a custom spreadsheet. The spreadsheet uses measurement results, along with the manufacturers specifications, to assign a direct-read measurement uncertainty to the balance. The fact that the assigned uncertainty is a best-case uncertainty is discussed with the customer; the assigned uncertainty contains no allowance for contributions associated with the unknown weighing sample, such as density, static charges, magnetism, etc. The attendee will learn uncertainty considerations associated with balance calibrations along with one method for assigning an uncertainty to a balance used for non-comparison measurements.

  16. DOE-ID FOIA Reading Room

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reading Room READING ROOM Eectronic Freedom of Information Act, E-FOIA RECORDS UNDER THE E-FOIA The Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996 addresses the issues and procedural aspects of FOIA administration. The amendment: defines the term "record" as including "any information that would be an agency record subject to the requirements of the FOIA when maintained by an agency in any format, including an electronic format; addresses the form or format in which a

  17. Effect of geotropism on instrument readings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolph, James T.

    2006-11-01

    A review of gravity's effect on instrument readings, also referred to as geotropism. In this essay a review of meter movement construction and the effect are reviewed as it applies to portable radiation instruments. Reference to the three ANSI standards and their requirements are reviewed. An alternate approach to test for the effects is offered.

  18. How to Read Your Electric Meter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Your Electric Meter How to Read Your Electric Meter The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing...

  19. runtime error message: "readControlMsg: System returned error...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    readControlMsg: System returned error Connection timed out on TCP socket fd" runtime error message: "readControlMsg: System returned error Connection timed out on TCP socket fd"...

  20. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo...

  1. Certification of DOE Reading Rooms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification of DOE Reading Rooms Certification of DOE Reading Rooms Certification of DOE Reading Rooms by Ingrid Kolb, Chief FOIA Officer, October, 17, 2008. PDF icon Certification_of_DOE_Reading_Rooms.pdf More Documents & Publications Memorandum from Secretary Moniz on the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Before the Subcommittee on National Parks - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources DRAFT 2012 DOE Project Management Workshop Agenda

  2. Determination of a cost-effective air pollution control technology for the control of VOC and HAP emissions from a steroids processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    A steroids processing plant located in northeastern Puerto Rico emits a combined average of 342 lb/hr of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various process operations. The approach that this facility used to implement maximum achievable control technology (MACT) may assist others who must contend with MACT for pharmaceutical or related manufacturing facilities. Federal air regulations define MACT standards for stationary sources emitting any of 189 HAPs. The MACT standards detailed in the NESHAPs are characterized by industry and type of emission control system or technology. It is anticipated that the standard will require HAP reductions of approximately 95%. The steroid plant`s emissions include the following pollutant loadings: VOC/HAP Emission Rate (lb/hr): Methanol 92.0; Acetone 35.0; Methylene chloride 126.0; Chloroform 25.0; Ethyl acetate 56.0; Tetrahydrofuran 5.00; and 1,4-Dioxane 3.00. The facility`s existing carbon adsorption control system was nearing the end of its useful life, and the operators sought to install an air pollution control system capable of meeting MACT requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. Several stand-alone and hybrid control technologies were considered for replacement of the carbon adsorption system at the facility. This paper examines the following technologies: carbon adsorption, membrane separation, thermal oxidation, membrane separation-carbon adsorption, and condensation-carbon adsorption. Each control technology is described; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing each technology for the steroid processing plant are examined; and capital and operating costs associated with the implementation of each technology are presented. The rationale for the technology ultimately chosen to control VOC and HAP emissions is presented.

  3. Reveal the True Biology: Exploiting Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing for Improved Microbial Assembly and Methylome Analysis ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Turner, Steve [Pacific Biosciences

    2013-03-22

    Steve Turner's talk "Reveal the True Biology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  4. P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries in true quaternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    The coefficients of P-odd, P-even, and T -odd asymmetries for a third and a fourth prescission particle emitted in the true quaternary fission of nuclei that was induced by polarized cold neutrons were studied on the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory. By using non-evaporation (nonadiabatic) mechanisms of light-particle emission, these coefficients were compared with the analogous coefficients for prescission third particles emitted in the ternary fission of nuclei.

  5. Method and apparatus for reading thermoluminescent phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus and method for rapidly reading thermoluminescent phosphors to determine the amount of luminescent energy stored therein. The stored luminescent energy is interpreted as a measure of the total exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to ionizing radiation. The thermoluminescent phosphor reading apparatus uses a laser to generate a laser beam. The laser beam power level is monitored by a laser power detector and controlled to maintain the power level nearly constant. A shutter or other laser beam interrupting means is used to control exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to the laser beam. The laser beam can be equalized using an optical equalizer so that the laser beam has an approximately uniform power density across the beam. The heated thermoluminescent phosphor emits a visible or otherwise detectable luminescent emission which is measured as an indication of the radiation exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphors. Also disclosed are preferred signal processing and control circuits.

  6. Reads and Plots PCM Data Files

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-08-23

    WINPLOT21 reads and plots PCM (Pulse code modulated) data files. The data files must contain the PCM data formatted per IRIG 106 Telemetry standards. The contents of the data files are interpreted using information found in ancillary calibration file that can be created using a Calibration Wizard feature of this program. PCM data is read in and scaled to engineering units. First and second order equations are applied to the engineering units. The user hasmore » the option of plotting the raw PCM counts, engineering units, integrated engineering units, or second order integration of the engineering units. A Butterworth filter can be applied to the engineering units if the source of the data is not a PCM subcommed channel. Scroll bars allow for zooming in along both the x and y axis.« less

  7. Introduction to Reading and Visualizing ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, James

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program standard data format is NetCDF 3 (Network Common Data Form). The object of this tutorial is to provide a basic introduction to NetCDF with an emphasis on aspects of the ARM application of NetCDF. The goal is to provide basic instructions for reading and visualizing ARM NetCDF data with the expectation that these examples can then be applied to more complex applications.

  8. Training and Required Reading Management Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    This tool manages training and required reading for groups, facilities, etc – abilities beyond the site training systems. TRRMTool imports training data from controlled site data sources/systems and provides greater management and reporting. Clients have been able to greatly reduce the time and effort required to manage training, have greater accuracy, foster individual accountability, and be proactive in verifying training of support personnel, to maintain compliance.

  9. Win big prizes in new summer reading contest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Win big prizes in new summer reading contest Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Win big prizes in new summer reading contest Author Rudolfo Anaya partners with Los Alamos Lab to launch inaugural program. April 27, 2016 Rudolfo Anaya's first children's book was The Farolitos of Christmas, published in 1995. Put it on your child's summer reading list as part of the Rudolfo Anaya Summer

  10. How to Read Your Electric Meter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances & Electronics » How to Read Your Electric Meter How to Read Your Electric Meter The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing period. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing period. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. The basic unit of measure of electric power is the Watt. One

  11. Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Better...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information ...

  12. Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Sole of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information ...

  13. Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Small Purchases |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Small Purchases Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Small Purchases Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). Small Purchases

  14. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  15. OPS 9.14 Required Reading 8/24/ 98 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Required Reading 824 98 OPS 9.14 Required Reading 824 98 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the facility required reading program and current status of ...

  16. Probabilities for the emission of light particles and their energy and angular distributions for true quaternary nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    On the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the features of true quaternary nuclear fission are studied by treating this fission process as a sequence of three processes following one another in the course of time. The first two processes are the escape of the first and then the second of the two light particles emitted from the neck of a fissioning nucleus because of a nonadiabatic character of the collective deformation motion of this nucleus. Finally, the third process is the separation of the fissioning nucleus into two rather heavy fission fragments. The differences that arise in the emission probabilities and in the angular and energy distributions upon going over from the first emitted to the second emitted prescission third and fourth particles are analyzed by invoking experimental data on the spontaneous and thermalneutron-induced fission of nuclei, and it is shown that these differences are caused by the changes both in the geometric configuration of the fissioning nucleus and in the shell structure of its neck after the first prescission particle is emitted from it.

  17. Read Your E-mail | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Read Your E-mail All Argonne employees can read their e-mail through the web. Argonne E-Mail service is a robust, reliable electronic communication solution for supporting day-to-day business activities. Features include e-mail, calendar, task lists, and contact lists. While it is designed to work Microsoft Outlook, it also works with other POP- and IMAP-based clients. All employees can read their e-mail through the web. Use the login link at right to get started. Login to E-mail

  18. Golden Reading Room: FOIA Requester Service Centers and Public Liaisons |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy FOIA Requester Service Centers and Public Liaisons Golden Reading Room: FOIA Requester Service Centers and Public Liaisons U.S. Department of Energy http://energy.gov/management/foia-contacts

  19. Reading Municipal Light Department- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers incentives for non-residential customers to install energy-efficient lighting and sensors in existing facilities. Rebates are limited to $20,000 per...

  20. Port Reading, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Port Reading is a census-designated place in Middlesex County, New Jersey.1 References ...

  1. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce...

  2. Reading Municipal Light Department- Residential Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers rebates to residential customers who install Energy Star appliances in eligible homes. The offer is limited to one rebate per appliance, or a...

  3. Reading Municipal Light Department- Residential Renewable Energy Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers rebates of $1.00/watt for solar photovoltaic and small wind installations for residential customers. A $0.25/watt adder is available for using local...

  4. Golden Field Office Reading Room | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Operations » Golden Field Office » Golden Field Office Reading Room Golden Field Office Reading Room The Golden Field Office was designated a Department of Energy (DOE) field office in December 1992 to support the development and commercialization of renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies. As a field office within DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office, Golden's mission is to award grants and manage contracts for clean energy projects, facilitate research and

  5. Golden Reading Room: Environmental Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Assessments Golden Reading Room: Environmental Assessments Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 11, 2016 EA-2020: Draft Environmental Assessment Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise

  6. Golden Reading Room: FINAL Environmental Impact Statements | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy FINAL Environmental Impact Statements Golden Reading Room: FINAL Environmental Impact Statements Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project, Hugoton, Stevens County,

  7. Golden Reading Room: FOIA Frequently Requested Documents | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Frequently Requested Documents Golden Reading Room: FOIA Frequently Requested Documents Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). DE-EE0002884 Sapphire Energy GO-12-043 Redacted Sapphire FOIA DE-EE0002877 Recovery Act Definitized Subcontract No.

  8. Golden Reading Room: FOIA Proactive Disclosures and Contracts | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Proactive Disclosures and Contracts Golden Reading Room: FOIA Proactive Disclosures and Contracts Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). 2013 Solar Decathlon Information Click on this link for updates: Solar Decathlon Information. Alliance for

  9. Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Better Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiative Support Services | Department of Energy Better Buildings Initiative Support Services Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Better Buildings Initiative Support Services Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). DE-SOL-0005538

  10. Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Sole of Limited

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source Justifications | Department of Energy Sole of Limited Source Justifications Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Sole of Limited Source Justifications Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). Sole of Limited Source Justificati

  11. Golden Reading Room: NREL Environmental and NEPA Documents | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy NREL Environmental and NEPA Documents Golden Reading Room: NREL Environmental and NEPA Documents Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). NREL Annual Environmental Performance Reports (Annual Site Environmental Reports) Every year NREL prepares an

  12. Golden Reading Room: Other NREL Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other NREL Documents Golden Reading Room: Other NREL Documents Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). National Renewable Energy Laboratory 10 Year Site Plan FY 2007 - FY 2018 Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report FY 2007

  13. Read More About Nuclear Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consent-Based Siting » Read More About Nuclear Waste Management Read More About Nuclear Waste Management Background Information Integrated Waste Management and Consent-Based Siting Booklet Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary of Energy Secretary Moniz's Remarks on "A Look Back on the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future" FACT SHEET: The

  14. ARM - Reading netCDF, HDF, and GRIB Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DocumentationReading netCDF, HDF, and GRIB Files Policies, Plans, Descriptions Data Documentation Home Data Sharing and Distribution Policy Data Management and Documentation Plan Data Product Registration and Submission Statement on Digital Data Management Guidelines for Integrating Data Products and Algorithms to ARM Data Libraries Reading netCDF and HDF Data Files Time in ARM netCDF Data Files Data Archive Documentation ARM Archive's Catalog of Data Streams (Updated monthly) Access to

  15. DOE-ID FOIA Electronic Reading Room Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Reading Room Documents Electronic Reading Room Documents The information contained here represents DOE-ID's responses to FOIA requests that have been or are likely to be of broad public interest, as stipulated under the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996. As required by the Act, documents created after November 1997, which meet the criteria for electronic presentation, will be made available here. Other documents requested under the FOIA will also be made

  16. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic Scintillation and Other Stereotactic Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Wang, X; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor (OF) measurements with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for small fields made by the high-definition multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the TrueBeam STx system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new small volume near-water equivalent and energy independent PSD manufactured by Standard Imaging, Inc. All measurements were performed in an IBA Blue Phantom water tank. Square MLC-shaped fields with sides ranging from 0.5 cm to 2 cm and jawshaped fields with sides ranging from 1 cm to 40 cm were measured using an SAD setup at 10 cm depth. Dose profile and percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were also taken under the same conditions for MLC fields 0.5×0.5 and 1×1 cm2 in size with jaws at 2×2cm2. The CC01 and W1 were vertically mounted. Results: OFs measured with the W1 for jaw only square fields were consistent with the ones measured with a Farmers PTW TN33013 ion chamber (1.8% maximum deviation). OF and penumbra measurement results are presented below. PDDs measured for all detectors are within 1.5% for the 0.5×0.5 cm2 and within 1% for the 1×1 cm2 MLC fields.Output factors:MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 0.555 0.541 0.5851.0cm 0.716 0.702 0.7331.5cm 0.779 0.761 0.7772.0cm 0.804 0.785 0.796Penumbras (mm):MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 2.7 2.9 2.51.0cm 3.0 3.4 2. Conclusion: OFs measured for small MLC fields were consistent with the ones measured with the other stereotactic detectors. Measured penumbras are consistent with detector size. The Exradin W1 PSD is an excellent choice for characterizing MLC-shaped small beam dosimetry used for stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field Radiotherapy”.

  17. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  18. Holographic Labeling And Reading Machine For Authentication And Security Appications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, David C.; Trolinger, James D.

    1999-07-06

    A holographic security label and automated reading machine for marking and subsequently authenticating any object such as an identification badge, a pass, a ticket, a manufactured part, or a package is described. The security label is extremely difficult to copy or even to read by unauthorized persons. The system comprises a holographic security label that has been created with a coded reference wave, whose specification can be kept secret. The label contains information that can be extracted only with the coded reference wave, which is derived from a holographic key, which restricts access of the information to only the possessor of the key. A reading machine accesses the information contained in the label and compares it with data stored in the machine through the application of a joint transform correlator, which is also equipped with a reference hologram that adds additional security to the procedure.

  19. Evaluation of radiographers’ mammography screen-reading accuracy in Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debono, Josephine C; Poulos, Ann E; Houssami, Nehmat; Turner, Robin M; Boyages, John

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of radiographers’ screen-reading mammograms. Currently, radiologist workforce shortages may be compromising the BreastScreen Australia screening program goal to detect early breast cancer. The solution to a similar problem in the United Kingdom has successfully encouraged radiographers to take on the role as one of two screen-readers. Prior to consideration of this strategy in Australia, educational and experiential differences between radiographers in the United Kingdom and Australia emphasise the need for an investigation of Australian radiographers’ screen-reading accuracy. Ten radiographers employed by the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute with a range of radiographic (median = 28 years), mammographic (median = 13 years) and BreastScreen (median = 8 years) experience were recruited to blindly and independently screen-read an image test set of 500 mammograms, without formal training. The radiographers indicated the presence of an abnormality using BI-RADS®. Accuracy was determined by comparison with the gold standard of known outcomes of pathology results, interval matching and client 6-year follow-up. Individual sensitivity and specificity levels ranged between 76.0% and 92.0%, and 74.8% and 96.2% respectively. Pooled screen-reader accuracy across the radiographers estimated sensitivity as 82.2% and specificity as 89.5%. Areas under the reading operating characteristic curve ranged between 0.842 and 0.923. This sample of radiographers in an Australian setting have adequate accuracy levels when screen-reading mammograms. It is expected that with formal screen-reading training, accuracy levels will improve, and with support, radiographers have the potential to be one of the two screen-readers in the BreastScreen Australia program, contributing to timeliness and improved program outcomes.

  20. PERTRAN: Genome-guided RNA-seq Read Assembler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Rokhsar, Dan

    2013-10-28

    As short RNA-seq reads become a standard, affordable input to any genome annotation project, a sensitive and accurate transcript assembler is an essential part of any gene prediction system. PERTRAN is a pipeline for assembling transcripts from RNA-seq reads which demonstrates higher sensitivity, with fewer fused exons (in most cases), and faster run times compared to other TOPHAT/CUFFLINKS and genome-guided Trinity. PERTRAN shows slightly lower specificity with increased gene fusions in some cases, discussed below. SAM files generated from PERTRAN can be used to compute expression level by cuffdiff and result is comparable to that from TOPHAT.

  1. ARM - Reading netCDF, HDF, and GRIB Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govDataReading netCDF, HDF, and GRIB Files Reading netCDF, HDF, and GRIB Files netCDF Files Most ARM data are stored in netCDF format. This format allows for the definition of data fields and storage of operational information in the header of the file. All ARM netCDF files are in UTC time and represent time as "seconds since January 1, 1970,'' which is called the "epoch time.'' For example, an epoch time of 1 means "Thu Jan 1 00:00:01 1970''; an epoch time of 992794875 is

  2. Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-09

    This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

  3. Method and apparatus for identifying conductive objects by monitoring the true resistive component of impedance change in a coil system caused by the object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, William D.; Capots, Larry H.; George, James P.; Janik, Richard

    1981-01-01

    The type of conductor, its property, and if a metal, its type and cross-sectional area can be obtained from measurements made at different frequencies for the amount of unbalance created in a previously balanced stable coil detection system. The true resistive component is accurately measured and thus reflects only the voltage loss attributable to eddy currents caused by introduction of the test sample to the coil system. This voltage divided by corresponding applied frequency gives a curve which peaks at a frequency dependent upon type of conductor. For a metal this peak frequency is proportional to the samples resistivity divided by its cross-sectional area.

  4. Read/write head for a magnetic tape device having grooves for reducing tape floating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aoki, Kenji (Kawasaki, JP)

    2005-08-09

    A read/write head for a magnetic tape includes an elongated chip assembly and a tape running surface formed in the longitudinal direction of the chip assembly. A pair of substantially spaced parallel read/write gap lines for supporting read/write elements extend longitudinally along the tape running surface of the chip assembly. Also, at least one groove is formed on the tape running surface on both sides of each of the read/write gap lines and extends substantially parallel to the read/write gap lines.

  5. Golden Reading Room: NEPA Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Categorical Exclusions Golden Reading Room: NEPA Categorical Exclusions Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Golden Field Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 10, 2016 CX-100608 Categorical Exclusion Determination Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Conventional Cooking Products RIN 1904-AD15 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 05/10/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field

  6. Emmanuel Giannelis > Walter R. Read Professor of Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science and Engineering > Faculty Directory > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Emmanuel Giannelis Walter R. Read Professor of Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Research Group Webpage epg2@cornell.edu In addition to his primary appointment in Materials Science and Engineering, Giannelis is a member of the Fields of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. He is a member of several organizations and serves or has served on the

  7. From: Angie Smith To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Please Read

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Angie Smith To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Please Read Date: Sunday, September 21, 2014 1:24:58 PM I am opposed to the establishment of National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETC's) for the following reasons. First, the easements place an undo burden on landowners on and near the transmission lines. The compensation cannot begin to cover the all of the losses, tangible and intangible that landowners would suffer. Second, I believe that condemning private property for

  8. Virtual Reading Room after to 2000 | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration after to 2000 Sequence Number Report Number Title Read more 1.00 DOE/EA-1381 DRAFT Atlas Relocation and Operation at the Nevada Test Site, Preapproval Draft, Environmental Assessment https://nnsa.energy.gov/sites/default/files/nnsa/foiareadingroom/RR0001.pdf 2.00 DOE/EA-1364 Predecisional Draft Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at LANL

  9. Apparatuses and methods for laser reading of thermoluminescent phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    Apparatuses and methods for rapidly reading thermoluminescent phosphors to determine the amount of luminescent energy stored therein. The stored luminescent energy is interpreted as a measure of the total exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to ionizing radiation. The thermoluminescent phosphor reading apparatus uses a laser to generate a laser beam. The laser beam power level is monitored by a laser power detector and controlled to maintain the power level at a desired value or values which can vary with time. A shutter or other laser beam interrupting means is used to control exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to the laser beam. The laser beam can be equalized using an opitcal equalizer so that the laser beam has an approximately uniform power density across the beam. The heated thermoluminescent phosphor emits a visible or otherwise detectable luminescent emission which is measured as an indication of the radiation exposure of the thermoluminscent phosphors. Also disclosed are preferred signal processing and control circuits including one system using a digital computer. Also disclosed are time-profiled laser power cycles for pre-anneal, read and post-anneal treatment of phosphors.

  10. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

  11. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  12. Golden Reading Room: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Golden Reading Room: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) The Golden FOIA Office exists to execute the legal requirements of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. § 552(a)(3)(A) (2006), amended by OPEN Government Act of 2007, Pub. L. No. 110175, 121 Stat. 2524). Enacted on July 4, 1966, and taking effect on one year later, the Freedom of Information Act provides that any person has a right, enforceable in court, to obtain access to federal agency

  13. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  14. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase reads an Spt5 CTD code (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase reads an Spt5 CTD code Authors: Doamekpor, Selom K. ; Schwer, Beate ; Sanchez, Ana M. ; Shuman, Stewart ; Lima, Christopher D. 1 ; ...

  15. Deconnable self-reading pocket dosimeter containment with self-contained light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Robyn L.; Arnold, Greg N.; McBride, Ryan G.

    1996-01-01

    A container for a self-reading pocket dosimeter includes a transparent tube for receiving the self-reading pocket dosimeter, a light source mounted at one end of the transparent tube, and an eyepiece mounted on an opposite end of the transparent tube for viewing a read-out of the self-reading pocket dosimeter. The container may further include an activation device for selectively supplying power to the light source. The container both protects the dosimeter from being contaminated and provides a light source for viewing the dosimeter.

  16. SU-E-T-71: Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of a Commercial Monte Carlo Electron Dose Calculation Model (eMC) for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheu, R; Tseng, T; Powers, A; Lo, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide commissioning and acceptance test data of the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo model (eMC v.11) for TrueBeam linac. We also investigated the uncertainties in beam model parameters and dose calculation results for different geometric configurations. Methods: For beam commissioning, PTW CC13 thimble chamber and IBA Blue Phantom2 were used to collect PDD and dose profiles in air. Cone factors were measured with a parallel plate chamber (PTW N23342) in solid water. GafChromic EBT3 films were used for dose calculation verifications to compare with parallel plate chamber results in the following test geometries: oblique incident, extended distance, small cutouts, elongated cutouts, irregular surface, and heterogeneous layers. Results: Four electron energies (6e, 9e, 12e, and 15e) and five cones (66, 1010, 1515, 2020, and 2525) with standard cutouts were calculated for different grid sizes (1, 1.5,2, and 2.5 mm) and compared with chamber measurements. The results showed calculations performed with a coarse grid size underestimated the absolute dose. The underestimation decreased as energy increased. For 6e, the underestimation (max 3.3 %) was greater than the statistical uncertainty level (3%) and was systematically observed for all cone sizes. By using a 1mm grid size, all the calculation results agreed with measurements within 5% for all test configurations. The calculations took 21s and 46s for 6e and 15e (2.5mm grid size) respectively distributed on 4 calculation servants. Conclusion: In general, commissioning the eMC dose calculation model on TrueBeam is straightforward and thedose calculation is in good agreement with measurements for all test cases. Monte Carlo dose calculation provides more accurate results which improves treatment planning quality. However, the normal acceptable grid size (2.5mm) would cause systematic underestimation in absolute dose calculation for lower energies, such as 6e. Users need to be cautious in this situation.

  17. SU-E-T-128: Dosimetric Evaluation of MLC Modeling in Pinnacle V9.2 for Varian TrueBeam STx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otageri, P; Grant, E; Maricle, S; Mathews, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of MLC modeling after commissioning the Varian TrueBeam LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2. Methods: Stepand-shoot IMRT QAs were investigated when we observed our measured absolute dose results using ion chamber (Capintec PR-05P) were uncharacteristically low; about 45% compared to doses calculated by Pinnacle{sup 3} (Phillips, Madison, WI). This problem was predominant for large and highly modulated head and neck (HN) treatments. Intuitively we knew this had to be related to shortcomings in the MLC modeling in Pinnacle. Using film QA we were able to iteratively adjust the MLC parameters. We confirmed results by re-testing five failed IMRT QA patients; and ion chamber measurements were verified in Quasar anthropomorphic phantom. Results: After commissioning the LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2, the MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X were 2.0%, 1.7% and 2.0%, respectively, and additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies was 0.5%. These parameters were obtained from profiles scanned with an Edge detector (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) during machine commissioning. A Verification testing with radiographic EDR2 film (Kodak, Rochester, NY) measurement was performed by creating a closed MLC leaf pattern and analyzing using RIT software (RIT, Colorado Springs, CO). This reduced MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X to 0.7%, 0.9% and 0.9%, respectively; while increasing additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies to 1.0%. Conclusion: Radiographic film measurements were used to correct MLC transmission values for step and shoot IMRT fields used in Pinnacle version 9.2. After adjusting the MLC parameters to correlate with the film QA, there was still very good agreement between the Pinnacle model and commissioning data. Using the same QA methodology, we were also able to improve the beam models for the Varian C-series linacs, Novalis-Tx, and TrueBeam M-120 linacs.

  18. Method and apparatus for reading free falling dosimeter punchcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langsted, J.M.

    1992-12-22

    A punchcode reader is provided for reading data encoded in a punchcode hole array on a dosimeter. The dosimeter falls through a passage in the reader containing photosensor detectors disposed along the passage which provide output signals to a microprocessor. The signals are processed to determine the orientation of the dosimeter in the reader, the location and state of punchcode holes in a two row array thereby decoding the encoded data. Multiple rate of fall calculations are made, and if appropriate matching of the punchcode array is not obtained in three tries, an error signal is output to the operator. The punchcode reader also provides for storage of data from multiple dosimeters passed through the reader, and for the output of decoded data to an external display or a computer for further processing. 8 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for reading meters from a video image

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Trevor J.; Ferguson, Jeffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system to enable acquisition of data about an environment from one or more meters using video images. One or more meters are imaged by a video camera and the video signal is digitized. Then, each region of the digital image which corresponds to the indicator of the meter is calibrated and the video signal is analyzed to determine the value indicated by each meter indicator. Finally, from the value indicated by each meter indicator in the calibrated region, a meter reading is generated. The method and system offer the advantages of automatic data collection in a relatively non-intrusive manner without making any complicated or expensive electronic connections, and without requiring intensive manpower.

  20. Method and apparatus for reading free falling dosimeter punchcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langsted, James M.

    1992-12-22

    A punchcode reader is provided for reading data encoded in a punchcode hole array on a dosimeter. The dosimeter falls through a passage in the reader containing photosensor detectors disposed along the passage which provide output signals to a microprocessor. The signals are processed to determine the orientation of the dosimeter in the reader, the location and state of punchcode holes in a two row array thereby decoding the encoded data. Multiple rate of fall calculations are made, and if appropriate matching of the punchcode array is not obtained in three tries, an error signal is outputted to the operator. The punchcode reader also provides for storage of data from multiple dosimeters passed through the reader, and for the output of decoded data to an external display or a computer for further processing.

  1. runtime error message: "readControlMsg: System returned error Connection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    timed out on TCP socket fd" readControlMsg: System returned error Connection timed out on TCP socket fd" runtime error message: "readControlMsg: System returned error Connection timed out on TCP socket fd" June 30, 2015 Symptom User jobs with sinlge or multiple apruns in a batch script may get this run time error: "readControlMsg: System returned error Connection timed out on TCP socket fd". This problem is intermittent, sometimes resubmit works. This error

  2. Rapid Evolutionary Placement of Short Sequence Reads (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-06-08

    Alexis Stamatakis of the Technical University of Munich gives a presentation on "Rapid Evolutionary Placement of Short Sequence Reads" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  3. Efficient Short-Read Assembly of Eukaryotic Genomes (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chapman, Jarrod

    2011-06-03

    Jarrod Chapman of the DOE JGI gives a presentation on "Efficient Short-Read Assembly of Eukaryotic Genomes" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  4. Parallel Assembly of Large Genomes from Paired Short Reads (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Aluru, Srinivas [Iowa State University

    2011-06-08

    Srinivas Aluru from Iowa State University gives a presentation on "Parallel Assembly of Large Genomes from Paired Short Reads" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  5. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerstedt, Henrik; Muschter, Steffen; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, Christian; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS [1] is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new readout system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

  6. A SPICE model for Si microstrip detectors and read-out electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacchetta, N.; Candelori, A.; Bisello, D.; Calgarotto, C.; Paccagnella, A.

    1996-06-01

    The authors have developed a SPICE model of silicon microstrip detector and its read-out electronics. The SPICE model of an AC-coupled single-sided polysilicon-biased silicon microstrip detector has been implemented by using a RC network containing up to 19 strips. The main parameters of this model have been determined by direct comparison with DC and AC measurements. The simulated interstrip and coupling impedance and phase angle are in good agreement with experimental results, up to a frequency of 1 MHz. The authors have used the PreShape 32 as the read-out chip for both the simulation and the measurements. It consists of a charge sensitive preamplifier followed by a shaper and a buffer. The SPICE parameters have been adjusted to fit the experimental results obtained for the configuration where every strip is connected to the read-out electronics and kept the same for the different read-out configurations they have considered. By adding 2 further capacitances simulating the parasitic contributions between the read-out channels of the PS32 chip, a satisfactory matching between the experimental data and the simulated curves has been reached on both rising and trailing edges of the signal. Such agreement deteriorates only for strips far from the strip where the signal has been applied.

  7. VOC Public Notice (9-8-15)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Meetings Requested Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant WHO: WHAT: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP). DOE and NWP will conduct public meetings to provide information on the following permit modification request to the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. WHEN: Tuesday, October 13, 2015 3-5 p.m. Thursday, October 15, 2015 5-7 p.m. WHERE : Courtyard by Marriott 3347 Cerrillos

  8. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  9. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  10. meraculous: de novo genome assembly with short paired-end reads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Jarrod A.; Ho, Isaac; Sunkara, Sirisha; Luo, Shujun; Schroth, Gary P.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2011-08-01

    We describe a new algorithm, meraculous, for whole genome assembly of deep paired-end short reads, and apply it to the assembly of a dataset of paired 75-bp Illumina reads derived from the 15.4 megabase genome of the haploid yeast Pichia stipitis. More than 95% of the genome is recovered, with no errors; half the assembled sequence is in contigs longer than 101 kilobases and in scaffolds longer than 269 kilobases. Incorporating fosmid ends recovers entire chromosomes. Meraculous relies on an efficient and conservative traversal of the subgraph of the k-mer (deBruijn) graph of oligonucleotides with unique high quality extensions in the dataset, avoiding an explicit error correction step as used in other short-read assemblers. A novel memory-efficient hashing scheme is introduced. The resulting contigs are ordered and oriented using paired reads separated by ~280 bp or ~3.2 kbp, and many gaps between contigs can be closed using paired-end placements. Practical issues with the dataset are described, and prospects for assembling larger genomes are discussed.

  11. DOE Science Showcase - Read about Energy-Efficient Lighting | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information DOE Science Showcase - Read about Energy-Efficient Lighting From the DOE Press Release: "These investments in cutting-edge lighting technologies will support American innovation, create new manufacturing jobs for U.S. workers, and help ensure that the United States leads the world in this rapidly evolving industry," said Secretary Chu. "These next-generation lighting technologies have the potential to transform the

  12. Golden Reading Room: Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036 Golden Reading Room: Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036 RFP DE-RP36-07GO97036 -- Management and Operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alliance Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308, through modification 1033

  13. Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources From the DOE Press Release: "High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage (HEATS). More than 90% of energy technologies involve the transport and conversion of thermal energy. Therefore, advancements in thermal energy storage - both hot and cold - would dramatically improve performance for a variety of critical energy applications. ..." From the Databases Energy Citations Database

  14. True Color Tube Borescope Inspection System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-08-07

    The overall purpose of TCTBIS is to determine the quality of the inside surface of a tube. This is done by acquiring multiple images along the inside of a tube and converting these images into one unwrapped image of the inside of a tube. This resultant image is the same as if you had slit a tube length-wise, flattened it out, and then taken a picture of it. What is unique about this system ismore » that the picture is acquired in a non-destructive manner. TCTBIS also analyzes the unwrapped images for oxidation, foreign particles, and surface imperfections, scratches.« less

  15. True Electric LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56298 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  16. U-152: OpenSSL "asn1_d2i_read_bio()" DER Format Data Processing Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to a type casting error in the "asn1_d2i_read_bio()" function when processing DER format data and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow.

  17. CMOS Integrated Single Electron Transistor Electrometry (CMOS-SET) circuit design for nanosecond quantum-bit read-out.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurrieri, Thomas M.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Levy, James E.

    2008-08-01

    Novel single electron transistor (SET) read-out circuit designs are described. The circuits use a silicon SET interfaced to a CMOS voltage mode or current mode comparator to obtain a digital read-out of the state of the qubit. The design assumes standard submicron (0.35 um) CMOS SOI technology using room temperature SPICE models. Implications and uncertainties related to the temperature scaling of these models to 100mK operation are discussed. Using this technology, the simulations predict a read-out operation speed of approximately Ins and a power dissipation per cell as low as 2nW for single-shot read-out, which is a significant advantage over currently used radio frequency SET (RF-SET) approaches.

  18. Read More...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS Case Study OSCARS Collaborative Work Publications and Presentations About OSCARS Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools The ESnet Engineering Team Network R&D Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Experimental Network Testbeds Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Data for Researchers Partnerships Publications Workshops Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News

  19. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (22,44,1010cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours). The scripting also allowed for creation of the files in advance without requiring access to TPS. The API scripting functionality enabled efficient creation/mining of TPS data. Finally, automation reduces the potential for human error in entering linac values at the machine console,and the script provides a log of measurements acquired for each session. This research was supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.

  20. Evaluating radiographers' diagnostic accuracy in screen-reading mammograms: what constitutes a quality study?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debono, Josephine C; Poulos, Ann E

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to first evaluate the quality of studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of radiographers as mammogram screen-readers and then to develop an adapted tool for determining the quality of screen-reading studies. A literature search was used to identify relevant studies and a quality evaluation tool constructed by combining the criteria for quality of Whiting, Rutjes, Dinnes et al. and Brealey and Westwood. This constructed tool was then applied to the studies and subsequently adapted specifically for use in evaluating quality in studies investigating diagnostic accuracy of screen-readers. Eleven studies were identified and the constructed tool applied to evaluate quality. This evaluation resulted in the identification of quality issues with the studies such as potential for bias, applicability of results, study conduct, reporting of the study and observer characteristics. An assessment of the applicability and relevance of the tool for this area of research resulted in adaptations to the criteria and the development of a tool specifically for evaluating diagnostic accuracy in screen-reading. This tool, with further refinement and rigorous validation can make a significant contribution to promoting well-designed studies in this important area of research and practice.

  1. Apparatus and method for reading two-dimensional electrophoretograms containing .beta.-ray-emitting labeled compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Herbert L.; Kinnison, W. Wayne; Lillberg, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus and method for electronically reading planar two dimensional .beta.-ray emitter-labeled gel electrophoretograms. A single, flat rectangular multiwire proportional chamber is placed in close proximity to the gel and the assembly placed in an intense uniform magnetic field disposed in a perpendicular manner to the rectangular face of the proportional chamber. Beta rays emitted in the direction of the proportional chamber are caused to execute helical motions which substantially preserve knowledge of the coordinates of their origin in the gel. Perpendicularly oriented, parallel wire, parallel plane cathodes electronically sense the location of the .beta.-rays from ionization generated thereby in a detection gas coupled with an electron avalanche effect resulting from the action of a parallel wire anode located therebetween. A scintillator permits the present apparatus to be rendered insensitive when signals are generated from cosmic rays incident on the proportional chamber. Resolution for concentrations of radioactive compounds in the gel exceeds 700 .mu.m. The apparatus and method of the present invention represent a significant improvement over conventional autoradiographic techniques in dynamic range, linearity and sensitivity of data collection. A concentration and position map for gel electrophoretograms having significant concentrations of labeled compounds and/or highly radioactive labeling nuclides can generally be obtained in less than one hour.

  2. Apparatus for reading two-dimensional electrophoretograms containing. beta. -ray-emitting labeled compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, H.L.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lillberg, J.W.

    1985-04-30

    An apparatus and method for electronically reading planar two-dimensional ..beta..-ray emitter-labeled gel electrophoretograms. A single, flat rectangular multiwire proportional chamber is placed in close proximity to the gel and the assembly placed in an intense uniform magnetic field disposed in a perpendicular manner to the rectangular face of the proportional chamber. Beta rays emitted in the direction of the proportional chamber are caused to execute helical motions which substantially preserve knowledge the coordinates of their origin in the gel. Perpendicularly oriented, parallel wire, parallel plane cathodes electronically sense the location of the ..beta..-rays from ionization generated thereby in a detection gas coupled with an electron avalanche effect resulting from the action of a parallel wire anode located therebetween. A scintillator permits the present apparatus to be rendered insensitive when signals are generated from cosmic rays incident on the proportional chamber. Resolution for concentrations of radioactive compounds in the gel exceeds 700-..mu..m. The apparatus and method of the present invention represent a significant improvement over conventional autoradiographic techniques in dynamic range, linearity and sensitivity of data collection. A concentration and position map for gel electrophoretograms having significant concentrations of labeled compounds and/or highly radioactive labeling nuclides can generally be obtained in less than one hour.

  3. Reprogrammable read only variable threshold transistor memory with isolated addressing buffer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lodi, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    A monolithic integrated circuit, fully decoded memory comprises a rectangular array of variable threshold field effect transistors organized into a plurality of multi-bit words. Binary address inputs to the memory are decoded by a field effect transistor decoder into a plurality of word selection lines each of which activates an address buffer circuit. Each address buffer circuit, in turn, drives a word line of the memory array. In accordance with the word line selected by the decoder the activated buffer circuit directs reading or writing voltages to the transistors comprising the memory words. All of the buffer circuits additionally are connected to a common terminal for clearing all of the memory transistors to a predetermined state by the application to the common terminal of a large magnitude voltage of a predetermined polarity. The address decoder, the buffer and the memory array, as well as control and input/output control and buffer field effect transistor circuits, are fabricated on a common substrate with means provided to isolate the substrate of the address buffer transistors from the remainder of the substrate so that the bulk clearing function of simultaneously placing all of the memory transistors into a predetermined state can be performed.

  4. Read/write head having a GMR sensor biased by permanent magnets located between the GMR and the pole shields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Samuel W.; Rottmayer, Robert Earl; Carey, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A compact read/write head having a biased giant magnetoresistive sensor. Permanent magnet films are placed adjacent to the giant magnetoresistive sensor operating in the current-perpendicular-to the-plane (Cpp) mode and spaced with respect to the sensor by conducting films. These permanent magnet films provide a magnetic bias. The bias field is substantial and fairly uniform across sensor height. Biasing of the giant magnetoresistive sensor provides distinguishable response to the rising and falling edges of a recorded pulse on an adjacent recording medium, improves the linearity of the response, and helps to reduce noise. This read/write head is much simpler to fabricate and pattern and provides an enhanced uniformity of the bias field throughout the sensor.

  5. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2013-02-11

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. MetaVelvet: An Extension of Velvet Assembler to de novo Metagenome Assembly from Short Sequence Reads (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Yasumbumi [Keio University

    2013-01-22

    Keio University's Yasumbumi Sakakibara on "MetaVelvet: An Extension of Velvet Assembler to de novo Metagenome Assembly from Short Sequence Reads" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  7. TANK VAPOR CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN & EXISTING DIRECT READING INSTRUMENTION & PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUTLER, N.K.

    2004-11-01

    This document takes the newly released Industrial Hygiene Chemical Vapor Technical Basis (RPP-22491) and evaluates the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) identified for selected implementation actions by the industrial hygiene organization. This document is not intended as a hazard analysis with recommended controls for all tank farm activities. Not all of the chemicals listed are present in all tanks; therefore, hazard analyses can and should be tailored as appropriate. Detection of each chemical by current industrial hygiene non-specific instrumentation in use at the tank farms is evaluated. Information gaps are identified and recommendations are made to resolve these needs. Of the 52 COPC, 34 can be detected with existing instrumentation. Three additional chemicals could be detected with a photoionization detector (PID) equipped with a different lamp. Discussion with specific instrument manufacturers is warranted. Consideration should be given to having the SapphIRe XL customized for tank farm applications. Other instruments, sampling or modeling techniques should be evaluated to estimate concentrations of chemicals not detected by direct reading instruments. In addition, relative instrument response needs to be factored in to action levels used for direct reading instruments. These action levels should be correlated to exposures to the COPC and corresponding occupational exposure limits (OELs). The minimum respiratory protection for each of the COPC is evaluated against current options. Recommendations are made for respiratory protection based on each chemical. Until exposures are sufficiently quantified and analyzed, the current use of supplied air respiratory protection is appropriate and protective for the COPC. Use of supplied air respiratory protection should be evaluated once a detailed exposure assessment for the COPC is completed. The established tank farm OELs should be documented in the TFC-PLN-34. For chemicals without an established tank farm OEL, consideration should be given to adopting protective limits from NIOSH, AIHA, or developing OELs. Protective gloves and suits are evaluated for each chemical for which information is available. Information gaps are identified for some of the compounds and materials. Recommendations are made for resolving these needs. Based on available information, Silver Shield{reg_sign} gloves are promising for tank farm applications. However, permeation testing documentation is needed for the COPC and mixtures for Silver Shield{reg_sign} gloves to evaluate their protectiveness. North Safety Products is expected to provide the requested documentation. Multiple Tychem{reg_sign} products are available. There is overlap between chemicals and effective materials. Further hazard evaluation to determine actual hazards and permeation testing documentation is required to assess the efficacy of a single Tychem{reg_sign} product for tank farm applications. All of this chemical specific data is combined into a spreadsheet that will assist the industrial hygienist in the selection of monitoring instruments, respiratory protection selection and protective clothing for performing work at a specific tank(s).

  8. Biofiltration control of VOC emissions: Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory studies were conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane and benzene from air streams using activated sludge-treated compost biofilters. Four types of experimental biofilter systems were developed: a bench scale packed tower system used primarily for kinetic studies; a small scale column system used to study the effects of different filter media on n-butane removal; a three stage system used to study benzene elimination; and a static batch biofilter system used to study the effects of temperature, compost water content, compost pH, and initial benzene concentrations on benzene elimination. Removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained for n-butane. Removal followed first order kinetics at inlet concentrations less than 25 ppM n-butane and zero order kinetics above 100 ppM n-butane. Removal of benzene followed fractional order kinetics for inlet concentrations from 15 to 200 ppM benzene. Thus, the removal of benzene is both mass transfer and bioreaction limited for the concentration range studied. The removal efficiency of benzene was found to be highly dependent on compost water content, compost pH, and temperature. Compost showed a low capacity for benzene removal, which suggested that degradation of these hydrocarbons required different species of microorganisms.

  9. Laboratory and Field Demonstration of Energy Efficient VOC Removal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Indoor Air 2014, Hong Kong, July Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley ...

  10. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    This factsheet describes a project that will develop a FlexCHP-65 system that incorporates new burner technology into a 65 kW microturbine and 100 HP heat recovery boiler.

  11. New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    New Novel Polymers Offer Significant Reduction in Use of Raw Materials. The North American architectural coatings industry sold over 700 million gallons of paint in 2002 for a value of $7 billion dollars.

  12. Energy Saving System to Remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Berkeley Lab have developed a catalyst and deployment devices to improve indoor air quality and reduce ventilation energy needs.Description The catalyst, a manganese...

  13. Process Development for High Voc CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferekides, C. S.; Morel, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    This is a cumulative and final report for Phases I, II and III of this NREL funded project (subcontract # XXL-5-44205-10). The main research activities of this project focused on the open-circuit voltage of the CdTe thin film solar cells. Although, thin film CdTe continues to be one of the leading materials for large-scale cost-effective production of photovoltaics, the efficiency of the CdTe solar cells have been stagnant for the last few years. This report describes and summarizes the results for this 3-year research project.

  14. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma ... plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. ...

  15. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from Pulp Mills Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program ... plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. ...

  16. DNA and RNA sequencing by nanoscale reading through programmable electrophoresis and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for performing nucleic acid (DNA and/or RNA) sequencing on a single molecule. The genetic sequence information is obtained by probing through a DNA or RNA molecule base by base at nanometer scale as though looking through a strip of movie film. This DNA sequencing nanotechnology has the theoretical capability of performing DNA sequencing at a maximal rate of about 1,000,000 bases per second. This enhanced performance is made possible by a series of innovations including: novel applications of a fine-tuned nanometer gap for passage of a single DNA or RNA molecule; thin layer microfluidics for sample loading and delivery; and programmable electric fields for precise control of DNA or RNA movement. Detection methods include nanoelectrode-gated tunneling current measurements, dielectric molecular characterization, and atomic force microscopy/electrostatic force microscopy (AFM/EFM) probing for nanoscale reading of the nucleic acid sequences.

  17. Dealing with the size-of-source effect in the calibration of direct-reading radiation thermometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, P.

    2013-09-11

    The majority of general-purpose low-temperature handheld radiation thermometers are severely affected by the size-of-source effect (SSE). Calibration of these instruments is pointless unless the SSE is accounted for in the calibration process. Traditional SSE measurement techniques, however, are costly and time consuming, and because the instruments are direct-reading in temperature, traditional SSE results are not easily interpretable, particularly by the general user. This paper describes a simplified method for measuring the SSE, suitable for second-tier calibration laboratories and requiring no additional equipment, and proposes a means of reporting SSE results on a calibration certificate that should be easily understood by the non-specialist user.

  18. Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    module that consists of an integrated "Universal PV-Dock" and a high-reliability, ... In 2011, the Universal PV Interface (UPVI) Alliance was formed as an open, ...

  19. Crayola's True Color Shines Through: Green | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    this project do? The solar panels produce enough energy to produce 1 billion crayons a year. ... Top 7 Things You Didn't Know About Energy: Back-to-School Edition Helios USA will build ...

  20. True: Order (2015-CE-42049) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal Student Competitions | Department of Energy Truckee Meadows Community College and Colorado School of Mines Win Geothermal Student Competitions Truckee Meadows Community College and Colorado School of Mines Win Geothermal Student Competitions October 9, 2014 - 9:09am Addthis The Energy Department announced the 2014 winners of the National Geothermal Student Competition and the Geothermal Case Study Challenge last week at an industry gathering in Portland, Oregon. These competitions

  1. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  2. Hydro Power to Make the American Dream Come True

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  3. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  4. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steam at the point of generation? From which boiler? At what header pressure or at what ... If the plant has only one steam generator (boiler), uses a single fuel, and has a single ...

  5. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was Shirley Oden Cox, retiree from Y-12. Shirley came to Oak Ridge when her dad, William Lewis (Bill) Oden, moved his wife and two children to here in September, 1944 to take a...

  6. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in pre-filled and photo-filled intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2014-08-18

    In this work, we study how Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination via energy levels in the bandgap, caused by defects or impurities, affects the performance of both photo-filled and pre-filled intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). For a pre-filled cell, the IB is half-filled in equilibrium, while it is empty for the photo-filled cell in equilibrium. The energy level, density, and capture cross-sections of the defects/impurities are varied systematically. We find that the photo-filled cells are, in general, less efficient than pre-filled cells, except when the defect level is between the conduction band and the IB. In that case, for a range of light intensities, the photo-filled cell performs better than the pre-filled. When the defect level is at the same energy as the IB, the efficiency is above 82% of the defect-free case, when less than 50% of the states at the IB lead to SRH recombination. This shows that even if SRH recombination via the IB takes place, high efficiencies can be achieved. We also show that band gap optimization can be used to reduce the SRH recombination.

  7. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  8. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  9. Realization of write-once-read-many-times memory device with O{sub 2} plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, P. Chen, T. P. Li, X. D.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2014-01-20

    A write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices based on O{sub 2} plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin films has been demonstrated. The device has a simple Al/IGZO/Al structure. The device has a normally OFF state with a very high resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2?V is ?10{sup 9} ? for a device with the radius of 50??m) as a result of the O{sub 2} plasma treatment on the IGZO thin films. The device could be switched to an ON state with a low resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2?V is ?10{sup 3} ? for the radius of 50??m) by applying a voltage pulse (e.g., 10?V/1??s). The WORM device has good data-retention and reading-endurance capabilities.

  10. AC 95 - selected readings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    Reports are presented on energy efficiency and conservation in residential buildings. Topics include housing and energy linkages; the people factor; low-income initiatives; green visions; utility programs; affordable comfort; housing as a system; and pressures and air flow in buildings.

  11. Public Reading Room

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    items consisting of technical documents, news clippings, videotapes, journal articles, annual reports, and environmental restoration and decontamination and...

  12. Manhattan Project: Suggested Readings

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A volume of the Army's legendary "Green Series" of Second World War histories. Smyth, Henry DeWolf. Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of ...

  13. Reading data stored in the state of metastable defects in silicon using band-band photoluminescence: Proof of concept and physical limits to the data storage density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rougieux, F. E.; Macdonald, D.

    2014-03-24

    The state of bistable defects in crystalline silicon such as iron-boron pairs or the boron-oxygen defect can be changed at room temperature. In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate that the chemical state of a group of defects can be changed to represent a bit of information. The state can then be read without direct contact via the intensity of the emitted band-band photoluminescence signal of the group of defects, via their impact on the carrier lifetime. The theoretical limit of the information density is then computed. The information density is shown to be low for two-dimensional storage but significant for three-dimensional data storage. Finally, we compute the maximum storage capacity as a function of the lower limit of the photoluminescence detector sensitivity.

  14. Field study results for VOCs with the Perkin-Elmer sequential tube sampler. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon, M.; McClenny, W.A.; Kronmiller, K.G.; Fortune, C.R.; Daughtrey, E.H.

    1995-10-01

    Two Perkin-Elmer Sequential Tube Samplers (Model STS-25) were evaluated for their performance, portability, and convenience of operation. Results obtained from both samplers and from a collocated Summa-polished stainless steel canister were compared for seven 3-h periods at three sites. Special attention was given to the monitoring of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide. Advantages for the use of the STS-25 are low cost, portability, ease of use, and a design suitable for obtaining sub-part-per billion detection limits with a standard analytical finish. Disadvantages are that it is a one-short technique and no universal solid absorbent material exists.

  15. Experiences with a compost biofilter for VOC control from batch chemical manufacturing operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, G.L.; Briggs, T.G.

    1997-12-31

    The Synthetic Chemicals Division of Eastman Kodak Company makes a large number of complex organic chemicals using batch reactor syntheses. Exhaust gas, resulting from batch reactor operations, typically contains many different volatile organic chemicals with dynamic concentration profiles. Exhaust streams of this type have been considered difficult to treat effectively by biofiltration. Eastman Kodak Company was interested in exploring the applicability of biofiltration to treat these types of off-gas streams as an alternative to more costly control technologies. To this end, a 20,000 cfm capacity BIOTON{reg_sign} biofilter was installed in December 1995 in Kodak Park, Rochester, New York. A study was initiated to determine the overall efficiency of the biofilter, as well as the chemical specific efficiencies for a number of organic compounds. Flame ionization detectors operated continuously on the inlet and outlet of the biofilter to measure total hydrocarbon concentrations. A process mass spectrometer was installed to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of seven organics in the inlet and outlet of the biofilter. In addition, the process control software for the biofilter continuously recorded pressure drop, temperature, and moisture content of the bed. This paper presents operating and performance data for the BIOTON biofilter from start-up through about eleven months of continuous operation. Included are data collected over a wide range of loading conditions, during initial start-up, and during start-up after shutdown periods. Data for total hydrocarbons, methanol, acetone, and heptane are presented. The relationship between organic loading and removal efficiency is discussed in the biofilter, which typically operates significantly below its design loading specification. The overall control efficiency of the biofilter at design loadings exceeds the design control efficiency of 90%.

  16. EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B

    2005-10-31

    The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

  17. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions - Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has developed a Flexible Combined Heat and Power (FlexCHP) system that incorporates a supplemental Ultra-Low-NOx (ULN) burner into a 65 kW microturbine and a heat recovery boiler. ...

  18. Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

    2002-06-28

    Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

  19. READ THIS: Before You Ventilate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-08

    This document reviews ventilation strategies for different climate zones and includes schematic drawings and photographs of various ventilation installations.

  20. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true,? part 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part 2 Last week we introduced Shirley Cox and began a two-part series on her career at Y-12 leading up to the recommendation that the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility...

  1. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Liu

    2012-05-01

    IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a “one-box” process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactor’s behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and fabricated a full-scale CMS membrane and module for the proposed application. This full-scale membrane element is a 3" diameter with 30"L, composed of ~85 single CMS membrane tubes. The membrane tubes and bundles have demonstrated satisfactory thermal, hydrothermal, thermal cycling and chemical stabilities under an environment simulating the temperature, pressure and contaminant levels encountered in our proposed process. More importantly, the membrane module packed with the CMS bundle was tested for over 30 pressure cycles between ambient pressure and >300 -600 psi at 200 to 300°C without mechanical degradation. Finally, internal baffles have been designed and installed to improve flow distribution within the module, which delivered ≥90% separation efficiency in comparison with the efficiency achieved with single membrane tubes. In summary, the full-scale CMS membrane element and module have been successfully developed and tested satisfactorily for our proposed one-box application; a test quantity of elements/modules have been fabricated for field testing. Multiple field tests have been performed under this project at National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The separation efficiency and performance stability of our full-scale membrane elements have been verified in testing conducted for times ranging from 100 to >250 hours of continuous exposure to coal/biomass gasifier off-gas for hydrogen enrichment with no gas pre-treatment for contaminants removal. In particular, "tar-like" contaminants were effectively rejected by the membrane with no evidence of fouling. In addition, testing was conducted using a hybrid membrane system, i.e., the CMS membrane in conjunction with the palladium membrane, to demonstrate that 99+% H{sub 2} purity and a high degree of CO{sub 2} capture could be achieved. In summary, the stability and performance of the full-scale hydrogen selective CMS membrane/module has been verified in multiple field tests in the presence of coal/biomass gasifier off-gas under this project. A promising process scheme has been developed for power generation and/or hydrogen coproduction with CCS based upon our proposed "one-box" process. Our preliminary economic analysis indicates about 10% reduction in the required electricity selling price and ~40% cost reduction in CCS on per ton CO{sub 2} can be achieved in comparison with the base case involving conventional WGS with a two-stage Selexsol® for CCS. Long term field tests (e.g., >1,000 hrs) with the incorporation of the catalyst for the WGS membrane reactor and more in-depth analysis of the process scheme are recommended for the future study.

  2. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution 2X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  3. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  4. TRUE COLORS: LEDS AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CCT, CRI, OPTICAL SAFETY, MATERIAL DEGRADATION, AND PHOTOBIOLOGICAL STIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-08-30

    This document analyzes the optical, material, and photobiological hazards of LED light sources compared to conventional light sources. It documents that LEDs generally produce the same amount of blue light, which is the primary contributor to the risks, as other sources at the same CCT. Duv may have some effect on the amount of blue light, but CRI does not.

  5. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIHNCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: "Water-Equivalent Plastic...

  6. U-028: Microsoft Windows win32k.sys TrueType Font Parsing Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in Microsoft Windows, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

  7. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The micromirrors have 1.4sup o tip angle and three stable states (east, west, and flat). The input is a fiber-and-microlens array, whose output spots are re-imaged multiple times ...

  8. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution GS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GS < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  9. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution AV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AV < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  10. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new...

  11. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Wells

    2008-11-30

    PolyFuel has developed state-of-the-art portable fuel cell technology for the portable computing market. A novel approach to passive water recycling within the MEA has led to significant system simplification and size reduction. Miniature stack technology with very high area utilization and minimalist seals has been developed. A highly integrated balance of plant with very low parasitic losses has been constructed around the new stack design. Demonstration prototype systems integrated with laptop computers have been shown in recent months to leading OEM computer manufacturers. PolyFuel intends to provide this technology to its customers as a reference design as a means of accelerating the commercialization of portable fuel cell technology. The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

  12. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaging surveys in this decade's hot competition to uncover the true nature of the dark side of our Universe. Read more Tip of the Week: Safety Summer dangers at the...

  13. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs): Remediation for wastewater. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wastewater contamination by volatile organic materials and the technology for reclamation. Remediation techniques discussed include use of activated carbon, activated sludge, oxidation, scrubbing, vapor stripping, biodegradation, and other degradative treatments. Articles include remediation of soils contaminated by volatile wastes. The citations examine a variety of compounds, including aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum wastes, chlorinated organics, and other volatile materials. (Contains a minimum of 215 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Final Technical Report: A Paradigm Shift in Chemical Processing: New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kenneth F.

    2006-07-26

    The project employed new processes to make emulsion polymers from reduced levels of petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks. Most waterborne paints contain spherical, emulsion polymer particles that serve as the film-forming binder phase. Our goal was to make emulsion polymer particles containing 30 percent feedstock that would function as effectively as commercial emulsions made from higher level feedstock. The processes developed yielded particles maintained their film formation capability and binding capacity while preserving the structural integrity of the particles after film formation. Rohm and Haas Company (ROH) and Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) worked together to employ novel polymer binders (ROH) and new, non-volatile, biomass-derived coalescing agents (ADM). The University of Minnesota Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science utilized its unique microscopy capabilities to characterize films made from the New Emulsion Polymers (NEP).

  15. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  16. 2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sun Solaris IBM AIX HP HPUX SGI IRIX Other PC Systems Windows 7 Windows Vista Windows XP Windows 2000 Other Windows Mac Systems MacOS X MacOS 9 or earlier Other Mac Other...

  17. Certification_of_DOE_Reading_Rooms.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Carmine Difiglio About Us Carmine Difiglio - Deputy Director for Energy Security Carmine Difiglio Dr. Carmine Difiglio serves as Deputy Director for Energy Security, Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA). In this capacity, Dr. Difiglio provides the Director of EPSA and the Secretary of Energy policy analysis, analytic support, and policy advice concerning U.S. energy security, including energy supply and demand, energy markets, long-term strategies to enhance U.S. energy security,

  18. Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model for decades to come and spur new directions in research." Decoding the Cosmos Written in light shortly after the big bang, the CMB is a faint glow that permeates...

  19. Empirical Validation Workshop Pre-Read

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A canonical example of anti-modeling perception is the 2008 paper by Mark Frankel and Cathy Turner of the New Buildings Institute, How Accurate is Energy Modeling in the Market ...

  20. Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    customers. Rebates of up to 50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce energy consumption in qualifying facilities. Incentive amounts are based upon project size...

  1. Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Operations Acquisition and Project Management Environmental Program Services Contract Environmental ...

  2. READING FILE COPY F-e

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Government Printing Office Main Order Desk (202) 512-1800 FAX: (202) 512-2250 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing...

  3. 7209542B2.ppt [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. Reading, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3356483, -75.9268747 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  5. 2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010/2011 User Survey Results Survey Text 2009/2010 User Survey Results 2008/2009 User Survey Results 2007/2008 User Survey Results 2006 User Survey Results 2005 User Survey Results 2004 User Survey Results 2003 User Survey Results 2002 User Survey Results 2001 User Survey Results 2000 User Survey Results 1999 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results HPC Requirements for Science HPC Workshop Reports NERSC Staff Publications & Presentations Journal Cover Stories Galleries facebook icon

  6. Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Star...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pumps Air conditioners Programmable Thermostats Other EE Maximum Rebate One rebate per Energy Star appliance or two rebates on the purchase of programmable thermostats Program...

  7. Reading a Star Map for Stargazing

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    litter, but this is the time of year that they move from their wintering sites to wetlands, where they mate and lay eggs. We'll explore their habitats in hopes of seeing one...

  8. Strangeness suppression of qq¯ creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK+, pπ0, and nπ+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  9. Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testoni, A. L.

    2011-10-19

    This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

  10. Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Miltec UV International at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about utilization of UV or...

  12. Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Miltec UV International at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the utilization of UV...

  14. FES Case Study Worksheets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Green Read Jeff Candy Read CS Chang Read Stephane Ethier Read Alex Friedman Read Kai Germaschewski Read Martin Greenwald Read Stephen Jardin Read...

  15. PDID: Pulsed-Discharge Ionization Detector A new detector for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VOC Biomarker Diagnosis Advantages Radical shift in diagnosis methodology * Non-invasive diagnosis from breath or the headspace of biological fluids. * VOC biomarkers are...

  16. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup...

  17. Savannah River Site - A/M Area Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver...

  18. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... VOC concentrations attributable to VOC emissions from open ... will always be located upstream from the open panel being ... Hydrogen and Methane Rate Monitoring NA Environmental ...

  19. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mound Plume Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup...

  20. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    881 Hillside Drum Storage Area Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory...

  1. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Carbon Tetrachoride Spill Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver...

  2. Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) VOCs can cause a wide variety of health problems. Some examples of potential heath effects include increased cancer risks, depression of the ...

  3. EA-1778-DEA-2010.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) VOCs can cause a wide variety of health problems. Some examples of potential health effects include increased cancer risks, depression of the ...

  4. Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) VOCs can cause a wide variety of health problems. Some examples of potential health effects include increased cancer risks, depression of the ...

  5. Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 43

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) VOCs can cause a wide variety of health problems. Some examples of potential heath effects include increased cancer risks, depression of the ...

  6. Could what that ESCO sales rep said really be true? Savings realization rates in ESPC versus bid-to-spec projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Philip; Earni, Shankar; Williams, Charles

    2014-08-11

    Claims that savings realization is greater in energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are rampant at least among energy service company representatives and other ESPC cheerleaders. But hard supporting evidence for these claims has been virtually non-existent. The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program uses its Compliance Tracking System (CTS) database to document the performance of federal buildings and projects towards meeting various federal energy-saving goals. This paper focuses on preliminary analysis from CTS to understand and compare the performance of federal ESPCs with projects that have been implemented with more conventional government appropriations funding. The authors have found preliminary evidence using CTS that shows markedly higher savings realization rates among ESPC projects than appropriations-funded ones. There are numerous caveats to the data comparison that clamor for further study, but the difference is still intriguing. If borne out, this finding will provide concrete support to the idea that ESPCs guarantees and measurement and verification, long touted by energy service companies (ESCOs) as offering savings assurance, may truly yield substantial benefits. If ESPCs actually do perform better (i.e., have higher realization rates and savings persistence) than conventional bid-to-spec projects, the perceived premium for conducting them may look like a very good deal after all.

  7. Golden Reading Room: Other NEPA Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California Request for Public and ...

  8. READ THIS: Before You Design, Build or Renovate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Lstiburek

    2006-12-07

    This pamphlet is designed for members of the residential construction and remodeling industries, as well as owners and managers who work in affordable housing, and presents building guidance for both new construction and rehabilitation, as well as practices that can be used by property maintenance personnel.

  9. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ....",0,".",".",".",".",0 2014,1,471,"Amana Society Service Co","IA","Final",177,5,".",".",18... 2014,1,12341,"MidAmerican Energy Co","IA","Final",561054,87577,453,0,64908...

  10. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...3323,".",".",".",".",0 2016,1,471,"Amana Society Service Co","IA","Preliminary",704,180,1,... 2016,1,12341,"MidAmerican Energy Co","IA","Preliminary",571337,90705,646,0...

  11. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...2242,".",".",".",".",0 2015,1,471,"Amana Society Service Co","IA","Preliminary",516,61,0,0... 2015,1,12341,"MidAmerican Energy Co","IA","Preliminary",565871,89165,618,0...

  12. Guidance on Reading the Scorecard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The third column provides relevant background information on NOVs and associated fines and ... Changes to the summary column between reporting periods are highlighted in bold text in ...

  13. Introduction to Reading and Visualizing ARM Data (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1226262 Report Number(s): DOESC-ARM-TR-136 PNNL-23161 DOE Contract ... Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI: 10.21721226262

  14. Building America Case Study: Zero Energy Read Home Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Its Spring Lake project in Woodland, California, includes 62 affordable apartment fats and townhomes for agricultural workers and their families. The DOE Building America team ...

  15. Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ...defaultfilesnnsafoiareadingroomDOC00030.pdf 31.00 Plans-QC-96-0005 Draft 86 Savannah River Operations Ten Year Plan https:nnsa.energy.govsitesdefaultfilesnnsa...

  16. Multi-kb Illumina reads Reveal Significant Strain Variation and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Word Cloud More Like This Multimedia File size NAView Multimedia View Multimedia

  17. Read More About Nuclear Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary of Energy ...

  18. READ THIS: Before You Turn Over a Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-12-08

    This pamphlet is designed for members of the residential construction and remodeling industries, and presents building guidance for both new construction and rehabilitation, as well as practices that can be used by property personnel.

  19. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Served - AMI (MWh)" "Year","Month","Utility Number","Utility Name","State","Data ... 2013,1,27058,"High West Energy, Inc","CO","Final",611,19,270,".",900,"."...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - SALISHAN [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dimitri Kusnezov Director, Advanced Simulation & Computing NNSA Petaflop-Scale Computing Salishan 4/19/05 Central Problem: Replacement of underground testing with a rigorous scientific methodology with which to assess and maintain our confidence in our nuclear stockpile. Time Urgencies: Supporting national policy with respect to the maintenance of our nuclear stockpile requires that we be able to certify annually to the Secretaries of the Departments of Energy and Defense that the stockpile

  1. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 "AMR meters",2103,2188,2991,4659,35987,29770,32000,3562 "Residential",935,1046,1722,310...

  2. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010 "AMR meters",46829659,47321320,48330822,45965762,48685043 "Residential",41830781,42491242,43455437,41451888,4391...

  3. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 "AMR meters",52528,53483,38201,81499,78292,96058,81992,63856 "Residential",43410,44206,30907,72579,69...

  4. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 "AMR meters",42342,53266,44430,84409,81030,77963,71278,58477 "Residential",37948,48343,39930,76274,7...

  5. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 "AMR meters",40233,38125,41827,35412,43254,27018,21054,8132 "Residential",37473,35775,28906,23442,317...

  6. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 "AMR meters",17894,6822,6415,5210,4499,116826,103242,101084 "Residential",15963,6455,6075,4920,3375,10...

  7. "AMR- Automatic Meter Reading. AMI- Advanced Meter Infrastructure...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Technology by sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 "AMR meters",33865,33662,57269,46871,44911,41201,28512,22820 "Residential",30803,32688,53083,44459,42...

  8. Hello out there. Are you reading me. [Audience identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    Audience identification is the first step in purposeful writing. Yet we find little written information that helps us in determining the makeup of an audience, what it needs to know, and how we can use that information to produce a meaningful publication. A large national laboratory reaches diverse audiences with different types of publications. Representative communicators who produce manuals, press releases, public relations publications, in-house publications, journal articles, and technical reports share their methods of identifying and writing for audiences and pose some thought-provoking questions about audiences and the lack thereof.

  9. Microsoft Word - Climate-Infrastructure-Workshop_read-ahead_R2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of other federal and state agencies. This mission falls into two categories: resilience to short time scale, episodic events (e.g., hurricanes; heat waves) and planning for...

  10. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1 Jenny Heimberg [Read-Only]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments A White House Climate Action Champions Case Study INDEX Executive Summary...............................2 Climate Action Champion.....................2 Project Spotlight.................................3-5 Co-benefits.............................................5 Challenges and Lessons Learned.........5 Resources and Contacts........................7 2 Executive Summary The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG) is an independent,

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2 Cynthia Barr [Read-Only]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Barrier Analysis in NRC Staff's Performance Assessment Reviews Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice December 10-11, 2014 Las Vegas, Nevada Cynthia Barr and George Alexander United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Outline * What is a barrier analysis? * How does NRC use barrier analysis in our reviews? * Barrier analysis review examples * Final thoughts 2 What is a Barrier Analysis? * Identification and description of barriers in a performance assessment * Function of

  13. Microsoft Word - Climate-Infrastructure-Workshop_read-ahead_R2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to infrasture assessment and planning rely on empirical weather data derived from historical trends, including geospatial distributions of both mean values and extreme values. ...

  14. Thinking About Buying a Car this Summer? Read This First!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chances are that if you've seen a car commercial in the last few weeks then you've heard about the Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS) Program. I know those commercials caught my attention on...

  15. EM's Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing its

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports Brookhaven National Laboratory - HFBR Tritium Groundwater Database Report - Brookhaven National Laboratory/HFBR Tritium Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I VOC Groundwater Database Report - Brookhaven National Laboratory/OU I VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I/IV VOC Groundwater Database Report - Brookhaven National Laboratory/OU I/IV VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC Groundwater Database

  16. Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Agway Energy Services, LLC + true + Aiken Electric Coop Inc + true + Aitkin Public Utilities Comm + true + Ajo Improvement Co + true + (previous 25) (next 25)...

  17. Property:EIA/861/IsoNy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc. + true + M Major Energy Electric Services + true + N NOCO Electric + true + NRG Power Marketing LLC + true + National Grid Generation, LLC + true + (previous 25) (next...

  18. Property:EIA/861/NercMro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Brainerd Public Utilities + true + Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm + true + Brown County Rural Elec Assn + true + Burke-Divide Electric Coop Inc + true + Butler County...

  19. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He?3(e?,e'd) Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  20. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of γγπ+π-,π0π0 and K¯K below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  1. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He3(e,e'd) Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  2. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  3. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... VOC concentrations attributable to VOC emissions from open ... will always be located upstream from the open panel being ... NA 4.6.5.1. Implementation of Hydrogen and Methane ...

  4. Services Initiatives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soy ink is renewable and is very low in Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) which evaporate little and cause no air pollution, whereas petroleum-based inks are high in VOCs and cause ...

  5. Analysis of Solar Cell Quality Using Voltage Metrics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toberer, E. S.; Tamboli, A. C.; Steiner, M.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    The highest efficiency solar cells provide both excellent voltage and current. Of these, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) is more frequently viewed as an indicator of the material quality. However, since the Voc also depends on the band gap of the material, the difference between the band gap and the Voc is a better metric for comparing material quality of unlike materials. To take this one step further, since Voc also depends on the shape of the absorption edge, we propose to use the ultimate metric: the difference between the measured Voc and the Voc calculated from the external quantum efficiency using a detailed balance approach. This metric is less sensitive to changes in cell design and definition of band gap. The paper defines how to implement this metric and demonstrates how it can be useful in tracking improvements in Voc, especially as Voc approaches its theoretical maximum.

  6. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  7. Property:NrelPartner | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1366 Technologies + true + 3 3M + true + A A.O. Smith + true + A123Systems + true + AAON + true + AQUA Products + true + AVL Powertrain...

  8. sc0011884-advanced-cooling | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative, Economical, Ultra-clean Incinerator for Low Heating Value VOC Emissions Last Reviewed 12/11/2015 DE-SC0011884 Goal The project goal is to develop an innovative, non-catalytic high destruction efficiency, and low fuel consumption volatile organic compounds (VOC) incinerator to reduce VOCs from condensate tanks and other low heat value waste gas streams. Performers Advanced Cooling Technologies (ACT), Inc Background VOC emissions from various sources (oil and gas storage tank,

  9. ORSSAB Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio Howard Holmes Member Read Bio Jennifer Kasten Member Read Bio Donald Mei Member Read Bio Greg Paulus Member Read Bio Mary Smalling Member Read Bio ...

  10. Property:IsDOELab | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Argonne National Laboratory + true + B Brookhaven National Laboratory + true + L Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) + true + Lawrence Livermore National...

  11. ADEPT, a dynamic next generation sequencing data error-detection program with trimming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Shihai; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Po-E; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2016-02-29

    Illumina is the most widely used next generation sequencing technology and produces millions of short reads that contain errors. These sequencing errors constitute a major problem in applications such as de novo genome assembly, metagenomics analysis and single nucleotide polymorphism discovery. In this study, we present ADEPT, a dynamic error detection method, based on the quality scores of each nucleotide and its neighboring nucleotides, together with their positions within the read and compares this to the position-specific quality score distribution of all bases within the sequencing run. This method greatly improves upon other available methods in terms of the truemore » positive rate of error discovery without affecting the false positive rate, particularly within the middle of reads. We conclude that ADEPT is the only tool to date that dynamically assesses errors within reads by comparing position-specific and neighboring base quality scores with the distribution of quality scores for the dataset being analyzed. The result is a method that is less prone to position-dependent under-prediction, which is one of the most prominent issues in error prediction. The outcome is that ADEPT improves upon prior efforts in identifying true errors, primarily within the middle of reads, while reducing the false positive rate.« less

  12. Property:GreenButtonPlannedCompliant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Generating Company + true + Ameren Energy Marketing + true + Appalachian Power Co + true + Atlantic City Electric Co + true + B Barton...

  13. Property:EIA/861/NercSerc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop + true + Beauregard Electric Coop, Inc + true + Benton County + true + Berkeley Electric Coop Inc + true + (previous 25) (next 25) Retrieved from "http:...

  14. Property:EIA/861/ActivityRetailMarketing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + B BP Energy Company + true + Beaver City Corporation (Utility Company) + true + Blue Star Energy Services + true + Bluerock Energy, Inc. + true + Board of Water Electric &...

  15. Property:GreenButtonCompliant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin (Michigan) + true + O Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC + true + P PacifiCorp + true + (previous 25) (next 25) Retrieved from...

  16. Property:EIA/861/IsoMiso | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Bremen Electric Light & Power Co + true + Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm + true + Butler Rural Electric Coop Inc + true + C Cannelton Utilities + true + Carroll County REMC +...

  17. http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/cfr/part061/full...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... or property or the common defense and security, and is otherwise in the public ... a 500 - year timeframe. (b) Waste classification and near-surface disposal. (1) ...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - BA Tech to Market Roadmaps RFI webinar 040715.pptx [Read-Only]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov Building America Webinar: Tech-to-Market Roadmaps ERIC WERLING Building America Program Coordinator Building Technology Office April 7, 2015 We already know how to build Zero Energy Homes 1. Construct Perfect Envelopes 2. Install High Efficiency HVAC, Ventilation, Appliances & Lighting 3. Add PV or Wind Energy 4. Add Conservation to Taste Zero Energy Home We Are On the Road to ... What Does Success

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - CSISVisitingSpeaker15Sept08.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    September 15, 2008. Washington DC "In the past three to five years, people are beginning to realize that DOE is a cornerstone to the future. What DOE does in terms of energy, science, and national security will impact some of national security will impact some of CSIS's vision of what the world will look like in the year 2025." Glenn Podonsky - Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer y Slide 1 of 12 "These dialogs within this Visiting Speaker Program help HSS Visiting Speaker

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Intro-Panel1.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    We at NAPA share with HSS a commitment on the need to change how government g g works and a vision that innovation and collaboration can be the central tools for leaders to drive change. These speaker events draw t th i d together across agencies and industries the thought leaders who can make this change happen. Jennifer L. Dorn, President and CEO National Academy of Public CEO, National Academy of Public Administration HSS Visiting Speaker Program - Governance and Regulation: U.S. to Lead or

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Panel2.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Innovation and competitiveness result from three factors that must work well together: business environment, regulatory environment, and innovation policy policy. The U.S. has the best business environment in the world. We have a good entrepreneurial climate. We have good managerial talents. And we have managerial talents. And we have good financial markets - current economic crisis not withstanding. The regulatory environment must be pro-innovation on both the social side and the business side.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Panel3.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    big regulatory issue from our HSS Visiting Speaker Program - Governance and Regulation: U.S. to Lead or Lag in the 21st Century? Co-Sponsored by the National Academy of Public Administration. July 24, 2009 The big regulatory issue from our members' perspective is that small companies struggle with the following concerns: * export issues ti l i t th i titi * negatively impacts their competitiveness and access to markets * ability to hire the best and brightest foreign workers * subsequent

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Panel4.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Basic High Reliability Organization (HRO) HSS Visiting Speaker Program - Governance and Regulation: U.S. to Lead or Lag in the 21st Century? Co-Sponsored by the National Academy of Public Administration. July 24, 2009 g y g ( ) characteristics are: successful at avoiding catastrophes in high risk, complex operating environments, and consistently delivering regular performance with complex missions. HROs can be envisioned in such areas as i ti t t ti fi i l h i l aviation, transportation,

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Quinault Indian Nation Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies [Read-Only]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies Presented By: Quinault Indian Nation in Partnership with American Community Enrichment, 501c3 Helping Rural Communities Thrive! Quinault Indian Nation 2014 Comprehensive Biomass for Heat Project Strategy Development Project Overview * Identify and confirm Tribal energy needs * Comprehensive review of QIN biomass availability* * Develop a biomass energy vision statement, goals and objectives * Identify and assess viable biomass energy

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - Rules.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Effi i P li R l Energy Efficiency Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for Illinois Chuck Goldman (LBNL) & Chuck Goldman (LBNL) & Rich Sedano (RAP) ICC Staff Workshop Chicago Illinois Chicago, Illinois November 6, 2006 Overview of Presentation 1. Background 2. The Scope and Structure of EE Policy Rules in Other States 3. State Experience in Developing EE Rules 4 Issues to Consider for Illinois 4. Issues to Consider for Illinois The Illinois Policy Context Illinois Public Act

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slideshow12Jan09V1.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Status of the U.S. Manufacturing Base. January 12, 2009 "The theme throughout all of these Visiting Speaker Events is to hit the issues at the forefront of creating a sustainable nation. Sustainability is simply defined as meeting your current mission with decisions that will not mortgage your future. g g y HSS is involved in collaboration efforts because we are a corporate organization with continuity. Experience from other corporations indicated that every organization that looked at

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slideshow16July08.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    July 16, 2008. Washington DC "We have drawn on the Visiting Speaker Program for presentations by leaders from a variety of disciplines in business, organizational theory, performance management performance management, sustainability, and organizational resilience." Glenn Podonsky - Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer y Slide 1 of 12 HSS Visiting Speaker Program - July 16, 2008. Washington DC "We believe sustainability and organizational resilience are both organizational

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slideshow30Oct08.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    We've found these Visiting Speaker events to be great opportunities for open dialogue HSS Visiting Speaker Program - October 30, 2008. Washington DC to be great opportunities for open dialogue. It's rather amazing ....... especially in the Federal government, how little cross- fertilization there is among executive agencies. Many of the agencies are doing th thi d ' t t lki the same things and we're not even talking to one another.....Yet, our nation is at a crossroads, a very serious point in

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Wrapup_NextSteps.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HSS is an organization that is considered an internal regulator. We recognize that the way DOE governs a highly technical organization with a large laboratory mission, is not working. Our laboratories won't be competitive. p Innovation and regulations require long- term thinking and that is the problem with many regulations because they often stay around for many more years than the rate of the world's changes would allow them t i l t to remain relevant. We've talked about how regulations skew

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - January Safety Culture.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Culture Presentation to Hanford Advisory Board Steve Pfaff February 9, 2012 Safety Culture * Safety culture is an organization's values and behaviors modeled by its leaders and...

  11. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    arXiv:1507.07424 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: International Workshop on SOI Pixel Detector. Sendai, Miyagi, Japan, ....

  12. ISC Conventional Reading Rooms | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy IRS Issues New Tax Credit Guidance for Owners of Small Wind Turbines IRS Issues New Tax Credit Guidance for Owners of Small Wind Turbines February 19, 2015 - 10:02am Addthis Homeowners who install small wind turbines similar to these can qualify for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Wind Utility Consulting Homeowners who install small wind turbines similar to these can qualify for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Wind Utility Consulting Patrick Gilman Wind Market

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - SNLResilienceApril29 [Read-Only

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - The proposed framework applies common principles across energy sectors - We're looking forward to your help SCENARIO CONCEPTS FRAMEWORK CASES SUMMARY 6 7 Load Served (MW) Time ...

  14. Monitoring I/O on Data-Intensive Clusters Visualizing Disk Reads...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YARN - Yet Another Resource Negotiator - Runs MapReduce jobs in Hadoop environment * Java 1.6 5 Monitoring Tools Splunk - software for searching and analyzing logs - able to...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - BEDES Webinar 11-13 draft3 [Read-Only]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BEDES Dictionary 1.0 Elena Alschuler elena.alschuler@ee.doe.gov Paul Mathew pamathew@lbl.gov Robin Mitchell rdmitchell@lbl.gov November 13, 2014 2 Webinar Overview - What is BEDES? - Background - Use Cases - Dictionary Walkthrough - Strategic Working Group Recommendations - Plans for 2015 - Get Involved 3 What is BEDES? BEDES provides a common set of terms, definitions and data fields that can be used by public and private software tools, data schemas and databases working within the building

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Huang_2015_StaffScienceHiglight_PRL [Read...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Se vacancies around W atoms. These new findings illustrate a concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of...

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Local_Xlography_highlight_v3 [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature based statistical analysis of atomically resolved images reveals the connectivity of lattice and bond structure, as well as highlights structural distortions, thus allowing...

  18. Electronic Reading Room | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - quarterly_agenda.ppt [Read-Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ITER to re-consider the orientation of its diagnostic neutral beam. 9 Plans * Plasma research operation for 15 weeks - Plasma cleanup phase complete - Ready for boronization *...

  20. Seismic Readings from the Deepest Borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolery, Edward W; Wang, Zhenming; Sturchio, Neil C

    2006-03-01

    Since the 1980s, the research associated with the UK network has been primarily strong-motion seismology of engineering interest. Currently the University of Kentucky operates a strong-motion network of nine stations in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. A unique feature of the network is the inclusions of vertical strong-motion arrays, each with one or two downhole accelerometers. The deepest borehole array is 260 m below the surfaces at station VASA in Fulton County, Kentucky. A preliminary surface seismic refraction survey was conducted at the site before drilling the hole at VSAS (Woolery and Wang, 2002). The depth to the Paleozoic bedrock at the site was estimated to be approximately 595 m, and the depth to the first very stiff layer (i.e. Porters Creek Clay) was found to be about 260 m. These depths and stratigraphic interpretation correlated well with a proprietary seismic reflection line and the Ken-Ten Oil Exploration No. 1 Sanger hole (Schwalb, 1969), as well as our experience in the area (Street et al., 1995; Woolery et al., 1999).

  1. http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/cfr/part020/full...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... during the current year. (b) Prior to permitting an individual to participate in a ... individual. (c) In complying with the requirements of paragraphs (a) or (b) of this ...

  2. How an mRNA capping enzyme reads distinct RNA polymerase II and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    codes Authors: Doamekpor, Selom K. ; Sanchez, Ana M. ; Schwer, Beate ; Shuman, Stewart ; Lima, Christopher D. 1 ; MSKCC) 2 + Show Author Affiliations (Weill-Med) ...

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Rules.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Effi i P li R l Energy Efficiency Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for Illinois Chuck ... in consumption of electricity or natural gas without reducing the level or quality of ...

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Lv_2016_UserProjectHighlight_PNAS [Read...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that boron doping in graphene leads to a much enhanced sensitivity when detecting toxic gases (e.g. NO 2 ). Our results will open up new avenues for developing high...

  5. 2015_05_04_Columbia University_FINAL[2].pptx (Read-Only)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 May 2015 Most significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - UP 1_rrb pres_final.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibil...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Components * Major Remedy Components - Pump-and-Treat - MNA - Flow-path control - ... Alternative 4- 25 Years Active Remediation and MNA Pump-and-Treat PT for technetium-99, ...

  7. Rnnotator: an automated de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from stranded RNA-Seq reads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Bruno, Vincent M.; Fang, Zhide; Meng, Xiandong; Blow, Matthew; Zhang, Tao; Sherlock, Gavin; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Zhong

    2010-11-19

    Background: Comprehensive annotation and quantification of transcriptomes are outstanding problems in functional genomics. While high throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has emerged as a powerful tool for addressing these problems, its success is dependent upon the availability and quality of reference genome sequences, thus limiting the organisms to which it can be applied. Results: Here, we describe Rnnotator, an automated software pipeline that generates transcript models by de novo assembly of RNA-Seq data without the need for a reference genome. We have applied the Rnnotator assembly pipeline to two yeast transcriptomes and compared the results to the reference gene catalogs of these organisms. The contigs produced by Rnnotator are highly accurate (95percent) and reconstruct full-length genes for the majority of the existing gene models (54.3percent). Furthermore, our analyses revealed many novel transcribed regions that are absent from well annotated genomes, suggesting Rnnotator serves as a complementary approach to analysis based on a reference genome for comprehensive transcriptomics. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that the Rnnotator pipeline is able to reconstruct full-length transcripts in the absence of a complete reference genome.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2015.pptx [Read-Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLEARWATER RESERVOIR MISSOURI ARKANSAS Lock and Dam No 1 10 CACHE RIVER LEGEND EXISTING ... M&I Water Supply Reallocation Studies Beaver Lake * Completed Studies * Beaver Dam Trout ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Recovery Fact Sheet rev4.ppt [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under current regulatory documents and current prime contracts, allowing work to begin contaminants, remediate soil contamination in in the 100 BC Areas, expandimprove...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - EM SSAB Chairs Webinar - (3) Tyborowski Presentation.042213 [Read-Only]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Budget Overview for the EM SSAB Chairs www.energy.gov/EM 1 Terry Tyborowski Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning & Budget Office of Environmental Management April 25, 2013 FY 2014 Budget Overview for the EM SSAB Chairs 235 237 213 472 475 448 555 5,000 5,200 5,400 5,600 5,800 6,000 (dollars in millions) EM Funding Levels: FY 2012 - FY 2014 ($M) 5,710 5,745 5,290 5,622 www.energy.gov/EM 2 5,003 5,033 4,618 4,854 224 213 4,200 4,400 4,600 4,800 FY 2012 Enacted FY 2013 Annualized CR

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Fire Safety workshop NQA-1 CGD 4 29 15 [Read-Only]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    v Nuclear and Facility Safety Programs Workshop Fire Safety Track May 5th, 2015 Overview NQA 1 Commercial Grade Dedication Critical Characteristics Department of Energy Nuclear and Facility Safety Programs Workshop Fire Safety Track May 5 th , 2015 Randy P. Lanham PE, CSP Dale Moon, PE Fire Protection Chief Engineer Facility Engineering Depart. Mng. Randy.Lanham@cns.doe.gov Consolidated Nuclear Security Pantex and Y12 2 Overview CGD Definition Safety Function / DSA Requirements Example of CGD

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2007_02_19_CMMAP.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Interactions in the MMF in the MMF Steve Ghan Mikhail Ovtchinnikov Mikhail Ovtchinnikov Dick Easter, Larry Berg, Bill Gustafson Gustafson PNNL, Richland, WA IPCC 2001 IPCC 2007 Needed MMF/SAM extensions Needed MMF/SAM extensions * Aerosol distributions and properties. p p Treatment must: - Address both the first and second indirect effects - Account for cloud effects on aerosols - Be applicable to MMF (efficient computationally and take advantage of resolved large convection) take

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - AWP Form Pictures-1 [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab AWP: Part I JLab AWP: Part II JLab AWP: Part II JLab AWP: Part III JLab AWP: Part III

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE presentation RL Site_DOE-RL.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richland Operations Office Site Report Survey Purpose * DOE tasked EurekaFacts to conduct a Hanford site-wide (federal and contractor) employee survey * Purpose - evaluate current state of Hanford's - Organizational Climate - Safety Culture - Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE) - Establish a baseline to develop and measure continuous improvement effort 2 Study Description * 2012 Hanford organizational survey was conducted between June 6, 2012 and 27, 2012. * Data were gathered through an

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE-ORP FY 11 Briefing_Appropriations.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY 2011Briefing May 26, 2011 www.em.doe.gov 2 Environmental Management: A National Responsibility  Our work is urgent and essential to the health and economic vitality of our communities and the nation and positions our Sites for future missions and use  Our mission is not discretionary - it is a Federal obligation to address the cold war environmental legacy cleanup and honor our regulatory commitments  We have demonstrated value for the American Taxpayer by delivering significant

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Draft HAB Pu presentation CJK 040412.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 5 6

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Hentschel_Power Review Program Overview.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Review of Operations & Maintenance Program (PRO&M) 2015 Southwestern Federal Hydropower Meeting Branson, MO Pete Hentschel, P.E. Chief, Maintenance Engineering Section Kansas City District Mark Dixson Chief, Hydropower Section Little Rock District 17 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Happy National Eat Your Vegetables Day!! BUILDING STRONG ® Happy National Apple Strudel Day!! BUILDING STRONG ® Happy Stewarts Root Beer Day!! BUILDING STRONG ® PRO&M Purpose  Periodic assessment

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Hydro Conf 6-15.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Value of Flexibility in the Markets June 2015 1 2 Value of Flexibility in the Markets * Basic overview of the SPP and MISO markets * Potential benefit to some SPA customers of using markets to schedule energy * Increasing need for ancillary services, and the value of ancillary services in the markets 3 4 4 MISO/SPP 5 5 SPP Locational Marginal Prices SPA - SPP Prices June 1 - June 7, 2015 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 6/1/2015 6/2/2015 6/3/2015 6/4/2015 6/5/2015 6/6/2015 6/7/2015 $/MWh Day Ahead Real

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Hydropower Meeting Dam Safety Program_20150615.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting Dam Safety Program Miles P. Waldron, P.E. Senior Hydropower Program Manager Southwestern Division 16 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Transition to a Risk Informed Dam Safety Program *Dam Safety Action Classification is assigned by probability of failure and the incremental risk. Degree of urgency. *USACE has moved from a solely standards-based approach for its dam safety program to a dam safety portfolio risk management approach. *Standards- based or essential guidelines approach is

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Johnson_Salishan_2005 [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salishan - April 2005 1 Operating Systems - the Code We Love to Hate (Operating and Runtime Systems: Status, Challenges and Futures) Fred Johnson Senior Technical Manager for Computer Science Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research DOE Office of Science Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Salishan - April 2005 2 Supports basic research that underpins DOE missions. Constructs and operates large scientific facilities for the U.S. scientific community. Accelerators, synchrotron

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Lindsey PARC EFRC Research Highlight March 2013.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Achievement Hydrophilic Bacteriochlorins for Biohybrid Light-Harvesting Architectures Scientific Achievement New synthetic pigments have been created that enable aqueous-based construction of light-harvesting architectures Significance and Impact The ability to readily construct biohybrid systems (peptides + absorbers) facilitates capture of the near-infrared solar light capture of the near infrared solar light Research Details -We previously created a family of lipophilic (I.e., greasy)

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - MTL DO Working Group 2015.ppt [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reservoir Releases, Downstream Water Quality, and Fisheries at Mark Twain Lake/Cannon Dam USACE St. Louis District 18 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Project Purposes  54,000 Acre Project with Multiple Project Purposes: ►Hydropower ►Recreation ►Fish and Wildlife ►Water Supply ►Incidental Navigation ►Flood Risk Management BUILDING STRONG ® Salt River Watershed BUILDING STRONG ® BUILDING STRONG ® Cannon Dam Reregulation Dam BUILDING STRONG ® Cannon Dam TW WQ Monitoring Turbine Bay

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Plan-Budget Process [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLANNING/BUDGET PROCESS Update Strategic Planning d C A Update Strategic Planning Based on Current FY AWP Update Strategic Planning d C A NSAC Long Range Plan Update 10 Year Site Plan (May) Update 10 Year Site Plan (May) Update 10 Year Site Plan (May) Update Annual Plan (10 Year Picture for DOE SC) Develop Kovar 5 Year Briefing (January - February) Develop Kovar 5 Year Briefing (January - February) Develop Kovar 5 Year Briefing (January - February) Develop 5 Year Budget Review (DOE SC) Update

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - River Protection Project HAB.ppt [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Protection Project Waste Treatment & Disposition January 2009 1 2 Insights From External Review Analyses * No need to make LAW ST decision now: make in 2015 - 2017 once Na/Al uncertainties reduced, M-2/M-3 Pretreatment issues resolved, and improved overall integrated RPP system understanding in place (e.g., System Plan 4) * WTP LAW Facility alone cannot complete LAW immobilization mission in same timeframe as HLW mission even with 3 rd melter or higher capacity melters. Third melter

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Fed Hydro Presentation 2015.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entergy Hydro Operations Ted Smethers tsmethe@entergy.com 501-620-0601 2 Ouachita River System 3 Ouachita River System LAKE OUACHITA LAKE HAMITLON LAKE CATHERINE Blakely Mountain Dam Carpenter Dam Remmel Dam OUACHITA RIVER CITY OF HOT SPRINGS DeGray Lake & Dam 4 Who Controls What? * Entergy's Lake Catherine Plant - Carpenter - Remmel * ACOE at Blakely Mountain Dam - Blakely - DeGray - Others 5 Blakely Mtn. Dam/Lake Ouachita * Built in 1955 * forms Lake Ouachita * Owned & Operated by ACOE

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWF Whitney Rehab.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WHITNEY POWERHOUSE MAJOR REHABILITATION Terry L. Bachim - Project Manager Operations Division Fort Worth District 17 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Whitney Powerhouse BUILDING STRONG ® Whitney Power Plant Main Generating Units Rehab Project 3 BUILDING STRONG ® General Plant Information Whitney Powerhouse  30 MW capacity, Peaking Plant  Purpose - Flood Control, Hydropower, Recreation  Two vertical axis Francis units  Average annual energy produced - 73,000 MWH  Plant placed in

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2015.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOUTHWESTERN FEDERAL HYDROPOWER MEETING Chad Dulaney District Water Resources Manager Little Rock, Arkansas 18 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® WHITE RIVER BASIN COMPREHENSIVE STUDY BUILDING STRONG ® WHITE RIVER BASIN, AR & MO HARRISON NEWPORT JONESBORO PARAGOULD POPLAR BLUFF PIEDMONT LITTLE ROCK FORREST CITY SPRINGFIELD NORFORK CLEARWATER RESERVOIR MISSOURI ARKANSAS Lock and Dam No 1 10 CACHE RIVER LEGEND EXISTING RESERVOIR OR LAKE WHITE RIVER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE CACHE RIVER WILDLIFE

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - PW highlight_BRS_HMC.pptx [Read-Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phases of the microstructure in alloys with a variety of oxygen contents, enables alloy design criteria to be established for commercial applications. Research Details * Mo atom...

  9. Microsoft Word - Climate-Infrastructure-Workshop_read-ahead_R2.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 LANL Workshop on Closing the Gap between Infrastructure Assessments and Climate Simulation Workshop Goals This w orkshop a ims t o d evelop a c ompelling t echnical f ocus f or n eeds a t t he i nterface b etween infrastructure a ssessment/adaptation a nd c limate s imulation. LANL has active but distinct research portfolios in simulation of both climate scenarios and infrastructures. Both communities have recognized the opportunity for a closer coordination, for example, by using climate

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Stephen Barnes DOE.pptx [Read-Only

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recent Workforce Trends in Energy High Demand TS&D Occupations * General and Operations Managers * Cost Estimators * Civil Engineers * Electrical Engineers * Health and Safety ...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - MTL DO Working Group 2015.ppt [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG Water Control Plan Fish Spawn: Enhance fish and wildlife to as great an extent as possible without ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - salishan_v2 [Read-Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level * Two tools that can help: IPM and APEXMAP Scientific Applications and Underlying ... High DARPA HPCS will characterize applications APEX-Map: A Synthetic Benchmark to Explore ...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 3Q12 Presentation_FINAL.pptx [Read-Only]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Surveillance and Maintenance Report for the LM Rocky Flats Site July-September 2012 Quarterly Monitoring and Reporting  Quarterly reports are required under RFLMA to document that the CERCLA remedy continues to be protective * Primary goal is protecting surface water  The response action under the final remedy for Rocky Flats is * Maintaining two landfill covers * Maintaining four groundwater treatment systems * Surface water and groundwater monitoring * Physical controls  Signage 

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - CY09 Annual Report Presentation - final.ppt [Read-Only]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 Rocky Flats Stewardship Council June 7, 2010 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Calendar Year 2009 3 Pond Operations - Calendar Year 2009 Terminal Pond Discharges: * Pond B-5 May 19 through June 6, 2009 (12.63 MG) * Pond A-4 May 23 through June 5, 2009 (9.1 MG) December 12 through December 21, 2009 (7.17 MG) * Pond C-2 May 26 through June 4, 2009 (4.84 MG) Transfers: * Pond A-3 to A-4 Four periods (24.62 MG total) Pond Levels: * As of January 1, 2010, Ponds A-3, A-4, B-5, and C-2 and the

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Customer meeting 20150617.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to provide consistency across the region through innovative and critical thinking, use of lessons learned and best practices, and the region's diverse workforce, . BUILDING STRONG...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - F_Abagnale_presentation_28Oct09.pps [Read...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This was used in the government's legal actions with Tyco, Enron, Arthur Anderson, etc. Enron, Arthur Anderson, etc. - Security micro-cut is the best, it turns paper into confetti ...

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint- 4. ORNL- deer.ppt [Read-Only

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory/National Transportation Research Center

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - EIA Presentation 04.26.11.ppt [Read-Only...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... prices to put impact into today's context We should note our closure assumptions will still require a significant portion of the US Coal fleet to require environmental capex to ...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011WinterFuels_finalv3.pptx [Read-Only...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... State with d t il d t ti ti detailed usage statistics * Compares energy statistics ... Short-Term Energy Outlook | www.eia.govsteo Annual Energy Outlook | www.eia.govaeo ...

  20. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speculations on getting an Instant Cold Drink You wrote: I remember a few years ago reading about a new idea of making it possible for that when you open a can of pop that it will instantly turn cold. For some reason I remember them as saying that it will be out in a few years. I was wondering if you knew how they could do this and as to if it is true and if so, when it will come out - tim Tim, How to create an instant cold drink an interesting question. There are probably engineers in the

  1. Open Access: From Myth to Paradox

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ginsparg, Paul [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States

    2010-01-08

    True open access to scientific publications not only gives readers the possibility to read articles without paying subscription, but also makes the material available for automated ingestion and harvesting by 3rd parties. Once articles and associated data become universally treatable as computable objects, openly available to 3rd party aggregators and value-added services, what new services can we expect, and how will they change the way that researchers interact with their scholarly communications infrastructure? I will discuss straightforward applications of existing ideas and services, including citation analysis, collaborative filtering, external database linkages, interoperability, and other forms of automated markup, and speculate on the sociology of the next generation of users.

  2. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An objective...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reading Gaussiat, Nicolas University of Reading Hogan, Robin University of Reading Illingworth, Anthony University of Reading Operational NWP models represent clouds by one or...

  4. Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

  5. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  6. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Gregory D.; Moore, Glenn A.; Stone, Mark L.; Reagen, William K.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  7. Performance status of 0.55 eV InGaAs thermophotovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtczuk, S.; Colter, P.; Charache, G.; DePoy, D.

    1998-10-01

    Data on {approximately} 0.55 eV In{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}As cells with an average open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 298 mV (standard deviation 7 mV) at an average short-circuit current density of 1.16 A/cm{sup 2} (sdev. 0.1 A/cm{sup 2}) and an average fill-factor of 61.6% (sdev. 2.8%) is reported. The absorption coefficient of In{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}As was measured by a differential transmission technique. The authors use a numerical integration of the absorption data to determine the radiative recombination coefficient for In{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}As. Using this absorption data and simple one-dimensional analytical formula the above cells are modeled. The models show that the cells may be limited more by Auger recombination rather than Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination at dislocation centers caused by the 1.3% lattice mismatch of the cell to the host InP wafer.

  8. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tributary Valley VOCs Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement PCE 29 Yes 5 TCE 28 Yes 5 cis-1,2-DCE 32 Yes 70 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Ra 2 Yes 5 Sr 3 No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? Yes Activity: 160000

  9. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VOC) Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: Unknown Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? Yes Multiple Units Affected? No Depth (feet): Avg Velocity (feet/year): Plume Information (no source) Source Plume

  10. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Current Versus Voltage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of devices, including: open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Isc), fill factor (FF), maximum power output of the device (Pmax), voltage at maximum power...

  11. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Ponds Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? Yes...

  12. ITP Aluminum: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Aluminum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Table 6-10. Typical Furnace Melt Loss Charge Material Melt Loss (% of the metal melted) ... VOCs, Effluents Alloying Furnace Heat Treating Furnace Quench Chamber Aging Furnace ...

  13. Method of increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherry, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    A method for increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a bioreactor is disclosed. The method comprises dissolving in the aqueous phase of the bioreactor a water soluble, nontoxic, non-biodegradable polymer having a molecular weight of at least 500 and operable for decreasing the distribution coefficient of the VOCs. Polyoxyalkylene alkanols are preferred polymers. A method of increasing the growth rate of VOC-degrading microorganisms in the bioreactor and a method of increasing the solubility of sparingly soluble VOCs in aqueous solution are also disclosed.

  14. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-LM since 2005, long-term monitoring and surveillance with institutional controls. IA plume is actually a collection of several small VOC plumes grouped together for...

  15. NREL Sustainability Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... emissions from the life cycle of biofuel: cellulosic biorefineries (October 3, ... emergency generator may be subject to: Engine NSPS 40 CFR 60, Subpart IIII PM, VOC, NO ...

  16. Microsoft Word - N01058_LTSM Plan.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Appendix E Inspection Checklist Appendix F Contact List ... MCL maximum contaminant level mgL milligrams per liter ... Center SWMU solid-waste management unit VOCs volatile ...

  17. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: High Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Verification Checklist RENEWABLE READY ... of the criteria of the EPA's Indoor airPLUS program, including low- or no-VOC ... National Green Building Standards, gold level. ...

  18. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Hammer and Hand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... fans. * Solar: 10 kW PV. * Water Conservation: Push-button recirculation pump. * Other: Energy management system; low- VOCs. Sliding cedar shades block unwanted solar heat ...

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of characterizing the ozone formation process and its dependence on ambient levels of NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Other Contacts Co-Investigators Linda Bowerman...

  20. A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... VOC's, CO ) for many fuel pathways. * Process Industries Modeling System (PIMS) Model - ... for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI ...

  1. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2011-10-31

    The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

  2. Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes ...

  3. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Riverton Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Riverton Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs...

  4. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long Shot Remediation Contractor: S.M. Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes...

  5. Study of e+e-?pp?0 in the vicinity of the ?(3770)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. ?N.; Ai, X.? C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. ?J.; An, F. ?F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. ?Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J.? V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J.? M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R.? A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G.? F.; Cetin, S.? A.; Chang, J.? F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.? S.; Chen, J.? C.; Chen, M.? L.; Chen, S.? J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.? R.; Chen, Y.? B.; Cheng, H.? P.; Chu, X.? K.; Chu, Y.? P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H.? L.; Dai, J.? P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z.? Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W.? M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L.? Y.; Dong, M. ?Y.; Du, S.? X.; Fan, J.? Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. ?S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. ?Q.; Fu, C. ?D.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W.? X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. ?H.; Gu, Y.? T.; Guan, Y.? H.; Guo, A.? Q.; Guo, L.? B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.? P.; Han, Y.? L.; Harris, F.? A.; He, K.? L.; He, M.; He, Z.? Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y.? K.; Hou, Z.? L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H.? M.; Hu, J. ?F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G.? M.; Huang, G. ?S.; Huang, H.? P.; Huang, J.? S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. ?T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. ?S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q.? P.; Ji, X. ?B.; Ji, X.? L.; Jiang, L. ?L.; Jiang, L.? W.; Jiang, X.? S.; Jiao, J.? B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D.? P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. ?L.; Kang, X.? S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Khn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.? S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C.? H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D.? M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.? B.; Li, J.? C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. ?R.; Li, Q.? J.; Li, T.; Li, W.? D.; Li, W.? G.; Li, X.? L.; Li, X.? N.; Li, X.? Q.; Li, Z.? B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y.? F.; Liang, Y.? T.; Lin, D.? X.; Liu, B.? J.; Liu, C. ?L.; Liu, C.? X.; Liu, F.? H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. ?B.; Liu, H.? H.; Liu, H.? M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.? P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.? Y.; Liu, P.? L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S.? B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.? B.; Liu, Z.? A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X.? C.; Lu, G.? R.; Lu, H.? J.; Lu, H.? L.; Lu, J.? G.; Lu, X.? R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y.? P.; Luo, C.? L.; Luo, M.? X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.? L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F.? C.; Ma, H. ?L.; Ma, Q.? M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. ?Y.; Maas, F. ?E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q.? A.; Mao, Y.? J.; Mao, Z.? P.; Messchendorp, J.? G.; Min, J.; Min, T.? J.; Mitchell, R.? E.; Mo, X.? H.; Mo, Y.? J.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N.? Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. ?B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X.? Y.; Olsen, S.? L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H.? P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J.? L.; Ping, R.? G.; Poling, R.; Q., N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C.? F.; Qin, L.? Q.; Qin, X.? S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. ?H.; Qiu, J. ?F.; Rashid, K.? H.; Redmer, C.? F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X.? D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C.? P.; Shen, X.? Y.; Sheng, H.? Y.; Shepherd, M.? R.; Song, W.? M.; Song, X. ?Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G.? X.; Sun, J. ?F.; Sun, S.? S.; Sun, Y.? J.; Sun, Y. ?Z.; Sun, Z. ?J.; Sun, Z.? T.; Tang, C.? J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E.? H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G.? S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.? Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.? L.; Wang, L. ?S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.? L.; Wang, Q.? J.; Wang, S.? G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.? F.; Wang, Y.? D.; Wang, Y.? F.; Wang, Y.? Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. ?G.; Wang, Z.? H.; Wang, Z.? Y.; Wei, D.? H.; Wei, J.? B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. ?P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L.? H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.? G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z.? J.; Xie, Y.? G.; Xiu, Q.? L.; Xu, G.? F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. ?J.; Xu, Q.? N.; Xu, X.? P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W.? B.; Yan, W.? C.; Yan, Y.? H.; Yang, H.? X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.? X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M.? H.; Yu, B. ?X.; Yu, C. ?X.; Yu, H.? W.; Yu, J.? S.; Yu, S.? P.; Yuan, C. ?Z.; Yuan, W.? L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. ?A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S.? L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. ?X.; Zhang, B.? Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. ?B.; Zhang, C.? C.; Zhang, D.? H.; Zhang, H.? H.; Zhang, H.? Y.; Zhang, J.? J.; Zhang, J.? Q.; Zhang, J.? W.; Zhang, J.? Y.; Zhang, J. ?Z.; Zhang, S.? H.; Zhang, X. ?J.; Zhang, X.? Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.? H.; Zhang, Z.? H.; Zhang, Z.? P.; Zhang, Z.? Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-?pp?0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at ?s=3.773 GeV, at s?=3.650 GeV, and during a ?(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp?0 in the vicinity of the ?(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5? are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 are 33.81.82.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimated cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section ?(pp??(3770)?0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned PANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 12210 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.

  6. Property:EIA/861/ActivityBuyingDistribution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Utility Company) + true + City of Hill City, Kansas (Utility Company) + true + City of Hope, North Dakota (Utility Company) + true + City of Kansas City, Kansas (Utility Company)...

  7. Property:EIA/861/IsoCa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services + true + C City & County of San Francisco (Utility Company) + true + City of Alameda, California (Utility Company) + true + City of Anaheim, California (Utility Company)...

  8. ORSSAB Members | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Members ORSSAB Members Belinda Price Chair Read Bio ‣ Alfreda Cook Vice Chair Read Bio ‣ David Hemelright Secretary Read Bio ‣ Leon Baker Member Read Bio ‣ Richard Burroughs Member Read Bio ‣ Martha Deaderick Member Read Bio ‣ Mike Ford Member Read Bio ‣ Bob Hatcher Member Read Bio ‣ Howard Holmes Member Read Bio ‣ Jennifer Kasten Member Read Bio ‣ Donald Mei Member Read Bio ‣ Greg Paulus Member Read Bio ‣ Mary Smalling Member Read Bio ‣ Scott Stout Member Read Bio ‣

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - SustainAbilitySlideshow18Sept08.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    What we have seen from these Visiting Speaker Programs is an opportunity for ll b ti Th l tt di HSS Visiting Speaker Program - September 18, 2008. Washington DC collaboration. The people attending are representative of organizations investing their time and they too are struggling to solve the same issues we are ; to keep America sustainable, secure, and to foster responsible leadership. Companies have been successful preparing for and navigating this new shifting global landscape." Index

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Window_Attachments-Webinar-Oct_28_2015_PNNL-SA-114072.pptx [Read-Only]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Energy Savings from Window Attachments: Please Mind the Gap Moderator: Nicole Harrison- National Renewable Energy Laboratory Panelists: Katherine Cort - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Thomas Culp - Birch Point Consulting Joseph Petersen- Pacific Northwest National Laboratory October 28, 2015 PNNL-SA-114072 2 Katherine Cort, Project Lead, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory * Katherine "Katie" Cort is an economist with PNNL and team lead of Building America's

  11. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  12. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  13. Seeing and Reading Red: Hue and Color-word Correlation in Images and Attendant Text on the WWW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsam, S

    2004-07-12

    This work represents an initial investigation into determining whether correlations actually exist between metadata and content descriptors in multimedia datasets. We provide a quantitative method for evaluating whether the hue of images on the WWW is correlated with the occurrence of color-words in metadata such as URLs, image names, and attendant text. It turns out that such a correlation does exist: the likelihood that a particular color appears in an image whose URL, name, and/or attendant text contains the corresponding color-word is generally at least twice the likelihood that the color appears in a randomly chosen image on the WWW. While this finding might not be significant in and of itself, it represents an initial step towards quantitatively establishing that other, perhaps more useful correlations exist. These correlations form the basis for exciting novel approaches that leverage semi-supervised datasets, such as the WWW, to overcome the semantic gap that has hampered progress in multimedia information retrieval for some time now.

  14. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-02-01

    The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

  15. Healthy and Affordable Housing: Practical Recommendations for Building, Renovating and Maintaining Housing: Read This Before You Move In

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-09-06

    This document provides advice for healthy and affordable housing: practical recommendations for building, renovating, and maintaining housing.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 15 Jun SW Fed Hydro Conference presentation Other Issues.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation Arkansas River Corridor Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee Tenkiller Downstream Fishery Issues DO / Minimum Flows Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update Cultural Resources Impacts Arkansas River Navigation Improvement BUILDING STRONG ® Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation A new biological opinion is underway and expected to be available in the coming weeks. We expect no change in the Least Tern program

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012 SCWE Survey_ORP Briefing (3)(1).pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizational Climate and SCWE Survey ORP Site Findings Report October 4 2012 Survey Purpose * DOE tasked EurekaFacts to conduct a Hanford site-wide (federal and contractor) employee survey * Purpose - evaluate current state of Hanford's - Organizational Climate - Safety Culture - Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE) - Establish a baseline to develop and measure continuous improvement effort 2 Study Description * 2012 Hanford organizational survey was conducted between June 6, 2012 and 27,

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Hentschel_KCD Proj's Impact Fed Power_2015 SWPA Hyd Meeting.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hentschel, P.E. Chief, Maintenance Engineering Section Operations Division Kansas City District 18 June 2015 Projects Impacting Federal Power Kansas City District 2015 Southwestern Federal Hydropower Meeting Branson, MO BUILDING STRONG ® Stockton Water Supply Reallocation  Contract currently in place with City Utilities of Springfield (CUS) for 50,000 ac-ft of storage between elevations 830 and 867 msl (normal pool)  Water Supply Reallocation Study Activities ► Purpose of study is to

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Ozark and WEbbers Hydropower conference1 15 June 2015 15.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWT Project Manager Lee Beverly -SWL Project Manager 18 June 2015 Ozark and Webbers Falls Powerhouse Major Rehabilitation BUILDING STRONG ® * Project Scope: Replace three turbines, rewind three generators and rehabilitate all cranes, tailrace and intake gates and bulkheads. * Total Project cost: $84.7M ($79.9M customer funded) * Turbine Contract Awarded: February 2008 * Awarded Turbine Contract Amount: $39.3M * Current Turbine Contract Amount: $47.1M * Current Required Completion Date : 5

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - RJC-Alastair Gardiner PARC EFRC Research Highlight March 2013.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Crystallisation of Purple Bacterial LH Complexes S i tifi A hi t Scientific Achievement Good progress is being made in crystallising a range of integral membrane LH complexes 1. Significance and Impact The first requirement in understanding the detailed mechanisms of energy transfer in LH is 3-D structural information 3. information Research Details 1. Large, highly resolving crystals of LH2 from Rps acidophila have 2. 3 2. The crystal packing of core complexes from Alc. vinosum h b d t i d

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - SAND2005-2351C_RedStormEarlyExperiences [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Early Experience with Red Storm April 19, 2005 Sue Kelly and Bob Ballance Sandia National Laboratories smkelly@sandia.gov, 505-845-9770 Outline of Talk * Overview of Red Storm * Where we are * How we got here * Where we're going * What we learned Red Storm is a Massively Parallel Processor Users

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWDRegional 5-Yr MIL and Ranking Process_20150616_revised.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-year Plan and MIL The Risk Factors Miles P. Waldron, P.E. Senior Hydropower Program Manager CESWD-PDO 15 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Ranking Criteria for Capitalized Work in Plants (Ranking Worksheet) Hydropower Relative Risk Index (1-5)- Primary Ranking *Condition Index *Consequence Rating Criteria *Hydropower Relative Risk Values Availability Risk Public Safety and Health Environmental Concerns Legal Concerns Impact to Other Business Lines Formulate a Condition Index Rank- 1=High Risk; 5=

  3. Healthy and Affordable Housing: Practical Recommendations for Building, Renovating and Maintaining Housing: Read This Before You Design, Build or Renovate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-09-06

    This document helps builders design, build, or renovate homes, keeping in mind the issues of asthma, health, indoor air quality, dust, and living creatures.

  4. Commercial and Cost Effective Production of Two-Dimensional Read-Out Boards for Sub-Atomic Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crary, David; Majka, Richard

    2010-10-22

    Tech-Etch has considerable experience in numerous related high precision etched Kapton® products including production of GEM foils. The required precision and production process for 2-D readout boards is similar to that developed for GEM foil production. Additionally, Tech-Etch has strong ties with several research institutions (namely Brookhaven National Laboratory, MIT and Yale University) that can help design and evaluate the performance of the readout boards produced at Tech-Etch. Since Tech-Etch is a small company, it also has the capability to produce a large variety of part configurations, optimized for a particular customer??s requirements. We report results from research aimed at developing and demonstrating production of 2-D readout structures for GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) charged particle tracking chambers at Tech-Etch. Readout boards of two types, bi-planar and single plane, were fabricated and evaluated. The results show that Tech-Etch can produce suitable boards of either type however the single plane board has a number of advantages both in production and use that will likely make it the preferred choice for GEM tracking chambers.

  5. FES Case Study Worksheets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Worksheets FES Case Study Worksheets This workshop is closed, and the worksheets can no longer be edited. If you have questions, please report any problems or suggestions for improvement to Richard Gerber (ragerber@lbl.gov). Please choose your worksheet template: Lee Berry, Paul Bonoli, David Green [Read] Jeff Candy [Read] CS Chang [Read] Stephane Ethier [Read] Alex Friedman [Read] Kai Germaschewski [Read] Martin Greenwald [Read] Stephen Jardin [Read] Charlson Kim [Read] Scott Kruger [Read]

  6. Volatile organic compound and particulate emission studies of AF (Air Force) paint-booth facilities. Phase 1. Final report, February-December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayer, J.; Wolbach, D.

    1988-07-01

    This study presents the results of volatile organic compound (VOC) and particulate emission surveys performed at three Air Force painting facilities. The three facilities -- one in McClellan AFB buildings 655 and two at Travis AFB in buildings 550 and 1014 -- did not meet local VOC emission standards. The possibility of reducing these emissions with recirculation modifications and various VOC reduction and control strategies is discussed. Although VOC emissions from paint spray booths can be controlled by add-on control systems, control is expensive for present air flow rates. The use of air recirculation within the spray booth can reduce the cost of VOC emission controls by reducing the quantity of air that requires processing. Recirculation systems were designed for two of the painting facilities included in this study. In designing the systems, various criteria such as paint booth VOC concentrations and health and safety standards were considered. Add-on VOC emission-control systems that can be used in conjunction with the recirculation system are evaluated. The devices of interest are a solvent incineration system and an activated-carbon adsorption bed. The VOC removal efficiency, initial capital investment and operating costs for both of these technologies are discussed.

  7. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of forward-backward asymmetry and top polarization in dilepton final states from tt¯ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simultaneous measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry and the top-quark polarization in tt¯ production in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector. To reconstruct the distributions of kinematic observables we employ a matrix element technique that calculates the likelihood of the possible tt¯ kinematic configurations. After accounting for the presence of background events and for calibration effects, we obtain a forward-backward asymmetry of Att¯=(15.0±6.4(stat)±4.9(syst))% and a top-quark polarization times spin analyzing power in the beam basis of κP=(7.2±10.5(stat)±4.2(syst))%, with a correlation of -56% between the measurements. If we constrain the forward-backward asymmetry to its expected standard model value, we obtain a measurement of the top polarization ofκP=(11.3±9.1(stat)±1.9(syst))%. If we constrain the top polarization to its expected standard model value, we measure a forward-backward asymmetry of Att¯=(17.5±5.6(stat)±3.1(syst))%. A combination with the D0 Att¯ measurement in the lepton+jets final state yields an asymmetry of Att¯=(11.8±2.5(stat)±1.3(syst))%. Within their respective uncertainties, all these results are consistent with the standard model expectations.

  9. Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy; Li, Na; Hodgson, Alfred; Offermann, Francis; Singer, Brett

    2013-02-01

    Continually changing materials used in home construction and finishing can introduce new chemicals or changes in the VOC profile in residential air and the trend towards tighter homes can lead to higher exposure concentrations for many indoor sources. However, the complex mixture of VOCs in residential air makes it difficult to discover emerging contaminants and/or trends in pollutant profiles. The purpose of this study is to prepare a comprehensive library of chemicals found in homes, along with a semi-quantitative approach to maximize the information gained from VOC measurements. We carefully reviewed data from 108 new California homes and identified 238 individual compounds. The majority of the identified VOCs originated indoors. Only 31% were found to have relevant health based exposure guidelines and less than 10% had a chronic reference exposure level (CREL). The finding highlights the importance of extending IAQ studies to include a wider range of VOCs

  10. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  11. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-16

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  12. Motor vehicle fuel economy, the forgotten HC control stragegy. [Hydrocarbon (HC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluchi, M.; Wang, Quanlu; Greene, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    Emissions of hydrocarbons from motor vehicles are recognized as major contributors to ozone pollution in urban areas. Petroleum-based motor fuels contain volatile organic compounds (VOC) which, together with oxides of nitrogen, promote the formation of ozone in the troposphere via complex photochemical reactions. VOC emissions from the tailpipe and evaporation from the fuel and engine systems of highway vehicles are believed to account for about 40% of total VOC emissions in any region. But motor fuels also generate emissions throughout the fuel cycle, from crude oil production to refining, storage, transportation, and handling, that can make significant contributions to the total inventory of VOC emissions. Many of these sources of emissions are directly related to the quantity of fuel produced and handled throughout the fuel cycle. It is, therefore, reasonable to expect that a reduction in total fuel throughput might result in a reduction of VOC emissions. In particular, reducing vehicle fuel consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy should reduce total fuel throughput, thereby cutting total emissions of VOCS. In this report we identify the sources of VOC emissions throughout the motor fuel cycle, quantify them to the extent possible, and describe their dependence on automobile and light truck fuel economy.

  13. Motor vehicle fuel economy, the forgotten HC control stragegy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluchi, M.; Wang, Quanlu; Greene, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    Emissions of hydrocarbons from motor vehicles are recognized as major contributors to ozone pollution in urban areas. Petroleum-based motor fuels contain volatile organic compounds (VOC) which, together with oxides of nitrogen, promote the formation of ozone in the troposphere via complex photochemical reactions. VOC emissions from the tailpipe and evaporation from the fuel and engine systems of highway vehicles are believed to account for about 40% of total VOC emissions in any region. But motor fuels also generate emissions throughout the fuel cycle, from crude oil production to refining, storage, transportation, and handling, that can make significant contributions to the total inventory of VOC emissions. Many of these sources of emissions are directly related to the quantity of fuel produced and handled throughout the fuel cycle. It is, therefore, reasonable to expect that a reduction in total fuel throughput might result in a reduction of VOC emissions. In particular, reducing vehicle fuel consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy should reduce total fuel throughput, thereby cutting total emissions of VOCS. In this report we identify the sources of VOC emissions throughout the motor fuel cycle, quantify them to the extent possible, and describe their dependence on automobile and light truck fuel economy.

  14. A proposal for a UPC memory consistency model, v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelick, Katherine; Bonachea, Dan; Wallace, Charles

    2004-05-05

    The memory consistency model in a language defines the order in which the results of write operations maybe observed through read operations. The behavior of a UPC program may depend on the timing of accesses to shared variables, so a program defines a set of possible executions, rather than a single execution. The memory consistency model constrains the set of possible executions for a given program; the user may then rely on properties that are true of all of those executions. The memory consistency model is defined in terms of the read and write operations issued by each thread in naive translation of the code, i.e., without any code transformations by the compiler, with each thread issuing operations as defined by the abstract machine defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3. A UPC compiler or run time system may perform various code transformations to improve performance, so long as they are not visible to the programmer - i.e., provided the set of externally-visible behaviors (the input/output dynamics and volatile behavior defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3) from any execution of the transformed program are identical to those of the original program executing on the abstract machine and adhering to the consistency model defined in this document.

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2010 Emissions Summary Table for U.S. Buildings Energy Consumption (Thousand Short Tons) (1) Buildings Buildings Percent Wood/SiteFossil Electricity Total U.S. Total of U.S. Total SO2 (2) 54% NOx 17% CO 5% VOCs 2% PM-2.5 15% PM-10 7% Note(s): Source(s): 1) VOCs = volatile organic compounds; PM-10 = particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter. PM-2.5 = particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter. CO and VOCs site fossil emissions mostly from wood

  16. Decomposition of chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes in an electron beam generated plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    An electron beam generated plasma reactor (EBGPR) is used to determine the plasma chemistry kinetics, energetics and decomposition pathways of six chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, ethyl chloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. A traditional chemical kinetic and chemical engineering analysis of the data from the EBGPR is performed, and the following hypothesis was verified: The specific energy required for chlorinated VOC decomposition in the electron beam generated plasma reactor is determined by the electron attachment coefficient of the VOC and the susceptibility of the molecule to radical attack. The technology was demonstrated at the Hanford Reservation to remove VOCs from soils.

  17. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  18. Environmental Management Advisory Board Members | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EMAB Board Member Read Bio David W. Swindle, Jr. EMAB Board Member Read Bio Robert J. Thompson EMAB Board Member Read Bio Lenn Vincent EMAB Board Member Read Bio

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Personal Computing Equipment, Data Center Equipment, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading...

  20. Chemical Transformation - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Read More Chemical Transformation January 13, 2015, Research Highlights ... Read More Chemical Transformation December 16, 2014, Research Highlights Electrode ...

  1. DOE-STD-1033-92 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Good Practices for Operations and Administration Updates Through Required Reading ... Administration Updates Through Required Reading More Documents & Publications ...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Food Service Equipment, Vending Machine Controls, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment, Data Center Equipment, Reflective Roofs, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading...

  4. Undergraduate Students | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Undergraduate Students Undergraduate Students Kirstie Swingle Undergraduate Student Read more about Kirstie Swingle Stephanie Botkin Read more about Stephanie Botkin Savannah Fuqua Read more about Savannah Fuqua Jennifer Li Read more about Jennifer Li Neil Stein Read more about Neil Stein Jieun Yim Undergraduate Student Read more about Jieun Yim Jared Ross Undergraduate Student Read more about Jared Ross Ryan Farhat-Sabet Undergraduate Student Read more about Ryan Farhat-Sabet Caroline Focht

  5. DOE Tour of Zero: The Charlottesville Infill by Promethean Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 of 13 Low-no-VOC certified paints and finishes are used for a healthier indoor environment. 6 of 13 This home uses an ultra-efficient heat pump system (21 SEER, 12.2...

  6. Gas Cleaning and Siloxane Removal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H2S, Siloxanes, VOCs, CO2, N2 and O2 - Production of gas for Pipeline, CNG and LNG - ... or upon combustion forms particles of Silica (SiO2) * Found in WWTP Digester Gas and ...

  7. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light JV characteristic and schematic of the dopant-free asymmetric heterocontact (DASH) silicon solar cell showing a conversion efficiency of 19.4%, with a high Voc above 710 mV, ...

  8. CX-013757: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 03/30/2015 Location(s): District of ColumbiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. Apparatus for sensing volatile organic chemicals in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Kottenstette, Richard; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2005-06-07

    A chemical-sensing apparatus is formed from the combination of a chemical preconcentrator which sorbs and concentrates particular volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and one or more chemiresistors that sense the VOCs after the preconcentrator has been triggered to release them in concentrated form. Use of the preconcentrator and chemiresistor(s) in combination allows the VOCs to be detected at lower concentration than would be possible using the chemiresistor(s) alone and further allows measurements to be made in a variety of fluids, including liquids (e.g. groundwater). Additionally, the apparatus provides a new mode of operation for sensing VOCs based on the measurement of decay time constants, and a method for background correction to improve measurement precision.

  10. Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently added a 6 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system to provide power to operate an enhanced treatment system that removes volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated groundwater at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site.

  11. DOE Tour of Zero: Anna Model by Charles Thomas Homes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-VOC paints and finishes help limit contaminants in the home while high-efficiency ceiling fans can help make occupants feel cooler. 7 of 11 EPA WaterSense-rated fixtures ...

  12. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (JSC) exceeds 16 mAcm2, which is among the highest values reported for a C60-based BHJ solar cell, albeit at a comparatively low VOC. A generalized structure-function...

  13. Template for Title Slide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Interior U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Strategy Daniel J. Goode, Ph.D. Research ... This VOC was not detected in subsequent samples from the same well. 21 Take Home Messages ...

  14. Limitation of the Open-Circuit Voltage Due to Metastable Intrinsic Defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Strategies to Avoid These Defects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lany, S.; Zunger, A.

    2008-05-01

    This paper summarizes using first-principles defect theory to investigate the role of intrinsic point defects in the limitation of the open-circuit voltage (VOC) in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells.

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - DRAFT-0013.1 - Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities, LLC comment.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8/2010 1 Green Grid Gateway @ North Coast Oregon America's First Smart Grid R&D Testing Business Campus _______________________________________________ 7/15/2010 Presentation to: Clatsop County Commissioners By Tom Barquinero Green Grid LLC By Tom Barquinero, Green Grid LLC The Green Grid Gateway Concept An R&D Testing Microgrid Substation Utility Data Control Centers in Campus Bldgs. AMI Commercial Buildings & Residences Testing Independent of Utility Involvement 11/8/2010 2 The

  16. Multi-kb Illumina reads Reveal Significant Strain Variation and Rare Organisms in Aquifer (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon, Itai [UC Berkely

    2014-03-20

    Itai Sharon from the University of California at Berkely speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2015-06-18 Corps Columbia Riverkeeper Settlement SWPA Mtg.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRESENTATION TITLE Wayne Todd Sr. Hydropower Program Manager Northwestern Division Corps of Engineers Agreement with Columbia Riverkeeper Regarding Hydropower Plant Discharges 2015 Southwestern Federal Hydropower Meeting June 18, 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Who is Columbia Riverkeeper? 2 From their official website: Columbia Riverkeeper is the leading public-interest group working to protect the Columbia.... While we utilize sophisticated scientific, legal, and policy tools to protect the river, we

  18. October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002 - September 2002 (CRAC 2 period) October 2001 - March 2002 (CRAC 1 period) Final LB CRAC True-Ups for FY 2006 True-Up for CRAC 9 Period: June 14, 2006 Workshop True-Up for...

  19. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Thornberg, Steven Michael

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  20. Resource conservation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Attachments: Volume 4 of 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Volume IV contains the following attachments for Module IV: VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests (Appendix D12); bin emission control and VOC monitoring system drawings; bin scale test room ventilation drawings; WIPP supplementary roof support system, underground storage area, room 1, panel 1, DOE/WIPP 91-057; and WIPP supplementary roof support system, room 1, panel 1, geotechnical field data analysis bi-annual report, DOE/WIPP 92-024.

  1. Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  2. Florida Power & Light Company, 700 Universe Blvd. Juno Beach 33408

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Introduction A combined heat and power (CHP) system can be a financially attractive energy option for many industrial and commercial facilities. This is particularly the case in areas of the country with high electricity rates. However, regions with air quality concerns often have strict limits on criteria pollutants, such as nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and

  3. Hanford Site - 100-BC-5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BC-5 Hanford Site - 100-BC-5 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-BC-5 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 2.8 No Metal Name Metal Concentration

  4. Hanford Site - 100-FR-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FR-3 Hanford Site - 100-FR-3 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-FR-3 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCS 15 Yes 5 (DWS) Fuel Present? No

  5. Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    KR-4 Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-KR-4 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 8.3 Yes 5 (DWS) Fuel Present? No

  6. Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    300-FF-3 Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 300-FF-3 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DCE 220 Yes 16 (CUL) TCE 430 Yes 4

  7. Idaho National Laboratory - WAG-1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Idaho National Laboratory - WAG-1 January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report Installation Name, State: Idaho National Laboratory, ID Responsible DOE Office: Office of Nuclear Energy Plume Name: WAG-1 Remediation Contractor: CWI PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement PCE 21 Yes 5 TCE 1272 Yes 5 VC 7 Yes 2 cis-1,2-DCE

  8. Biotic and Abiotic Transformation of a Volatile Organics Plume in a Semi-Arid Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, J.E.; Singletary, M.A.; Miller, D.R.

    1999-04-08

    An evaluation of biotic and abiotic attenuation processes potentially important to chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) fate and transport in the 148 meter thick vadose zone beneath the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was conducted. A unique feature of this evaluation is the comparison of two estimates of VOC mass present in the soil gas, pore-water, and solid phases (but not including mass as non-aqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) of the vadose zone in 1993. One estimate, 1,800 kg, was obtained from vadose zone transport modeling that incorporated molecular diffusion and volatilization to the atmosphere, but not biotic or chemical processes. The other estimate, 2,120 kg, was obtained from the sum of VOC mass physically removed during soil vapor extraction and an estimate of VOC mass remaining in the vadose zone in 1998, both adjusted to exclude NAPL mass. This comparison indicates that biogeochemical processes were at best slightly important to historical VOC plume development. Some evidence of aerobic degradation of non-chlorinated VOCs and abiotic transformation of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane was identified. Despite potentially amenable site conditions, no evidence was found of cometabolic and anaerobic transformation pathways. Relying principally on soil-gas analytical results, an upper-bound estimate of 21% mass reduction due to natural biogeochemical processes was developed. Although available information for the CWL indicates that natural attenuation processes other than volatilization to the atmosphere did not effective y enhance groundwater protection, these processes could be important in significantly reducing groundwater contamination and exposure risks at other sites. More laboratory and field research is required to improve our collective ability to characterize and exploit natural VOC attenuation processes, especially with respect to the combination of relatively thick and dry vadose zones and chlorinated VOCs.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory - WAG-7 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Laboratory - WAG-7 Idaho National Laboratory - WAG-7 January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Idaho National Laboratory, ID Responsible DOE Office: Office of Nuclear Energy Plume Name: WAG-7 Remediation Contractor: CWI PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement CCI4 5.43 Yes 5 Fuel

  10. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    903 Pad Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement CCl4 505 Yes PCE 800 Yes 5 TCE 5500 Yes 5 other (provide names) TCM 850 Yes Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? No Multiple Units Affected? No Depth (feet): 14 Avg

  11. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Management Plume Name: Ashtabula Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: Unknown Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 440000 No VC 47 No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Pb 28 No Ba 3222 No Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Tc 591000 No U 12400 No

  12. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Management Plume Name: Fernald Remediation Contractor: S.M. Stoller Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 120 Yes 5 carbon disulfide 14 Yes 5.5 Fuel Present? Yes Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Mn 11400 Yes 900 Mo 690 Yes 100 U 1586 Yes 30 Ni 134 Yes 100 Zn 155 Yes 21 Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity

  13. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Management Plume Name: Great Miami Aquifer Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: Unknown Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 58 No carbon disulfide 6 No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Mn 2000 No Mo 200 No U 845 No Ni 1540 No Zn 30 No Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory

  14. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OU 1 Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement PCE Yes 5 TCE Yes 5 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? Yes Activity: (pCi/l) Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? No Multiple Units Affected? No Depth (feet): 25 Avg Velocity (feet/year):

  15. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Salmon Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Alluvial Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 190 Yes 5 cis-1,2-DCE 130 Yes 70 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement As 19 Yes 10 Cr (total) 120 Yes 100 Pb 16 Yes 15 Isotopes Present? No Explosives

  16. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tritium Remediation Contractor: SM Soller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2008 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 15 Yes 5 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? Yes Multiple Units Affected? No Depth (feet): 25 Avg Velocity (feet/year): Plume Information (no

  17. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 763 Yes 5 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement U 264 Yes 20 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DNT (dinitrotoluene) Yes 0.11 Other

  18. Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  19. Savannah River Site - Central Shops GW OU | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Central Shops GW OU Savannah River Site - Central Shops GW OU January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: Central Shops GW OU Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup

  20. Savannah River Site - F-Area Seepage Basins | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    F-Area Seepage Basins Savannah River Site - F-Area Seepage Basins January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: F-Area Seepage Basins Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver

  1. Savannah River Site - GSA Western | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GSA Western Savannah River Site - GSA Western January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: GSA Western Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 34 Yes 5

  2. Savannah River Site - H-Area Seepage Basins | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    H-Area Seepage Basins Savannah River Site - H-Area Seepage Basins January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: H-Area Seepage Basins Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver

  3. Savannah River Site - Sanitary Landfill | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  4. Biological Air Emissions Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Air Emissions Control Biological Air Emissions Control Innovative Technology Enables Low-Cost, Energy-Efficient Treatment of Industrial Exhaust Streams Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and acrolein) during production of wood products must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOCs and HAPs emission

  5. Coupled ππ, KK¯ scattering in P-wave and the ρ resonance from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering in $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $m_\\pi = 236$ MeV in a cubic volume of $\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $\\pi\\pi$, $K\\overline{K}$ and $q\\bar{q}$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $\\pi\\pi$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $\\rho$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $K\\overline{K}$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.

  6. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle inpp¯Z/γ*e+e-Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.  M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.  S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.  P.; Alexeev, G.  D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.  V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.  F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.  B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.  C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.  E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.  B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.  P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.  C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.  M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.  W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.  E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.  J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.  P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.  T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.  F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.  V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.  D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.  N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.  E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.  H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.  A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.  E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.  D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.  W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.  M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.  P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.  D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.  D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.  L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.  S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.  S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.  W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.  N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.  M.; Kozelov, A.  V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V.  A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.  S.; Lee, S.  W.; Lee, W.  M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.  Z.; Lim, J.  K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.  V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.  L.; Maciel, A.  K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.  L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.  L.; Meijer, M.  M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.  G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.  K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.  A.; Negret, J.  P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.  T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.  K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V.  M.; Popov, A.  V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.  N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M.  P.; Santos, A.  S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.  D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.  A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.  R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.  A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.  V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.  M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.  W.; Vasilyev, I.  A.; Verkheev, A.  Y.; Vertogradov, L.  S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H.  D.; Wang, M.  H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M.  R. J.; Wilson, G.  W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D.  R.; Wyatt, T.  R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.  A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S.  W.; Yu, J.  M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.  G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2θeff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp¯→Z/γ*→e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2θeff=0.23147±0.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  7. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state inB0?J/?K-?+decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  8. Effects of uncertainty in SAPRC90 rate constants and selected product yields on reactivity adjustment factors for alternative fuel vehicle emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergin, M.S.; Russell, A.G.; Yang, Y.J.; Milford, J.B.; Kirchner, F.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Tropospheric ozone is formed in the atmosphere by a series of reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). While NOx emissions are primarily composed of only two compounds, nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), there are hundreds of different VOCs being emitted. In general, VOCs promote ozone formation, however, the rate and extent of ozone produced by the individual VOCs varies considerably. For example, it is widely acknowledged that formaldehyde (HCHO) is a very reactive VOC, and produces ozone rapidly and efficiently under most conditions. On the other hand, VOCs such as methane, ethane, propane, and methanol do not react as quickly, and are likely to form less urban ozone than a comparable mass of HCHO. The difference in ozone forming potential is one of the bases for the use of alternative fuels. The fuels considered in this study included compressed natural gas, LPG, mixtures of methanol and gasoline, ethanol and gasoline, and a reformulated gasoline.

  9. Ventilation Control of Volatile Organic Compounds in New U.S. Homes: Results of a Controlled Field Study in Nine Residential Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willem, Henry; Hult, Erin L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion L.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Singer, Brett C.

    2013-01-01

    In order to optimize strategies to remove airborne contaminants in residences, it is necessary to determine how contaminant concentrations respond to changes in the air exchange rate. The impact of air exchange rate on the indoor concentrations of 39 target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was assessed by measuring air exchange rates and VOC concentrations at three ventilation settings in nine residences. Active sampling methods were used for VOC concentration measurements, and passive perfluorocarbon tracer gas emitters with active sampling were used to determine the overall air exchange rate corresponding to the VOC measurements at each ventilation setting. The concentration levels and emission rates of the target VOCs varied by as much as two orders of magnitude across sites. Aldehyde and terpene compounds were typically the chemical classes with highest concentrations, followed by alkanes, aromatics, and siloxanes. For each home, VOC concentrations tended to decrease as the air exchange rate was increased, however, measurement uncertainty was significant. The indoor concentration was inversely proportional to air exchange rate for most compounds. For a subset of compounds including formaldehyde, however, the indoor concentration exhibited a non-linear dependence on the timescale for air exchange

  10. Assessment of gas flammability in transuranic waste container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Loehr, C.A.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    The Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package [Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) SARP] set limits for gas generation rates, wattage limits, and flammable volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in transuranic (TRU) waste containers that would be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Based on existing headspace gas data for drums stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), over 30 percent of the contact-handled TRU waste drums contain flammable VOC concentrations greater than the limit. Additional requirements may be imposed for emplacement of waste in the WIPP facility. The conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the facility required that flame tests be performed if significant levels of flammable VOCs were present in TRU waste containers. This paper describes an approach for investigating the potential flammability of TRU waste drums, which would increase the allowable concentrations of flammable VOCS. A flammability assessment methodology is presented that will allow more drums to be shipped to WIPP without treatment or repackaging and reduce the need for flame testing on drums. The approach includes experimental work to determine mixture lower explosive limits (MLEL) for the types of gas mixtures observed in TRU waste, a model for predicting the MLEL for mixtures of VOCS, hydrogen, and methane, and revised screening limits for total flammable VOCs concentrations and concentrations of hydrogen and methane using existing drum headspace gas data and the model predictions.

  11. Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Double Vision into Atomizing Sprays Read more... Carbon in the Core Read more... Making Super-Tough Materials the See-Through-Mollusk Way Read more... Setting a Baseline for Iron's...

  12. Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpet cushions: Screening measurements. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, A.T.; Phan, T.A.

    1994-05-01

    The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has received complaints from consumers regarding the occurrence of adverse health effects following the installation of new carpeting (Schachter, 1990). Carpet systems are suspected of emitting chemicals which may be the cause of these complaints, as well as objectionable odors. Carpets themselves have been shown to emit a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The objective of this study was to screen the representative samples of carpet cushions for emissions of individual VOCS, total VOCs (TVOC), formaldehyde, and, for the two types of polyurethane cushions, isomers of toluene diisocyanate (TDI). The measurements of VOCS, TVOC and formaldehyde were made over six-hour periods using small-volume (4-L) dynamic chambers. Sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques were used to identify many of the VOCs emitted by the cushion samples and to obtain quantitative estimates of the emission rates of selected compounds. Separate screening measurements were conducted for TDI. The data from the screening measurements were used by the CPSC`s Health Sciences Laboratory to help design and conduct week-long measurements of emission rates of selected compounds.

  13. Full body powder antichip. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-17

    Chipping is the major paint defect listed for automobile customer dissatisfaction. The improved chip resistance and smoother paint surfaces produced by full body powder antichip will result in greater customer satisfaction and greater demand for US-produced automobiles. Powder antichip contains virtually no solvent, thereby reducing the potential VOC emissions from Newark Assembly by more than 90 tons per year as compared to the solvent-borne material presently applied in most full body applications. Since Newark Assembly Plant is in a severe non-attainment air quality area, which must demonstrate a 15% reduction in emissions by 1996, projects such as this are crucial to the longevity of industry in this region. The liquid paint spray systems include incineration of the oven volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) at 1,500 F. Since there are minimal VOC`s in powder coatings and the only possible releases occur only during polymerization, incineration is not required. The associated annual savings resulting from the elimination of the incinerator utilized on the liquid spray system is 1.44 {times} 10{sup 10} BTU`s per unit installed. The annual cost savings is approximately $388 thousand, far below the original estimates.

  14. Office of the Chief Information Officer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of the Chief Information Officer DOE Cyber Distinguished Speaker Series DOE Cyber Distinguished Speaker Series Learn from the experts. Read more DOE Cyber Strategy DOE Cyber Strategy Check out the DOE's strategy for meeting today's cyber challenges. Read more Women in STEM Women in STEM Read about women working in STEM at Energy. Read more Records Management Records Management Your guide to Records Management. Read more FY 2014-2018 DOE IRM STRATEGIC PLAN Read the FY 2014-2018 DOE IRM

  15. Theme 2 Members | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Members Theme 2 Members Volker Urban Principal Investigator Read more about Volker Urban Dean Myles Dean Myles Principal Investigator Read more about Dean Myles Himadri Pakrasi Himadri Pakrasi Principal Investigator Read more about Himadri Pakrasi Graham Leggett Graham Leggett Professor Read more about Graham Leggett Neil Hunter Neil Hunter Theme 2 Leader/Principal Investigator Read more about Neil Hunter Dewey Holten Associate Director/Theme 3 Leader/Principal Investigator Read more about

  16. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  17. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA hosts CTBT inspectors at Nevada National Security Site Read more Y-12 honors its inventors for technology transfer Read more Sandia National Laboratories Contract Process Announced Read more NNSA honors two security professionals who protect U.S. nuclear enterprise Read more NNSA lab makes fire tornados to ensure weapon safety Read more Sandia's California site invites community to 60th anniversary Read more CTBT inspectors Tech Transfer Sandia Contract Security awards Fire tornados Sandia

  18. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    application runtimes vs node placement. Read More Hopper Performance Monitoring Benchmarking performance of scientific applications on Hopper Read More Hopper:Improving IO...

  19. Theme 1 Members | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Members Theme 1 Members Volker Urban Principal Investigator Read more about Volker Urban Dean Myles Dean Myles Principal Investigator Read more about Dean Myles Himadri Pakrasi...

  20. Principal Investigators | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schulten Klaus Schulten Principal Investigator Read more about Klaus Schulten Volker Urban Principal Investigator Read more about Volker Urban Andrew Shreve Andrew Shreve...