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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

3

Calculation of heating values for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments. (authors)

Peterson, J.; Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are compared with calculations made with a state-of-the art radiative transfer model (Modtran). The model is driven by measurements that give an as accurate as possible...

6

Model for Calculating Photosynthetic Photon Flux Densities in Forest Openings on Slopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model has been developed to calculate the spatial distribution of the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in elliptical forest openings of given slopes and orientations. The PPFD is separated into direct and diffuse components. The direct ...

Jing M. Chen; T. Andrew Black; David T. Price; Reid E. Carter

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Use of the Inertial Dissipation Method for Calculating Turbulent Fluxes from Low-Level Airborne Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements are currently used for computing turbulence fluxes of heat and momentum. The method generally used is the eddy correlation technique, which requires sophisticated equipments to calculate the absolute velocities of the air. ...

Pierre Durand; Leonardo De Sa; Aimé Druilhet; Frédérique Said

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Calculation of Consistent Flux and Advective Terms from Adjusted Vertical Profiles of Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple framework is presented for adjusting the normal wind components in a polygon of data points which produces a vanishing vertical integral of horizontal divergence, allows correct calculation of flux and advective terms, and permits ...

John Molinari; Steven Skubis

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Comparison of Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Calculations Using the Bowen Ratio and Aerodynamic Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis technique is outlined that calculates the sensible and latent heat fluxes by the Bowen ratio and aerodynamic methods, using profile measurements at any number of heights. Field measurements at two sites near Churchill, Manitoba, ...

David H. Halliwell; Wayne R. Rouse

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Efficient Calculation of Infrared Fluxes and Cooling Rates Using the Two-Stream Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calculation of infrared radiative fluxes and cooling rates using the two-stream equations is discussed. It is argued that at infrared wavelengths the two-stream equations are best viewed as an approximation to the differential radiance, the ...

J. M. Edwards

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Calculating Monthly Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates fromMonthly Cloud Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative transfer model from NCAR’s general circulation model CCM3 is modified to calculate monthly radiative fluxes and heating rates from monthly observations of cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project ...

John W. Bergman; Harry H. Hendon

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integrated framework for the flux calculation of neutral species inside trenches and holes during plasma etching  

SciTech Connect

An integrated framework for the neutral flux calculation inside trenches and holes during plasma etching is described, and a comparison between the two types of structure in a number of applications is presented. First, a detailed and functional set of equations for the neutral and ion flux calculations inside long trenches and holes with cylindrical symmetry is explicitly formulated. This set is based on early works [T. S. Cale and G. B. Raupp, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 8, 1242 (1990); V. K. Singh et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10, 1091 (1992)], and includes new equations for the case of holes with cylindrical symmetry. Second, a method for the solution of the respective numerical task, i.e., one or a set of linear or nonlinear integral equations, is described. This method includes a coupling algorithm with a surface chemistry model and resolves the singularity problem of the integral equations. Third, the fluxes inside trenches and holes are compared. The flux from reemission is the major portion of the local flux at the bottom of both types of structure. The framework is applied in SiO{sub 2} etching by fluorocarbon plasmas to predict the increased intensity of reactive ion etching lag in SiO{sub 2} holes compared to trenches. It is also applied in deep Si etching: By calculating the flux of F atoms at the bottom of very high aspect ratio (up to 150) Si trenches and holes during the gas chopping process, the aspect ratio at which the flux of F atoms is eliminated and etching practically stops is estimated.

Kokkoris, George; Boudouvis, Andreas G.; Gogolides, Evangelos [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki 15310 (Greece); School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou Campus, Attiki 15780 (Greece); Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki 15310 (Greece)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Comparison of three-dimensional neutron flux calculations for Maine Yankee  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed on the Maine Yankee Power Plant to obtain three-dimensional neutron fluxes using the spatial synthesis with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code THREEDANT and the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP. Neutron fluxes are compared for energies above 0.1 MeV and 1.0 MeV as well as dpa. Results were obtained at the Yankee dosimetry locations and special test regions within the pressure vessel, in the reactor cavity, and in a shield tank detector well.

Urban, W.T.; Crotzer, L.A.; Waters, L.S.; Parsons, D.K.; Alcouffe, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spinney, K.B.; Cacciapouti, R.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

15

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

16

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

17

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

18

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

19

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.2 Print 0.2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

20

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

22

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

23

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

24

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

25

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

26

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

27

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

28

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

29

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

30

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

31

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

32

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.0.2 Print 2.0.2 Print Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

33

The method of convergence to calculate particles fluxes in X rays spectrometry techniques. Application in nuclear compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to calculate particle fluxes applicable in most of the spectroscopy techniques is described. Flux intensities of backscattered or absorbed electrons and emitted photons are calculated using a method of convergence to solve the invariant embedding equations that are used to describe the particle trajectories inside a solid sample. Our results are found to be helpful to carry out a procedure for quantitative characterization using instruments such as electron probe microanalyser or other probes. Examples of application to calculate the composition of ternary alloys are given and are compared with the same calculations using another procedure.

Figueroa, C.; Nieva, N.; Brizuela, H.; Heluani, S. P. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Solido, Dpto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Very narrow band model calculations of atmospheric fluxes and cooling rates  

SciTech Connect

A new very narrow band model (VNBM) approach has been developed and incorporated into the MODTRAN atmospheric transmittance-radiance code. The VNBM includes a computational spectral resolution of 1 cm{sup {minus}1}, a single-line Voigt equivalent width formalism that is based on the Rodgers-Williams approximation and accounts for the finite spectral width of the interval, explicit consideration of line tails, a statistical line overlap correction, a new sublayer integration approach that treats the effect of the sublayer temperature gradient on the path radiance, and the Curtis-Godson (CG) approximation for inhomogeneous paths. A modified procedure for determining the line density parameter 1/d is introduced, which reduces its magnitude. This results in a partial correction of the VNBM tendency to overestimate the interval equivalent widths. The standard two parameter CG approximation is used for H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, while the Goody three parameter CG approximation is used for O{sub 3}. Atmospheric flux and cooling rate predictions using a research version of MODTRAN, MODR, are presented for H{sub 2}O (with and without the continuum), CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} for several model atmospheres. The effect of doubling the CO{sub 2} concentration is also considered. These calculations are compared to line-by-line (LBL) model calculations using the AER, GLA, GFDL, and GISS codes. The MODR predictions fall within the spread of the LBL results. The effects of decreasing the band model spectral resolution are illustrated using CO{sub 2} cooling rate and flux calculations. 36 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Bernstein, L.S.; Berk, A.; Acharya, P.K.; Robertson, D.C. [Spectral Sciences, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States)] [and others] [Spectral Sciences, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); and others

1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Neutron Flux Measurements and Calculations in the Gamma Irradiation Facility Using MCNPX.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gamma irradiation facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)is used to deliver a pure gamma dose to any target of interest. in addition… (more)

Giuliano, Dominic Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

37

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

38

Calculation of Surface Fluxes under Convective Conditions by Turbulence Closure Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of deriving new relationships between near-surface turbulent fluxes and vertical differences of wind speed and potential temperature between two levels in the atmospheric surface layer from simplified second-order turbulence closure ...

Lech ?obocki

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CALCULATION OF EFFECT OF FUEL BURNUP ON FUEL AND POISON DISTRIBUTIONS AND ON FLUX DISTRIBUTION IN THE MARINE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The changes in fuel and poison distributions and the changes in flux shape which accompany the consumption of fuel are studied. The technique employed is a perturbation calculation based on a one-velocity group treatment of the neutrons. The geometry is a spherical core surrounded by an infinite reflector. The programming forms for the IBM-650 which performs the computations using the Wolontis interpretative system are included. Two sample calculations were worked out using the code described and the results are plotted. (M.H.R.)

Hinman, G.

1957-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Simple Radiative Transfer Methods for Calculating Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes in Inhomogeneous Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of cloud fraction as a means of incorporating horizontal cloud inhomogeneity in radiative transfer calculations is widespread in the atmospheric science community. This study addresses some issues pertaining to the use of cloud fraction ...

P. M. Gabriel; K. F. Evans

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Neutron Flux Interpolation with Finite Element Method in the Nuclear Fuel Cell Calculation using Collision Probability Method  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactor design and analysis of next-generation reactors require a comprehensive computing which is better to be executed in a high performance computing. Flat flux (FF) approach is a common approach in solving an integral transport equation with collision probability (CP) method. In fact, the neutron flux distribution is not flat, even though the neutron cross section is assumed to be equal in all regions and the neutron source is uniform throughout the nuclear fuel cell. In non-flat flux (NFF) approach, the distribution of neutrons in each region will be different depending on the desired interpolation model selection. In this study, the linear interpolation using Finite Element Method (FEM) has been carried out to be treated the neutron distribution. The CP method is compatible to solve the neutron transport equation for cylindrical geometry, because the angle integration can be done analytically. Distribution of neutrons in each region of can be explained by the NFF approach with FEM and the calculation results are in a good agreement with the result from the SRAC code. In this study, the effects of the mesh on the k{sub eff} and other parameters are investigated.

Shafii, M. Ali [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Kurniasih, Neny [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Yulianti, Yanti [Physics Department, Lampung University, Jl.Sumantri Brojonegoro no 1, Lampung (Indonesia); Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

MCNP modeling of the Swiss LWRs for the calculation of the in- and ex-vessel neutron flux distributions  

SciTech Connect

MCNP models of all Swiss Nuclear Power Plants have been developed by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), in collaboration with the utilities and ETH Zurich, for the 2011 decommissioning cost study. The estimation of the residual radionuclide inventories and corresponding activity levels of irradiated structures and components following the NPP shut-down is of crucial importance for the planning of the dismantling process, the waste packaging concept and, consequently, for the estimation of the decommissioning costs. Based on NPP specific data, the neutron transport simulations lead to the best yet knowledge of the neutron spectra necessary for the ensuing activation calculations. In this paper, the modeling concept towards the MCNP-NPPs is outlined and the resulting flux distribution maps are presented. (authors)

Pantelias, M.; Volmert, B.; Caruso, S. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste Nagra, Hardstrasse 73, 5430, Wettingen (Switzerland); Zvoncek, P. [Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092, Zurich (Switzerland); Bitterli, B. [Kernkraftwerk Goesgen-Daeniken AG, 4658 Daeniken (Switzerland); Neukaeter, E.; Nissen, W. [BKW FMB Energie AG-Kernkraftwerk Muehleberg, 3203 Muehleberg (Switzerland); Ledergerber, G. [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, 5325 Leibstadt (Switzerland); Vielma, R. [Axpo AG-Kernkraftwerk Beznau, 5312 Doettingen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

On the use of flux limiters in the discrete ordinates method for 3D radiation calculations in absorbing and scattering media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of flux limiters to the discrete ordinates method (DOM), S"N, for radiative transfer calculations is discussed and analyzed for 3D enclosures for cases in which the intensities are strongly coupled to each other such as: radiative equilibrium ... Keywords: Discrete ordinates method (DOM), Flux limiters, Newton-Krylov GMRES, Non-homogeneous 3D media, Radiation heat transfer, Radiative transfer equation (RTE), TVD schemes

William F. Godoy; Paul E. DesJardin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

45

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

46

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

47

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

48

Beamline 12.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.2 0.2 Beamline 12.0.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:30 Coherent science Scientific disciplines: Applied science, magnetism, materials science Endstations: 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Third harmonic of 8-cm-period undulator (U8) Energy range 300-1500 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM, with two gratings (600 and 1200 lines/mm) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 500 eV Resolving power (E/DE) 1,000 Beam size Focused: 70 x 10 µm Unfocused: 200 x 200 µm Endstations 12.0.2.1: Coherent optics 12.0.2.2: Coherent scattering Detectors DetectorsCCD, photodiode, scintillator Scientific applications Branchlines designed for spatially coherent soft x-ray experiments

49

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

50

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

51

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

52

Beamline 11.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.3.2 Print 1.3.2 Print Inspection of EUV lithography masks GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 50-1000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Endstations The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool Detector 2048 x 2048 EUV CCD Characteristics 900-1000x zoneplate microscope Spot size at sample 1-5 microns Spatial resolution 60 nm Sample format EUV Photolithography masks: 6" glass plate, multilayer coated for normal incidence reflectivity at 13.4 nm Sample preparation Cleanroom handling Sample environment 2.0 x 10-7 Torr base pressure Scientific applications EUV lithography Local contacts/ Spokespersons This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

53

Beamline 11.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Beamline 11.0.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:16 PEEM3, Soft X-Ray Scattering Scientific disciplines: Magnetism, materials, surface science, polymers Endstations: 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5.0-cm period elliptical polarization undulator (EPU5) Energy range 150-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1013 photons/s/0.1%BW at 800 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 4,000 at 800 eV Endstations 11.0.1.1: Photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) 11.0.1.2: Soft x-ray scattering Special notes Polarization is user selectable; linear polarization continuously variable from horizontal to vertical; left and right elliptical (or circular) polarization

54

Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility  

SciTech Connect

The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Beamline 6.3.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Now Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 300-2000 eV Monochromator VLS-PGM...

56

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reflected Fluxes for Broken Clouds over a Lambertian Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for broken cloudiness (i.e., nonplane parallel) as a function of cloud cover, cloud optical depth, solar zenith angle and surface albedo. These calculations extend previous results for broken cloud reflected fluxes ...

Ronald M. Welch; Bruce A. Wielicki

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

Beamline 6.0.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(6-month cycle) Source characteristics 3.5-cm period undulator (U3) Energy range 250 eV- 1.5 keV Monochromator White light and VLS-PGM, with two gratings (250 and 1000 linesmm)...

65

Float Observations of the Southern Ocean. Part II: Eddy Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (ALACE) floats are used to examine eddy fluxes in the Southern Ocean. Eddy fluxes are calculated from differences between ALACE float data and mean fields derived from hydrographic atlas data or ...

Sarah T. Gille

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Martin Wild; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Tristan L’Ecuyer; Seiji Kato; David S. Henderson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

GCM-Simulated Surface Energy Fluxes in Climate Change Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes in the surface energy fluxes calculated with a general circulation model under increased levels of carbon dioxide concentration are analyzed and related to the simulation of these fluxes under present-day conditions. It is shown that ...

Martin Wild; Atsumu Ohmura; Ulrich Cubasch

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

POLOIDAL FLUX LINKAGE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAREXPERIMENTAL REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flat-top phase of the proposed [2] and JSOLVER [3] to calculate the flux linkage requirements during the current ramp-up and steady regarding the plasma ramp-up time, and the amount of flux linkage change that the poloidal field coil system

70

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Footprint Calculator?  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

fuels and advanced vehicles (AFVs). The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emis- sions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Fleet Foot- print Calculator can help fleets decide on...

72

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

73

Experimental and Computational Study of the Flux Spectrum in Materials Irradiation Facilities of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the available experimental neutron flux data in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to computational models of the HFIR loosely based on the experimental loading of cycle 400. Over the last several decades, many materials irradiation experiments have included fluence monitors which were subsequently used to reconstruct a coarse-group energy-dependent flux spectrum. Experimental values for thermal and fast neutron flux in the flux trap about the midplane are found to be 1.78 0.27 and 1.05 0:06 1E15 n/cm sec, respectively. The reactor physics code MCNP is used to calculate neutron flux in the HFIR at irradiation locations. The computational results are shown to correspond to closely to experimental data for thermal and fast neutron flux with calculated percent differences ranging from 0:55 13.20%.

McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Daly, Thomas F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electric Flux Tube in Magnetic Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a methodical problem related to the magnetic scenario recently suggested and initiated by the authors \\cite{Liao_ES_mono} to understand the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP): the electric flux tube in monopole plasma. A macroscopic approach, interpolating between Bose condensed (dual superconductor) and classical gas medium is developed first. Then we work out a microscopic approach based on detailed quantum mechanical calculation of the monopole scattering on electric flux tube, evaluating induced currents for all partial waves. As expected, the flux tube looses its stability when particles can penetrate it: we make this condition precise by calculating the critical value for the product of the flux tube size times the particle momentum, above which the flux tube dissolves. Lattice static potentials indicate that flux tubes seem to dissolve at $T>T_{dissolution} \\approx 1.3 T_c$. Using our criterion one gets an estimate of the magnetic density $n\\approx 4.4 \\sim 6.6 fm^{-3}$ a...

Liao Jin Feng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Measurements of Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum and Sensible Heat over the Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent fluxes of momentum and sensible heat were estimated from sonic anemometer measurements gathered over the Labrador Sea during a winter cruise of the R/V Knorr. The inertial dissipation method was used to calculate turbulent fluxes of ...

Karl Bumke; U. Karger; K. Uhlig

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24°C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Nonlinear Statistical Model of Turbulent Air–Sea Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the bulk algorithms used to calculate turbulent air–sea fluxes of momentum and heat are iterative algorithms whose convergence is slow and not always achieved. To avoid these drawbacks that are critical when large datasets must be ...

Denis Bourras; Gilles Reverdin; Guy Caniaux; Sophie Belamari

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Surface Energy Fluxes of the South Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluxes of sensible, latent and radiational energy and momentum across the surface of the South Atlantic Ocean have been calculated by substituting ship meteorological observations into bulk aerodynamic and empirical radiation equations. Upper-air ...

Andrew F. Bunker

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stratocumulus Cloud Field Reflected Fluxes: The Effect of Cloud Shape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for stratocumulus cloud fields as a function of sky cover, cloud aspect ratio, and cloud shape. Cloud liquid water volume is held invariant as cloud shape is varied so that the results can be utilized more ...

R. M. Welch; B. A. Wielicki

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Estimating Sensible Heat Flux from the Oklahoma Mesonet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges of using the Oklahoma Mesonet for calculations of sensible heat flux are discussed. The mesonet is an integrated network of 115 remote and automated meteorological stations across Oklahoma that provides the spatial density to ...

Jerald A. Brotzge; Kenneth C. Crawford

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Top-of-Atmosphere Radiance-to-Flux Conversion in the SW Domain for the ScaRaB-3 Instrument on Megha-Tropiques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earth radiation budget (ERB) is the difference between the solar absorbed flux and the terrestrial emitted flux. These fluxes are calculated from satellite measurements of outgoing shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiances using empirical or ...

Michel Viollier; Carsten Standfuss; Olivier Chomette; Arnaud Quesney

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1989-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Theory of flux cutting and flux transport at the critical current of a type-II superconducting cylindrical wire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I introduce a critical-state theory incorporating both flux cutting and flux transport to calculate the magnetic-field and current-density distributions inside a type-II superconducting cylinder at its critical current in a longitudinal applied magnetic field. The theory is an extension of the elliptic critical-state model introduced by Romero-Salazar and Perez-Rodriguez. The vortex dynamics depend in detail on two nonlinear effective resistivities for flux cutting ({rho}{parallel}) and flux flow ({rho}{perpendicular}), and their ratio r = {rho}{parallel}/{rho}{perpendicular}. When r flux cutting in reducing the magnitude of the internal magnetic-flux density leads to a paramagnetic longitudinal magnetic moment. As a model for understanding the experimentally observed interrelationship between the critical currents for flux cutting and depinning, I calculate the forces on a helical vortex arc stretched between two pinning centers when the vortex is subjected to a current density of arbitrary angle {phi}. Simultaneous initiation of flux cutting and flux transport occurs at the critical current density J{sub c}({phi}) that makes the vortex arc unstable.

Clem, John R.

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

Theory of flux cutting and flux transport at the critical current of a type-II superconducting cylindrical wire  

SciTech Connect

I introduce a critical-state theory incorporating both flux cutting and flux transport to calculate the magnetic-field and current-density distributions inside a type-II superconducting cylinder at its critical current in a longitudinal applied magnetic field. The theory is an extension of the elliptic critical-state model introduced by Romero-Salazar and Pérez-Rodríguez. The vortex dynamics depend in detail on two nonlinear effective resistivities for flux cutting (?{sub ?}) and flux flow (?{sub ?}), and their ratio r=?{sub ?}/?{sub ?}. When r<1, the low relative efficiency of flux cutting in reducing the magnitude of the internal magnetic-flux density leads to a paramagnetic longitudinal magnetic moment. As a model for understanding the experimentally observed interrelationship between the critical currents for flux cutting and depinning, I calculate the forces on a helical vortex arc stretched between two pinning centers when the vortex is subjected to a current density of arbitrary angle ?. Simultaneous initiation of flux cutting and flux transport occurs at the critical current density J{sub c}(?) that makes the vortex arc unstable.

Clem, John R.

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mapping Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared camera technique designed for remote sensing of air–water heat flux has been developed. The technique uses the differential absorption of water between 3.817 and 4.514 microns. This difference causes each channel’s radiance to ...

Walt McKeown; Richard Leighton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Underground particle fluxes in the Soudan mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of our knowledge of the underground particle fluxes in the vicinity of Soudan 2 and of the future MINOS detector. It includes a brief description of the measured muon fluxes and of the gamma ray spectra deduced from measurements of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations in the rock. Counting rates in gaseous and scintillation detectors are estimated. Some data on what is known about the chemical composition of the local rocks are included; these are relevant to an understanding of the underground muon rates and also to a calculation of low energy neutron fluxes. 1 Introduction As plans for the MINOS detector and for the excavation of a new detector hall progress, some people have begun asking what is known of the fluxes of various particles underground. The muon flux is relevant for possibly calibrating and certainly for monitoring the long term behavior of the detector. It will likely be the determining factor in the eventual trigger rate if the MINOS det...

Keith Ruddick; Keith Ruddick; Th

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

90

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

1993-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Effects of Airflow Trajectories Around Aircraft on Measurements of Scalar Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential-flow calculations of the airflow around two research aircraft are used to estimate the effect of flow distortion on measured fluxes of sensible heat and water vapor. From the calculated flow patterns, flow-distortion coefficients are ...

William A. Cooper; Diana Rogers

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

An approximate algorithm for the flux from a rectangular volume source  

SciTech Connect

An exact semi-analytic formula for the flux from a rectangular surface source with a slab shield has been derived and the required function table has been calculated. This formula is the basis for an algorithm which gives a good approximation for the flux from a rectangular volume source. No other hand calculation method for this source geometry is available in the literature.

Wallace, O.J.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

94

Detection of the Neutrino Fluxes from Several Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is considered the detection of neutrinos moving from the opposite directions. The states of the particle of the detector interacting with the neutrinos are connected with the P-transformation. Hence only a half of neutrinos gives contribution into the superposition of the neutrino states. Taking into account the effect of the opposite neutrino directions the total neutrino flux from several sources are in the range 0.5--1 of that without the effect. The neutrino flux from nuclear reactors measured in the KamLAND experiment is $0.611\\pm 0.085 {\\rm (stat)} \\pm 0.041 {\\rm (syst)} $ of the expected flux. Calculations for the conditions of the KamLAND experiment yield the neutrino flux taking into account the effect of the opposite neutrino directions, 0.555, of that without the effect that may account for the neutrino flux observed in the KamLAND experiment.

D. L. Khokhlov

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Gradiometric flux qubits with tunable gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For gradiometric three-Josephson-junction flux qubits, we perform a systematic study on the tuning of the minimal transition frequency, the so-called qubit gap. By replacing one of the qubit's Josephson junctions by a dc SQUID, the critical current of this SQUID and, in turn, the qubit gap can be tuned in situ by a control flux threading the SQUID loop. We present spectroscopic measurements demonstrating a well-defined controllability of the qubit gap between zero and more than 10 GHz. In the future, this enables one to tune the qubit into and out of resonance with other superconducting quantum circuits, while operating the qubit at its symmetry point with optimal dephasing properties. The experimental data agree very well with model calculations based on the full qubit Hamiltonian. From a numerical fit, we determine the Josephson coupling and the charging energies of the qubit junctions. The derived values agree well with those measured for other junctions fabricated on the same chip. We also demonstrate the biasing of gradiometric flux qubits near the symmetry point by trapping an odd number of flux quanta in the gradiometer loop. In this way, we study the effect of the significant kinetic inductance, thereby obtaining valuable information for the qubit design.

M. J. Schwarz; J. Goetz; Z. Jiang; T. Niemczyk; F. Deppe; A. Marx; R. Gross

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ion fluxes through nano-pores and transmembrane channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nano-pores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nano-pore recently obtained by Levin [1]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through a gramicidin A channel, obtaining the current-voltage and the current-concentration relations under various experimental conditions. A good agreement with experimental results is observed. [1] Y. Levin. Europhys. Letters, 76, 163 (2006).

Bordin, José Rafael; Barbosa, Marcia C; Levin, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

100

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Prompt muon contribution to the flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high energy spectra and zenith-angle distributions of the atmospheric muons computed for the depths of the locations of the underwater neutrino telescopes. We compare the calculations with the data obtained in the Baikal and the AMANDA muon experiments. The prompt muon contribution to the muon flux underwater due to recent perturbative QCD-based models of the charm production is expected to be observable at depths of the large underwater neutrino telescopes. This appears to be probable even at rather shallow depths (1-2 km), provided that the energy threshold for muon detection is raised above $\\sim 100$ TeV.

T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Direct Calculation of Current Drive in Toroidal Geometry J. C. Wright and C. K. Phillips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field in the quasilinear flux are used to evaluate the current in a specified toroidal geometry. PACS­induced quasilinear flux in a toroidal geometry and a Green's function for the current. An expression calculation of the current using a quasilinear flux model for a spectrum of parallel wavenum­ bers, k k j k

104

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

105

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

106

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

107

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mass, Heat and Freshwater Fluxes in the South Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10° to 32°S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the ...

Lee-Lueng Fu

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

My Trip Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings Calculator Trip Calculator Benefits Why is fuel economy important? Climate Change Oil Dependence Costs Sustainability Save Money Vehicles produce about half of the...

112

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

113

Estimation of Surface Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors reconsider the problem of estimating the sensible heat transfer at the earth's surface from direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. For simplicity, only horizontally homogeneous conditions are ...

Jielun Sun; Steven K. Esbensen; L. Mahrt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

115

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and Al-Hf alloy heat sink system is capable of maintaining all system components below their maximum temperature limits. The maximum temperature of this conduction cooling system, 224.2°C (435.6 °F) occurs in a small, localized region in the heat sink structure near the core mid-plane. The total coolant flow rate requirement for this configuration is 207 L/min (54.7 gpm). The calculated Flow Instability Ratio and Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio for this configuration under nominal conditions are 6.5 and 8.0, respectively, which safely exceed the minimum values of 2.0. Materials and fabrication issues inspection revealed that the neutron absorber would probably best be made from powdered Al3Hf mixed with aluminum powder and extruded or hot isostatically pressed. Although Al3Hf has not been specifically studied extensively, its mechanical and chemical properties should be very much like Al3Zr, which has been studied. Its behavior under irradiation should be very satisfactory, and resistance to corrosion will be investigated to a limited extent in planned miniplate irradiation tests in ATR. Pressurized water systems needed to effect heat removal are already available in the ATR complex, and mixed gas temperature control systems needed to trim experiment temperatures have been engineered and need only be fabricated and installed. In sum, it appears the alternately cooled configuration arrived at can be very successful. The cost estimate for this configuration indicates to

Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

120

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Can Shipboard Measurements Reveal Secular Changes in Tropical Air–Sea Heat Flux?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set for the period 1854–1979 will soon become available for studies of secular climate changes in ocean surface heat flux. Of the observed variables from which heat flux is calculated, wind speed and sea ...

C. S. Ramage

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Advanced Online Flux Mapping of CANDU PHWR by Least-Squares Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A least-squares method that solves both the core neutronics design equations and the in-core detector response equations on the least-squares principle is presented as a new advanced online flux-mapping method for CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The effectiveness of the new flux-mapping method is examined in terms of online flux-mapping calculations with numerically simulated true flux distribution and detector signals and those with the actual core-follow data for the Wolsong CANDU PHWRs in Korea. The effects of core neutronics models as well as the detector failures and uncertainties of measured detector signals on the effectiveness of the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are also examined.The following results are obtained. The least-squares method predicts the flux distribution in better agreement with the simulated true flux distribution than the standard core neutronics calculations by the finite difference method (FDM) computer code without using the detector signals. The adoption of the nonlinear nodal method based on the unified nodal method formulation instead of the FDM results in a significant improvement in prediction accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations. The detector signals estimated from the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are much closer to the measured detector signals than those from the flux synthesis method (FSM), the current online flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors. The effect of detector failures is relatively small so that the plant can tolerate up to 25% of detector failures without seriously affecting the plant operation. The detector signal uncertainties aggravate accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations, yet the effects of signal uncertainties of the order of 1% standard deviation can be tolerable without seriously degrading the prediction accuracy of the least-squares method. The least-squares method is disadvantageous because it requires longer CPU time than the existing FSM. Considering ever-increasing computer speed and the improved operational safety margin of CANDU reactors gained by accurate flux-mapping calculations, however, it is concluded that the least-squares method presents an effective alternative to the existing flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors.

Hong, In Seob [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Hyo [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Boundary Layer of Mars: Fluxes, Stability, Turbulent Spectra, and Growth of the Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectra of wind from high-frequency measurements in the Martian atmospheric surface layer, along with the diurnal variation of the height of the mixed surface layer, are calculated for the first time for Mars. Heat and momentum fluxes, stability, ...

James E. Tillman; Lars Landberg; Søren E. Larsen

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Estimating Meridional Energy Transports by the Atmospheric and Oceanic General Circulations Using Boundary Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean meridional energy transport in the atmosphere–ocean system (total transport) is estimated using 4-yr mean net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology ...

Y-C. Zhang; W. B. Rossow

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Incoming Shortwave Fluxes at the Surface—A Comparison of GCM Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that the excess surface net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces is mostly due to excess incoming shortwave fluxes. Based on long-term observations from 22 worldwide inland stations and ...

J. R. Garratt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluation of Turbulent Surface Flux Parameterizations for the Stable Surface Layer over Halley, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculated surface fluxes from seven surface layer parameterizations are verified against 45 months of observations from Halley, Antarctica, with a temporal resolution of 1 h. The surface layer parameterizations are taken from widely used ...

John J. Cassano; Thomas R. Parish; John C. King

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Estimation of Meridional Heat Flux in the North Atlantic by Inverse Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic sections spanning the Atlantic Ocean at 24, 36 and 48°N are used to make an estimate of meridional heat flux in the ocean. An inverse method provides reference level velocities for geostrophic calculations, consistent with ...

Dean Roemmich

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Distribution of Surface Fluxes and Boundary Layer Divergence in Midlatitude Ocean Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface meteorological observations have been used to calculate the distributions of surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and latent heat and the distributions of surface divergence and curl of surface stress which are characteristic of ...

Robert G. Fleagle; Wendell A. Nuss

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Uncertainties in Global Ocean Surface Heat Flux Climatologies Derived from Ship Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology to define uncertainties associated with ocean surface heat flux calculations has been developed and applied to a global climatology that utilizes a summary of the Comprehensive Ocean–Atmosphere Data Set surface observations. ...

Peter J. Gleckler; Bryan C. Weare

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

131

R-value Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Wall Systems Advanced Wall Systems ORNL Home ASTM Testing BEP Home Related Sites Work With Us Advanced Wall Systems Home Interactive Calculators New Whole Wall R-value Calculators As A Part Of The ORNL Material Database For Whole Building Energy Simulations These calculators are replacing the old Whole Wall Thermal Performance calculator. These new versions of the calculator contain many new features and are part of the newly developed Interactive Envelope Materials Database for Whole-Building Energy Simulation Programs. The simple version of the Whole Wall R-value calculator is now available for use. This calculator is similar to the previous Whole Wall Thermal Performance calculator and does not require any downloads from the user. However, it was updated to allow calculations for fourteen wall details

132

DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s{sup -2} to 320 km s{sup -1}, thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 {mu}T, 6 R{sub Sun} above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} Wb (1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day{sup -1} and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Wb yr{sup -1} (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx yr{sup -1}) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to {approx} - 0.2 nT yr{sup -1} change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

136

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Antarctic Zone Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In winter the eastern Weddell Sea in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean hosts some of the most dynamic air-ice-sea interactions found on earth. Sea ice in the region is kept relatively thin by heat flux from below, maintained by upper-...

M. G. McPhee; S. F. Ackley; P. Guest; T. P. Stanton; B. A. Huber; D. G. Martinson; J. H. Morison; R. D. Muench; L. Padman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel isotopes, with improvements on three aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. the second one is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The last one is more carefully calculation of the average energy taken away by antineutrinos in thermal fission with the comparison of antineutrino spectrum from different models. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.32%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 50% smaller.

X. B. Ma; W. L. Zhong; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; J. Cao

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Uncertainties in (E)UV model atmosphere fluxes (Research Note)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. During the comparison of synthetic spectra calculated with two NLTE model atmosphere codes, namely TMAP and TLUSTY, we encounter systematic differences in the EUV fluxes due to the treatment of level dissolution by pressure ionization. Aims. In the case of Sirius B, we demonstrate an uncertainty in modeling the EUV flux reliably in order to challenge theoreticians to improve the theory of level dissolution. Methods. We calculated synthetic spectra for hot, compact stars using state-of-the-art NLTE model-atmosphere techniques. Results. Systematic differences may occur due to a code-specific cutoff frequency of the H I Lyman bound-free opacity. This is the case for TMAP and TLUSTY. Both codes predict the same flux level at wavelengths lower than about 1500 Å for stars with effective temperatures (Teff) below about 30 000 K only, if the same cutoff frequency is chosen. Conclusions. The theory of level dissolution in high-density plasmas, which is available for hydrogen only should be generalized to all species. Especially, the cutoff frequencies for the bound-free opacities should be defined in order to make predictions of UV fluxes more reliable.

T. Rauch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For energy dependent cross sections please go to ... The neutron scattering length density is defined ... To calculate scattering length densities enter a ...

146

Heating Fuel Comparision Calculator  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood, Pellet, Corn (kernel), and Coal Heaters Heating Fuel Comparison Calculator Instructions and Guidance Residential Fuel/Energy Price Links Spot Prices, Daily

147

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The first calculation will take the longest because the program has to download ... will take a few seconds as the database of isotopes is downloaded ...

148

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system  

SciTech Connect

The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

Davis, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

An Algorithm for the Calculation of the Time-Dependent Mixing Height in Coastal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple algorithm for the calculation of the time-dependent mixing height h(t) in coastal sites using wind, temperature, momentum flux, and heat flux time series as input data. A stationary expression for the coastal ...

Paolo Martano

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

How do Uncertainties in the Surface Chemical Abundances of the Sun Affect the Predicted Solar Neutrino Fluxes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that uncertainties in the values of the surface heavy element abundances of the Sun are the largest source of the theoretical uncertainty in calculating the p-p, pep, 8B, 13N, 15O, and 17F solar neutrino fluxes. We evaluate for the first time the sensitivity (partial derivative) of each solar neutrino flux with respect to the surface abundance of each element. We then calculate the uncertainties in each neutrino flux using `conservative (preferred)' and `optimistic' estimates for the uncertainties in the element abundances. The total conservative (optimistic) composition uncertainty in the predicted 8B neutrino flux is 11.6% (5.0%) when sensitivities to individual element abundances are used. The traditional method that lumps all abundances into a single quantity (total heavy element to hydrogen ratio, Z/X) yields a larger uncertainty, 20%. The uncertainties in the carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, and iron abundances all make significant contributions to the uncertainties in calculating solar neutrino fluxes; the uncertainties of different elements are most important for different neutrino fluxes. The uncertainty in the iron abundance is the largest source of the estimated composition uncertainties of the important 7Be and 8B solar neutrinos. Carbon is the largest contributor to the uncertainty in the calculation of the p-p, 13N, and 15O neutrino fluxes. However, for all neutrino fluxes, several elements contribute comparable amounts to the total composition uncertainty.

John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

157

MODIFIED ZONE METHOD CALCULATOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone Method is recommended for R-value calculations in steel stud walls by the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals ASHRAE 1997. The Modified Zone Method is similar to the...

158

Source and replica calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

Whalen, P.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

160

Observations and Calculations of Aerosol Heating over the Arabian Sea during MONEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation flux observations were obtained during a flight of the NCAR Electra over the Arabian Sea during MONEX when aerosols were present, and these observations have been compared with theoretical calculations based upon simultaneously observed ...

Robert O. Ellingson; George N. Serafino

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Comparison of Radiation Variables Calculated in the UCLA General Circulation Model to Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the spatial patterns of solar and thermal fluxes of radiation calculated by the UCLA general circulation model and observations. The latter include estimates at the Pacific Ocean surface of the climatological averages ...

Bryan C. Weare

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Simplified Method for the Calculation of Diurnally Averaged Photodissociation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressions are given for the calculation of the diurnally averaged transmission of solar flux from a series summation involving relatively few terms (10) and readily available mathematical functions. It is shown that these expressions can be ...

Robert E. Boughner

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

New Insights into the Ocean Heat Budget Closure Problem from Analysis of the SOC Air–Sea Flux Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from an analysis of the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) global air–sea heat flux climatology, which has been calculated using in situ weather reports from voluntary observing ships covering the period 1980–93, are presented. ...

Simon A. Josey; Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Urban Areas: Observations and a Local-Scale Urban Meteorological Parameterization Scheme (LUMPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linked set of simple equations specifically designed to calculate heat fluxes for the urban environment is presented. This local-scale urban meteorological parameterization scheme (LUMPS), which has similarities to the hybrid plume dispersion ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Aerosol Radiative Impact on Spectral Solar Flux at the Surface, Derived from Principal-Plane Sky Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of the spectral solar flux reaching the surface in cloud-free conditions are required to determine the aerosol radiative impact and to test aerosol models that are used to calculate radiative forcing of climate. Spectral ...

Y. J. Kaufman; D. Tanré; B. N. Holben; S. Mattoo; L. A. Remer; T. F. Eck; J. Vaughan; Bernadette Chatenet

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Impact of Isopycnal Diffusion on Heat Fluxes and the Transient Response of a Two-Dimensional Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (latitude–depth) ocean–climate model is used to assess the impact of calculating diffusive heat and salinity fluxes along and across isopycnal surfaces rather than in a vertical–horizontal coordinate system. Differences between ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology to calculate the impingement load in the region of a submerged turbulent jet where a potential core exits and the jet is not fully developed. The profile of the jet flow velocities is represented by a piece-wise linear function which satisfies the conservation of momentum flux of the jet flow. The adequacy of the of the predicted jet expansion is further verified by considering the continuity of the jet flow from the region of potential core to the fully developed region. The jet impingement load can be calculated either as a direct impingement force or a drag force using the jet velocity field determined by the methodology presented.

Wu, T.T.

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Digital signal processing control of induction machine`s torque and stator flux utilizing the direct stator flux field orientation method  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of the Direct Stator Flux Field Orientation control method. This method can be used to control an induction motor`s torque and flux directly and is the application of interest for this thesis. This control method is implemented without the traditional feedback loops and associated hardware. Predictions are made, by mathematical calculations, of the stator voltage vector. The voltage vector is determined twice a switching period. The switching period is fixed throughout the analysis. The three phase inverter duty cycle necessary to control the torque and flux of the induction machine is determined by the voltage space vector Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) technique. Transient performance of either the flux or torque requires an alternate modulation scheme which is also addressed in this thesis. A block diagram of this closed loop system is provided. 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Seiz, J.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

TVDG LET Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator TVDG LET Calculator This program calculates the Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target. Select the Target Material from the dropdown list. Select the Ion Specie from the dropdown list. Enter the Total Ion Energy in the text box. This is equal to the Atomic Mass times the Energy/Nucleon. Click the 'Calculate' button or press the 'Enter' key. The Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target will be returned. Select your Target from the list Air Aluminum Oxide Carbon Copper Gallium Arsenide Gold Polyester Polyethylene Silicon Silicon Dioxide Skin Soda Lime Glass Sodium Iodide Water Select your Ion from the list

172

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

173

Spin resonance strength calculations  

SciTech Connect

In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

Courant,E.D.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

A unique method of neutron flux determination from experimental data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

Paxton, Frank A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

Paxton, Frank A. (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC) has been developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) as an online tool to compare greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation proposals by various countries for the year 2020. In this paper, ... Keywords: Business intelligence, Cost curves, Decision model, Interactive system, Optimisation

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Lena Hoeglund-Isaksson; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tunnel closure calculations  

SciTech Connect

When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

Moran, B.; Attia, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

180

Flux: for brass quintet with analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper will examine the piece Flux: for Brass Quintet, completed in the spring of 2010 by Robert DeVet. It will first examine the system… (more)

Devet, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Vector Representation of Trade Cumulus Thermodynamic Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vector representation of the BOMEX thermodynamic budget data is presented which shows graphically the relationship of the fluxes and the mean layer structure.

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

184

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

186

Steep Slope Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steep Slope Calculator Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating Savings for Residential Roofs with Non-Black Surfaces Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Click to see Data for All 243 Locations Roof Inputs: R-value(Btu-in/(hr ft2 oF):

187

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 1992–93 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels ~30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm2. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant–hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures Fausto Cattaneo study the topology of field lines threading buoyant magnetic flux struc- tures. The magnetic structures ­ Sun: interior ­ Sun: magnetic fields ­ Stars: spots 1 Current address: Department of Mathematics

191

Skew Fluxes in Polarized Wave Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar flux due to small amplitude waves that exhibit a preferred sense of rotation or polarization is shown to consist of a component. FS, that is skewed, being everywhere orthogonal to the mean scalar gradient, Q. The skew flux is ...

John F. Middleton; John W. Loder

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

PRIMARY SHIELDING CALCULATIONS ON THE IBM 650 (ROC CODES)  

SciTech Connect

Four programs written for the IBM 650 to calculate the gamma dose rates in the primary shielding of thermal reactors are described. Their functions are outlined as follows: Program 651-calculates the core attenuation coefficient and equivalent core gamma volumetric source values for a specific core. Program 652- calculates the activation gamma source data in the shield and prepares tabular data in machine storage for Programs 653 and 654. Program 653- calculates the gamma dose rates in the shield due to gammas arising from activation of shield materials. Program 654calculates the gamma dose rates in the shield due to gammas arising in the core. Gamma photo source values are obtained on the basis of two group neutron flux distributions throughout the reactor core and shield. (W.D.M.)

Rosen, S.S.; Oby, P.V.; Caton, R.L.

1958-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Calculating Energy Flux in Internal Solitary Waves with an Application to Reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of internal solitary waves (ISWs) in continuous, quasi-two-layer stratifications are explored using fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic numerical simulations. The kinetic energy of an internal solitary wave is always greater than the ...

Kevin G. Lamb; Van T. Nguyen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Very Narrow Band Model Calculations of Atmospheric Fluxes and Cooling Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new very narrow band model (VNBM) approach has been developed and incorporated into the MODTRAN atmospheric transmittance–radiance code. The VNBM includes a computational spectral resolution of 1 cm?1, a single-line Voigt equivalent width ...

L. S. Bernstein; A. Berk; P. K. Acharya; D. C. Robertson; G. P. Anderson; J. H. Chetwynd; L. M. Kimball

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) The files in this site contain a revised (October 2009) version of the climatological mean values in 4° Latitude X 5° Longitude box areas and the distribution maps. These were originally published in: Takahashi, et al. (2009), DSR II, 56, 554-577. The data file containing annual flux data for each 4° X 5° box is located here. The data file from which this map was created, including all 12 months of data is here. This data file, in ASCII form, also contains the flux data and the intermediate values used to calculate that flux for each month. In December 2010 our colleague, R. Wanninkhof pointed out a problem with the flux data for the month of December. The file of ice coverage for December was corrupted and showed zero ice for the entire month, worldwide. This has been corrected with the estimated percent of ice and the flux recalculated. Version "c" of the data files contain this correction.

197

MFE/ACT: a TRS-80 code for calculating neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MFE/ACT code, written to run on the TRS-80, can be used to calculate the neutron activation of materials used in fission and fusion reactors. Input data include the specific isotopes to be calculated, the neutron fluxes, the neutron cross sections, and the nuclear decay half-lives.

Dorn, D.W.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

On the parametrization of atmospheric muon angular flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical expression for angular integral flux of atmospheric muons in matter with the explicit relation of its parameters with those of the sea level spectrum is obtained. The fitting formula for the sea level muon spectrum at different zenith angles for spherical atmosphere is proposed. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented. Fluctuations of muon energy losses are taken into account by means of parametrized correction factor calculated using survival probabilities resulted from Monte Carlo simulations. Parametrizations of all continuous energy losses are obtained with using the most recent expressions for muon interaction cross-sections. The corresponding parametrization errors and field of method application are comprehensively discussed. The proposed formulae could be useful primarily for experimentalists processing data of arrays located deep under water or under ice.

S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Surface Heat Flux in the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological monthly mean variations of the surface heat fluxes over the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea are calculated by both a data analysis and a numerical simulation. The result of the data analysis based on the empirical/bulk method ...

Naoki Hirose; Hyun-Chul Lee; Jong-Hwan Yoon

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

Attila Csoto

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

1963-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dynamical Collective Calculation of Supernova Neutrino Signals  

SciTech Connect

We present the first calculations with three flavors of collective and shock wave effects for neutrino propagation in core-collapse supernovae using hydrodynamical density profiles and the S matrix formalism. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of multiple resonances upon the time signal of positrons in supernova observatories. A specific signature is found for the inverted hierarchy and a large third neutrino mixing angle and we predict, in this case, a dearth of lower energy positrons in Cherenkov detectors midway through the neutrino signal and the simultaneous revelation of valuable information about the original fluxes. We show that this feature is also observable with current generation neutrino detectors at the level of several sigmas.

Gava, Jerome; Kneller, James; Volpe, Cristina; McLaughlin, G. C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay cedex, CNRS/IN2P3 and University of Paris-XI (France); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES  

SciTech Connect

We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

Fan, Y. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity, leading in some cases to a polarity reversal while inhibiting the background dynamo from doing so in others. The emerged magnetic flux is slowly advected poleward while being diffused and assimilated by the background dynamo field.

Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S., E-mail: rui.pinto@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

The influence of the geomagnetic field and of the uncertainties in the primary spectrum on the development of the muon flux in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the sensitivity of the flux of atmospheric muons to uncertainties in the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to the treatment of the geomagnetic field in a calculation. We use the air shower simulation program AIRES to make the calculation for two different primary spectra and under several approximations to the propagation of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. The results illustrate the importance of accurate modelling of the geomagnetic field effects. We propose a high and a low fit of the proton and helium fluxes, and calculate the muon fluxes with these different inputs. Comparison with measurements of the muon flux by the CAPRICE experiment shows a slight preference for the higher primary cosmic ray flux parametrization.

P. Hansen; T. K. Gaisser; T. Stanev; S. J. Sciutto

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Computing Surface Fluxes from Mesonet Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using air–vegetation–soil layer coupled model equations as weak constraints, a variational method is developed to compute sensible and latent heat fluxes from conventional observations obtained at meteorological surface stations. This method ...

Binbin Zhou; Qin Xu

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

211

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

BTRIC - Tools & Calculators - ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculators Calculators Attic Radiant Barrier Calculator Low-Slope Roof Calculator for Commercial Buildings (6/05) - estimates annual energy cost savings Moisture Control for Low-Slope Roofing (5/04) - determine if a roof design needs a vapor retarder or if the roofing system can be modified to enhance its tolerance for small leaks Modified Zone Method Roof Savings Calculator (12/12) - for commerical and residential buildings using whole-building energy simulations Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculator (6/06) Steep-Slope Roof Calculator on Residential Buildings (6/05) - estimate annual energy cost savings Whole-Wall R-Value Calculator 2.0 (10/06) ZIP-Code R-Value Recommendation Calculator (1/08) Roofs/Attics Attic Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet (Jan 2011) Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Fact Sheet

213

Radiative component and combined heat transfer in the thermal calculation of finned tube banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more exact calculation of combined heat transfer in the case of finned tube banks (e.g., in the convective section of a furnace), the radiative heat transfer cannot be neglected. A new method for relatively simple calculation of total heat flux (convection + radiation + conduction in fins) is fully compatible with that for bare tube banks/bundles developed earlier. It is based on the method of radiative coefficients. However, the resulting value of heat flux must be corrected due to fin thickness and especially due to the fin radiative influence. For this purpose the so-called multiplicator of heat flux was introduced. The applicability of this methods has been demonstrated on a tubular fired heater convective section. A developed computer program based on the method has also been used for an analysis of the influence of selected parameters to show the share of radiation on the total heat flux.

Stehlik, P. [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering] [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Intercomparison of Various Surface Latent Heat Flux Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) latent heat flux field is compared with the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS), the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface ...

Masahisa Kubota; Atsuko Kano; Hidenori Muramatsu; Hiroyuki Tomita

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Gravity Wave 1-leat Fluxes: A Lagrangian Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a vertically propagating, internal gravity wave on the vertical flux of potential temperature (heat) is considered by averaging the local heat flux vector over a potential temperature surface. This approach gives the wave heat flux ...

Lawrence Coy; David C. Fritts

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A computer program for HVDC converter station RF noise calculations  

SciTech Connect

HVDC converter station operations generate radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) noise which could interfere with adjacent communication and computer equipment, and carrier system operations. A generic Radio Frequency Computer Analysis Program (RAFCAP) for calculating the EM noise generated by valve ignition of a converter station has been developed as part of a larger project. The program calculates RF voltages, currents, complex power, ground level electric field strength and magnetic flux density in and around an HVDC converter station. The program requires the converter station network to be represented by frequency dependent impedance functions. Comparisons of calculated and measured values are given for an actual HVDC station to illustrate the validity of the program. RAFCAP is designed to be used by engineers for the purpose of calculating the RF noise produced by the igniting of HVDC converter valves.

Kasten, D.G.; Caldecott, R.; Sebo, S.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Liu, Y. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Bradley Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

RADIATION FROM COMOVING POYNTING FLUX ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with particle-in-cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi [Rice University, Houston TX 77005-1892 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radiation from Comoving Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with Particle-In-Cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

220

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and...

222

MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

Erdos, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Calculating kinetics parameters and reactivity changes with continuous-energy Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect

The iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux forms the basis for a method to perform adjoint weighting of tally scores in continuous-energy Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue calculations. Applying this approach, adjoint-weighted tallies are developed for two applications: calculating point reactor kinetics parameters and estimating changes in reactivity from perturbations. Calculations are performed in the widely-used production code, MCNP, and the results of both applications are compared with discrete ordinates calculations, experimental measurements, and other Monte Carlo calculations.

Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Paul [UNIV. WISCONSIN

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Generalized flux-tube solution in Abelian-projected SU(N) gauge theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The [U(1)]^{N-1} dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory as a low-energy effective theory of Abelian-projected SU(N) gauge theory is formulated in a Weyl symmetric way. The string tensions of flux-tube solutions of the DGL theory associated with color-electric charges in various representations of SU(N) are calculated analytically at the border between type-I and type-II of the dual superconducting vacuum (Bogomol'nyi limit). The resulting string tensions satisfy the flux counting rule, which reflects the non-Abelian nature of gauge theory.

Yoshiaki Koma

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

2050 Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 Calculator 0 Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2050 Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United Kingdom Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, Economic Development, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Multi-model Integration, Multi-sector Impact Evaluation, Solar, Wind Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Analysis Tools, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet, Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.gov.uk/2050-pathways-analysis Country: United Kingdom Web Application Link: 2050-calculator-tool.decc.gov.uk/pathways/1111111111111111111111111111

226

The explicit representation for the angular flux solution in the simplified P{sub N} (SP{sub N}) theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current SP{sub n} theory formulation, via either the asymptotic method or the variational method, does not provide an explicit and calculable representation for the corresponding angular flux solution. It is therefore not possible to reconstruct from the SP{sub n} solution the corresponding angular flux solution, or to extract from a reference transport solution the corresponding SP{sub n} solution. This makes it impossible to calculate the necessary surface discontinuity factors to force consistency between the SP{sub n} solution and the higher level transport solution. Without discontinuity factors, the superiority of SP{sub n} over diffusion could be significantly degraded in practical applications. In this paper we present a different SP{sub n} formulation that provides the explicit angular flux solution such that the physical picture for the SP{sub n} approximation is transparent and the SP{sub n} discontinuity factors can be calculated. (authors)

Chao, Y. A. [Apartment 101, Building 2, 788 Hong Xu Road, Shanghai 201103 (China); Yamamoto, A. [Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

HRA Calculator v. 5.0 BETA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HRA Calculator analyzes and calculates human error probabilities in support of probabilistic risk assessments. HRA Calculator takes ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

228

EPRI HRA Calculator Version 5.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HRA Calculator analyzes and calculates human error probabilities in support of probabilistic risk assessments. HRA Calculator takes ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

A transport based one-dimensional perturbation code for reactivity calculations in metal systems  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional reactivity calculation code is developed using first order perturbation theory. The reactivity equation is based on the multi-group transport equation using the discrete ordinates method for angular dependence. In addition to the first order perturbation approximations, the reactivity code uses only the isotropic scattering data, but cross section libraries with higher order scattering data can still be used with this code. The reactivity code obtains all the flux, cross section, and geometry data from the standard interface files created by ONEDANT, a discrete ordinates transport code. Comparisons between calculated and experimental reactivities were done with the central reactivity worth data for Lady Godiva, a bare uranium metal assembly. Good agreement is found for isotopes that do not violate the assumptions in the first order approximation. In general for cases where there are large discrepancies, the discretized cross section data is not accurately representing certain resonance regions that coincide with dominant flux groups in the Godiva assembly. Comparing reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and a straight {Delta}k/k calculation shows agreement within 10% indicating the perturbation of the calculated fluxes is small enough for first order perturbation theory to be applicable in the modeled system. Computation time comparisons between reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and straight {Delta}k/k calculations indicate considerable time can be saved performing a calculation with a perturbation code particularly as the complexity of the modeled problems increase.

Wenz, T.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6 Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities. 6.0.1 Energy Current Density The energy current density is given by the Poynting vector S = E Ã? H (6.1) where all quantities are real. The Poynting vector gives the instantaneous lo- cal energy current density

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

231

A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations and Methodology Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

232

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Relativistic Poynting-Flux Jets as Transmission Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent radio emission, polarization, and Faraday rotation maps of the radio jet of the galaxy 3C 303 have shown that one knot of this jet has a {\\it galactic}-scale electric current of $\\sim 3\\times 10^{18}$ Amp\\`ere flowing along the jet axis (Kronberg et al. 2011). We develop the theory of relativistic Poynting-flux jets which are modeled as a transmission line carrying a DC current $I_0$, having a potential drop $V_0$, and a definite impedance ${\\cal Z}_0 =90(u_z/c)\\Omega$, where $u_z$ is the bulk velocity of the jet plasma. The electromagnetic energy flow in the jet is ${\\cal Z}_0 I_0^2$. The observed current in 3C 303 can be used to calculate the electromagnetic energy flow in this magnetically dominated jet. Time-dependent but not necessarily small perturbations of a Poynting-flux jet - possibly triggered by a gas cloud penetrating the jet - are described by "telegrapher's equations," which predict the propagation speed of disturbances and the effective wave impedance ${\\cal Z}$. The disturbance of a Po...

Lovelace, R V E; Kronberg, P P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE ERUPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fields of the flux rope were partly opened due to magnetic reconnection. Subject headings: Sun: flares to escape with a fairly small reconnection rate in the vertical current sheet created below. Magnetic flux an interesting flux rope eruption model for fast CMEs, in which a flux rope is in a specific sling-shot field

235

Heterotic type IIA duality with fluxes - towards the complete story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the heterotic type IIA duality when fluxes are turned on. We show that many of the known fluxes are dual to each other and claim that certain fluxes on the heterotic side require that the type IIA picture is lifted to M or even F-theory compactifications with geometric fluxes.

Andrei Micu

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

236

Application of the adjoint method in atmospheric radiative transfer calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transfer of solar radiation through a standard mid-latitude summer atmosphere including different amounts of aerosols (from clear to hazy) has been computed. The discrete-ordinates (S/sub N/) method, which has been developed to a high degree of computational efficiency and accuracy primarily for nuclear radiation shielding applications, is employed in a forward as well as adjoint mode. In the adjoint mode the result of a transfer calculation is an importance function (adjoint intensity) which allows the calculation of transmitted fluxes, or other radiative responses, for any arbitrary source distribution. The theory of the adjoint method is outlined in detail and physical interpretations are developed for the adjoint intensity. If, for example, the downward directed solar flux at ground level, F/sub lambda/ (z = 0), is desired for N different solar zenith angles, a regular (forward) radiative transfer calculation must be repeated for each solar zenith angle. In contrast, only 1 adjoint transfer calculation gives F/sub lambda/ (z = 0) for all solar zenith angles in a hazy aerosol atmosphere, for 1 wavelength interval, in 2.3 seconds on a CDC-7600 computer. A total of 155 altitude zones were employed between 0 and 70 km, and the convergence criterion for the ratio of fluxes from successive iterations was set at 2 x 10/sup -3/. Our results demonstrate not only the applicability of the highly efficient modern S/sub N/ codes, but indicate also conceptual and computational advantages when the adjoint formulation of the radiative transfer equation is used.

Gerstl, S.A.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Influence of the geomagnetic field and of the uncertainties in the primary spectrum on the development of the muon flux in the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the sensitivity of the flux of atmospheric muons to uncertainties in the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to the treatment of the geomagnetic field. We use the air shower simulation program AIRES to make the calculation for two different primary spectra and under several approximations to the propagation of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. The results illustrate the importance of accurate modeling of the geomagnetic field effects. We propose a high and a low fit of the proton and helium fluxes, and calculate the muon fluxes with these different inputs. Comparison with measurements of the muon flux by the CAPRICE experiment shows a slight preference for the higher primary cosmic ray flux parametrization.

Hansen, P.; Gaisser, T.K.; Stanev, T.; Sciutto, S.J. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Departamento de Fisica and IFLP/CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C. C. 67 - 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup 3} N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10`s of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup 3] N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Compact high-flux two-stage solar collectors based on tailored edge-ray concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The recently-invented tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC) approach permits the design of compact two-stage high-flux solar collectors, with a focusing primary reflector and a non-imaging TERC secondary reflector. We present a new primary reflector shape based on the TERC approach and a secondary TERC tailored to its particular flux map, such that more compact concentrators emerge at flux concentration levels in excess of 90% of the thermodynamic limit. Calculations and raytrace simulation results are also offered which demonstrate that V-cone approximations to a wide variety of TERCs attain the concentration of the TERC to within a few percent. These V-cones represent practical secondary concentrators that may be superior to corresponding compound parabolic concentrator or trumpet secondaries. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Friedman, R.P. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Gordon, J.M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel)]|[Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Ries, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m {center_dot} K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations.

M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

Surdutovich, Eugene [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gallagher, David C. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Solov'yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasma along open magnetic field lines: Parallel heat flux  

SciTech Connect

In a long mean-free-path plasma where temperature anisotropy can be sustained, the parallel heat flux has two components with one associated with the parallel thermal energy and the other the perpendicular thermal energy. Due to the large deviation of the distribution function from local Maxwellian in an open field line plasma with low collisionality, the conventional perturbative calculation of the parallel heat flux closure in its local or non-local form is no longer applicable. Here, a non-perturbative calculation is presented for a collisionless plasma in a two-dimensional flux expander bounded by absorbing walls. Specifically, closures of previously unfamiliar form are obtained for ions and electrons, which relate two distinct components of the species parallel heat flux to the lower order fluid moments such as density, parallel flow, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and the field quantities such as the magnetic field strength and the electrostatic potential. The plasma source and boundary condition at the absorbing wall enter explicitly in the closure calculation. Although the closure calculation does not take into account wave-particle interactions, the results based on passing orbits from steady-state collisionless drift-kinetic equation show remarkable agreement with fully kinetic-Maxwell simulations. As an example of the physical implications of the theory, the parallel heat flux closures are found to predict a surprising observation in the kinetic-Maxwell simulation of the 2D magnetic flux expander problem, where the parallel heat flux of the parallel thermal energy flows from low to high parallel temperature region.

Guo Zehua; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

SHORT CIRCUIT CALCULATION (TEMPORARY POWER)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this calculation is to determine the momentary and interrupting duty on the breakers, for 69kV temporary power only.

Yuri Shane

1995-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

FLUX SENSOR EVALUATIONS AT THE ATR CRITICAL FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the ATR Critical (ATRC) facilities lack real-time methods for detecting thermal neutron flux and fission reaction rates for irradiation capsules. Direct measurements of the actual power deposited into a test are now possible without resorting to complicated correction factors. In addition, it is possible to directly measure minor actinide fission reaction rates and to provide time-dependent monitoring of the fission reaction rate or fast/thermal flux during transient testing. A joint Idaho State University /Idaho National Laboratory ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project was recently initiated to evaluate new real-time state-of-the-art in-pile flux detection sensors. Initially, the project is comparing the accuracy, response time, and long duration performance of French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)-developed miniature fission chambers, specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) by the Argentinean National Energy Commission (CNEA), specially developed commercial SPNDs, and back-to-back fission (BTB) chambers developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). As discussed in this paper, specialized fixturing and software was developed by INL to facilitate these joint ISU/INL evaluations. Calculations were performed by ISU to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. Ultimately, project results will be used to select the detector that can provide the best online regional ATRC power measurement. It is anticipated that project results may offer the potential to increase the ATRC’s current power limit and its ability to perform low-level irradiation experiments. In addition, results from this effort will provide insights about the viability of using these detectors in the ATR. Hence, this effort complements current activities to improve ATR software tools, computational protocols and in-core instrumentation under the ATR Modeling, Simulation and V&V Upgrade initiative, as well as the work to replace nuclear instrumentation under the ATR Life Extension Project (LEP) and provide support to the ATR NSUF.

Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Eric Bonebrake

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a boundary layer in free convection where turbulent thermal structures communicate information between the surface and the interior of the mixed layer, it is hypothesized that the surface momentum flux can be parameterized by u*2 = bDwBMML, ...

Roland B. Stull

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Continental scale estimastes of the biotic carbon flux from land cover change: 1850 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a Numeric Data Package (NDP) that contains annual carbon flux estimates from land cover change for nine regions of the world (i.e., North America, Europe, the Former Soviet Union, Pacific Developed Region, China, South and Central America, North Africa-Middle East, Tropical Africa, and South and Southeast Asia). Annual rates of land cover change and vegetation-soil response curves for each region and ecosystem are included in the database. The vegetation-soil curves are used in a bookkeeping carbon model to estimate the carbon flux with the atmosphere from the clearing or degradation of vegetation, cultivation of soils, decay of dead vegetation, and the recovery of abandoned lands. The model calculates the net flux of carbon in each region based on land cover change rates and vegetation-soil response curves for the period 1850 to 1980 (a few regions have WA cover records beginning in 1700 and carbon flux estimates ending in 1990). These data were collected and modeled in an attempt to reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of the flux of carbon from terrestrial vegetation to the atmosphere.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houghton, R.A.; Hackler, J.L. [Woods Hole Research Center, MA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NUCLEAR CALCULATIONS FOR THE PNPF  

SciTech Connect

The reactivity of the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility (PNPF) was calculated at various loadings using a oneregion (with reflector savings), four-group diffusion equation. These calculations were checked with a two-region, four- group FOG calculation. The thermal group constants were obtained with the TEMPEST II-S/sub 4/ procedure, the fast group constants with FORM. The U/sup 238/ resonance integral was adjusted to make the calculations for the critical assembly fit the measurements and the adjusted parameter was used for the PNPF calculations. The minimum critical loading at 360 deg F was calculated to be 20.4 elements, with and excess reactivity of 0.22% (31 cents) for the minimum critical loading of 21 elements. The excess reactivity wss calculated for core loadings of 19, 37, 61, and 85 elements, which result as the outer rings of element positions are filled consecutively. The isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity was estimated for several core loadings by using the calculated reactivities at 325 deg F and 585 deg F. The values of the coefficient for 21- and 61-element loadings are --4.6 and --4.9 x 10/sup -5/ delta k/ deg F, respectively. The largest coefficient is --5.0 x 10/sup -6/ delta k/ deg F at a loading of 38 elements. The kinetics parameters 1 and BETA /sub eff/ were calculated using the PERT program. The lifetime is 5.23 x 10/sup -5/ seconds at 325 deg F and 5.67 x 10/sup -6/ at 585 deg F. Beta effective ranged from 0.00689 for and 85-element loading at 325 deg F to 0.00728 for a 19-element loading at 585 deg F. A value of 0.0070 was chosen for kinetics calculations. (auth)

Mountford, L.A.; Hume, J.R.

1963-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

Surface Heat Flux Variations across the Kuroshio Extension as Observed by Surface Flux Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime sea surface heat flux variability across the Kuroshio Extension (KE) front is analyzed using data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) buoy in the Kuroshio recirculation gyre south of the KE front and from the Japan Agency for ...

Masanori Konda; Hiroshi Ichikawa; Hiroyuki Tomita; Meghan F. Cronin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

Todreas, Neil E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Detailed Burnup Calculations for Testing Nuclear Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general method (MCQ) has been developed by introducing a microscopic burnup scheme that uses the Monte Carlo calculated fluxes and microscopic reaction rates of a complex system and a depletion code for burnup calculations as a basis for solving nuclide material balance equations for each spatial region in which the system is divided. Continuous energy-dependent cross-section libraries and full 3D geometry of the system can be input for the calculations. The resulting predictions for the system at successive burnup time steps are thus based on a calculation route where both geometry and cross sections are accurately represented, without geometry simplifications and with continuous energy data, providing an independent approach for benchmarking other methods and nuclear data of actinides, fission products, and other burnable absorbers. The main advantage of this method over the classical deterministic methods currently used is that the MCQ System is a direct 3D method without the limitations and errors introduced on the homogenization of geometry and condensation of energy of deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo and burnup codes adopted until now are the widely used MCNP and ORIGEN codes, but other codes can be used also. For using this method, there is need of a well-known set of nuclear data for isotopes involved in burnup chains, including burnable poisons, fission products, and actinides. For fixing the data to be included in this set, a study of the present status of nuclear data is performed, as part of the development of the MCQ method. This study begins with a review of the available cross-section data of isotopes involved in burnup chains for power and research nuclear reactors. The main data needs for burnup calculations are neutron cross sections, decay constants, branching ratios, fission energy, and yields. The present work includes results of selected experimental benchmarks and conclusions about the sensitivity of different sets of cross-section data for burnup calculations, using some of the main available evaluated nuclear data files (ENDF-B-VI-Rel.8, JEFF-3.0, JENDL-3.3), on an isotope-by-isotope basis as much as possible. The selected experimental burnup benchmarks are reference cases for LWR and HWR reactors, with analysis of isotopic composition as a function of burnup. For LWR (H2O-moderated uranium oxide lattices) four benchmarks are included: ATM-104 NEA Burnup credit criticality benchmark; Yankee-Rowe Core V; H.B.Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3. For HWR (D2O-moderated uranium oxide cluster lattices), three benchmarks were selected: NPD-19-rod Fuel Clusters; Pickering-28-rod Fuel Clusters; and Bruce-37-rod Fuel Clusters. The isotopes with experimental concentration data included in these benchmarks are: Se-79, Sr90, Tc99, Ru106, Sn126, Sb125,1129, Cs133-137, Nd143, 145, Sm149-150, 152, Eul53-155, U234-235, 238, Np237, Pu238-242, Am241-243, and Cm242-248. Results and analysis of differences between calculated and measured absolute and/or relative concentrations of these isotopes for the seven benchmarks are included in this work.

Leszczynski, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), 8400 S.C.de Bariloche (Argentina)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Dose measurements and calculations in the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam at BMRR were measured, calculated, and reported. This beam has already been used for animal irradiations. We anticipate that it will be used for clinical trials. Thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities distributions, and dose rate distributions, as a function of depth were measured in a lucite dog-head phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed and compared with the measured values. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Fairchild, R.G.; Greenberg, D.; Kamen, Y.; Fiarman, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept.); Benary, V. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept. Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Kalef-Ezra, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept. Ioannina Univ. (Greece)); Wielopolski, L. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept. State Univ. of New

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Atmospheric Muon Flux at Sea Level, Underground, and Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical sea-level muon spectrum at energies above 1 GeV and the underground/underwater muon intensities at depths up to 18 km w.e. are calculated. The results are particularly collated with a great body of the ground-level, underground, and underwater muon data. In the hadron-cascade calculations, the growth with energy of inelastic cross sections and pion, kaon, and nucleon generation in pion-nucleus collisions are taken into account. For evaluating the prompt muon contribution to the muon flux, we apply two phenomenological approaches to the charm production problem: the recombination quark-parton model and the quark-gluon string model. To solve the muon transport equation at large depths of homogeneous medium, a semi-analytical method is used. The simple fitting formulas describing our numerical results are given. Our analysis shows that, at depths up to 6-7 km w. e., essentially all underground data on the muon intensity correlate with each other and with predicted depth-intensity relation for conventional muons to within 10%. However, the high-energy sea-level data as well as the data at large depths are contradictory and cannot be quantitatively decribed by a single nuclear-cascade model.

E. V. Bugaev; A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Study of the Neutron Flux and Dpa Attenuation in the Reactor Pressure-Vessel Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of the neutron flux and dpa attenuation in the reactor pressure vessel (PV) wall presented in this work was performed with state-of-the art methods currently used to determine PV fluxes, the BUGLE-96 cross-section library, and the iron displacement cross sections derived from ENDF/B-VI data. The calculations showed that the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, extrapolation formula predicts slower--and therefore conservative--attenuation of the neutron flux (E > 1MeV) in the PV wall. More importantly, the calculations gave slower attenuation of the dpa rate in the PV wall than the attenuation predicted by the formula. The slower dpa rate attenuation was observed for all the cases considered, which included two different PWRs, and several configurations obtained by varying the PV wall thickness and thermal shield thickness. For example, for a PV wall thickness of {approximately}24 cm, the calculated ratio of the dpa rate at 1/4 and 3/4 of the PV wall thickness to the dpa value on the inner PV surface is {approximately}14% and 19% higher, respectively, than predicted by the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, formula.

Remec, I.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kunkel, K.E. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH  

SciTech Connect

Voyager 1(V1) and Voyager 2(V2) have observed heliosheath plasma since 2005 December and 2007 August, respectively. The observed speed profiles are very different at the two spacecrafts. Speeds at V1 decreased to zero in 2010 while the average speed at V2 is a constant 150 km s{sup -1} with the direction rotating tailward. The magnetic flux is expected to be constant in these heliosheath flows. We show that the flux is constant at V2 but decreases by an order of magnitude at V1, even after accounting for divergence of the flows and changes in the solar field. If reconnection were responsible for this decrease, the magnetic field would lose 70% of its free energy to reconnection and the energy density released would be 0.6 eV cm{sup -3}.

Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Decker, R. B. [Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Drake, J. F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Opher, M., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: robert.decker@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: drake@umd.edu, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

On Rayleigh Optical Depth Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used for the calculation of Rayleigh optical depth in the atmosphere. In some cases differences among these techniques can be important, especially in the UV region of the spectrum and under clean atmospheric ...

Barry A. Bodhaine; Norman B. Wood; Ellsworth G. Dutton; James R. Slusser

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ORNL DAAC, Arctic Tundra Flux Data, February 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric fluxes in the Arctic tundra are now available on-line. The newly released data set "Arctic Tundra Flux Study in the Kuparuk River Basin (Alaska), 1994-1996" contains...

272

Stability-Dependent Exchange Coefficients for Air–Sea Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study introduces exchange coefficients for wind stress (CD), latent heat flux (CL), and sensible heat flux (CS) over the global ocean. They are obtained from the state-of-the-art Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) bulk ...

A. Birol Kara; Harley E. Hurlburt; Alan J. Wallcraft

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Spatial Distribution of Surface Fluxes Estimated from Remotely Sensed Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study relates surface fluxes to remotely sensed variables over well-defined variations of surface wetness and vegetation. The surface fluxes are estimated from repeated Twin Otter aircraft flights at 33 m above the surface after correcting ...

Jielun Sun; L. Mahrt

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

BOREAS SSA-YJP Tower Flux Data Revised  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tower Flux Data Revised A revised version of the BOREAS TF04 tower flux data is now available from the ORNL DAAC. Data providers have revised the data set entitled "BOREAS TF-04...

275

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes u?p? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Measurements over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This papar presents an extensive act of sensible heat (Reynolds flux and dissipation methods) and latent heat (dissipation method) flux measurements from a stable deep water tower and from ships on the deep sea. Operational difficulties ...

W. G. Large; S. Pond

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Enhanced flux balance analysis to model metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a widely used technique to predict rates of reactions in metabolic networks in cells under steady state using only stoichiometric information about the reactions. In this work, we introduce Enhanced Flux Balance Analysis ...

Nishanth Ulhas Nair; Navin Goyal; Nagasuma R. Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Evaluation of HOAPS-3 Ocean Surface Freshwater Flux Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, latent heat flux and precipitation over the global ocean surface can be determined from microwave satellite data as a basis for estimating the related fields of the ocean surface freshwater flux. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and ...

Axel Andersson; Christian Klepp; Karsten Fennig; Stephan Bakan; Hartmut Grassl; Jörg Schulz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Flux and Wavelet Diagnostics of Secondary Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, aircraft data from mountain waves have been primarily analyzed using velocity and temperature power spectrum and momentum flux estimation. Herein it is argued that energy flux wavelets (i.e., pressure–velocity wavelet cross-...

Bryan K. Woods; Ronald B. Smith

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Entry, Flux, and Exit of Potential Vorticity in Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux form of the potential vorticity (PV) equation is employed to derive simple expressions for the boundary and interior flux of PV in ocean circulation using Bernoulli functions. The formulas are discussed and physically interpreted and ...

John Marshall; Daniel Jamous; Johan Nilsson

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

284

EXTERNAL CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR DOE SNF CODISPOSAL WASTE PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to evaluate the potential for criticality for the fissile material that could accumulate in the near-field (invert) and in the far-field (host rock) beneath the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal waste packages (WPs) as they degrade in the proposed monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The scope of this calculation is limited to the following DOE SNF types: Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Enrico Fermi, Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Fort St. Vrain, Melt and Dilute, Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, and Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics reactor (TRIGA). The results of this calculation are intended to be used for estimating the probability of criticality in the near-field and in the far-field. There are no limitations on use of the results of this calculation. The calculation is associated with the waste package design and was developed in accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan for: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel and Plutonium Disposition Work Packages'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC [BSC], 2002a). This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310Ml in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-0000 10 REV 01 (BSC 2002a).

H. Radulescu

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

Superconductor with Improved Flux Pinning and Reduced AC ...  

Superconductor with Improved Flux ... involve ramped magnetic or oscillating magnetic fields or require that the HTS wire carry alternating current ...

286

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

287

High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

Cameron, C.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

SciTech Connect

We conducted observations and modeling at a forest site to assess importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions. We used the terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes And Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the calculated biomass energy storages. Effects of energy storages on flux exchanges and variations of radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without the storages. We found that with the storages, FAPIS predictions agreed with measurements well; without them, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all surface energy fluxes. The biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 Wm-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Without-storage simulations produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with with-storage simulations. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the biomass energy storages act to dampen diurnal temperature range. Therefore, biomass heat and biochemical energy storages are an integral and substantial part of the surface energy budget and play a role in modulating land surface temperatures and must be considered in studies of land - atmosphere interactions and climate modeling.

Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Liu, Qing [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Averaging-Related Biases in Monthly Latent Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal-to-multidecadal applications that require ocean surface energy fluxes often require accuracies of surface turbulent fluxes to be 5 W m?2 or better. While there is little doubt that uncertainties in the flux algorithms and input data can ...

Paul J. Hughes; Mark A. Bourassa; Jeremy J. Rolph; Shawn R. Smith

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

292

Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion  

SciTech Connect

During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

Dayananda, M.A.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Comparing Aircraft-Based Remotely Sensed Energy Balance Fluxes with Eddy Covariance Tower Data Using Heat Flux Source Area Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to better evaluate distributed airborne remotely sensed sensible and latent heat flux estimates, two heat flux source area (footprint) models were applied to the imagery, and their pixel weighting/integrating functionality was ...

JoséL. Chávez; Christopher M. U. Neale; Lawrence E. Hipps; John H. Prueger; William P. Kustas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Measuring Spectral Actinic Flux and Irradiance: Experimental Results from the Actinic Flux Determination from Measurements of Irradiance (ADMIRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the Actinic Flux Determination from Measurements of Irradiance (ADMIRA) campaign to measure spectral global UV irradiance and actinic flux at the ground, beneath an atmosphere well defined by supporting measurements. ...

A. R. Webb; A. F. Bais; M. Blumthaler; G-P. Gobbi; A. Kylling; R. Schmitt; S. Thiel; F. Barnaba; T. Danielsen; W. Junkermann; A. Kazantzidis; P. Kelly; R. Kift; G. L. Liberti; M. Misslbeck; B. Schallhart; J. Schreder; C. Topaloglou

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Comparative Calculations of Solubility Equilibria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in calculated solubilities in the Na-F-PO{sub 4}-HPO{sub 4}-OH system. at 25 C for NaOH concentrations up to 5 mol/kg were assessed. These uncertainties were based on an evaluation of the range of values for the Gibbs energies of the solids. Comparative calculations using the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) and SOLGASMIX indicated that the variation in activity coefficients with NaOH concentration is much greater in the ESP code than in SOLGASMIX. This resulted in ESP calculating a higher solubility in water and a lower solubility in NaOH concentrations above 1 mol/kg: There was a marked discrepancy in the solubilities of the pure components sodium fluoride and trisodium phosphate predicted by ESP and SOLGASMIX. In addition, different solubilities for these components were obtained using different options in ESP. Because of these observations, a Best Practices Guide for ESP will be assembled.

Beahm, E.C.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Kunkel, K. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

Hong, S. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., 446-701 Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 305-353 Duckjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_(Lewicki_%26_Oldenburg)&oldid=508144" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

300

Optimisation of a transverse flux linear PM generator using 3D Finite Element Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Several transverse flux and longitudinal flux linear generator topologies exist for freepiston Stirling engine applications. In this thesis the transverse flux permanent magnet… (more)

Schutte, Jacques

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Trapped Quintessential Inflation from Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quintessential inflation is studied using a string modulus as the inflaton - quintessence field. It is assumed that the modulus crosses an enhanced symmetry point (ESP) in field space. Particle production at the ESP temporarily traps the modulus resulting in a period of inflation. After reheating, the modulus freezes due to cosmological friction at a large value, such that its scalar potential is dominated by contributions due to fluxes in the extra dimensions. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it can become quintessence.

Konstantinos Dimopoulos

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Tributary Fluxes into Brush Creek Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements in a tributary to Brush Creek Valley during the September and October 1984 ASCOT campaign with laser anemometers, tethersondes, a minisodar, and smoke release were used to calculate the contribution by tributaries to nocturnal ...

R. L. Coulter; Monte Orgill; William Porch

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

304

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be p...

Zhan, H; Eisenstein, D J; Katz, N; Zhan, Hu; Dave, Romeel; Eisenstein, Daniel; Katz, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Towards CFD Modelling of Critical Heat Flux in Fuel Rod Bundles  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes actual CFD approaches to subcooled boiling and investigates their capability to contribute to fuel assembly design. In a prototype version of the CFD code CFX a wall boiling model is implemented based on a wall heat flux partition algorithm. It can be shown, that the wall boiling model is able, to calculate the cross sectional averaged vapour volume fraction with good agreement to published measurements. The most sensitive parameters of the model are identified. Needs for more detailed experiments are established which are necessary to support further model development. Nevertheless in the paper the model is applied for the investigation of the phenomena inside a hot channel in a fuel assembly. Here the essential parameter is the critical heat flux. Although subcooled boiling represents only a preliminary state toward critical heat flux essential parameters like the swirl, the cross flow between adjacent channels and concentration regions of bubbles can be determined. By calculating the temperature at the rod surface the critical regions can be identified which might later on lead to departure from nucleate boiling and possible damage of the fuel pin. The application of up-to-date CFD with a subcooled boiling model for the simulation of a hot channel enables the comparison and the evaluation of different geometrical designs of the spacer grids of a fuel rod bundle. (authors)

Krepper, Eckhard [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Safety Research, D-01314 Dresden, POB 510119 (Germany); Egorov, Yury [ANSYS Germany GmbH Staudenfeldweg 12, D-83624 Otterfing (Germany); Koncar, Bostjan ['Jozef Stefan' Institute Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

C.E. Sanders

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part I: Momentum Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important outcome from the ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Hurricane Program is the first-ever direct measurements of momentum flux from within hurricane boundary layers. In 2003, a specially instrumented NOAA P3 ...

Jeffrey R. French; William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An experimental evaluation of the instrumented flux synthesis method for the real-time estimation of reactivity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

One method of determining the flux density is flux synthesis which approximates the flux in the core by linear combinations of precomputed shape functions. In traditional flux synthesis, the unknown mixing coefficients are determined using a weighted residual method of solving the diffusion equation. In the instrumented synthesis method, the mixing coefficients are determined using count rates from neutron detectors in the core. In this way the mixing coefficients are linked to conditions in the reactor. Using the synthesized flux, kinetics parameters, notably reactivity, can be calculated in real time. An experimental evaluation has been performed in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor, MITR-II. Detector measurements have been collected using fission chambers placed at the periphery of the core. The reactor was put into a number of various conditions, both static and transient, and data were collected using a digital acquisition system for later combination with shape functions. Transients included increasing power, decreasing power, and a reactor scram. The shape functions were generated using Version 3.0 of the QUARTZ code, a quadratic nodal diffusion theory code in triangular-Z geometry. Supernodal analysis algorithms have been added to the original program, along with subroutines to guarantee diagonal dominance of the leakage matrix in the finite difference or quadratic current approximations in the coarse mesh. The agreement between coarse mesh and fine mesh in all cases is excellent, with finite difference coarse mesh solutions generally slightly better. The synthesis method has been shown to accurately reflect the changes from an initial condition by combining representative flux shapes. It can be concluded that, with proper calibration of the measurement system and inclusion of representative flux shapes, the instrumented synthesis method will properly predict the flux in the core under a number of conditions.

Hughes, J.C.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

Computer modeling and experimental verification of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the computer modeling and experimental verification of the magnetic forces associated with a figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system. A set of computer codes called COILGDWY, were developed on the basis of the dynamic circuit model and verified by means of a laboratory model. The experimental verification was conducted with a rotating PVC drum, the surface of which held various types of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coils that interacted with a stationary permanent magnet. The transient and dynamic magnetic forces between the stationary magnet and the rotating conducting coils were measured and compared with results obtained from the computer model. Good agreement between the experimental results and computer simulations was obtained. The computer model can also be used to calculate magnetic forces in a large-scale magnetic-levitation system.

He, J.L.; Mulcahey, T.M.; Rote, D.M.; Kelly, T.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marineof gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SEED BANKS FOR MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION GENERATORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting experiments that require pulsed high currents to be delivered into inductive loads. The loads fall into two categories (1) pulsed high field magnets and (2) the input stage of Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG). Three capacitor banks of increasing energy storage and controls sophistication have been designed and constructed to drive these loads. One bank was developed for the magnet driving application (20kV {approx} 30kJ maximum stored energy.) Two banks where constructed as MFCG seed banks (12kV {approx} 43kJ and 26kV {approx} 450kJ). This paper will describe the design of each bank including switching, controls, circuit protection and safety.

Fulkerson, E S

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

314

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

315

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

316

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Laboratory experiments aimed at evaluating gas flux sampling methods The value of using the noble gas suite in transport studies is made obvious by the eight-fold enrichment in 4Her132Xe observed in the 80% CO sample (Table 2 1), relative to abundancies in air. Our results at least show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state values. On-site measurements other than CO2 flux could

318

Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earth’s horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

The DFLU flux for systems of conservation laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DFLU numerical flux was introduced in order to solve hyperbolic scalar conservation laws with a flux function discontinuous in space. We show how this flux can be used to solve a certain class of systems of conservation laws such as systems modeling ... Keywords: 35F25, 35L65, 65M06, 65M12, 76M12, 76M20, 76S05, Finite differences, Finite volumes, Flow in porous media, Polymer flooding, Riemann solvers, System of conservation laws

Adimurthi; G. D. Veerappa Gowda; JéRôMe Jaffré

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Calculator...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers (Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only) This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost...

322

Hybrid Car Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hybrid Car Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hybrid Car Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: New American Dream Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine...

323

Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

325

Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

326

FLUX COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR TREATING URANIUM-CONTAINING METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux composition is preseated for use with molten uranium and uranium alloys. It consists of about 60% calcium fluoride, 30% calcium chloride and 10% uranium tetrafluoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomyflux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence a JB algebra. We show the Jordan GNS construction produces a state that is invariant under all inner derivations of the holonomy-flux *-algebra. Implications for the corresponding

Michael Rios

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National...

329

Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The proposed research involves designing, testing, and ics. analyzing a coupled, flux transformer heat pipe system following the patent of Oktay and Peterson (1997). Experiments… (more)

Renzi, Kimberly Irene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

331

Forest understory soil temperatures and heat flux calculated using a Fourier model and scaled using a digital camera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uneven but periodic solar heating of the soil surface due tothe uneven but periodic solar heating of the soil due to a

Graham, Eric; Lam, Yeung; Yuen, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Spectral UV Measurements of Global Irradiance, Solar Radiance, and Actinic Flux in New Zealand: Intercomparison between Instruments and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presented here are the results of a short but intense measurement campaign at Lauder, New Zealand, in which spectral irradiance from instruments operated by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and Austria/Innsbruck (...

Mario Blumthaler; Barbara Schallhart; Michael Schwarzmann; Richard McKenzie; Paul Johnston; Michael Kotkamp; Hisako Shiona

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability Reliability U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 2007 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Joe Paladino October 29, 2007 Approach for Calculating OE Benefits Challenges * Established benefits methodologies (e.g., NEMS and MARKAL) do not address some of the major benefits that OE's program will provide (e.g. reliability). * Much of OE's program is about transforming the way the T&D infrastructure operates rather than replacing components: - Some technologies need a high penetration or must be deployed as an entire system to yield benefits (e.g. PMUs or Distribution Automation). - Some programs within OE are not developing "widgets" that can be easily counted. - OE is developing tools/methodologies or funding demonstrations that

334

Shielding calculations at dismantled synchrocyclotron  

SciTech Connect

The Space Radiation Effects Laboratory located in Newport News, Virginia, was operated by the College of William and Mary for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A synchrocyclotron which was formerly in operation in this building was removed in 1980. At several locations, the scattered radiation caused an induced radioactivity within the walls of the cyclotron room. A radiological survey has been performed to determine the amount of residual radioactivity on the walls. Calculations were performed to determine the thickness of the concrete walls and floor for shielding the residual radiation in the cyclotron room. Recommendations are made to minimize exposures from the residual radioactivity on the walls and floor of the cyclotron room to potential occupants working in the building. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Yalcintas, M.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Power Line Calculator for DOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Power Line Calculator (PLC) for DOS, version 1.0, is a program that describes the electrical characteristics of a transmission or distribution system given user-defined input. This input may consist of a combination of operating currents and phases, symmetric components, power factor, and real or reactive power. The program also allows the user to designate whether currents are present on the system neutral or in the ground. The PLC assumes that any value entered by the user remains fixed (e.g., phase current, power factor), and for underdetermined systems, basic default assumptions are incorporated: the power factor is held at or near 1.0, the net phase current is kept at or near zero, and the phase conductor currents are kept balanced. The program operates under PC/MS-DOS version 3.3 or later, and the output is available in both tabular and graphic formats.

Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations  

SciTech Connect

We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

339

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

340

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide for improved generation and sustainment of an energetic plasma in a spheromak fusion reactor. A large poloidal magnetic flux is inductively induced in a spheromak-shaped plasma utilizing a reduced magnetic field-generating current in a current-carrying flux core.

Furth, H.P.; Janos, A.C.; Uyama, T.; Yamada, M.

1986-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Theory and experiment testing flux-line cutting physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss predictions of five proposed theories for the critical state of type-II superconductors accounting for both flux cutting and flux transport (depinning). The theories predict different behaviours for the ratio E{sub y}/E{sub z} of the transverse and parallel components of the in-plane electric field produced just above the critical current of a type-II superconducting slab as a function of the angle of an in-plane applied magnetic field. We present experimental results measured using an epitaxially grown YBCO thin film favouring one of the five theories, i.e. the extended elliptic critical-state model. We conclude that when the current density J is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the local magnetic flux density B, both flux cutting and flux transport occur simultaneously when J exceeds the critical current density J{sub c}, indicating an intimate relationship between flux cutting and depinning. We also conclude that the dynamical properties of the superconductor when J exceeds J{sub c} depend in detail upon two nonlinear effective resistivities for flux cutting ({rho}{sub c}) and flux flow ({rho}{sub f}) and their ratio r = {rho}{sub c}/{rho}{sub f}.

Clem, John R.; Weigand, Marcus; Durrell, J. H.; Campbell, A. M.

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

An Analysis of Moisture Fluxes into the Gulf of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the nature of episodes of enhanced warm-season moisture flux into the Gulf of California. Both spatial structure and primary time scales of the fluxes are examined using the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis data for the period 1980–...

Man-Li C. Wu; Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Norden E. Huang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Compton Spectrum from Poynting Flux Accelerated e+e- Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the Compton scattering emission from the Poynting flux acceleration of electron- positron plasma simulated by the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell(PIC) code. We show these and other remarkable properties of Poynting flux acceleration and Compton spectral output, and discuss the agreement with the observed spectra of GRBs and XRFs.

Sugiyama, S; Noguchi, K; Takabe, H; Sugiyama, Shinya; Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi; Takabe, Hideaki

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Compton Spectrum from Poynting Flux Accelerated e+e- Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the Compton scattering emission from the Poynting flux acceleration of electron- positron plasma simulated by the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell(PIC) code. We show these and other remarkable properties of Poynting flux acceleration and Compton spectral output, and discuss the agreement with the observed spectra of GRBs and XRFs.

Shinya Sugiyama; Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi; Hideaki Takabe

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

Diurnal Covariation in Soil Heat Flux and Net Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diurnal variation in soil heat flux is a key constraint on the amount of energy available for sensible and latent heating of the lower troposphere. Many studies have demonstrated that soil heat flux G is strongly correlated with net radiation Rn. ...

Joseph A. Santanello Jr.; Mark A. Friedl

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Device for regulating radiant flux in solar installations  

SciTech Connect

Devices for regulating luminous flux in solar installations that concentrate solar radiation are considered. Shutter-type luminous-flux regulators located on heliostats are considered, as well as devices that permit automatic variation in orientation of each concentrator facet in accordance with the prescribed program. The advantages and drawbacks of the devices described are cited.

Khakimov, R.A.; Zakhidov, R.A.; Sizov, Yu.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Diagnosis of the Net Cloud Mass Flux in Gate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic analysis of the net cloud mass flux for the mean state of Phase III is presented. In the upper troposphere, the environmental mass flux is shown to be slightly larger than the adiabatic sinking motion required by radiative cooling. ...

Yi-Leng Chen

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

HRA Calculator Version 4.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HRA Calculator analyzes and calculates human error probabilities in support of probabilistic risk assessments. HRA Calculator takes a 8220toolboxapproach that uses a variety of HRA methods. The PRA Tools / HRA Calculator User Group was formed in 2000 to address the industryneed for HRA tools and to encourage consistency in HRA results. Version 4.2 adds value by expanding the HRA Calculator methods applied, overcoming past limitations on particular parameters, improving the dependency analysis features, ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

HRA Calculator, Version 4.21 DEMO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HRA Calculator analyzes and calculates human error probabilities in support of probabilistic risk assessments. HRA Calculator takes a “toolbox” approach that uses a variety of HRA methods. The PRA Tools / HRA Calculator User Group was formed in 2000 to address the industry’s need for HRA tools and to encourage consistency in HRA results. Version 4.21 adds value by expanding the HRA Calculator methods applied, overcoming past limitations on particular parameters, improving the ...

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

351

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

352

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

353

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

354

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

355

HELICAL LENGTHS OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS FROM THE MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION  

SciTech Connect

We estimate axial lengths of helical parts in magnetic clouds (MCs) at 1 AU from the magnetic flux (magnetic helicity) conservation between solar active regions (ARs) and MCs with the event list of Leamon et al. Namely, considering poloidal magnetic flux (PHI{sub P}) conservation between MCs and ARs, we estimated L{sub h} in MCs, where L{sub h} is the axial length of an MC where poloidal magnetic flux and magnetic twist exist. It is found that L{sub h} is 0.01-1.25 AU in the MCs. If the cylinder flux rope picture is assumed, this result leads to a possible new picture of the cylinder model whose helical structure (namely, poloidal magnetic flux) localizes in a part of a MC.

Yamamoto, Tetsuya T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan); Kataoka, R. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, 152-8550 (Japan); Inoue, S., E-mail: tyamamot@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.j [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Koganei, 184-8795 (Japan)

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

357

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

358

NACP Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set from the North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP Site: Terrestrial Biosphere Model and Aggregated Flux Data in Standard Format . Data set prepared by D.M. Ricciuto, K. Schaefer, P.E. Thornton, K. Davis, R.B. Cook, Shishi Liu, R. Anderson, M.A. Arain, I. Baker, J.M. Chen, M. Dietze, R. Grant, C. Izaurralde, A.K. Jain, A.W. King, C. Kucharik, Shuguang Liu, E. Lokupitiya, Y. Luo, C. Peng, B. Poulter, D. Price, W. Riley, A. Sahoo, H. Tian, C. Tonitto, and H. Verbeeck. This data set provides standardized output variables for gross primary productivity (GPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), leaf area index (LAI), ecosystem respiration (Re), latent heat flux (LE), and sensible heat flux (H) from 24

359

A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomy-flux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence a JB algebra. We show the Jordan GNS construction produces a state that is invariant under all inner derivations of the holonomy-flux *-algebra. Implications for the corresponding Jordan-Schrodinger equation are also discussed.

Michael Rios

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

360

One-point fitting of the flux density produced by a heliostat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and simple models for the flux density reflected by an isolated heliostat should be one of the basic tools for the design and optimization of solar power tower systems. In this work, the ability and the accuracy of the Universidad de Zaragoza (UNIZAR) and the DLR (HFCAL) flux density models to fit actual energetic spots are checked against heliostat energetic images measured at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA). Both the fully analytic models are able to acceptably fit the spot with only one-point fitting, i.e., the measured maximum flux. As a practical validation of this one-point fitting, the intercept percentage of the measured images, i.e., the percentage of the energetic spot sent by the heliostat that gets the receiver surface, is compared with the intercept calculated through the UNIZAR and HFCAL models. As main conclusions, the UNIZAR and the HFCAL models could be quite appropriate tools for the design and optimization, provided the energetic images from the heliostats to be used in the collector field were previously analyzed. Also note that the HFCAL model is much simpler and slightly more accurate than the UNIZAR model. (author)

Collado, Francisco J. [Univ. Zaragoza, CPS-B, Dpto de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

Pond, R. B.

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing [Idaho Accelerator Centre, Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

363

Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Correcting eddy-covariance flux underestimates over a grassland.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent measurements of the major energy balance flux components are not often consistent with the principle of conservation of energy. This is referred to as a lack of closure of the surface energy balance. Most results in the literature have shown the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes measured by eddy covariance to be less than the difference between net radiation and soil heat fluxes. This under-measurement of sensible and latent heat fluxes by eddy-covariance instruments has occurred in numerous field experiments and among many different manufacturers of instruments. Four eddy-covariance systems consisting of the same models of instruments were set up side-by-side during the Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment and all systems under-measured fluxes by similar amounts. One of these eddy-covariance systems was collocated with three other types of eddy-covariance systems at different sites; all of these systems under-measured the sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The net radiometers and soil heat flux plates used in conjunction with the eddy-covariance systems were calibrated independently and measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux showed little scatter for various sites. The 10% absolute uncertainty in available energy measurements was considerably smaller than the systematic closure problem in the surface energy budget, which varied from 10 to 30%. When available-energy measurement errors are known and modest, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes should be adjusted for closure. Although the preferred method of energy balance closure is to maintain the Bowen-ratio, the method for obtaining closure appears to be less important than assuring that eddy-covariance measurements are consistent with conservation of energy. Based on numerous measurements over a sorghum canopy, carbon dioxide fluxes, which are measured by eddy covariance, are underestimated by the same factor as eddy covariance evaporation measurements when energy balance closure is not achieved.

Twine, T. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Norman, J. M.; Cook, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Meyers, T. P.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; DOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationoratory

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

PRELIMINARY SOLUTION CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS FOR THE HIGH-FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was supported by a series of preliminary experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1960. The experiments yielded results describing directly some of the expected performance characteristics of the reactor and strengthened the calculational methods used in its design. The critical assembly, like the reactor, was of a flux-trap type in which a central 6-in.-dia column of H/sub 2/O was surrounded by an annulus of fissile material and, in turn, by an annular neutron reflector. The fuel region contained a solution of enriched uranyl nitrate in a mixture of H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and the reflector was a composite of two annuli, the inner one of D/sub 2/O surrounded by one of H/sub 2/O. In most experiments the ends of the assembly were reflected by H/sub 2/O. Important results evaluate the absolute thermal-neutron flux to be expected in the design reactor and describe the flux distributions within this type of assembly. It was also observed that the cadmium ratio along the axis of the assembly was about 100, showing that a highly thermal-neutron flux was truly developed in the trap. It was shown that reduction of the hydrogen density in the central water column to about 80% of its normal value increased the reactivity about 6% and that further hydrogen density reduction decreased the reactivity as the effect of the loss of neutron moderation dominated the effect of the increased coupling across the central column. These considerations are of importance to the safety of the reactor. Additional experiments gave values of the usual critical dimensions and explored the effects on both the dimensions and the flux distributions of changing the concentration of the uranyl nitrate solution, of changing the composition of the solvent, and of adding neutron-absorbing materials to the D/ sub 2/O reflector. These changes were made to alter the neutron properties of the fuel solution over a range including those expected in the reactor itself. (auth)

Fox, J.K.; Gilley, L.W.; Magnuson, D.W.

1963-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

PROMINENCE FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH AN EMERGING HELICAL FLUX ROPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation and evolution process and magnetic configuration of solar prominences remain unclear. In order to study the formation process of prominences, we examine continuous observations of a prominence in NOAA AR 10953 with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. As reported in our previous Letter, we find a signature suggesting that a helical flux rope emerges from below the photosphere under a pre-existing prominence. Here we investigate more detailed properties and photospheric indications of the emerging helical flux rope, and discuss their relationship to the formation of the prominence. Our main conclusions are: (1) a dark region with absence of strong vertical magnetic fields broadens and then narrows in Ca II H-line filtergrams. This phenomenon is consistent with the emergence of the helical flux rope as photospheric counterparts. The size of the flux rope is roughly 30,000 km long and 10,000 km wide. The width is larger than that of the prominence. (2) No shear motion or converging flows are detected, but we find diverging flows such as mesogranules along the polarity inversion line. The presence of mesogranules may be related to the emergence of the helical flux rope. (3) The emerging helical flux rope reconnects with magnetic fields of the pre-existing prominence to stabilize the prominence for the next several days. We thus conjecture that prominence coronal magnetic fields emerge in the form of helical flux ropes that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the prominence.

Okamoto, Takenori J.; Tsuneta, Saku; Katsukawa, Yukio; Suematsu, Yoshinori [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Lites, Bruce W.; Kubo, Masahito [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Yokoyama, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Berger, Thomas E.; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto, 607-8471 (Japan); Shimizu, Toshifumi [ISAS/JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall  

SciTech Connect

In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Extension of the Complete Flux Scheme to Systems of Conservation Laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the extension of the complete flux scheme to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. For stationary problems, the flux approximation is derived from a local system boundary value problem for the entire system, including the source term vector. ... Keywords: Advection-diffusion-reaction systems, Finite volume method, Flux (vector), Green's matrix, Integral representation of the flux, Matrix functions, Numerical flux, Peclet matrix

J. H. Thije Boonkkamp; J. Dijk; L. Liu; K. S. Peerenboom

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division Home Reactor Projects Celebrating DOE's Cleanup Accomplishments (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) HFBR Overview HFBR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision HFBR Complex Cleanup Actions HFBR Documents HFBR Science & Accomplishments Groundwater Protection Group Environmental Protection Division Contact > See also: HFBR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor Under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) underwent stabilization and partial decommissioning to prepare the HFBR confinement for long-term safe

374

Bounded limit for the Monte Carlo point-flux-estimator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a Monte Carlo random walk the kernel K(R,E) is used as an expected value estimator at every collision for the collided flux phi/sub c/ r vector,E) at the detector point. A limiting value for the kernel is derived from a diffusion approximation for the probability current at a radius R/sub 1/ from the detector point. The variance of the collided flux at the detector point is thus bounded using this asymptotic form for K(R,E). The bounded point flux estimator is derived. (WHK)

Grimesey, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Systematic Tendency Error in Budget Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric budget calculations suffer from various observational and numerical errors. This paper demonstrates that all budget calculations applied to a large number of samples suffer from additional errors originating from systematic tendency ...

Masao Kanamitsu; Suranjana Saha

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Duct Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Calculator Duct Calculator Duct Calculator logo. Provides access to duct calculation and sizing capabilities either as a standalone Windows program or from within the Autodesk Building Mechanical, the new HVAC-oriented version of AutoCAD. Based on the engineering data and procedures outlined in the ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook Calculation Methods, Duct Calculator features an advanced and fully interactive user interface. Slide controls for air flow, velocity, friction and duct size provide real-time, interactive feedback; as you spin one, the others dynamically respond in real time. When used with Autodesk Building Mechanical, Duct Calculator streamlines the design process by automatically re-sizing whole branches of ductwork. Screen Shots Keywords duct-sizing, design, engineering, calculation

379

Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Vehicle Cost Calculator[1] Logo: Vehicle Cost Calculator Calculate the total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Overview This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate

380

SPC/E Water Reference Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SPC/E Water Reference Calculations - Ewald Summation. In ... 5. Sample Configurations of SPC/E Water Molecules. Four ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

MEASURED AND CALCULATED HEATING AND DOSE RATES FOR THE HFIR HB4 BEAM TUBE AND COLD SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was upgraded to install a cold source in horizontal beam tube number 4. Calculations were performed and measurements were made to determine heating within the cold source and dose rates within and outside a shield tunnel surrounding the beam tube. This report briefly describes the calculations and presents comparisons of the measured and calculated results. Some calculated dose rates are in fair to good agreement with the measured results while others, particularly those at the shield interfaces, differ greatly from the measured results. Calculated neutron exposure to the Teflon seals in the hydrogen transfer line is about one fourth of the measured value, underpredicting the lifetime by a factor of four. The calculated cold source heating is in good agreement with the measured heating.

Slater, Charles O [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Bucholz, James A [ORNL; Popov, Emilian L [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Status Report of NNLO QCD Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review recent progress in next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) perturbative QCD calculations with special emphasis on results ready for phenomenological applications. Important examples are new results on structure functions and jet or Higgs boson production. In addition, we describe new calculational techniques based on twistors and their potential for efficient calculations of multiparticle amplitudes.

Klasen, Michael [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Box 351550, Seattle, WA 98195-1550 (United States)

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

384

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

385

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

386

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

387

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

388

Convective Boundary Layers Driven by Nonstationary Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the response of dry convective boundary layers to nonstationary surface heat fluxes is systematically investigated. This is relevant not only during sunset and sunrise but also, for example, when clouds modulate incoming solar ...

Robert van Driel; Harm J. J. Jonker

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Broadband Water Vapor Transmission Functions for Atmospheric IR Flux Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmission functions associated with water vapor molecular line and e-type absorption in the IR spectral regions are presented in the form of simple analytical functions and small tables, from which atmospheric IR fluxes and cooling rates can ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Correlation between Flux Pinning Property and Interfacial Defects in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both the self-field and in-field critical current densities were improved as ... Effect of Strain on the Critical Current and Flux Pinning in YBa2Cu3O7-delta Coated ...

391

Improvement of Surface Longwave Flux Algorithms Used in CERES Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improvement was developed and tested for surface longwave flux algorithms used in the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System processing based on lessons learned during the validation of global results of those algorithms. The algorithms ...

Shashi K. Gupta; David P. Kratz; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Anne C. Wilber; Taiping Zhang; Victor E. Sothcott

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Countergradient vorticity Flux Generated in Continental Boundary Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that the inshore shear of continental boundary flows like the Florida Current can be accounted for by a countergradient vorticity flux, rather than by lateral diffusion to the shore. Two simple barotropic models with cross-stream ...

Melvin E. Stern

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection Neggers, Roel European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Category: Modeling A new convective boundary layer scheme is presented that is currently being developed for the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Part of the total turbulent flux is modeled through advective mass flux by multiple updrafts, initialized at the surface. Two groups of updrafts are explicitly represented; i) updrafts that never reach their lifting condensation level, and ii) updrafts that condensate and become cloudy. Key new ingredient is the flexibility of the associated updraft area fractions, as a function of model state. As a result, an extra degree of freedom is introduced in the

394

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

395

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007, A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Managment Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

396

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

397

Technical Sessions Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces R. L. Coulter J. D. Shannon T. J. Martin Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991 and described in greater detail elsewhere (Doran et al. 1991), various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMs) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term).

398

Molten Mold Flux Technology for Continuous Casting of the ULC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat flux from the molten steel to the cupper plate of the casting mold was .... of Conventional and High Niobium API 5L X80 Line Pipe Steel Using EBSD.

399

HF Doppler Measurements of Mesospheric Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies have emphasized the probable importance of internal gravity waves in balancing the momentum budget of the mesosphere. In this paper, we propose a method by which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum can be measured ...

R. A. Vincent; I. M. Reid

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Bivariate Conditional Sampling of Moisture Flux over a Tropical Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of conditional sampling using the bivariate joint frequency distribution (JFD) and conditional mean distribution (CMD) are introduced to analyze time series of water vapor flux obtained from aircraft gust-probe vertical velocity ...

Robert L. Grossman

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, T. B. Zhuravleva, and S. Y. Popov Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch...

402

Metastable states of hydrogen: their geometric phases and flux densities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the geometric phases and flux densities for the metastable states of hydrogen with principal quantum number n=2 being subjected to adiabatically varying external electric and magnetic fields. Convenient representations of the flux densities as complex integrals are derived. Both, parity conserving (PC) and parity violating (PV) flux densities and phases are identified. General expressions for the flux densities following from rotational invariance are derived. Specific cases of external fields are discussed. In a pure magnetic field the phases are given by the geometry of the path in magnetic field space. But for electric fields in presence of a constant magnetic field and for electric plus magnetic fields the geometric phases carry information on the atomic parameters, in particular, on the PV atomic interaction. We show that for our metastable states also the decay rates can be influenced by the geometric phases and we give a concrete example for this effect. Finally we emphasise that the general...

Gasenzer, T; Trappe, M -I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ORNL DAAC, Map Server for Flux Data, June 12, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for FLUXNET Data The ORNL DAAC has developed a Web map server to help users locate flux tower sites from around the world. Users can choose from more than 210 sites in the FLUXNET...

404

Experiments with Cloud Properties: Impact on Surface Radiative Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation reaching the earth’s surface provides the primary forcing of the climate system, and thus, information on this parameter is needed at a global scale. Several satellite-based estimates of surface radiative fluxes are available, but ...

H. Wang; R. T. Pinker; P. Minnis; M. M. Khaiyer

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Applied Modeling of Surface Fluxes under Different Stability Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study various surface layer parameters, fluxes, and eddy diffusivity profiles have been estimated by making use of routine meteorological data for both unstable and stable conditions. Several empirical relationships for estimating ...

Manju Mohan; T. A. Siddiqui

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Scaling Baroclinic Eddy Fluxes: Vortices and Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eddy heat flux generated by the statistically equilibrated baroclinic instability of a uniform, horizontal temperature gradient is studied using a two-mode f-plane quasigeostrophic model. An overview of the dependence of the eddy diffusivity ...

Andrew F. Thompson; William R. Young

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sensitivity of Global Mixing and Fluxes to Isolated Transport Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of isolated transport barriers on the global mixing and fluxes of a tracer are investigated, where a barrier is defined as a local minimum in effective diffusivity. An idealized 1D model with a prescribed diffusivity profile, with or ...

Noboru Nakamura

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Observations of Fluxes and Inland Breezes over a Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repeated aircraft runs at about 33 m over heterogeneous terrain are analyzed to study the spatial variability of the mesoscale flow and turbulent fluxes. An irrigated area, about 12 km across, generates a relatively cool moist inland breeze. As ...

L. Mahrt; Jielun Sun; Dean Vickers; J. I. Macpherson; J. R. Pederson; R. L. Desjardins

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Mass-Flux Budgets of Shallow Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical transport by shallow nonprecipitating cumulus clouds of conserved variables, such as the total specific humidity or the liquid water potential temperature, can be well modeled by the mass-flux approach, in which the cloud field is ...

Stephan R. de Roode; Christopher S. Bretherton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Regional Variations of Moist Static Energy Flux into the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the climmological heating of the Arctic by the atmospheric moist static energy (MSE) flux from lower latitudes based on 25 years (November 1964–1989) of the GFDL dataset. During the five month winter period (NDJFM) the ...

James E. Overland; Philip Turet; Abraham H. Oort

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sampling Errors in Flux Measurements of Slowly Depositing Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling errors in vertical flux measurements obtained by eddy correlation methods are investigated by specifying a jointly normal–lognormal density distribution for the vertical velocity and scalar concentration. The probability density function ...

Edward E. O'Brien

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Sensitivity of Surface Solar Fluxes to Cloud Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were performed to examine the sensitivity of computed solar fluxes using a delta-Eddington model to recent parameterizations of cloud albedo of single scattering and asymmetry factor, In particular, the changes in the surface downward ...

J. A. Ewing; R. T. Pinker

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Interpretation of Flux-Profile Observations at ITCE (1976)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At an International Turbulence Comparison Experiment (ITCE) in Australia (1976), wind, temperature and humidity profiles, plus vertical fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat were measured for a limited range of unstable conditions, ...

R. J. Francey; J. R. Garratt

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Structural Analysis of Airborne Flux Estimates over a Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft-based observations of turbulence fields of velocity, moisture, and temperature are used to study coherent turbulent structures that dominate turbulent transfer of moisture and heat above three different eco-systems. Flux traces are ...

Paulo Caramori; Peter Schuepp; Raymond Desjardins; Ian MacPherson

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Eddy Heat Flux in the Subtropical North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meridional eddy heat flux in the subtropical North Pacific is estimated from TRANSPAC ship-of-opportunity data collected during 1976–80. Two methods are used. The first fits simple functional forms to be temporal anomalies of the temperature ...

Andrew F. Bennett; Warren B. White

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Intraseasonal Latent Heat Flux Based on Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weekly average satellite-based estimates of latent heat flux (LHTFL) are used to characterize spatial patterns and temporal variability in the intraseasonal band (periods shorter than 3 months). As expected, the major portion of intraseasonal ...

Semyon A. Grodsky; Abderrahim Bentamy; James A. Carton; Rachel T. Pinker

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

On the Influence of Buoyancy Fluxes on Wind Drift Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a moored buoy in the Baltic proper have been analyzed to study the ageostrophic wind-driven (Ekman) transport accounting for buoyancy fluxes in a stratified ocean. A model considering different dynamical regimes governed by wind stress ...

Signild Nerheim; Anders Stigebrandt

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Parameterization of Radiative Flux Profiles within Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of radiative flux profiles within clouds can have a significant impact on the thermodynamic processes that maintain and dissipate the clouds, particularly in the case of marine stratus and stratocumulus. However, dynamic ...

Howard P. Hanson; Vernon E. Derr

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Flux to a Cyclonic Eddy off Cabo Frio, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the energy flux from the mean flow of South Atlantic western boundary currents toward typical Cabo Frio eddies (at Brazilian southeast coast), the southwestern Atlantic circulation was simulated with the Princeton Ocean Model. ...

Manlio F. Mano; Afonso M. Paiva; Audalio R. Torres Jr.; Alvaro L. G. A. Coutinho

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An Energy-Constrained Parameterization of Eddy Buoyancy Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization for eddy buoyancy fluxes for use in coarse-grid models is developed and tested against eddy-resolving simulations. The development is based on the assumption that the eddies are adiabatic (except near the surface) and the ...

Paola Cessi

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Boundary Layer Characteristics over Areas of Inhomogeneous Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a June 1992 field program to study the response of the boundary layer over a site with well-defined extreme differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes over clearly separated areas, each with characteristic ...

J. C. Doran; W. J. Shaw; J. M. Hubbe

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Parameterized Updraft Mass Flux as a Predictor of Convective Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterized updraft mass flux, available as a unique predictive field from the Kain–Fritsch (KF) convective parameterization, is presented as a potentially valuable predictor of convective intensity. The KF scheme is described in some detail, ...

John S. Kain; Michael E. Baldwin; Steven J. Weiss

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Direct Estimation of Heat Flux in a Seasonal Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a direct measurement of the turbulent heat flux. The sampling was from a submarine that used a conventional airfoil probe to measure the vertical component of turbulent velocity and a thermistor probe to measure the ...

Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Thomas Osborn

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Direct Heat Flux Estimates Using a Towed Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct estimates of vertical heat flux were computed using data collected with a towed vehicle that carried collocated velocity and temperature sensors. Horizontal wavenumbers from about 1 to 40 cpm were resolved, which excludes some potentially ...

M. Fleury; R. G. Lueck

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A novel method for flux distribution computation in metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the study on metabolic networks has attracted considerable attention from the research community. Though the topological structures of genome-scale metabolic networks of some organisms have been investigated, their metabolic flux distributions ...

Da Jiang; Shuigeng Zhou; Jihong Guan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Momentum flux in two-phase flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The average momentum flux at a section of a pipe with twophase upflow has been measured by the impulse technique. Steamwater and air-water mixtures were tested in one-inch and onehalf inch nominal pipes. Homogeneous ...

Andeen, Gerry B.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Differential evolution and its application to metabolic flux analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metabolic flux analysis with measurement data from 13C tracer experiments has been an important approach for exploring metabolic networks. Though various methods were developed for 13C positional enrichment or isotopomer modelling, ...

Jing Yang; Sarawan Wongsa; Visakan Kadirkamanathan; Stephen A. Billings; Phillip C. Wright

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Acceleration Field Associated with Vorticity Flux Convergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that each term that represents vorticity flux convergence or divergence in the quasigeostrophic potential vorticity equation can be inverted to obtain fluid acceleration associated with that term, and the same can be obtained for the ...

Colin Y. Shen

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

On Heat Flux Boundary Conditions for Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modeling studies of thermohaline variability have imposed rapid damping of modeled sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies equivalent to assuming the atmosphere has an infinite heat capacity. Such surface heat flux parameterizations ...

Richard Seager; Yochanan Kushnir; Mark A. Cane

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

432

How Far is Far Enough?: The Fetch Requirements for Micrometeorological Measurement of Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent model estimates of the flux footprint are used to examine the fetch requirements for accurate micro-meteorological measurement of surface fluxes of passive, conservative scalars within the surface flux layer. The required fetch is ...

T. W. Horst; J. C. Weil

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Intercomparisons of Air–Sea Heat Fluxes over the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consistency and discrepancy of air–sea latent and sensible heat fluxes (LHF and SHF, respectively) in the Southern Ocean for current-day flux products are analyzed from climatology and interannual-to-decadal variability perspectives. Five flux ...

Jiping Liu; Tingyin Xiao; Liqi Chen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Turbulent Flux Transfer over Bare-Soil Surfaces: Characteristics and Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterization of turbulent flux from bare-soil and undercanopy surfaces is imperative for modeling land–atmosphere interactions in arid and semiarid regions, where flux from the ground is dominant or comparable to canopy-sourced flux. This ...

Kun Yang; Toshio Koike; Hirohiko Ishikawa; Joon Kim; Xin Li; Huizhi Liu; Shaomin Liu; Yaoming Ma; Jieming Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part I: Design and Laboratory Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An untended instrument to measure ocean surface heat flux has been developed for use in support of field experiments and the investigation of heat flux parameterization techniques. The sensing component of the Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Definition: Interchange Distribution Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution Calculator Distribution Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Interchange Distribution Calculator The mechanism used by Reliability Coordinators in the Eastern Interconnection to calculate the distribution of Interchange Transactions over specific Flowgates. It includes a database of all Interchange Transactions and a matrix of the Distribution Factors for the Eastern Interconnection.[1] Related Terms Reliability Coordinator, Interchange Transaction References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Interchange_Distribution_Calculator&oldid=480261" Categories: Definitions

437

Distributed Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distributed Energy Calculator Distributed Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Distributed Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Apps for Energy Challenge Participant Sector: Energy Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: distributedenergycalculator.com/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Challenge Generated, Green Button Apps Language: English References: Apps for Energy[1] The Distributed Energy Calculator allows you to explore the potential energy savings for your community using Solar, Small Wind or Microturbines. The Distributed Energy Calculator allows you to explore the potential energy savings for your community using Solar, Small Wind or Microturbines. You can upload Green Button Data to compare your utility energy costs to

438

Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Valentine, Kenneth H. (Lenoir City, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Quadrupole, and Sextupole Magnets using POISSON Ro be rt J. La ri<::::R~ i. September 10, 1985 Introduction LS-32 The computer program POISSON was used to calculate the dipole, quadru- pole, and sextupole magnets of the 6 GeV electron storage ring. A trinagular mesh must first be generated by LATTICE. The triangle size is varied over the "universe" at the discretion of the user. This note describes a series of test calculations that were made to help the user decide on the size of the mesh to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular mesh used to calculate a "perfect" dipole magnet is shown in

440

Chalmers Climate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chalmers Climate Calculator Chalmers Climate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Chalmers Climate Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Chalmers University of Technology Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: dhcp2-pc011134.fy.chalmers.se Cost: Free Chalmers Climate Calculator Screenshot References: Chalmers Climate Calculator[1] Logo: Chalmers Climate Calculator " In the Chalmers Climate Calculator the user can decide on when and how fast emissions of CO2 are reduced and what this emissions scenario implies in terms of CO2 concentration and global average surface temperature change. The climate sensitivity and the net aerosol forcing in year 2005

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

Lewandowski, A; Scholl, K; Bingham, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

On the Chaotic Flux Dynamics in a Long Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux dynamics in an annular long Josephson junction is studied. Three main topics are covered. The first is chaotic flux dynamics and its prediction via Melnikov integrals. It turns out that DC current bias cannot induce chaotic flux dynamics, while AC current bias can. The existence of a common root to the Melnikov integrals is a necessary condition for the existence of chaotic flux dynamics. The second topic is on the components of the global attractor and the bifurcation in the perturbation parameter measuring the strength of loss, bias and irregularity of the junction. The global attractor can contain co-existing local attractors e.g. a local chaotic attractor and a local regular attractor. In the infinite dimensional phase space setting, the bifurcation is very complicated. Chaotic attractors can appear and disappear in a random fashion. Three types of attractors (chaos, breather, spatially uniform and temporally periodic attractor) are identified. The third topic is ratchet effect. Ratchet effect can be achieved by a current bias field which corresponds to an asymmetric potential, in which case the flux dynamics is ever lasting chaotic. When the current bias field corresponds to a symmetric potential, the flux dynamics is often transiently chaotic, in which case the ratchet effect disappears after sufficiently long time.

Z. C. Feng; Y. Charles Li

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Momentum Flux and Flux Divergence of Gravity Waves in Directional Shear Flows over Three-Dimensional Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear mountain wave theory is used to derive the general formulas of the gravity wave momentum flux (WMF) and its vertical divergence that develop in directionally sheared flows with constant vertical shear. Height variations of the WMF and its ...

Xin Xu; Yuan Wang; Ming Xue

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Eddy Diffusivity/Mass Flux and Shallow Cumulus Boundary Layer: An Updraft PDF Multiple Mass Flux Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the eddy diffusivity/mass flux (EDMF) approach is used to combine parameterizations of nonprecipitating moist convection and boundary layer turbulence. The novel aspect of this EDMF version is the use of a probability density ...

Kay Sušelj; João Teixeira; Georgios Matheou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A tall tower flux measurement setup was established in metropolitan Houston, Texas, to measure trace gas fluxes from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in… (more)

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

3D Atlas vertical plate oil transmission line field calculations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of questions regarding current density and inductance estimates of the Atlas oil transmission line in the region where the vertical plates connect to the disk line, calculations using the 3D FE program Flux3d were initiated. Flux3d inductance values are nearly that estimated by D. Scudder. Calculations for three base designs of E. Ballard and D. Pierce were completed where several variations for each base design were used to determine the important parameters affecting inductance and to check inductance consistency. Flux3d showed for the first base design a very high current density of 36MA/m at the connection between the vertical and horizontal ground plates resulting in a magnetic pressure of 120 kpsi. The second base design modified this connection to reduce the current density to 20MA/m and 36 kpsi and for design 3 current density is 17MA/m. Maximum current density on the hot plates is 20MA/m for all 3 designs. These values assumed 1.2MA per VTL or 45.6MA total system current. Electrical fields on the top of the hot plate near the disk line connection is about 50% greater than the nominal value near the center of the vertical plates.

NONE

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry  

SciTech Connect

A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

Application of Phase Diagram Calculation to Accelerated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Application of Phase Diagram Calculation to Accelerated Development of Mo-Si-B Based Alloys. Author(s), Ying Yang, H Bei, Shuanglin ...

451

Multilevel acceleration of neutron transport calculations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear reactor design requires the calculation of integral core parameters and power and radiation profiles. These physical parameters are obtained by the solution of the… (more)

Marquez Damian, Jose Ignacio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

NREL: Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Calculators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Center Energy Analysis Newsletter Power Technologies Energy Data Book Home Table of Contents Browse by Technology Calculators Renewable Energy Conversion...

453

Using Bayes' Theorem for Free Energy Calculations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Statistical mechanics is fundamentally based on calculating the probabilities of molecular-scaleevents. Although Bayes’ theorem has generally been recognized as providing key guiding principals for setup… (more)

Rogers, David M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Drag calculations improve efficiency of hydraulic jars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using drag calculations helps accurately determine the maximum hook load for optimal over-pull force during jarring operations. The driller then has a better chance of freeing stuck pipe on the first jarring attempt. Several operational situations demonstrate how these calculations allow the over pull force on the jar during operation to be increased by 40 % compared to calculations involving the weight of the drillstring only. The drag calculation method significantly increases the probability of successful jarring operations. This article concentrates on upward jarring; the results and procedures are applicable, however, for downward jarring as well.

Aarrestad, T.V. (Den norske stats oljeselskap AS, Statoil (Norway))

1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lennard-Jones Fluid Reference Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The definition of these energetic terms are given ... calculations given here, the following definitions are relevant: ... D. The pair internal energy is given ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Design Calculations For APS Safety Shutters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Design Calculations for the Advanced Photon Source Safety Shutters P. K. Job, Advanced Photon Source B. J. Micklich, Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Argonne National Laboratory,...

457

Building Technologies Office: 179D DOE Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy simulations are required to show compliance with the energy and power cost savings requirements. View more detailed information. What is the 179D DOE Calculator? The...

458

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations with Supercomputing Centers for New Materials Discovery Speaker(s): Anubhav Jain Date: December 18, 2012 - 12:00pm...

459

MatCalc - The Materials Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 12, 2007 ... MatCalc is supported on Windows, Linux, and Mac OSX systems. Citation: " MatCalc - The Materials Calculator." © MatCalc (2008).

460

Building Technologies Office: Qualified Software for Calculating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

you'll find a list of qualified computer software for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements. To submit...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Calculating Cyclotomic Polynomials - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm calculates ?n(z) as a quotient of products of sparse power series. ... polynomials and their coefficients available at the Sloane On-Line Encyclopedia  ...

462

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

Modelling of light driven CO2 concentration gradient and photosynthetic carbon assimilation flux distribution at the chloroplast level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steady state of the two-substance model of light driven carbon turnover for the photosynthetic CO2 assimilation rate is presented. The model is based on the nonlinear diffusion equation for a single chloroplast in the elliptical geometry by assuming light driven Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration and CO2 assimilation reaction of carboxilation coupled with the photosynthetic sink strength. The detailed analysis of 3 -dimensional CO2 concentration and flux on the chloroplast level is made. It is shown that under intense light irradiation there exists a boundary layer of chloroplasts with a high value of CO2 assimilation flux. The presented simplified model can be used for the calculations and experimental estimations of the CO2 assimilation rate for environmental applications.

Jouravlev, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Data base to compare calculations and observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and climatological data bases were compared with known tritium release points and diffusion calculations to determine if calculated concentrations could replace measure concentrations at the monitoring stations. Daily tritium concentrations were monitored at 8 stations and 16 possible receptors. Automated data retrieval strategies are listed. (PSB)

Tichler, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Numerical Object Oriented Quantum Field Theory Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The qft++ package is a library of C++ classes that facilitate numerical (not algebraic) quantum field theory calculations. Mathematical objects such as matrices, tensors, Dirac spinors, polarization and orbital angular momentum tensors, etc. are represented as C++ objects in qft++. The package permits construction of code which closely resembles quantum field theory expressions, allowing for quick and reliable calculations.

M. Williams

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

468

Proper Orthogonal Decomposition for Flow Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper Orthogonal Decomposition for Flow Calculations and Optimal Control in a Horizontal CVD calculations are discussed. AMS Subject Classification: 76N10, 65K10, 49J20 & 35C10 \\Lambda This research a chemical reaction in the gas phase above the surface of the film to deposit desired materials onto

469

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

470

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Design of Sampling Strategies to Detect CO2 Emissions From Hidden Geothermal Systems, Lewicki, Oldenburg and Kennedy. The objective of this project is to investigate geothermal CO2 monitoring in the near surface as a tool to discover hidden geothermal reservoirs. A primary goal of this project is to develop an approach that places emphasis on cost and time-efficient near-surface exploration methods and yields results to guide and focus more cost-intensive geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids. To this end, we present (1) the physical properties of CO2 key to its transport in the

471

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? HFBR The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is being decommissioned because the Department of Energy (DOE) decided in 1999 that it would be permanently closed. The reactor was shut down in 1997 after tritium from a leak in the spent-fuel pool was found in the groundwater. The HFBR, which had operated from 1965 to 1996, was used solely for scientific research, providing neutrons for materials science, chemistry, biology, and physics experiments. The reactor was shut down for routine maintenance in November of 1996. In January 1997, tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen and a by-product of reactor operations, was found in groundwater monitoring wells immediately south of the HFBR. The tritium

472

The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Las Vegas, Nevada Introduction We have used a single-column model (SCM) to examine the sensitivity of fundamental quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameterizations of clouds and cloud microphysics. When an SCM, which consists of one isolated column of a global atmospheric model, is forced with observational estimates of horizontal advection terms, the parameterizations within the SCM produce time-dependent fields which can be

473

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); O' Malley, Ronald J. (Miamisburg, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

476

Molecular isotopic effects on coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes  

SciTech Connect

A full quantum treatment shows that coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes exhibit a strong sensitivity to a small mass change in a vibrating molecule. This has been exemplified with the existing isotopes of H{sub 2}{sup +} as well as few fictitious ones. We find that the fluxes undergo a significant change as one goes from one isotope of reduced mass {mu} to another. Other well-defined observables are likewise affected. It turns out that as a general rule, the heavier the isotope, the larger the flux, the smaller the dispersion, and the longer the revival period. While we were able to confirm analytically that the time at the first turning point scales as {radical}({mu}) and that the revival period changes linearly with {mu}, the mechanism of other observables remains subtle as the result of quantum interference highlighted by the pronounced difference observed on the dispersion pattern.

Kenfack, A.; Paulus, B. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Barth, I. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Marquardt, F. [Visualisierung und Datenanalyse, Zuse Institut Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Mathematik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

G-flux in F-theory and algebraic cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct explicit G4 fluxes in F-theory compactifications. Our method relies on identifying algebraic cycles in the Weierstrass equation of elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds. We show how to compute the D3-brane tadpole and the induced chirality indices directly in F-theory. Whenever a weak coupling limit is available, we compare and successfully match our findings to the corresponding results in type IIB string theory. Finally, we present some generalizations of our results which hint at a unified description of the elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfold together with the four-form flux G4 as a coherent sheaf. In this description the close link between G4 fluxes and algebraic cycles is manifest.

Andreas P. Braun; Andres Collinucci; Roberto Valandro

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

478

Remote high temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in high temperature environments. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet light. The luminescence emitted by the two thermographic-phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, B.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Type II superconductivity and magnetic flux transport in neutrons stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transition to a type II proton superconductor which is believed to occur in a cooling neutron star is accompanied by changes in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and by the formation of proton vortices with quantized magnetic flux. Analysis of the electron Boltzmann equation for this system and of the proton supercurrent distribution formed at the transition leads to the derivation of a simple expression for the transport velocity of magnetic flux in the liquid interior of a neutron star. This shows that flux moves easily as a consequence of the interaction between neutron and proton superfluid vortices during intervals of spin-down or spin-up in binary systems. The differences between the present analysis and those of previous workers are reviewed and an error in the paper of Jones (1991) is corrected.

P. B. Jones

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

480

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

482

China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China 2050 Pathways Calculator China 2050 Pathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: China 2050 Pathways Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: China's Energy Research Institute (ERI), UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Low-carbon plans/TNAs/NAMAs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: china-en.2050calculator.net/pathways/111011011011101101011010111101101 Country: China OpenEI Keyword(s): International Eastern Asia Language: English References: Global Energy Governance Reform, 3 October 2012[1]

483

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Climate, Land Focus Area: Forestry Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/ccrc/topics/urban-forests/ctcc/ Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator[1] Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator is the only tool approved by the Climate Action Reserve's Urban Forest Project Protocol for quantifying carbon dioxide sequestration from GHG tree planting projects. The CTCC is programmed in an Excel spreadsheet and provides carbon-related information

484

Campus Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Campus Carbon Calculator Campus Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Campus Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air-Cool Planet Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.cleanair-coolplanet.org/toolkit/inv-calculator.php The Campus Carbon Calculator(tm), Version 6.4, is now available for download. Version 6.4 includes new features, updates and corrections - including greatly expanded projection and solutions modules, designed to aid schools that have completed greenhouse gas inventories in developing long term, comprehensive climate action plans based on those inventories. The new modules facilitate analysis of carbon reduction options, determining project payback times, net present value, cost per ton reduced,

485

Morphology and dynamics of three interacting kink-unstable flux ropes in a laboratory magnetoplasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of the flux rope is produced by the poloidal field of a field-aligned finite sized current which magnetic flux ropes. Flux ropes can be created in the laboratory by a finite size field-aligned current were acquired and the magnetic field structure and dynamics of the flux ropes can thus be reconstructed

California at Los Angles, University of

486

Deriving the Surface Soil Heat Flux from Observed Soil Temperature and Soil Heat Flux Profiles Using a Variational Data Assimilation Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to infer surface soil heat fluxes from measured profiles of soil temperature, soil heat flux, and observations of the vegetation canopy temperature and the incoming shortwave radiation is evaluated for the Cabauw measurement ...

R. J. Ronda; F. C. Bosveld

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Calculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation with absorbing boundary conditions  

SciTech Connect

A new method is suggested for the calculation of the microcanonical cumulative reaction probability {ital via} flux autocorrelation relations. The Hamiltonian and the flux operators are computed in a discrete variable representation (DVR) and a well-behaved representation for the Green's operator, {ital G}({ital E}{sup +}), is obtained by imposing absorbing boundary conditions (ABC). Applications to a one-dimensional-model problem and to the collinear H+H{sub 2} reaction show that the DVR-ABC scheme provides a very efficient method for the {ital direct} calculation of the microcanonical probability, circumventing the need to compute the state-to-state dynamics. Our results indicate that the cumulative reaction probability can be calculated to a high accuracy using a rather small number of DVR points, confined to the vicinity of the transition state. Only limited information regarding the potential-energy surface is therefore required, suggesting that this method would be applicable also to higher dimensionality problems, for which the complete potential surface is often unknown.

Seideman, T.; Miller, W.H. (Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati