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1

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

2

AHR 3/16/06 Equilibrium Flux Surface Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preserved, with no flattening in edge stochastic region. · Assume zero net current (00 = 0). #12;#12;2 AHR 31 AHR 3/16/06 Equilibrium Flux Surface Calculations for W7AS and NCSX A. Reiman1, M. Zarnstorff1, D resonant magnetic field near plasma edge. Coil calculated to have little effect on rotational transform

Hudson, Stuart

3

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hadronic cascade calculations of angular distributions of integrated secondary particle fluxes from external targets and new empirical formulae describing particle production in proton-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hadronic cascade calculations of angular distributions of integrated secondary particle fluxes from external targets and new empirical formulae describing particle production in proton-nucleus collisions

Ranft, J

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

On the “direct” calculation of thermal rate constants. II. The flux-flux autocorrelation function with absorbing potentials, with application to the O+HCl?OH+Cl reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the trace in Eq. ~1.1b! is itself of low rank, but it is not possible to exploit this as was done in Part I for Cfs(t), because here we need Cf f(t) for a range of t while in Part I we needed Cfs(t) only for one ~large! value of t .! For this purpose... step of the calculation is therefore to find the eigenfunctions of the Boltzmannized flux operator, Fˆ (b) of Eq. ~2.1b!, that have the largest ~in absolute value! eigenval- ues, and the Lanczos algorithm26 is ideal for this purpose. Starting...

Thompson, Ward H.; Miller, William H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

MCNP modeling of the Swiss LWRs for the calculation of the in- and ex-vessel neutron flux distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MCNP models of all Swiss Nuclear Power Plants have been developed by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), in collaboration with the utilities and ETH Zurich, for the 2011 decommissioning cost study. The estimation of the residual radionuclide inventories and corresponding activity levels of irradiated structures and components following the NPP shut-down is of crucial importance for the planning of the dismantling process, the waste packaging concept and, consequently, for the estimation of the decommissioning costs. Based on NPP specific data, the neutron transport simulations lead to the best yet knowledge of the neutron spectra necessary for the ensuing activation calculations. In this paper, the modeling concept towards the MCNP-NPPs is outlined and the resulting flux distribution maps are presented. (authors)

Pantelias, M.; Volmert, B.; Caruso, S. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste Nagra, Hardstrasse 73, 5430, Wettingen (Switzerland); Zvoncek, P. [Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092, Zurich (Switzerland); Bitterli, B. [Kernkraftwerk Goesgen-Daeniken AG, 4658 Daeniken (Switzerland); Neukaeter, E.; Nissen, W. [BKW FMB Energie AG-Kernkraftwerk Muehleberg, 3203 Muehleberg (Switzerland); Ledergerber, G. [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, 5325 Leibstadt (Switzerland); Vielma, R. [Axpo AG-Kernkraftwerk Beznau, 5312 Doettingen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N GoodsMexico's EnergyCalculation of

11

Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

Current Status of the Synchrotron Radiation Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) operates the Aladdin electron storage ring at energies of 800 MeV or 1 GeV in support of a broad range of national and international research programs. A low emittance configuration is in routine operation during 800-MeV shifts and offers improved photon flux density with about the same beam lifetime. An improved undulator compensation algorithm and new optical beam position monitors have been implemented improving beam stability and maintaining vertical beam size variations to < 2% peak-to-peak during undulator scanning. Instrumentation initiatives include construction of a modified Wadsworth beamline (7.8 - 50 eV) and a variable-line-spacing plane-grating monochromator (VLS-PGM, 75 - 2000 eV) to utilize radiation from a permanent magnet undulator. The Wadsworth beamline is being commissioned for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments using high-resolution Scienta analyzers. The VLS-PGM is being constructed for experiments that require higher photon energies and high flux density such as x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is scheduled to be available in early 2004. Recent research at the SRC has produced exciting results in a variety of fields, culminating in eight articles published in Physical Review Letters and three in Nature since October 2002, in addition to articles in many other publications. An outreach program offers research experiences for undergraduates and provides the general public with an awareness of synchrotron radiation. Hands-on workshops and activities on FTIR microscopy and X-PEEM are offered for graduate students and scientists. SRC sponsors a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program and offers opportunities to non-research universities and high schools. Tours and educational events are coordinated with local civic groups and schools. Open houses are offered that include tours, demonstrations, and family activities.

Kinraide, R.; Moore, C.J.; Jacobs, K.D.; Severson, M.; Bissen, M.J.; Frazer, B.; Bisognano, J.J.; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M.A.; Gundelach, C.T.; Hansen, R.W.C.; Hochst, H.; Julian, R.L.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Kubala, T.; Legg, R.A.; Pedley, B. [Synchrotron Radiation Center (United States)] [and others

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Today's Material Gauss' Law and Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the contents of the box, the box must contain zero net electric charge. Slide 27-31 #12;Gauss' Law and Flux: · The Concept of Flux · Calculating Electric Flux · Symmetry · Gauss's Law · Using Gauss's Law · Conductors that the box must contain net positive electric charge. Slide 27-29 #12;© 2013 Pearson Education, Inc

Ashlock, Dan

16

Anthropogenic and Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Fluxes From Typical Land Uses in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation with measured traffic counts collected on local thoroughfares. Due to a presumed small bias in the flux calculation methodology, neither flux contribution truly measured zero, so anthropogenic and biogenic “background” fluxes were calculated (0...

Werner, Nicholas D

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

charlotb

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

Easier way to calculate E fields Equivalent to Coulomb's law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lines enter as leave closed surface the net is zero = ·= dAE AdE cos rr #12;Flux Calculate fluxGauss' Law Easier way to calculate E fields ­ Gauss' Law Equivalent to Coulomb's law Use ·= AE rr Let A become small so flux becomes integral over Gaussian surface Flux is proportional to net

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

19

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15800 – Calculators – GOOD AND BAD. ONLY ONE-LINE scientific calculators are permitted. *RECOMMENDED CALCULATOR: TI-30XA(See Below).

charlotb

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nonlocal fluxes at a plasma sheath  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The particle and energy fluxes of electrons at the boundary of a plasma in contact with a perfectly absorbing plate are considered. In general, the fluxes are shown not to be determined by the plasma temperature and density at the plate but rather by a convolution of the plasma profiles in the vicinity of the plate. A simple empirical expression is proposed for the nonlocal fluxes, which approximately reproduces the results of a full kinetic calculation. The implications of this, to divertor plasmas near the neutralizer plate, are discussed.

Marchand, R.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Matte, J.P. (INRS-Energie, C. P. 1020, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2, Canada (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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27

Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Radiative Flux Analysis  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

Long, Chuck [NOAA

29

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

30

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

OwenDavis

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

32

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known "magnetic flux problem" can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the pres...

Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Calculation of sensitivity coefficients for a neutron well logging tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Lsmsrsh, 1966; Bartine et al. , 1974; Duderstadt et al. , 1976). The straightforward (direct) calculation requires knowledge of the forward neutron flux, neutron cross section data, and detector responses (such as reaction rates) for each situation, i.... e. , the detector's responses are repeatedly com- puted for each change in the formation's composition. The perturbation (indirect) method requires knowledge of the forward neutron flux, detector response, and sd- joint neutron flux for a base...

Chen, Chien-Hsiang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

HIGS Flux Performance Projection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWCHIGS flux performance table

36

Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 8, Tome 39, aolit 1978,page C6-619 FLUX-FLOW VOLTAGE PULSES I N SUPERCONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tension pnoduite par le mou- vement d'un vortex ou tube de flux. Abstract.- A new theoretical method for the calculation of the measured voltage pulse produced by a moving flux vortex or flux tube is described the superconductor, the lo- + cal flux density contribution bi from vortex i is large only within about XB

Boyer, Edmond

38

How Do Calculators Calculate? Helmut Knaust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not convert numbers to base 2. They use a binary-coded decimal (BCD) system instead. Calculators can only

Knaust, Helmut

39

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

High Heat Flux Components Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

Whitley, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Original Impact Calculations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

46

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field dynamics and tunneling in a flux landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate field dynamics and tunneling between metastable minima in a landscape of Type IIB flux compactifications, utilizing monodromies of the complex structure moduli space to continuously connect flux vacua. After describing the generic features of a flux-induced potential for the complex structure and Type IIB axio-dilaton, we specialize to the Mirror Quintic Calabi--Yau to obtain an example landscape. Studying the cosmological dynamics of the complex structure moduli, we find that the potential generically does not support slow-roll inflation and that in general the landscape separates neatly into basins of attraction of the various minima. We then discuss tunneling, with the inclusion of gravitational effects, in many-dimensional field spaces. A set of constraints on the form of the Euclidean paths through field space are presented, and then applied to construct approximate instantons mediating the transition between de Sitter vacua in the flux landscape. We find that these instantons are generically thick-wall and that the tunneling rate is suppressed in the large-volume limit. We also consider examples where supersymmetry is not broken by fluxes, in which case near-BPS thin-wall bubbles can be constructed. We calculate the bubble wall tension, finding that it scales like a D- or NS-brane bubble, and comment on the implications of this correspondence. Finally, we present a brief discussion of eternal inflation in the flux-landscape.

Matthew C Johnson; Magdalena Larfors

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Magnetic and Electric Flux Quanta: the Pion Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The angular momentum of the magnetic flux quantum is balanced by that of the associated supercurrent, such that in condensed matter the resultant angular momentum is zero. The notion of a flux quantum in free space is not so simple, needing both magnetic and electric flux quanta to propagate the stable dynamic structure of the photon. Considering these flux quanta at the scale where quantum field theory becomes essential, at the scale defined by the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron, exposes variants of a paradox that apparently has not been addressed in the literature. Leaving the paradox unresolved in this note, reasonable electromagnetic rationales are presented that permit to calculate the masses of the electron, muon, pion, and nucleon with remarkable accuracy. The calculated mass of the electron is correct at the nine significant digit limit of experimental accuracy, the muon at a part in one thousand, the pion at two parts in ten thousand, and the nucleon at seven parts in one hundred thousand. The accuracy of the pion and nucleon mass calculations reinforces the unconventional common notion that the strong force is electromagnetic in origin.

P Cameron

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Improved approximate formulas for flux from cylindrical and rectangular sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides two new approximate formulas for the flux at detector points outside the radial and axial extensions of a homogeneous cylindrical source and improved approximate formulas for the flux at points opposite rectangular surface sources. These formulas extend the range of geometries for which analytic approximations may be used by shield design engineers to make rapid scoping studies and check more extensive calculations for reasonableness. These formulas can be used to support skeptical, independent evaluations and are also valuable teaching tools for introducing shield designers to complex shield analyses.

Wallace, O.J.; Bokharee, S.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

52

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

RADIATION DOSE CALCULATION FOR FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CLOSURE CELL EQUIPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculation evaluates the energy deposition rates in silicon, gamma and neutron flux spectra at various locations of interest throughout FHF closure cell. The physical configuration features a complex geometry, with particle flux attenuation of many orders of magnitude that cannot be modeled by computer codes that use deterministic methods. Therefore, in this calculation the Monte Carlo method was used to solve the photon and neutron transport. In contrast with the deterministic methods, Monte Carlo does not solve an explicit transport equation, but rather obtain answers by simulating individual particles, recording the aspects of interest of their average behavior, and estimates the statistical precision of the results.

D. Musat

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermal rate constant calculation using flux–flux autocorrelation functions: Application to Cl+H2?HCl+H reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rotation constants evaluated at some reference geometry ~e.g., the transition state!. The rotational energy of Eq. ~3.12c! then enters the Hamiltonian of Eq. ~3.12a! as a constant, so that kJK JS ~ T !5k0~T !e2Erot JK/kBT, ~3.14a! with E rot JK 51/2 ~ A‡1B...

Wang, Haobin; Thompson, Ward H.; Miller, William H.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Higher order treatment on temporal derivative of angular flux for time-dependent MOC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new kinetic analysis method, whose angular dependence of temporal derivative for angular flux is accurately treated within practical memory requirement, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, the computational resources, i.e., the memory capacity, can be still a crucial problem for rigorous kinetic calculations using MOC. In the straightforward approach for kinetic calculation using MOC, the segment-averaged angular fluxes should be stored on the memory in order to explicitly calculate the temporal derivative of the angular flux, which would require huge memory. Thus, in the conventional kinetic calculation code using MOC, the temporal derivative of the angular flux has been approximated as angularly isotropic in order to reduce the memory requirement (isotropic assumption). However, the approximation error caused by the conventional isotropic assumption has not been thoroughly and quantitatively investigated so far and an accurate kinetic calculation method, which can quantitatively estimate the above approximation error within practical memory storage, has not been developed. The present study tries to address this issue with a newly developed approach. Effect of the approximate treatment for the temporal derivative of angular flux is evaluated through benchmark calculations. (authors)

Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A. [Nagoya University, Department of Material, Physics and Energy Engineering, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Kamiyama, Y.; Kirimura, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Wadasakicho1-1-1, Hyogo-ku, Kobe, 652-8585 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Analysis of Fluxes by Duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M-theory on K3xK3 with non-supersymmetry-breaking G-flux is dual to M-theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold times a 2-torus without flux. This allows for a thorough analysis of the effects of flux without relying on supergravity approximations. We discuss several dual pairs showing that the usual rules of G-flux compactifications work well in detail. We discuss how a transition can convert M2-branes into G-flux. We see how new effects can arise at short distances allowing fluxes to obstruct more moduli than one expects from the supergravity analysis.

Paul S. Aspinwall

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

Deldar, Sedigheh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

Improved Calculation of Core Loss With Nonsinusoidal Waveforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Comparison with experimental measure- ments in MnZn ferrite shows improved accuracy. The result may be op machines, transformers, inductors, and other static reactors, loss in the magnetic material is often pre of the flux density. It can be directly calculated from geometry and bulk resistivity in ferrites, and

66

Calculating Vessel Volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This summarizes a demonstration at the "Metron" conference (April 2002, Yale University), using a computer program to calculate the capacity of pots drawn on the computer screen and then given one dimension (e.g., its ...

Younger, John G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A coupled neutronics/thermalhydraulics tool for calculating fluctuations in Pressurized Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Reactors or Heavy Water Reactors (LarssoA coupled neutronics/thermal­hydraulics tool for calculating fluctuations in Pressurized Water in neutron flux, fuel temperature, moderator den- sity and flow velocity in Pressurized Water Reactors

Demazière, Christophe

68

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling...

70

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

71

An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

75

Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

Paxton, Frank A. (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

77

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

78

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

A two-dimensional, semi-analytic expansion method for nodal calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most modern nodal methods used today are based upon the transverse integration procedure in which the multi-dimensional flux shape is integrated over the transverse directions in order to produce a set of coupled one-dimensional flux shapes. The one-dimensional flux shapes are then solved either analytically or by representing the flux shape by a finite polynomial expansion. While these methods have been verified for most light-water reactor applications, they have been found to have difficulty predicting the large thermal flux gradients near the interfaces of highly-enriched MOX fuel assemblies. A new method is presented here in which the neutron flux is represented by a non-seperable, two-dimensional, semi-analytic flux expansion. The main features of this method are (1) the leakage terms from the node are modeled explicitly and therefore, the transverse integration procedure is not used, (2) the corner point flux values for each node are directly edited from the solution method, and a corner-point interpolation is not needed in the flux reconstruction, (3) the thermal flux expansion contains hyperbolic terms representing analytic solutions to the thermal flux diffusion equation, and (4) the thermal flux expansion contains a thermal to fast flux ratio term which reduces the number of polynomial expansion functions needed to represent the thermal flux. This new nodal method has been incorporated into the computer code COLOR2G and has been used to solve a two-dimensional, two-group colorset problem containing uranium and highly-enriched MOX fuel assemblies. The results from this calculation are compared to the results found using a code based on the traditional transverse integration procedure.

Palmtag, S.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fluxing agent for metal cast joining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fast neutron fluxes in pressure vessels using Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of calculating the fast neutron flux in the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor by Monte Carlo methods. Neutron reactions reduce the ductility of the steel and thus limit the useful life of this important reactor component. This work was performed for Virginia Power (VEPCO). VIM is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code which provides a versatile geometrical capability and a neutron physics data base closely representing the EDNF/B-IV data from which it was derived.

Edlund, M.C.; Thomas, J.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related LinksCalculatorsRelative

86

ARM - Index of Calculators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX NewsCalculators Outreach Home Room

87

PHELIX for flux compression studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Comparison of different global information sources used in surface radiative flux calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the Laboratoire de Me´te´orologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project surface albedos in the near-infrared remain poorly constrained (highly uncertain), they do not cause too

89

Genome Informatics 13: 363364 (2002) 363 Exploring Flux Distribution Profiles for Switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, negative for substrate uptake and zero for intermediate li,ui = lower and upper bounds for the net is then calculated by optimizing a particular objective. Herein, various objective functions can be used to identify of metabolite i in reaction j bi = net transport flux of metabolite i; positive value for product secretion

90

The Total Meridional Heat Flux and Its Oceanic and Atmospheric Partition CARL WUNSCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model residual is done to permit calculation of a preliminary uncertainty estimate for the atmospheric the oceanic flux drops rapidly, but does not actually vanish until the oceanic surface area goes to zero The partitioning and fluctuations in the net poleward transport of heat (energy, actually enthalpy; see War- ren

Wunsch, Carl

91

Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

Attila Csoto

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Angular Size-Redshift: Experiment and Calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper the next attempt is made to clarify the nature of the Euclidean behavior of the boundary in the angular size-redshift cosmological test. It is shown experimentally that this can be explained by the selection determined by anisotropic morphology and anisotropic radiation of extended radio sources. A catalogue of extended radio sources with minimal flux densities of about 0.01 Jy at 1.4 GHz was compiled for conducting the test. Without the assumption of their size evolution, the agreement between the experiment and calculation was obtained both in the Lambda CDM model (Omega_m=0.27 , Omega_v=0.73.) and the Friedman model (Omega = 0.1 ).

Amirkhanyan, V R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Calculable Toy Model of the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent discussions of the string-theory landscape, we propose field-theoretic realizations of models with large numbers of vacua. These models contain multiple U(1) gauge groups, and can be interpreted as deconstructed versions of higher-dimensional gauge theory models with fluxes in the compact space. We find that the vacuum structure of these models is very rich, defined by parameter-space regions with different classes of stable vacua separated by boundaries. This allows us to explicitly calculate physical quantities such as the supersymmetry-breaking scale, the presence or absence of R-symmetries, and probabilities of stable versus unstable vacua. Furthermore, we find that this landscape picture evolves with energy, allowing vacua to undergo phase transitions as they cross the boundaries between different regions in the landscape. We also demonstrate that supergravity effects are crucial in order to stabilize most of these vacua, and in order to allow the possibility of cancelling the cosmological constant.

Keith R. Dienes; Emilian Dudas; Tony Gherghetta

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line and integrated off-line to obtain the magnetic flux in the steel yoke close to the muon chambers at full excitations of the solenoid. The 3-D Hall sensors installed on the steel-air interfaces give supplementary information on the components of magnetic field and permit to estimate the remanent field in steel to be added to the magnetic flux density obtained by the voltages integration. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The results of the measurements and calculations are presented, compared and discussed.

V. I. Klyukhin; N. Amapane; A. Ball; B. Curé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; A. Hervé; M. Mulders; R. Loveless

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

95

RAPID DETAILED BALANCE CALCULATIONS FOR MULTIPLE ENERGY GAP SOLAR CELLS S. P. Bremner, M. Y. Levy, C. B. Honsberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a particular solar cell design providing a framework for assessing novel device designs [5,6] and a guide. This method uses Incomplete Riemann Zeta Integrals as a replacement for the Bose-Einstein integral when as blackbodies with the fluxes given by the so called Bose-Einstein integral. The calculation of these fluxes

Honsberg, Christiana

96

New solar opacities, abundances, helioseismology, and neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct solar models with the newly calculated radiative opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) and recently determined (lower) heavy element abundances. We compare results from the new models with predictions of a series of models that use OPAL radiative opacities, older determinations of the surface heavy element abundances, and refinements of nuclear reaction rates. For all the variations we consider, solar models that are constructed with the newer and lower heavy element abundances advocated by Asplund et al. (2005) disagree by much more than the estimated measuring errors with helioseismological determinations of the depth of the solar convective zone, the surface helium composition, the internal sound speeds, and the density profile. Using the new OP radiative opacities, the ratio of the 8B neutrino flux calculated with the older and larger heavy element abundances (or with the newer and lower heavy element abundances) to the total neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is 1.09 (0.87) with a 9% experimental uncertainty and a 16% theoretical uncertainty, 1 sigma errors.

John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Calculation of Accurate Hexagonal Discontinuity Factors for PARCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we derive a methodology for calculating discontinuity factors consistent with the Triangle-based Polynomial Expansion Nodal (TPEN) method implemented in PARCS for hexagonal reactor geometries. The accuracy of coarse-mesh nodal methods is greatly enhanced by permitting flux discontinuities at node boundaries, but the practice of calculating discontinuity factors from infinite-medium (zero-current) single bundle calculations may not be sufficiently accurate for more challenging problems in which there is a large amount of internodal neutron streaming. The authors therefore derive a TPEN-based method for calculating discontinuity factors that are exact with respect to generalized equivalence theory. The method is validated by reproducing the reference solution for a small hexagonal core.

Pounders. J., Bandini, B. R. , Xu, Y, and Downar, T. J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A computer program for HVDC converter station RF noise calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HVDC converter station operations generate radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) noise which could interfere with adjacent communication and computer equipment, and carrier system operations. A generic Radio Frequency Computer Analysis Program (RAFCAP) for calculating the EM noise generated by valve ignition of a converter station has been developed as part of a larger project. The program calculates RF voltages, currents, complex power, ground level electric field strength and magnetic flux density in and around an HVDC converter station. The program requires the converter station network to be represented by frequency dependent impedance functions. Comparisons of calculated and measured values are given for an actual HVDC station to illustrate the validity of the program. RAFCAP is designed to be used by engineers for the purpose of calculating the RF noise produced by the igniting of HVDC converter valves.

Kasten, D.G.; Caldecott, R.; Sebo, S.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Liu, Y. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Bradley Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet describes a high-flux, microchannel solar receiver project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Oregon State University, is working to demonstrate a microchannel-based solar receiver capable of absorbing high solar flux, while using a variety of liquid and gaseous working fluids. High-flux microchannel receivers have the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of a solar receiver by minimizing re-radiation and convective losses.

100

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Countercurrent flow limited (CCFL) heat flux in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) fuel element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The countercurrent flow (CCF) performance in the fuel element region of the HFIR is examined experimentally and theoretically. The fuel element consists of two concentric annuli filled with aluminum clad fuel plates of 1.27 mm thickness separated by 1.27 mm flow channels. The plates are curved as they go radially outward to accomplish constant flow channel width and constant metal-to-coolant ratio. A full-scale HFIR fuel element mock-up is studied in an adiabatic air-water CCF experiment. A review of CCF models for narrow channels is presented along with the treatment of CCFs in system of parallel channels. The experimental results are related to the existing models and a mechanistic model for the annular'' CCF in a narrow channel is developed that captures the data trends well. The results of the experiment are used to calculate the CCFL heat flux of the HFIR fuel assembly. It was determined that the HFIR fuel assembly can reject 0.62 Mw of thermal power in the CCFL situation. 31 refs., 17 figs.

Ruggles, A.E.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Calculating kinetics parameters and reactivity changes with continuous-energy Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux forms the basis for a method to perform adjoint weighting of tally scores in continuous-energy Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue calculations. Applying this approach, adjoint-weighted tallies are developed for two applications: calculating point reactor kinetics parameters and estimating changes in reactivity from perturbations. Calculations are performed in the widely-used production code, MCNP, and the results of both applications are compared with discrete ordinates calculations, experimental measurements, and other Monte Carlo calculations.

Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Paul [UNIV. WISCONSIN

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

104

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

ENRAF gauge reference level calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

Soft pion emission from fat flux tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission of pions from multiquark flux tubes is examined as an explanation of the soft pion puzzle. Although the soft pion spectra from the decay of fat flux tubes can account for some low {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}} enhancement, the dependence on the number of involved quarks is too weak to provide a plausible explanation of the observed enhancement in the pion spectrum at low transverse momenta.

Kusnezov, D.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS ON THE TWO-STEP EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SUN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the new results of the two-dimensional numerical experiments on the cross-sectional evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube rising from the deeper solar convection zone (-20,000 km) to the corona through the surface. The initial depth is 10 times deeper than most of the previous calculations focusing on the flux emergence from the uppermost convection zone. We find that the evolution is illustrated by the following two-step process. The initial tube rises due to its buoyancy, subject to aerodynamic drag due to the external flow. Because of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field, the tube maintains its coherency and does not deform to become a vortex roll pair. When the flux tube approaches the photosphere and expands sufficiently, the plasma on the rising tube accumulates to suppress the tube's emergence. Therefore, the flux decelerates and extends horizontally beneath the surface. This new finding owes to our large-scale simulation, which simultaneously calculates the dynamics within the interior as well as above the surface. As the magnetic pressure gradient increases around the surface, magnetic buoyancy instability is triggered locally and, as a result, the flux rises further into the solar corona. We also find that the deceleration occurs at a higher altitude than assumed in our previous experiment using magnetic flux sheets. By conducting parametric studies, we investigate the conditions for the two-step emergence of the rising flux tube: field strength {approx}> 1.5 x 10{sup 4} G and the twist {approx}> 5.0 x 10{sup -4} km{sup -1} at -20,000 km depth.

Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: toriumi@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

110

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of...

111

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

112

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

113

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

114

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A...

115

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

116

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

117

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

118

Contribution to the local cosmic-ray flux from the Geminga supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution to the local cosmic-ray flux from the Geminga supernova is calculated assuming shock acceleration to 10^14 eV in a remnant which was formed several 10^5 years ago along with the Geminga pulsar. The particles are propagated to Earth using a simple diffusion model. In the region below the knee in the spectrum, it is found the supernova may contribute 10% of the local cosmic-ray flux, assuming plausible explosion parameters. The contribution to the amplitude of the anisotropy is not in conflict with the data in this energy region.

P. A. Johnson

1994-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

RF-sheath heat flux estimates on Tore Supra and JET ICRF antennae. Extrapolation to ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RF-sheath induced heat loads are identified from infrared thermography measurements on Tore Supra ITER-like prototype and JET A2 antennae, and are quantified by fitting thermal calculations. Using a simple scaling law assessed experimentally, the estimated heat fluxes are then extrapolated to the ITER ICRF launcher delivering 20 MW RF power for several plasma scenarios. Parallel heat fluxes up to 6.7 MW/m{sup 2} are expected very locally on ITER antenna front face. The role of edge density on operation is stressed as a trade-off between easy RF coupling and reasonable heat loads. Sources of uncertainty on the results are identified.

Colas, L.; Portafaix, C.; Goniche, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Jacquet, Ph. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

120

A transport based one-dimensional perturbation code for reactivity calculations in metal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional reactivity calculation code is developed using first order perturbation theory. The reactivity equation is based on the multi-group transport equation using the discrete ordinates method for angular dependence. In addition to the first order perturbation approximations, the reactivity code uses only the isotropic scattering data, but cross section libraries with higher order scattering data can still be used with this code. The reactivity code obtains all the flux, cross section, and geometry data from the standard interface files created by ONEDANT, a discrete ordinates transport code. Comparisons between calculated and experimental reactivities were done with the central reactivity worth data for Lady Godiva, a bare uranium metal assembly. Good agreement is found for isotopes that do not violate the assumptions in the first order approximation. In general for cases where there are large discrepancies, the discretized cross section data is not accurately representing certain resonance regions that coincide with dominant flux groups in the Godiva assembly. Comparing reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and a straight {Delta}k/k calculation shows agreement within 10% indicating the perturbation of the calculated fluxes is small enough for first order perturbation theory to be applicable in the modeled system. Computation time comparisons between reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and straight {Delta}k/k calculations indicate considerable time can be saved performing a calculation with a perturbation code particularly as the complexity of the modeled problems increase.

Wenz, T.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Estimation of reactive fluxes in gradient stochastic systems using an analogy with electric circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •The MaxFlux functional should be called the resistivity functional. •A Hamilton–Jacobi approach for computing transition paths in collective variables. •Conversion of the network of reactive channels into an electric circuit. •Test on the Alanine-Dipeptide. Perfect agreement. •Application to the problem of CO escape from Myoglobin. -- Abstract: We propose an approach for finding dominant reactive channels and calculating percentages of reactive flux through each channel in chemical systems driven by a deterministic potential force and a small thermal noise. We assume that the temperature is low enough so that the reactive flux focuses around a finite number of paths connecting the reactant and the product states. These paths can be found in a systematic way by solving a Hamilton–Jacobi equation for the so called MaxFlux functional. We argue that the name “MaxFlux” is misleading: it should be called the resistivity functional instead. Once the network of transition paths is found, one can define an equivalent electric circuit and find the currents through each of its wires. These currents give estimates of the reactive flux along the corresponding transition paths. We test our approach on the problem of finding transition paths in the Alanine-Dipeptide with two dihedral angles where the reactive current can be computed exactly. The percentages of the reactive flux through each reactive channel given by our approach turn out to be in remarkable agreement with the exact ones. We apply this approach to the problem of finding escape paths of a CO molecule from a Myoglobin protein. We find a collection of exit locations and establish percentages of the reactive flux through each of them.

Cameron, M.K., E-mail: cameron@math.umd.edu

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalculation of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,Committee E-3.2, "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International Recommendationsthe Calculation of Natural Daylight, 11 CIE PUBLICATION No.Committee E-3.2 1 "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Neutrino Fluxes from NUHM LSP Annihilations in the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We extend our previous studies of the neutrino fluxes expected from neutralino LSP annihilations inside the Sun to include variants of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with squark, slepton and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the GUT scale, but allowing one or two non-universal supersymmetry-breaking parameters contributing to the Higgs masses (NUHM1,2). As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM) with universal Higgs masses, there are large regions of the NUHM parameter space where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate, and there are also large regions where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering. The spectra possible in the NUHM are qualitatively similar to those in the CMSSM. We calculate neutrino-induced muon fluxes above a threshold energy of 10 GeV, appropriate for the IceCube/DeepCore detector, for points where the NUHM yields the correct cosmological relic density for representative choices of the NUHM parameters. We find that the IceCube/DeepCore detector can probe regions of the NUHM parameter space in addition to analogues of the focus-point strip and the tip of the coannihilation strip familiar from the CMSSM. These include regions with enhanced Higgsino-gaugino mixing in the LSP composition, that occurs where neutralino mass eigenstates cross over. On the other hand, rapid-annihilation funnel regions in general yield neutrino fluxes that are unobservably small.

Ellis, John; /CERN /King's Coll. London; Olive, Keith A.; /Minnesota U. /SLAC; Savage, Christopher; /Stockholm U., OKC; Spanos, Vassilis C.; /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) reactor shutdown system reliability reevaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reliability analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor shutdown system was reevaluated. Failure information based on five years of plant operating experience was used to verify original reliability numbers or to establish new ones. Also, system modifications made subsequent to performance of the original analysis were incorporated into the reevaluation. Reliability calculations and sensitivity analyses were performed using a commercially available spreadsheet on a personal computer. The spreadsheet was configured so that future failures could be tracked and compared with expected failures. A number of recommendations resulted from the reevaluation including both increased and decreased surveillance intervals. All recommendations were based on meeting or exceeding existing reliability goals. Considerable cost savings will be incurred upon implementation of the recommendations.

Pierce, B.F.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Super-radiance and flux conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as super-radiance still continues to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that super-radiance in a quantum field theory [QFT] context is not the same as super-radiance (super-fluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation, (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux non-conservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of super-radiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both super-radiance and damping.

Petarpa Boonserm; Tritos Ngampitipan; Matt Visser

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux buildup in the heliosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electron heat flux. The first panel shows the preeruption heliospheric flux, which consists of the an open the observed doubling in the magnetic field intensity at 1 AU over the solar cycle. Such timescales signatures; no flux buildup results. The dynamic simulation yields a solar cycle flux variation with high

California at Berkeley, University of

129

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

Howard Baer

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Global variance reduction for Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past few decades, hybrid Monte-Carlo-Deterministic (MC-DT) techniques have been mostly focusing on the development of techniques primarily with shielding applications in mind, i.e. problems featuring a limited number of responses. This paper focuses on the application of a new hybrid MC-DT technique: the SUBSPACE method, for reactor analysis calculation. The SUBSPACE method is designed to overcome the lack of efficiency that hampers the application of MC methods in routine analysis calculations on the assembly level where typically one needs to execute the flux solver in the order of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} times. It places high premium on attaining high computational efficiency for reactor analysis application by identifying and capitalizing on the existing correlations between responses of interest. This paper places particular emphasis on using the SUBSPACE method for preparing homogenized few-group cross section sets on the assembly level for subsequent use in full-core diffusion calculations. A BWR assembly model is employed to calculate homogenized few-group cross sections for different burn-up steps. It is found that using the SUBSPACE method significant speedup can be achieved over the state of the art FW-CADIS method. While the presented speed-up alone is not sufficient to render the MC method competitive with the DT method, we believe this work will become a major step on the way of leveraging the accuracy of MC calculations for assembly calculations. (authors)

Zhang, Q.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Calculating differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization without explicit use of the asymptotic form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the calculation of singly differential (energy-sharing) cross sections for electron-impact ionization. First, using exterior complex scaling, we calculate the outgoing portion of the scattering wave function without explicit use of asymptotic boundary conditions. Once that wave function is known for a finite region of space, the outgoing flux can be calculated and extrapolated to large distances according to behavior that is specific to the ionization problem. The differential cross section is proportional to the outgoing flux in specific directions of a hyperspherical angle in the coordinates. Calculations on the singlet s-wave radial limit (Temkin-Poet and collinear) models of electron-hydrogen atom ionization are presented. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

McCurdy, C.W. [Computing Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Computing Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rescigno, T.N. [Physics and Space Technology Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Physics and Space Technology Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

135

6, 52515268, 2006 Turbulent fluxes over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´exico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico Received: 24 March 2006 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2006 ­ Published: 26 June 2006 wind speed conditions (up to 25 ms -1 ). The estimates of total momentum flux and turbulent kinetic energy can be represented very5 accurately (r2 =0.99, when data are binned every 1 ms-1 ) by empirical

Boyer, Edmond

136

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste Management Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission#12;#12;Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual'nat the average annual l'elease of radon-222 from the disposal sites to t.he atmosp~1er0 by residuai radioactive

137

Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H. [Cameron, 1000 McClaren Woods Drive, Coraopolis, PA 15108 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

Todreas, Neil E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0.4 Radiance Radiance is the energy flux density per solid angle.[W/(m2 � steradian)] 6.0.5 Radiant Intensity Radiant intensity is the energy flux per solid angle [W/steradian] (radiometry) 6.0.6 Intensity Intensity)· ^Ndt (6.4) Intensity is again measured in [W/m2 ] 6.0.7 Fluence Fluence is radiant energy per area

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

140

Impact of solar EUV flux on CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions in the dayglow of Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is aimed at making a calculation about the impact of the two most commonly used solar EUV flux models -- SOLAR2000 (S2K) of \\cite{Tobiska04} and EUVAC model of \\cite{Richards94} -- on photoelectron fluxes, volume emission rates, ion densities and CO Cameron and CO$_2^+$ UV doublet band dayglow emissions on Mars in three solar activity conditions: minimum, moderate, and maximum. Calculated limb intensities profiles are compared with SPICAM/Mars Express and Mariner observations. Analytical yield spectrum (AYS) approach has been used to calculate photoelectron fluxes in Martian upper atmosphere. Densities of prominent ions and CO molecule in excited triplet a$^3\\Pi$ state are calculated using major ion-neutral reactions. Volume emission rates of CO Cameron and CO$_2^+$ UV doublet bands have been calculated for dif{}ferent observations (Viking condition, Mariner and Mars Express SPICAM observations) on Mars. For the low solar activity condition, dayglow intensities calculated using the S2K model are $\\...

Jain, Sonal Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Pressure tensor and heat flux vector for inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids under the influence of three-body forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupled with the Axilrod-Teller three-body force. Our method of planes calculations agree perfectlyPressure tensor and heat flux vector for inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids under the influence of three-body forces Junfang Zhang and B. D. Todd* Centre for Molecular Simulation, Swinburne University

142

High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ARM - VAP Product - lblch1flux  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byProductsbsrncalcbsrncalc Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsuthProductslbllblch1flux

144

Coupling spin ensembles via superconducting flux qubits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a hybrid quantum system consisting of spin ensembles and superconducting flux qubits, where each spin ensemble is realized using the nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond crystal and the nearest-neighbor spin ensembles are effectively coupled via a flux qubit.We show that the coupling strengths between flux qubits and spin ensembles can reach the strong and even ultrastrong coupling regimes by either engineering the hybrid structure in advance or tuning the excitation frequencies of spin ensembles via external magnetic fields. When extending the hybrid structure to an array with equal coupling strengths, we find that in the strong-coupling regime, the hybrid array is reduced to a tight-binding model of a one-dimensional bosonic lattice. In the ultrastrong-coupling regime, it exhibits quasiparticle excitations separated from the ground state by an energy gap. Moreover, these quasiparticle excitations and the ground state are stable under a certain condition that is tunable via the external magnetic field. This may provide an experimentally accessible method to probe the instability of the system.

Yueyin Qiu; Wei Xiong; Lin Tian; J. Q. You

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Heat flux dynamics in dissipative cascaded systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum system that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a {\\it cascaded} fashion. Despite the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a non-exponential time behaviour which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of $S$ and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases -- a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes -- and compare the corresponding behaviours. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

Salvatore Lorenzo; Alessandro Farace; Francesco Ciccarello; G. Massimo Palma; Vittorio Giovannetti

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

146

Flux Expulsion - Field Evolution in Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models for the evolution of magnetic fields of neutron stars are constructed, assuming the field is embedded in the proton superconducting core of the star. The rate of expulsion of the magnetic flux out of the core, or equivalently the velocity of outward motion of flux-carrying proton-vortices is determined from a solution of the Magnus equation of motion for these vortices. A force due to the pinning interaction between the proton-vortices and the neutron-superfluid vortices is also taken into account in addition to the other more conventional forces acting on the proton-vortices. Alternative models for the field evolution are considered based on the different possibilities discussed for the effective values of the various forces. The coupled spin and magnetic evolution of single pulsars as well as those processed in low-mass binary systems are computed, for each of the models. The predicted lifetimes of active pulsars, field strengths of the very old neutron stars, and distribution of the magnetic fields versus orbital periods in low-mass binary pulsars are used to test the adopted field decay models. Contrary to the earlier claims, the buoyancy is argued to be the dominant driving cause of the flux expulsion, for the single as well as the binary neutron stars. However, the pinning is also found to play a crucial role which is necessary to account for the observed low field binary and millisecond pulsars.

M. Jahan-Miri

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

THE ROLE OF A FLUX ROPE EJECTION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the dynamic evolution of a three-dimensional (3D) flux rope eruption and magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare by simply extending the two-dimensional (2D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation model of solar flares with low ? plasma to a 3D model. We succeeded in reproducing a current sheet and bi-directional reconnection outflows just below the flux rope during the eruption in our 3D simulations. We calculated four cases of a strongly twisted flux rope and a weakly twisted flux rope in 2D and 3D simulations. The time evolution of a weakly twisted flux rope in the 3D simulation shows behaviors similar to those of the 2D simulation, while a strongly twisted flux rope in the 3D simulation clearly shows a different time evolution from the 2D simulation except for the initial phase evolution. The ejection speeds of both strongly and weakly twisted flux ropes in 3D simulations are larger than in the 2D simulations, and the reconnection rates in 3D cases are also larger than in the 2D cases. This indicates positive feedback between the ejection speed of a flux rope and the reconnection rate even in the 3D simulation, and we conclude that the plasmoid-induced reconnection model can be applied to 3D. We also found that small-scale plasmoids are formed inside a current sheet and make it turbulent. These small-scale plasmoid ejections have a role in locally increasing the reconnection rate intermittently as observed in solar flares, coupled with a global eruption of a flux rope.

Nishida, Keisuke; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)] [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Nishizuka, Naoto, E-mail: nishida@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

statistical regression of EC energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) against available energy (net radiation, less soil heat flux). While incomplete (R2 0.77 for 1:1 line),...

149

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

150

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April 2006 that further funding for the project would be suspended. Remaining funds have been used to prepare and irradiate mini-plates of the proposed booster fuel. The current baseline design is for a set of three test positions inside an in-pile tube with a thermal neutron absorber and heat sink made of aluminum mixed with hafnium. Operating the ATR at power levels needed to achieve the required fast flux will result in an estimated increase in ATR fuel consumption between 15 and 20% above present rates and a reduction in the time between fuel replacements. Preliminary safety analyses conducted have indicted safe operation of the ATR with the GTL under normal, abnormal, and postulated accident conditions. More comprehensive analyses are needed.

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

Hong, S. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., 446-701 Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 305-353 Duckjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Blade Motion and Nutrient Flux to the Kelp, Eisenia arborea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blade Motion and Nutrient Flux to the Kelp, Eisenia arborea MARK DENNY* AND LORETTA ROBERSON- plore the effect of oscillatory pitching on the flux to a flat plate and to two morphologies of the kelp-averaged flux to both kelp mor- phologies, but not to the plate. In fast flow (equivalent to 20 cm s 1 in water

Denny, Mark

153

Energy flux of timeharmonic waves in anisotropic dissipative media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy flux of time­harmonic waves in anisotropic dissipative media Vlastislav Ÿ Cerven 2, Czech Republic. E­mail vcerveny@seis.karlov.m#.cuni.cz Summary The energy flux of time to consider the average energy flux, which is real­valued and time­independent. An extension

Cerveny, Vlastislav

154

SEDIMENT FLUX THROUGH THE RIO GRANDE RIVER: A MONSOONAL EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEDIMENT FLUX THROUGH THE RIO GRANDE RIVER: A MONSOONAL EFFECT Troy C.Hiatt A thesis submitted University August 2010 Copyright © 2010 Troy C. Hiatt All Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Sediment Flux through Climate has historically been recognized as an influence on sediment flux and deposition. The North

Seamons, Kent E.

155

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

Pieper, S.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

AmeriFlux Network Data from the ORNL AmeriFlux Website  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The AmeriFlux network was established in 1996 to provide continuous observations of ecosystem level exchanges of CO2, water, energy and momentum spanning diurnal, synoptic, seasonal, and interannual time scales. It is fed by sites from North America, Central America, and South America. DOE's CDIAC stores and maintains AmeriFlux data, and this web site explains the different levels of data available there, with links to the CDIAC ftp site. A separate web-based data interface is also provided; it allows users to graph, query, and download Level 2 data for up to four sites at a time. Data may be queried by site, measurement period, or parameter. More than 550 site-years of level 2 data are available from AmeriFlux sites through the interface.

159

The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it lead...

Gandhi, Raj; Watanabe, Atsushi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Jokovic, D.; Udovicic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Puzovic, J.; Anicin, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Parametric amplification by coupled flux qubits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report parametric amplification of a microwave signal in a Kerr medium formed from superconducting qubits. Two mutually coupled flux qubits, embedded in the current antinode of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, are used as a nonlinear element. Shared Josephson junctions provide the qubit-resonator coupling, resulting in a device with a tunable Kerr constant (up to 3?×?10{sup ?3}) and a measured gain of about 20?dB. This arrangement represents a unit cell which can be straightforwardly extended to a quasi one-dimensional quantum metamaterial with large tunable Kerr nonlinearity, providing a basis for implementation of wide-band travelling wave parametric amplifiers.

Rehák, M.; Neilinger, P.; Grajcar, M. [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Oelsner, G.; Hübner, U.; Meyer, H.-G. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Il'ichev, E. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Ave., 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

163

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlintFlux Power Incorporated Jump to:

164

MiniBooNE Flux Data Release  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3EutecticMinding the GapThe Neutrino Flux

165

Optimisation of a transverse flux linear PM generator using 3D Finite Element Analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Several transverse flux and longitudinal flux linear generator topologies exist for freepiston Stirling engine applications. In this thesis the transverse flux permanent magnet… (more)

Schutte, Jacques

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

Margaret Torn

167

Transient critical heat flux and blowdown heat-transfer studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective of this study is to give a best-estimate prediction of transient critical heat flux (CHF) during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. To accomplish this task, a predictional method has been developed. Basically it involves the thermal-hydraulic calculation of the heated core with boundary conditions supplied from experimental measurements. CHF predictions were based on the instantaneous ''local-conditions'' hypothesis, and eight correlations (consisting of round-tube, rod-bundle, and transient correlations) were tested against most recent blowdown heat-transfer test data obtained in major US facilities. The prediction results are summarized in a table in which both CISE and Biasi correlations are found to be capable of predicting the early CHF of approx. 1 s. The Griffith-Zuber correlation is credited for its prediction of the delay CHF that occurs in a more tranquil state with slowly decaying mass velocity. In many instances, the early CHF can be well correlated by the x = 1.0 criterion; this is certainly indicative of an annular-flow dryout-type crisis. The delay CHF occurred at near or above 80% void fraction, and the success of the modified Zuber pool-boiling correlation suggests that this CHF is caused by flooding and pool-boiling type hydrodynamic crisis.

Leung, J.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Polarimetric Properties of Flux-Ropes and Sheared Arcades in Coronal Prominence Cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coronal magnetic field is the primary driver of solar dynamic events. Linear and circular polarization signals of certain infrared coronal emission lines contain information about the magnetic field, and to access this information, either a forward or an inversion method must be used. We study three coronal magnetic configurations that are applicable to polar-crown filament cavities by doing forward calculations to produce synthetic polarization data. We analyze these forward data to determine the distinguishing characteristics of each model. We conclude that it is possible to distinguish between cylindrical flux ropes, spheromak flux ropes, and sheared arcades using coronal polarization measurements. If one of these models is found to be consistent with observational measurements, it will mean positive identification of the magnetic morphology that surrounds certain quiescent filaments, which will lead to a greater understanding of how they form and why they erupt.

Rachmeler, L A; Dove, J B; DeVore, C R; Fan, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

Law, B E

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

170

Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

172

Measurement and analysis of neutron flux distribution of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter. Contract research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured neutron flux distribution around the core tank of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) to develop the method to measure reactivity for subcritical systems. The neutron flux distribution data in the position accuracy of +-13 mm have been obtained in the range of uranium concentration of 50g/L to 210g/L both in critical and in subcritical state. The prompt neutron decay constant, alpha, was evaluated from the measurement data of pulsed neutron source experiments. We also calculated distribution of neutron flux and sup 3 He reaction rates at the location of PSPC by using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measurement data was compared with the calculation results. As results of comparison, calculated values agreed generally with measurement data of PSPC with Cd cover in the region above half of solution height, but the difference between calculated value and measurement data was large in the region below half of solution height. On the other hand, ...

Murazaki, M; Uno, Y

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Anomalous diffusion modifies solar neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density and temperature conditions in the solar core suggest that the microscopic diffusion of electrons and ions could be nonstandard: diffusion and friction coefficients are energy dependent, collisions are not two-body processes and retain memory beyond the single scattering event. A direct consequence of nonstandard diffusion is that the equilibrium energy distribution of particles departs from the Maxwellian one (tails goes to zero more slowly or faster than exponentially) modifying the reaction rates. This effect is qualitatively different from temperature and/or composition modification: small changes in the number of particles in the distribution tails can strongly modify the rates without affecting bulk properties, such as the sound speed or hydrostatic equilibrium, which depend on the mean values from the distribution. This mechanism can considerably increase the range of predictions for the neutrino fluxes allowed by the current experimental values (cross sections and solar properties) and can be u...

Kaniadakis, G; Lissia, M; Quarati, P

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Renewed experimentation with Ranchero flux compression genereators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, Los Alamos pursued a coaxial flux compression generator (FCG) concept that was described in several publications under the name 'Ranchero.' These FCGs were designed to be cost effective high current generators, and a variety of configurations were tested. The Ranchero armature is a 152 mm diameter aluminum cylinder with a 6 mm thick wall. The high explosive (HE) is detonated simultaneously on axis, and as the armature expands a factor of two, the wall thins to {approx}3 mm. At the final 300 mm diameter, the circumference is over 900 mm, and this should allow currents to be generated in the 90 MA range. No tests significantly over 50 MA have been performed but an experiment is planned. We have recently begun using Ranchero devices for a new application and we continue to improve the design. In this paper we describe recent tests of Ranchero and its subsystems. The load for our new application is an imploding aluminum liner that would deform due to the magnetic pressure applied during the initial flux loading. It will, however, implode properly when powered only during the {approx}29 {micro}s Ranchero flux compression time. This gives rise to a new system with explOSively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches and an integral closing switch that isolates the load. A capacitor bank delivers 2.8 MA to the Ranchero circuit in {approx}85 {micro}s. During this time, four parallel 63.5 mm wide EFFs, external to the coaxial system, complete the circuit. After armature motion begins, insulation which initially isolates the load is severed, connecting the load to the FCG in parallel with the EFFs. External HE charges are initiated on each of the EFFs to produce a resistance rise timed to not precede closure of the load isolation switch. The EFFs achieve significant resistance, and the flux remaining in the 191 nH generator and 3 nH transmission line is compressed to generate 30.85 MA in a {approx}12.5 nH static load. On three tests, the EFF system has operated flawlessly, and only {approx}100kA is driven back into the EFFs during peak voltage of the generator output. A test incorporating a 19.5 nH dual liner dynamic load has also been completed, and these results are also presented. Ranchero generators have been operated with armatures from 43 cm to 1.4 m long, corresponding to initial inductances from 56 to 191 nH. MHD code modeling gives better agreement with experiments using modules 43 cm long than the 1.4 m modules, and these results will also be presented.

Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, David T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, R. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riesman, D. B. [LLNL

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

177

Benchmark calculations for a heavy water research reactor using the WIMS-D4M code and a ENDF/B-V based library  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of unit-cell and global diffusion and transport calculations performed for the Georgia Tech heavy water research reactor using the WIMS-D4m code and a new ENDF/B-V based library are presented in this paper. Key cross sections, eigenvalues, neutron fluxes and peak power densities obtained from global diffusion calculations are compared.

Mo, S.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparative study of 2-group P1 and diffusion theories for the calculation of the neutron noise in 1D 2-region systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative study of 2-group P1 and diffusion theories for the calculation of the neutron noise of the neutron flux around its mean value, is calculated in 2-group P1 and diffusion theories for a 2-region slab reactor using Green's function technique. The applicability of diffusion theory for different types

Demazière, Christophe

179

Temperture and composition dependence of the high flux plasma sputtering yield of Cu-Li binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High flux deuterium plasma sputtering and ion beam experiments have been performed on Cu-Li alloys to determine if the reduction in copper erosion previously predicted and observed in low flux ion beam experiments occurs at particle fluxes representative of an RFP first wall or tokamak limiter. Partial sputtering yields of the copper and lithium components have been measured as a function of alloy composition and sample temperature using optical plasma emission spectroscopy, weight loss and catcher foil techniques. It is found that the lithium sputtering yield increases with increasing sample temperature while the copper yield decreases by as much as two orders of magnitude. The temperature required to obtain the reduction in copper erosion is found to be a function of bulk lithium concentration. Consequences of these experimental results for anticipated erosion/redeposition properties are calculated, and the Cu-Li alloy in found to compare favorably with conventional low-Z materials.

Krauss, A.R.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Bohdansky, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Exact-to-precision generalized perturbation for neutron transport calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manuscript extends the exact-to-precision generalized perturbation theory (E{sub P}GPT), introduced previously, to neutron transport calculation whereby previous developments focused on neutron diffusion calculation only. The E{sub P}GPT collectively denotes new developments in generalized perturbation theory (GPT) that place premium on computational efficiency and defendable accuracy in order to render GPT a standard analysis tool in routine design and safety reactor calculations. EPGPT constructs a surrogate model with quantifiable accuracy which can replace the original neutron transport model for subsequent engineering analysis, e.g. functionalization of the homogenized few-group cross sections in terms of various core conditions, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. This is achieved by reducing the effective dimensionality of the state variable (i.e. neutron angular flux) by projection onto an active subspace. Confining the state variations to the active subspace allows one to construct a small number of what is referred to as the 'active' responses which are solely dependent on the physics model rather than on the responses of interest, the number of input parameters, or the number of points in the state phase space. (authors)

Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State University, 911 Oval Dr., Centennial Campus, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

as4 flux morfologiya: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guido D'Amico; Roberto Gobbetti; Matthew Kleban; Marjorie Schillo 2012-11-14 11 Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes CERN Preprints Summary: The most probable initial magnetic...

185

Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Current Source Inverters for HEVs and FCVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Wireless Charging Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

186

annual particle flux: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a cascade Wehrli, Bernhard 20 Earth Planets Space, 62, 333345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux in paleomagnetospheres Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

187

Ising interaction between capacitively-coupled superconducting flux qubits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here, we propose a scheme to generate a controllable Ising interaction between superconducting flux qubits. Existing schemes rely on inducting couplings to realize Ising interactions between flux qubits, and the interaction strength is controlled by an applied magnetic field On the other hand, we have found a way to generate an interaction between the flux qubits via capacitive couplings. This has an advantage in individual addressability, because we can control the interaction strength by changing an applied voltage that can be easily localized. This is a crucial step toward the realizing superconducting flux qubit quantum computation.

Takahiko Satoh; Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Kosuke Kakuyanagi; Koichi Semba; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Shiro Saito

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Gaugino Condensates and Fluxes in N = 1 Effective Superpotentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of orbifold compactifications of heterotic and type II orientifolds, we study effective N = 1 supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates. These string solutions display a broad phenomenology which we analyze using the method of N = 4 supergravity gaugings. We give examples in type II and heterotic compactifications of combined fluxes and condensates leading to vacua with naturally small supersymmetry breaking scale controlled by the condensate, cases where the supersymmetry breaking scale is specified by the fluxes even in the presence of a condensate and also examples where fluxes and condensates conspire to preserve supersymmetry.

Jean-Pierre Derendinger; Costas Kounnas; P. Marios Petropoulos

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

antineutrino flux measurements: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements CERN Preprints Summary: Uranium and thorium are the main heat producing elements in the earth. Their quantities and...

190

CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS Michael Rub August 1981 TWO-WEEK LOAN

Rubin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Suggestions for the measurement and derivation of fluxes and flux divergences from a satellite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical studies shown here indicate that the best bands to measure and derive the total outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), surface downward flux (SDF), and cooling rates (CRs) using linear regression are (1) the band between 800 and 1,200 cm{sup {minus}1} for OLR, (2) the band between 500 and 660 cm{sup {minus}1} or 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for SDF, and (3) the band between 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for CRs. These results are obtained from scatter plots of total fluxes and cooling rates associated with the various bands. The advanced very high resolution radiometer OLR is damped compared with the Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) OLR, which is derived from the broadband, narrow field of view ERB instrument, owing to its use of only one narrow band (centered around the 11-{mu}m window region) measurement.

Man-Li C. Wu (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

1990-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

193

Study on in situ calibration for neutron flux monitor in the Large Helical Device based on Monte Carlo calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron monitoring is important to manage safety of fusion experiment facilities because neutrons are generated in fusion reactions. Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in evaluating the influence of neutron scattering from various structures and correcting differences between deuterium plasma experiments and in situ calibration experiments. We evaluated these influences based on differences between the both experiments at Large Helical Device using Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP5. A difference between the both experiments in absolute detection efficiency of the fission chamber between O-ports is estimated to be the biggest of all monitors. We additionally evaluated correction coefficients for some neutron monitors.

Nakano, Y., E-mail: nakano.yuuji@c.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yamazaki, A.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-city, GIFU 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110).Development of Aerosol Models

195

Forest understory soil temperatures and heat flux calculated using a Fourier model and scaled using a digital camera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an infrared thermometer along an 11 m transect, a sun?Multiscale sensing Infrared thermometer Remote sensing Imagefacing infrared thermometer (Model 4000.3ZL, Ever- est

Graham, Eric; Lam, Yeung; Yuen, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Distribution of electric field and energy flux around the cracks on the surfaces of Nd-doped phosphate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We simulate and calculate numerically the electromagnetic field and energy flux around a surface crack of an Nd-doped phosphate laser glass by using the finite-difference time-domain method. Because of a strong interference between the incident wave and the total internal reflections from the crack and the glass surface, the electric field is redistributed and enhanced. The results show that the electric-field distribution and corresponding energy flux component depend sensitively on the light polarization and crack geometry, such as orientation and depth. The polarization of the incident laser beam relative to the crack surfaces will determine the profile of the electric field around the crack. Under TE wave incidence, the energy flux peak is always inside the glass. But under TM wave incidence, the energy flux peak will be located inside the glass or inside the air gap. For both incident modes, the light intensification factor increases with the crack depth, especially for energy flux along the surface. Because cracks on the polished surfaces are the same as the roots extending down, the probability for much larger intensification occurring is high. The results suggest that the surface laser-damage threshold of Nd-doped phosphate may decrease dramatically with subsurface damage.

Zhang Lei; Huang Li; Fan Sijun; Bai Gongxun; Li Kefeng; Chen Wei; Hu Lili

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Critical heat flux predictions based on the BODYFIT-2PE computer code and Columbia University CHF correlation. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BODYFIT-2PE (Boundary-Fitted Coordinate, 2-Phase Flow with Partially Elliptic) computer code has been developed and was employed to simulate the critical heat flux experiment in a General Electric 3 x 3 rod bundle by using a CHF correlation recently developed at Columbia University under EPRI sponsorship. CHF predictions are important in analyzing rod bundle performance in nuclear reactor operation. The results of the BODYFIT calculations compared favorably with the experimental measurements.

Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Anomalous diffusion modifies solar neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density and temperature conditions in the solar core suggest that the microscopic diffusion of electrons and ions could be nonstandard: Diffusion and friction coefficients are energy dependent, collisions are not two-body processes and retain memory beyond the single scattering event. A direct consequence of nonstandard diffusion is that the equilibrium energy distribution of particles departs from the Maxwellian one (tails goes to zero more slowly or faster than exponentially) modifying the reaction rates. This effect is qualitatively different from temperature and/or composition modification: Small changes in the number of particles in the distribution tails can strongly modify the rates without affecting bulk properties, such as the sound speed or hydrostatic equilibrium, which depend on the mean values from the distribution. This mechanism can considerably increase the range of predictions for the neutrino fluxes allowed by the current experimental values (cross sections and solar properties) and can be used to reduce the discrepancy between these predictions and the solar neutrino experiments.

G. Kaniadakis; A. Lavagno; M. Lissia; P. Quarati

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

200

Thermal neutron flux perturbation due to indium foils in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

press) 13. Axford, R. A. , and Day, G. M. , personnel communication. 14. Ritchie, R. H. , Thermal Neutron Flux De ression, Health Physics Division Annual Prog. Rep. July, 1958, ORNL-2806, p. 133. 27 i 5, Walker, J. V. , "The Measurement of Absolute... Fluxes in Water and Graphite, " 'ORNL- 2842, 204 (f959). ...

Stinson, Ronald Calvin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

Murata, Tomoya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

Tomoya Murata; Toru Sato

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of 'Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy' (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia); Isnaeni, Muh Darwis [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Directional Dependence of Apertures, Limits and Sensitivity of the Lunar Cherenkov Technique to a UHE Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use computer simulations to obtain the directional-dependence of the lunar Cherenkov technique for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino detection. We calculate the instantaneous effective area of past lunar Cherenkov experiments as a function of neutrino arrival direction, and hence the directional-dependence of the combined limit imposed by GLUE and the experiment at Parkes. We also determine the directional dependence of the aperture of future planned experiments with ATCA, ASKAP and the SKA to a UHE neutrino flux, and calculate the potential annual exposure to astronomical objects as a function of angular distance from the lunar trajectory through celestial coordinates.

C. W. James; R. J. Protheroe

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

Vigeesh, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu Yu, E-mail: guojuan@bao.ac.c [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatories, Kunming 650011 (China)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Historical deposition and fluxes of mercury in Narraguinnep Reservoir, southwestern Colorado,USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Narraguinnep Reservoir has been identified as containing fish with elevated Hg concentrations and has been posted with an advisory recommending against consumption of fish. There are presently no point sources of significant Hg contamination to this reservoir or its supply waters. To evaluate potential historical Hg sources and deposition of Hg to Narraguinnep Reservoir, the authors measured Hg concentrations in sediment cores collected from this reservoir. The cores were dated by the 137Cs method and these dates were further refined by relating water supply basin hydrological records with core sedimentology. Rates of historical Hg flux were calculated (ng/cm(2)/a) based on the Hg concentrations in the cores, sediment bulk densities, and sedimentation rates. The flux of Hg found in Narraguinnep Reservoir increased by approximately a factor of 2 after about 1970. The 3 most likely sources of Hg to Narraguinnep Reservoir are surrounding bedrocks, upstream inactive Au/Ag mines, and several coal-fired electric power plants in the Four Corners region. Patterns of Hg flux do not support dominant Hg derivation from surrounding bedrocks or upstream mining sources. There are 14 coal-fired power plants within 320 km of Narraguinnep Reservoir that produce over 80 x 10(6) MWH of power and about 1640 kg-Hg/a are released through stack emissions, contributing significant Hg to the surrounding environment. Two of the largest power plants, located within 80 km of the reservoir, emit about 950 kg-Hg/a. Spatial and temporal patterns of Hg fluxes for sediment cores collected from Narraguinnep Reservoir suggest that the most likely source of Hg to this reservoir is from atmospheric emissions from the coal-fired electric power plants, the largest of which began operation in this region in the late-1960s and early 1970s.

Gray, John E.; Fey, David L.; Holmes, Charles W.; Lasorsa, Brenda K.

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Calculator Tips for TI-30XA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TI-30XA Calculator Tips. Calculator Memory. - To use the memory function, hit the STO key to store a number in either memory 1, 2, or 3. o To store the product of ...

Owen Davis

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

213

Calculation of Stochasticity from Topological Noise in the DIII-D Shot 115467 3000 ms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An area-preserving map in magnetic coordinates is derived from Hamiltonian equations of motion for magnetic field lines using an infinitesimal canonical transformation of second type. The map generating function for the field lines in the DIII-D is calculated from the experimental data for the shot 115467 at 3000 ms. The poloidal magnetic flux, {chi}, is the Hamiltonian for field lines. The equilibrium Hamiltonian function for the DIII-D, {chi}0, is calculated from the shot data as a piece-wise defined function of toroidal flux, {psi}. For 0{<=}{psi}{<=}{psi}1, safety factor q increases monotonically to the value 5. For {psi}1{<=}{psi}{<=}{psi}sep, the safety factor increases logarithmically without limit. {psi}sep is the toroidal flux inside separatrix in the DII-D. The logarithmic singularity is symmetric about the separatrix. The singular region contains 5% of toroidal flux, and 0.87% of poloidal flux inside the separatrix in the DIII-D shot. In the open field line region outside the separatrix, q is defined by the distance a field line requires to go from its first to its second close approach to the X-point. In this region, the safety factor first decreases to the value 3.8, and then increases. Stochasticity caused by topological noise in the DIII-D shot is calculated using this map. Topological noise consists of modes (m,n) = {l_brace}(3,1), (4,1), (6,2), (7,2), (8,2), (9,3), (10,3), (11,3), (12,3){r_brace} with each amplitude equals to 0.8x10-5. Topological noise creates two very narrow layers of stochasticity. One is inside the separatrix and another is outside the separatrix. From the equilibrium data, a transformation from magnetic coordinates to the DIII-D (R,Z,{phi}) coordinates is calculated. This transformation is used to calculate stochasticity in physical space. Preliminary results of this investigation are presented. This work is supported by DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793.

Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima [Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); Evans, Todd [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Boozer, Allen [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

Wang, Lin-Wang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations Charles G. Nathanson1. , Corina E. Here we provide a general formula for calculating evolutionary dynamics in a wide class of structured) Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations. PLoS Comput Biol 5(12): e1000615. doi:10

Nowak, Martin A.

216

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

Colour flux-tubes in static Pentaquark systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The colour fields created by the static tetraquark and pentaquark systems are computed in quenched SU(3) lattice QCD, with gauge invariant lattice operators, in a 24^3 x 48 lattice at beta=6.2 . We generate our quenched configurations with GPUs, and detail the respective benchmanrks in different SU(N) groups. While at smaller distances the coulomb potential is expected to dominate, at larger distances it is expected that fundamental flux tubes, similar to the flux-tube between a quark and an antiquark, emerge and confine the quarks. In order to minimize the potential the fundamental flux tubes should connect at 120o angles. We compute the square of the colour fields utilizing plaquettes, and locate the static sources with generalized Wilson loops and with APE smearing. The tetraquark system is well described by a double-Y-shaped flux-tube, with two Steiner points, but when quark-antiquark pairs are close enough the two junctions collapse and we have an X-shaped flux-tube, with one Steiner point. The pentaquark system is well described by a three-Y-shaped flux-tube where the three flux the junctions are Steiner points.

Pedro Bicudo; Nuno Cardoso; Marco Cardoso

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Materials Compatibility and Aging for Flux and Cleaner Combinations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

Archuleta, Kim; Piatt, Rochelle

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

Bounded limit for the Monte Carlo point-flux-estimator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Monte Carlo random walk the kernel K(R,E) is used as an expected value estimator at every collision for the collided flux phi/sub c/ r vector,E) at the detector point. A limiting value for the kernel is derived from a diffusion approximation for the probability current at a radius R/sub 1/ from the detector point. The variance of the collided flux at the detector point is thus bounded using this asymptotic form for K(R,E). The bounded point flux estimator is derived. (WHK)

Grimesey, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison Of Hybrid Methods For Global Variance Reduction In Shielding Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Monte Carlo shielding problems that calculate a mesh tally over the entire problem, the relative uncertainties computed for each voxel can vary widely. This can lead to unacceptably long run times in order to reduce the uncertainties in all areas of the problem to a reasonably low level. Hybrid methods using estimates from deterministic calculations to create importance maps for variance reduction in Monte Carlo calculations have been successfully used to optimize the calculation of specific tallies. For the global problem, several methods have been proposed that create importance maps that distribute Monte Carlo particles in such a way as to achieve a more uniform distribution of relative uncertainty across the problem. The goal is to compute a mesh tally with nearly the same relative uncertainties in the low flux/dose areas as in the high flux/dose areas. Methods based on only forward deterministic estimates and methods using both forward and adjoint deterministic methods have been implemented the SCALE/MAVRIC package and have been compared against each other by computing global mesh tallies on several representative shielding problems. Methods using both forward and adjoint estimates provide better performance for computing more uniform relative uncertainties across a global mesh tally.

Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Comparison of hybrid methods for global variance reduction in shielding calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Monte Carlo shielding problems that calculate a mesh tally over the entire problem, the statistical uncertainties computed for each voxel can vary widely. This can lead to unacceptably long run times in order to reduce the uncertainties in all areas of the problem to a reasonably low level. Hybrid methods - using estimates from deterministic calculations to create importance maps for variance reduction in Monte Carlo calculations - have been successfully used to optimize the calculation of specific tallies. For the global problem, several methods have been proposed to create importance maps that distribute Monte Carlo particles in such a way as to achieve a more uniform distribution of relative uncertainty across the problem. The goal is to compute a mesh tally with nearly the same relative uncertainties in the low flux/dose areas as in the high flux/dose areas. Methods based on only forward deterministic estimates and methods using both forward and adjoint deterministic methods have been implemented in the SCALE/MAVRIC package and have been compared against each other by computing global mesh tallies on several representative shielding problems. Methods using both forward and adjoint estimates provide better performance for computing more uniform relative uncertainties across a global mesh tally. (authors)

Peplow, D. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Momentum flux in two-phase flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The average momentum flux at a section of a pipe with twophase upflow has been measured by the impulse technique. Steamwater and air-water mixtures were tested in one-inch and onehalf inch nominal pipes. Homogeneous ...

Andeen, Gerry B.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the geothermal area. Ultimately for potential development of EGS. Notes A CO2 soil gas flux survey was conducted in areas recognized as geothermal upflow zones within the...

227

Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal field. This paper reports results from accumulation-chamber measurements of soil CO2 flux from locations in the dead zone and stable isotope and chemical data on fluids...

228

affecting carbon fluxes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(IFN) (2 Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 43 High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak* Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: ,. 1. *...

229

New constraints on Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE L12807AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE Levin,Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux Z. Yang, 1 R. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Coherence characterization with a superconducting flux qubit through NMR approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses a series of experimental studies that investigate the coherence properties of a superconducting persistent-current or flux qubit, a promising candidate for developing a scalable quantum processor. A ...

Yan, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

OBSERVATION OF FLUX-TUBE CROSSINGS IN THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current sheets are ubiquitous in the solar wind. They are a major source of the solar wind MHD turbulence intermittency. They may result from nonlinear interactions of the solar wind MHD turbulence or are the boundaries of flux tubes that originate from the solar surface. Some current sheets appear in pairs and are the boundaries of transient structures such as magnetic holes and reconnection exhausts or the edges of pulsed Alfven waves. For an individual current sheet, discerning whether it is a flux-tube boundary or due to nonlinear interactions or the boundary of a transient structure is difficult. In this work, using data from the Wind spacecraft, we identify two three-current-sheet events. Detailed examination of these two events suggests that they are best explained by the flux-tube-crossing scenario. Our study provides convincing evidence supporting the scenario that the solar wind consists of flux tubes where distinct plasmas reside.

Arnold, L.; Li, G.; Li, X. [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)] [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Yan, Y., E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

atmospheric muon flux: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I. Sarcevic 1997-10-15 9 Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the ANTARES detector CERN Preprints Summary: ANTARES is a submarine neutrino telescope deployed in the...

233

Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of tensile strain on grain connectivity and flux pinning...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tensile strain on grain connectivity and flux pinning in Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O x tapes D. C. van der Laan and J. W. Ekin National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder,...

235

Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The flux measure of influence in engineering networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this project is to characterize the influence of individual nodes in complex networks. The flux metric developed here achieves this goal by considering the difference between the weighted outdegree and ...

Schwing, Kyle Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Model of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical phenomenon occurring before and at the critical heat flux (CHF) for subcooled flow boiling has been investigated. The first phase of this study established the basic nature of the flow structure at CHF. A ...

Fiori, Mario P.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Global sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global sea-to-air flux climatology Ko, M. K. W. , Poulet,Global sea-to-air flux climatology Vogt, R. , Sander, R. ,sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase Ag/Ag2O deposition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Abstract: The flux of atomic oxygen generated in a...

240

Detecting gravity modes in the solar $^8B$ neutrino flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of gravity modes produced in the solar radiative zone has been a challenge in modern astrophysics for more than 30 yr and their amplitude in the core is not yet determined. In this Letter, we develop a new strategy to look for standing gravity modes through solar neutrino fluxes. We note that due to a resonance effect, the gravity modes of low degree and low order have the largest impact on the $^{8}B$ neutrino flux. The strongest effect is expected to occur for the dipole mode with radial order $2$, corresponding to periods of about 1.5 hr. These standing gravity waves produce temperature fluctuations that are amplified by a factor of 170 in the boron neutrino flux for the corresponding period, in consonance with the gravity modes. From current neutrino observations, we determine that the maximum temperature variation due to the gravity modes in the Sun's core is smaller than $5.8\\times 10^{-4}$. This study clearly shows that due to their high sensitivity to the temperature, the $^8B$ neutrino flux time series is an excellent tool to determine the properties of gravity modes in the solar core. Moreover, if gravity mode footprints are discovered in the $^{8}B$ neutrino flux, this opens a new line of research to probe the physics of the solar core as non-standing gravity waves of higher periods cannot be directly detected by helioseismology but could leave their signature on boron neutrino or on other neutrino fluxes.

Ilídio Lopes; Sylvaine Turck-Chièze

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

Lewandowski, A; Scholl, K; Bingham, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

On the Chaotic Flux Dynamics in a Long Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux dynamics in an annular long Josephson junction is studied. Three main topics are covered. The first is chaotic flux dynamics and its prediction via Melnikov integrals. It turns out that DC current bias cannot induce chaotic flux dynamics, while AC current bias can. The existence of a common root to the Melnikov integrals is a necessary condition for the existence of chaotic flux dynamics. The second topic is on the components of the global attractor and the bifurcation in the perturbation parameter measuring the strength of loss, bias and irregularity of the junction. The global attractor can contain co-existing local attractors e.g. a local chaotic attractor and a local regular attractor. In the infinite dimensional phase space setting, the bifurcation is very complicated. Chaotic attractors can appear and disappear in a random fashion. Three types of attractors (chaos, breather, spatially uniform and temporally periodic attractor) are identified. The third topic is ratchet effect. Ratchet effect can be achieved by a current bias field which corresponds to an asymmetric potential, in which case the flux dynamics is ever lasting chaotic. When the current bias field corresponds to a symmetric potential, the flux dynamics is often transiently chaotic, in which case the ratchet effect disappears after sufficiently long time.

Z. C. Feng; Y. Charles Li

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp synthetic flux Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

flux Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp synthetic flux Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A genetically encoded fluorescent reporter...

247

I. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE PROPELLANT-DRIVEN MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

is perfectly conducting (R 0) , the well-known electrodynamic result of flux (LI) conservation is obtained. Under this condition the conservation of flux leads to the result:...

248

Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based...

249

Optimization of superconducting flux qubit readout using near-quantum-limited amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

junctions . . . . . . . 1.4 Superconducting QuantumInterference 1.5 Superconducting qubits . . . . . . . . .2 Superconducting flux qubits 2.1 The one-junction flux

Johnson, Jedediah Edward Jensen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - au flux diffus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chauffage (Fig. l), le flux... lumineux diffus diminue au lieu d'augmenter. Temperature (OC) FIG. 1. -Etude du flux lumineux diffus par... ternaire perpendiculaire au...

251

Filter diagonalization of shell-model calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method of filter diagonalization for shell-model calculations. This method is based on the Sakurai and Sugiura (SS) method, but extended with the help of the shifted complex orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) method. A salient feature of this method is that it can calculate eigenvalues and eigenstates in a given energy interval. We show that this method can be an alternative to the Lanczos method for calculating ground and excited states, as well as spectral strength functions. With an application to the M-scheme shell-model calculations we demonstrate that several inherent problems in the widely used Lanczos method can be removed or reduced.

Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute of Natural Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo 101-8425 (Japan); Kaneko, Kazunari [Department of Physics, Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka 813-8503 (Japan); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Tetsuya [Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Calculators and Science and Engineering Calculus Occasionally ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on examinations and quizzes. These courses do spend some class time discussing the use of graphing calculators, and some of the pitfalls into which graphing ...

1910-10-51T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

254

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Reactor physics input to the safety analysis report for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HFIR specific, few group neutron and coupled neutron-gamma libraries have been prepared. These are based on data from ENDF/B-V and beginning-of-life (BOL) conditions. The neutron library includes actinide data for curium target rods. Six critical experiments, collectively designated HFIR critical experiment 4, were analyzed. Calculated k-effective was 2% high at BOL-typical conditions but was 1.0 at end-of-life-typical conditions. The local power density distributions were calculated for each of the critical experiments. The axially averaged values at a given radius were frequently within experimental error. However at individual points, the calculated local power densities were significantly different from the experimentally derived values (several times greater than experimental uncertainty). A reassessment of the foil activation data with transport theory techniques seems desirable. Using the results of the critical experiments study, a model of current HFIR configuration was prepared. As with the critical experiments, BOL k-effective was high (3%). However, end-of-life k-effective was high (2%). The end-of-life concentrations of fission products were compared to those generated using the ORIGEN code. Agreement was generally good through differences in the inventories of some important nuclides, Xe and I, need to be understood. End-of-cycle curium target isotopics based on measured, discharged target rods were compared to calculated values and agreement was good. Axial flux plots at various irradiation positions were generated. Time-dependent power distributions based on two-dimensional calculations were provided.

Primm, R.T. III.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux from lunar observations with the Parkes radio telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux based on a non-detection of radio pulses from neutrino-initiated particle cascades in the Moon, in observations with the Parkes radio telescope undertaken as part of the LUNASKA project. Due to the improved sensitivity of these observations, which had an effective duration of 127 hours and a frequency range of 1.2-1.5 GHz, this limit extends to lower neutrino energies than those from previous lunar radio experiments, with a detection threshold below 10^20 eV. The calculation of our limit allows for the possibility of lunar-origin pulses being misidentified as local radio interference, and includes the effect of small-scale lunar surface roughness. The targeting strategy of the observations also allows us to place a directional limit on the neutrino flux from the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A.

Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ris-M-2584 RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-M-2584 RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS Improvements of methods intended for calculation of reliability of structures and systems Kurt E. Petersen Abstract. Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either

259

First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented.

Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Quark model calculation of the EMC effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a potential model, we calculate quark distributions for a six-quark quasi-deuteron, including the effects of the Pauli Principle and quark tunneling between nuclei. Using a phenomenological sea distribution, the EMC ratio is calculated and found to be in qualitative agreement with experiment.

Benesh, C.J.; Goldman, T.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

Weston, Ken

262

Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Neutrino fluxes from nonuniversal Higgs mass LSP annihilations in the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We extend our previous studies of the neutrino fluxes expected from neutralino LSP annihilations inside the Sun to include variants of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with squark, slepton and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the GUT scale, but allowing one or two nonuniversal supersymmetry breaking parameters contributing to the Higgs masses (NUHM1,2). As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM) with universal Higgs masses, there are large regions of the NUHM parameter space where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate, and there are also large regions where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering. The spectra possible in the NUHM are qualitatively similar to those in the CMSSM. We calculate neutrino-induced muon fluxes above a threshold energy of 10 GeV, appropriate for the IceCube/DeepCore detector, for points where the NUHM yields the correct cosmological relic density for representative choices of the NUHM parameters. We find that the IceCube/DeepCore detector can probe regions of the NUHM parameter space in addition to analogues of the focus point strip and the tip of the coannihilation strip familiar from the CMSSM. These include regions with enhanced Higgsino-gaugino mixing in the LSP composition, that occurs where neutralino mass eigenstates cross over. On the other hand, rapid-annihilation funnel regions in general yield neutrino fluxes that are unobservably small.

Ellis, John [TH Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King's College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States) and Department of Physics and SLAC, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305 (United States); Savage, Christopher [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Spanos, Vassilis C. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Athens (Greece)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Neutrino fluxes from constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model lightest supersymmetric particle annihilations in the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluate the neutrino fluxes to be expected from neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) annihilations inside the Sun, within the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model with supersymmetry-breaking scalar and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the grand unified theory scale [the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM)]. We find that there are large regions of typical CMSSM (m{sub 1/2},m{sub 0}) planes where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate. We show that neutrino fluxes are dependent on the solar model at the 20% level, and adopt the AGSS09 model of Serenelli et al. for our detailed studies. We find that there are large regions of the CMSSM (m{sub 1/2},m{sub 0}) planes where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering, e.g., at large m{sub 1/2} along the CMSSM coannihilation strip. We calculate neutrino fluxes above various threshold energies for points along the coannihilation/rapid-annihilation and focus-point strips where the CMSSM yields the correct cosmological relic density for tan{beta}=10 and 55 for {mu}>0, exploring their sensitivities to uncertainties in the spin-dependent and -independent scattering matrix elements. We also present detailed neutrino spectra for four benchmark models that illustrate generic possibilities within the CMSSM. Scanning the cosmologically favored parts of the parameter space of the CMSSM, we find that the IceCube/DeepCore detector can probe at best only parts of this parameter space, notably the focus-point region and possibly also at the low-mass tip of the coannihilation strip.

Ellis, John [TH Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Savage, Christopher [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Spanos, Vassilis C. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Dynamics of Flux Tubes in a High Beta Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a new model for the structure of a magnetic field embedded high $\\beta$ turbulent plasma, based on the popular notion that the magnetic field will tend to separate into individual flux tubes. We point out that interactions between the flux tubes will be dominated by coherent effects stemming from the turbulent wakes created as the fluid streams by the flux tubes. Balancing the attraction caused by shielding effects with turbulent diffusion we find that flux tubes have typical radii comparable to the local Mach number squared times the large scale eddy length, are arranged in a one dimensional fractal pattern, have a radius of curvature comparable to the largest scale eddies in the turbulence, and have an internal magnetic pressure comparable to the ambient pressure. When the average magnetic energy density is much less than the turbulent energy density the radius, internal magnetic field and curvature scale of the flux tubes will be smaller than these estimates. Realistic resistivity does not alter the macroscopic properties of the fluid or the large scale magnetic field. In either case we show that the Sweet-Parker reconnection rate is much faster than an eddy turnover time. Realistic stellar plasmas are expected to either be in the ideal limit (e.g. the solar photosphere) or the resistive limit (most of the solar convection zone). All current numerical simulations of three dimensional MHD turbulence are in the viscous regime and are inapplicable to stars or accretion disks.

E. T. Vishniac

1994-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Estimates of the effect of a plasma momentum flux on the free surface of a thin film of liquid metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The idea of using a flowing thin film of liquid metal (LM) to protect the divertor surface of a tokamak from untimely erosion and radiation damage has gained some attention over the years but has met with criticism on several key issues. One such issue in particular is the effect the momentum flux of a very obliquely incident plasma particle stream on the shape of the free surface of LM. This momentum may push to LM to one side of the duct and cause the formation of dry spots no longer protected from the plasma beam. It is this issue that this paper addresses in the air of a first approximation. Estimates are made of the magnitude and direction of the flux of plasma momentum at the LM divertor surface. The effect of this flux is modeled with a modified version of the ordinary fluid dynamics code RIPPLE, designed for transient free surface fluid flow problems in which surface tension plays an important role. Initial results indicate that in the OHD approximation, ITER-like magnitudes of the momentum flux are comparable to the hydrostatic pressure of a thin LM film. The momentum can have a significant effect on the form of the free surface, causing both significant splashing as well as shifting of the LM to one side of the channel. Due to the inertial nature of this problem, movement of the metal cannot occur instantaneously and a maximum exposure time of the LM to the plasma, as a function of momentum flux magnitude and direction, is defined and estimated from the results of RIPPLE predictions. Full MHD calculations, while beyond the scope of this initial assessment, will be required to more fully and accurately characterize this effect.

Morley, N.B.; Gaizer, A.A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath theMoon?s surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequencywindow for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a samplingfrequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, thedetection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit onthe UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R.G.; al Yahyaoui, R.

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

GLOBAL AND LOCAL CUTOFF FREQUENCIES FOR TRANSVERSE WAVES PROPAGATING ALONG SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is a well-established result that the propagation of linear transverse waves along a thin but isothermal magnetic flux tube is affected by the existence of the global cutoff frequency, which separates the propagating and non-propagating waves. In this paper, the wave propagation along a thin and non-isothermal flux tube is considered and a local cutoff frequency is derived. The effects of different temperature profiles on this local cutoff frequency are studied by considering different power-law temperature distributions, as well as the semi-empirical VAL C model of the solar atmosphere. The obtained results show that the conditions for wave propagation strongly depend on the temperature gradients. Moreover, the local cutoff frequency calculated for the VAL C model gives constraints on the range of wave frequencies that are propagating in different parts of the solar atmosphere. These theoretically predicted constraints are compared to observational data and are used to discuss the role played by transverse tube waves in the atmospheric heating and dynamics, and in the excitation of solar atmospheric oscillations.

Routh, S. [Department of Physics, R. V. College of Engineering, Bangalore (India)] [Department of Physics, R. V. College of Engineering, Bangalore (India); Musielak, Z. E. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Hammer, R., E-mail: routhswati@rvce.edu.in, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu, E-mail: hammer@kis.uni-freiburg.de [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, Freiburg, D-79104 Germany (Germany)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Global neutrino data and recent reactor fluxes: status of three-flavour oscillation parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a global neutrino oscillation data analysis within the three-flavour framework. We include latest results from the MINOS long-baseline experiment (including electron neutrino appearance as well as anti-neutrino data), updating all relevant solar (SK II+III), atmospheric (SK I+II+III) and reactor (KamLAND) data. Furthermore, we include a recent re-calculation of the anti-neutrino fluxes emitted from nuclear reactors. These results have important consequences for the analysis of reactor experiments and in particular for the status of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In our recommended default analysis we find from the global fit that the hint for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ remains weak, at 1.8$\\sigma$ for both neutrino mass hierarchy schemes. However, we discuss in detail the dependence of these results on assumptions concerning the reactor neutrino analysis.

Thomas Schwetz; Mariam Tórtola; J. W. F. Valle

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advancements in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind which makes photospheric simulations important predictors of solar events on Earth. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over small regions of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the ADAPT model and the implementation of the LETKF. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.

Kyle S. Hickmann; Humberto C. Godinez; Carl J. Henney; C. Nick Arge

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

274

Primary Cosmic Ray Proton Flux Measured by AMS-02  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a high energy particle detector designed to study origin and nature of cosmic rays up to a few TV from space. It was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011. During the first two years of operation AMS-02 performed precise measurements of the proton flux. In the low rigidity range, from 1 GV to 20 GV, the proton flux was daily measured with a statistical error less than 1%. In the same rigidity range a gradual decrease due to Solar modulation effect and transit variations due to Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejection were also observed. In the rigidity range from 20 GV up to 100 GV instead, AMS-02 data show no drastic variation and the results are consistent with other experiments. Above 100 GV, AMS-02 proton flux exhibits a single power low behavior with no fine structures nor brakes.

C. Consolandi; on Behalf of the AMS-02 Collaboration

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Type II superconductivity and magnetic flux transport in neutrons stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition to a type II proton superconductor which is believed to occur in a cooling neutron star is accompanied by changes in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and by the formation of proton vortices with quantized magnetic flux. Analysis of the electron Boltzmann equation for this system and of the proton supercurrent distribution formed at the transition leads to the derivation of a simple expression for the transport velocity of magnetic flux in the liquid interior of a neutron star. This shows that flux moves easily as a consequence of the interaction between neutron and proton superfluid vortices during intervals of spin-down or spin-up in binary systems. The differences between the present analysis and those of previous workers are reviewed and an error in the paper of Jones (1991) is corrected.

P. B. Jones

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

Sugrue, Rosemary M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Calculated structures and fluoride affinities for fluorides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that SCF-MO calculations provide good estimates of the energies of the processes MF/sub n/ ..-->.. M/sup n+/ + nF/sup -/ where M/sup n+/ is an ion of a first- or second-row element in a closed-shell or s/sup 2/ configuration. The fluoride ion affinities are then calculated for a number of molecules and ions. Where comparison with experiment is possible, the agreement is generally good when allowance is made for experimental uncertainties. In favorable cases, accurate heats of formation may be calculated from fluoride affinities.

O'Keeffe, M.

1986-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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281

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Use of computers for multicomponent distillation calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The corrected values for the b 's are best cal- i culated by multiplying (b. /d ) by (d. ) The compositions for each component in the vapor and liquid streams leaving plate j are calculated by use of the following equations. ('i/ i)ca ( i)co y. ji c Z (v... . . /b. ) (b. ) ji i ca i co i=1 , f a j x N+1 C (47-b) A temperature profile may be calculated by making either bubble or dew point calculations based on the compositions obtained by use of Equations (46) and (47). The specified distillate rate must...

Sullivan, Samuel Lane

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991... Major Subject: Civil Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Approved as to style and content by: Stuart A. a terman (Co-chair of Committee) Andrew . cFa land (Member) Bill Batchelor (Co...

McQuown, Brian C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Validation of Minor Actinide Cross Sections by Studying Samples Irradiated for 492 Days at the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor - II: Burnup Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate neutron cross-section data of minor actinides (MAs), separated actinide samples and dosimetry samples were irradiated at the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor for 492 effective full-power days. Irradiated samples were analyzed both at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). This independent duplication has resulted in the generation of reliable radiochemical analysis data. Based on the burnup calculations of major actinide ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) and dosimetry samples, the neutron flux distribution and the flux level were adjusted at the locations where MA samples were irradiated. The burnup calculations were carried out for MAs using the determined flux distribution and flux level. The calculated results were compared with the experimental data. A brief description of sample preparation and irradiation and a detailed discussion of radiochemical analysis at JAERI are given in a companion paper. The current paper discusses the burnup calculations and the validation of MA cross-section data in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

Tsujimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kohno, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Shinohara, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Sakurai, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Nakahara, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

SIS Calculator User Guide 1 What's Inside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................2 Measurement of Soil Moisture by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide general potential water and energy savings estimates, the calculator creates water and energy savings estimates associated with implementing SIS on a particular field

288

Historical river flow rates for dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

Carlton, W.H.

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be ...

Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

Lazarine, Alexis D

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hartree-Fock calculations of nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartree-Fock calculations pertaining to the determination of nuclear binding energies throughout the whole chart of nuclides are reviewed. Such an approach is compared with other methods. Main techniques in use are shortly presented. Advantages and drawbacks of these calculations are also discussed with a special emphasis on the extrapolation towards nuclei far from the stability valley. Finally, a discussion of some selected results from light to superheavy nuclei, is given.

Quentin, P

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Signal probability calculations using partial functional manipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATIONS IV THE CUTTING ALGORITHM 14 V RESULTS 17 VI CONCLUSIONS . . REFERENCES APPENDIX A 32 35 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Characteristic table of all ISCAS combinational benchmarks II Number of ambiguous lines using the single best ordering... heuristics can be used to generate orderings, in a few cpu seconds [17]. These heuristics have a very low cost of generation, as compared to that of the best ordering. Iterative OPDD calculations with difFerent variable orderings were made, and the best...

Kodavarti, Ravishankar

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence Eric Falcon,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence ´Eric Falcon,1 S´ebastien Auma^itre,2 Claudio Falc gravity and capillary wave turbulence in a statistically stationary regime displays fluctuations much interactions transfer kinetic energy toward small scales where viscous dissipation takes place

Falcon, Eric

296

Self-field and magnetic-flux quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-field and quantized magnetic-flux are employed to generate the quantum numbers n, m, and l of atomic physics. Wave-particle duality is shown to be a natural outcome of having a particle and its self-field.

Paul Harris

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

4, 28772914, 2007 Air-sea O2 flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variability in air-sea O2 and CO2 fluxes and its impact on atmospheric potential oxygen (APO 2 1 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 2 Dept. of Marine Chemistry-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract A three dimensional, time-evolving field of atmospheric

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

298

Solar Neutrino Fluxes Using The Exponential S-Factor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently we propose an exponential form for the astrophysical S-factor. This form produces about 20% more solar 3He production through the 3He-3He reaction. In this note, we investigate the effects on the 7Be and 8B neutrino productions since the neutrino fluxes depend on the 3He abundance.

Kassim, Hasan Abu; Jalil, Ithnin Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement Glenn A. Spinelli, Emily R. Giambalvo, and Andrew T. Fisher 6.1 Introduction Sediments blanketing oceanic igneous basement rocks control the communication between fluid within the crust and the oceans. Seafloor sediments

Fisher, Andrew

300

Analytical model for flux saturation in sediment transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport of sediment by a fluid along the surface is responsible for dune formation, dust entrainment and for a rich diversity of patterns on the bottom of oceans, rivers, and planetary surfaces. Most previous models of sediment transport have focused on the equilibrium (or saturated) particle flux. However, the morphodynamics of sediment landscapes emerging due to surface transport of sediment is controlled by situations out-of-equilibrium. In particular, it is controlled by the saturation length characterizing the distance it takes for the particle flux to reach a new equilibrium after a change in flow conditions. The saturation of mass density of particles entrained into transport and the relaxation of particle and fluid velocities constitute the main relevant relaxation mechanisms leading to saturation of the sediment flux. Here we present a theoretical model for sediment transport which, for the first time, accounts for both these relaxation mechanisms and for the different types of sediment entrainment prevailing under different environmental conditions. Our analytical treatment allows us to derive a closed expression for the saturation length of sediment flux, which is general and can thus be applied under different physical conditions.

T. Pähtz; E. J. R. Parteli; J. F. Kok; H. J. Herrmann

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

302

CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

303

CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

304

High flux heat transfer in a target environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

McDonald, Kirk

305

Section 2: Solar Energy Flux Variations H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section 2: Solar Energy Flux Variations H. S. Hudson Space Sciences Laboratory, University discuss this subject. We might also note for completeness the neutrino energy loss from the solar core of California, Berkeley The chapters in this section of the monograph deal with the basic raw material of solar

Hudson, Hugh

306

ENTROPY PRODUCTION AND RADIATION ENTROPY FLUX OF THE EARTH SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the assumption of an isotropic gray-body Earth and isotropic reflecting TOA shortwave (SW) radiation. It is shown entropy flux can be improved by relaxing the commonly used Lambertian assumption. __________ NOTICE- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript

307

Confinement and the Short Type I' Flux Tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the recent world-sheet analysis of the quantum fluctuations of a short flux tube in type II string theory leads to a simple and precise description of a pair of stuck D0branes in an orientifold compactification of the type I' string theory. The existence of a stable type I' flux tube of sub-string-scale length is a consequence of the confinement of quantized flux associated with the scalar dualized ten-form background field strength *F_{10}, evidence for a -2brane in the BPS spectrum of M theory. Using heterotic-type I duality, we infer the existence of an M2brane of finite width O(\\sqrt{\\alpha'}) in M-theory, the strong coupling resolution of a spacetime singularity in the D=9 twisted and toroidally compactified E_8 x E_8 heterotic string. This phenomenon has a bosonic string analog in the existence of a stable short electric flux tube arising from the confinement of photons due to tachyon field dynamics. The appendix clarifies the appearance of nonperturbative states and enhanced gauge symmetry in toroidal compactifications of the type I' string. We account for all of the known disconnected components of the moduli space of theories with sixteen supercharges, in striking confirmation of heterotic-type I duality.

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

309

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave, Cambridge CB3 0EL, United Kingdom ivasconc@gmail.com Abstract: Existing methods for Green's function extraction give the Green's function from the correlation of field fluctuations recorded at those points

Snieder, Roel

310

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

311

Quantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with considerable spatial and temporal variability, resulting in a global annual total of 0.1 Tg C/yr. Air vegetation [Guenther et al., 1995], with the tropics responsible for most of the global annual total ($500 TgQuantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations Paul I. Palmer

Palmer, Paul

312

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal modelEstimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce

Mcdonough, William F.

313

Verification and validation of the maximum entropy method for reconstructing neutron flux, with MCNP5, Attila-7.1.0 and the GODIVA experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification and validation of reconstructed neutron flux based on the maximum entropy method is presented in this paper. The verification is carried out by comparing the neutron flux spectrum from the maximum entropy method with Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta (Attila). A spherical 100% 235U critical assembly is modeled as the test case to compare the three methods. The verification error range for the maximum entropy method is 15–21% where MCNP5 is taken to be the comparison standard. Attila relative error for the critical assembly is 20–35%. Validation is accomplished by comparing a neutron flux spectrum that is back calculated from foil activation measurements performed in the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). The error range of the reconstructed flux compared to GODIVA is 0–10%. The error range of the neutron flux spectrum from MCNP5 compared to GODIVA is 0–20% and the Attila error range compared to the GODIVA is 0–35%. The maximum entropy method is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multienergy group methods (Attila) and with respect to the GODIVA experiment.

Douglas S. Crawford; Tony Saad; Terry A. Ring

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

Buxbaum, Robert

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Solving three-body-breakup problems with outgoing-flux asymptotic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytically solvable three-body collision system (s wave) model is used to test two different theoretical methods. The first one is a configuration interaction expansion of the scattering wave function using a basis set of Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF) with purely outgoing flux (CISF), introduced recently in A. L. Frapicinni, J. M. Randazzo, G. Gasaneo, and F. D. Colavecchia [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43, 101001 (2010)]. The second one is a finite element method (FEM) calculation performed with a commercial code. Both methods are employed to analyze different ways of modeling the asymptotic behavior of the wave function in finite computational domains. The asymptotes can be simulated very accurately by choosing hyperspherical or rectangular contours with the FEM software. In contrast, the CISF method can be defined both in an infinite domain or within a confined region in space. We found that the hyperspherical (rectangular) FEM calculation and the infinite domain (confined) CISF evaluation are equivalent. Finally, we apply these models to the Temkin-Poet approach of hydrogen ionization.

Randazzo, J. M.; Frapiccini, A. L.; Colavecchia, F. D. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and CONICET, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Buezas, F.; Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur and CONICET, 8000 Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

LCEs for Naval Reactor Benchmark Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this engineering calculation is to document the MCNP4B2LV evaluations of Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs) performed as part of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology program. LCE evaluations documented in this report were performed for 22 different cases with varied design parameters. Some of these LCEs (10) are documented in existing references (Ref. 7.1 and 7.2), but were re-run for this calculation file using more neutron histories. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the MCNP4B2LV code system's ability to accurately calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for various critical configurations. These LCE evaluations support the development and validation of the neutronics methodology used for criticality analyses involving Naval reactor spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository.

W.J. Anderson

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Sequential Covariance Calculation for Exoplanet Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct imaging of exoplanets involves the extraction of very faint signals from highly noisy data sets, with noise that often exhibits significant spatial, spectral and temporal correlations. As a results, a large number of post-processing algorithms have been developed in order to optimally decorrelate the signal from the noise. In this paper, we explore four such closely related algorithms, all of which depend heavily on the calculation of covariances between large data sets of imaging data. We discuss the similarities and differences between these methods, and demonstrate how the use sequential calculation techniques can significantly improve their computational efficiencies.

Savransky, Dmitry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nonperturbative calculations in light-front QED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods of light-front quantization and Pauli-Villars regularization are applied to a nonperturbative calculation of the dressed-electron state in quantum electrodynamics. This is intended as a test of the methods in a gauge theory, as a precursor to possible methods for the nonperturbative solution of quantum chromodynamics. The electron state is truncated to include at most two photons and no positrons in the Fock basis, and the wave functions of the dressed state are used to compute the electrons's anomalous magnetic moment. A choice of regularization that preserves the chiral symmetry of the massless limit is critical for the success of the calculation.

Chabysheva, Sophia S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812 (United States)

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

Giant magnetoresistance calculated from first principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Layer Korringa Kohn Rostoker-Coherent Potential Approximation technique was used to calculate the low temperature Giant Magnetoresistance from first principles for Co{vert_bar}Cu and permalloy{vert_bar}Cu superlattices. Our calculations predict large giant magnetoresistance ratios for Co{vert_bar}Cu and extremely large ratios for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu for current perpendicular to the layers. Mechanisms such as spin-orbit coupling which mix spin channels are expected to greatly reduce the GMR effect for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu.

Butler, W.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacLaren, J.M. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zhang, X.G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 30 different (j{sup {prime}}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.

Wiringa, R.B.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Calculation on the Self-field of a Point Charge and the Unruh Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the context of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, Hacyan and Sarmiento defined the vacuum stress-energy tensor with respect to the accelerated observer. They calculated it for uniform acceleration and circular motion, and derived that the rotating observer perceives a flux. Mane related the flux to synchrotron radiation. In order to investigate the relation between the vacuum stress and bremsstrahlung, we estimate the stress-energy tensor of the electromagnetic field generated by a point charge, at the position of the charge. We use the retarded field as a self-field of the point charge. Therefore the tensor diverges if we evaluate it as it is. Hence we remove the divergent contributions by using the expansion of the tensor in powers of the distance from the point charge. Finally, we take an average for the angular dependence of the expansion. We calculate it for the case of uniform acceleration and circular motion, and it is found that the order of the vacuum stress multiplied by $\\pi\\alpha$ ($\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ is the fine structure constant) is equal to that of the self-stress. In the Appendix, we give another trial approach with a similar result.

T. Hirayama; T. Hara

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

A PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH ACommittee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalcula- tion of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,

Bryan, H.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Investigation of edge neutral flux on the ISX-B tokamak using a low-energy charge-exchange analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the emission of D/sup 0/ from the periphery of a tokamak plasma, a low-energy neutral particle spectrometer optimized for (16 < E < 500 eV) has been built and employed on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. The diagnostic utilizes a cesium vapor cell to form negative ions from the incident D/sup 0/ neutrals and a four-channel electrostatic analyzer to energy analyze the negative ions. The spectrometer was absolutely calibrated using D/sup 0/ beams formed by electron capture by positive ions in a gas cell and by photo-detachment of negative ions by a yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. For the observation region chosen on ISX-B (120/sup 0/ toroidally away from the limiter, near the gas puff), the neutral particle flux has a two-component nature. These data are well fit by two separate exponential distributions of equivalent temperatures 6 to 8 eV for particle energies below about 80 eV and 70 to 80 eV for particle energies above 80 eV. For ohmically heated discharges, the measured particle flux in the energy range 25 to 700 eV is approx. 2.5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/; the mean particle energy is approx. 70 eV, and the calculated flux at the wall is approx. 30 mW/cm/sup 2/. The major effect of neutral beam heating is to increase the particle flux in the 25- to 700-eV range by a factor of 3.

Thomas, D. M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Predicting low-frequency radio fluxes of known extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Close-in giant extrasolar planets (''Hot Jupiters'') are believed to be strong emitters in the decametric radio range. Aims. We present the expected characteristics of the low-frequency magnetospheric radio emission of all currently known extrasolar planets, including the maximum emission frequency and the expected radio flux. We also discuss the escape of exoplanetary radio emission from the vicinity of its source, which imposes additional constraints on detectability. Methods. We compare the different predictions obtained with all four existing analytical models for all currently known exoplanets. We also take care to use realistic values for all input parameters. Results. The four different models for planetary radio emission lead to very different results. The largest fluxes are found for the magnetic energy model, followed by the CME model and the kinetic energy model (for which our results are found to be much less optimistic than those of previous studies). The unipolar interaction model does ...

Grießmeier, J -M; Spreeuw, H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

Lung, Tyler B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roe, Phil [University of Michigan; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Superconducting and Spinning Non-Abelian Flux Tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find new non-Abelian flux tube solutions in a model of $N_f$ scalar fields in the fundamental representation of SU(N)xU(1) with $N \\leq N_f$ (the ``extended non-Abelian Higgs model''), and study their main properties. Among the solutions there are spinning strings as well as superconducting ones. The solutions exist only in a non trivial domain of the parameter space defined by the ratio between the SU(N) and U(1) coupling constants, the scalar self-interaction coupling constants, the magnetic fluxes (Abelian as well as non-Abelian) and the ``twist parameter'' which is a non-trivial relative phase of the Higgs fields.

Y. Brihaye; Y. Verbin

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

FLUXCAP: A flux-coupled ac/dc magnetizing device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on an instrument for applying ac and dc magnetic fields by capturing the flux from a rotating permanent magnet and projecting it between two adjustable pole pieces. This can be an alternative to standard electromagnets for experiments with small samples or in probe stations in which an applied magnetic field is needed locally, with advantages that include a compact form-factor, very low power requirements and dissipation as well as fast field sweep rates. This flux capture instrument (FLUXCAP) can produce fields from -400 to +400 mT, with field resolution less than 1 mT. It generates static magnetic fields as well as ramped fields, with ramping rates as high as 10 T/s. We demonstrate the use of this apparatus for studying the magnetotransport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a nanoscale device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance.

Gopman, Daniel B; Kent, Andrew D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Damien Allain Ingnieur recherche, dveloppement, calcul scientifique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 5 articles publiés. · Administration du parc de machines de calculs Linux. 01/2003­03/2003 Ingénieur données, la réparation de code source en C/C++, de téléchargement de patch et de conversion d'image pour

333

2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT April 2005 CEC-300 on net system power [Senate Bill 1305, (Sher), Chapter 796, Statute of 1997]1 . Net system power in California. Net system power plays a role in California's retail disclosure program, which requires every

334

FIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy losses have prevented the experimental demonstration of net fusion energy production fromFIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT M. KOTSCHENREUTHER, W. DORLAND, Q.P. LIU Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, United States of America G.W. HAMMETT, M

Hammett, Greg

335

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

Su, Xiao

336

New correlation calculates reliable paraffin solubilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new correlation based on boiling point has been developed which accurately calculates paraffin solubilities in water. The correlation provides reliable solubility values down to very low concentrations (parts per million and less), for which the API correlation is not accurate. It can be used for initial engineering studies, including those involving health, safety, and environmental considerations.

Yaws, C.L.; Pan, X. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Oberseminar -ICP Temperature Calculation for Tribological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and passing to third parties. 0 #12;Overview Where to calculate the heat: diesel injection pump First focus: journal bearings DS/ETI2 Vortrag 24.01.05.tex 24.01.05 c Robert Bosch GmbH reserves all rights even;Approach Some assessments: Heat diffuses 30µm in diesel in the time of one rotation of the shaft

Harting, Jens

338

THE PHOTOSPHERIC ENERGY AND HELICITY BUDGETS OF THE FLUX-INJECTION HYPOTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flux-injection hypothesis for driving coronal mass ejections (CMEs) requires the transport of substantial magnetic energy and helicity flux through the photosphere concomitant with the eruption. Under the magnetohydrodynamics approximation, these fluxes are produced by twisting magnetic field and/or flux emergence in the photosphere. A CME trajectory, observed 2000 September 12 and fitted with a flux-rope model, constrains energy and helicity budgets for testing the flux-injection hypothesis. Optimal velocity profiles for several driving scenarios are estimated by minimizing the photospheric plasma velocities for a cylindrically symmetric flux-rope magnetic field subject to the flux budgets required by the flux-rope model. Ideal flux injection, involving only flux emergence, requires hypersonic upflows in excess of the solar escape velocity 617 km s{sup -1} over an area of 6 x 10{sup 8} km{sup 2} to satisfy the energy and helicity budgets of the flux-rope model. These estimates are compared with magnetic field and Doppler measurements from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager on 2000 September 12 at the footpoints of the CME. The observed Doppler signatures are insufficient to account for the required energy and helicity budgets of the flux-injection hypothesis.

Schuck, P. W., E-mail: peter.schuck@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Room 250, Building 21 Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, Heliophysics Science Division, 8801 Greenbelt Rd., Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fusion Rules in Turbulent Systems with Flux Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion rules in turbulence specify the analytic structure of many-point correlation functions of the turbulent field when a group of coordinates coalesce. We show that the existence of flux equilibrium in fully developed turbulent systems combined with a direct cascade induces universal fusion rules. In certain examples these fusion rules suffice to compute the multiscaling exponents exactly, and in other examples they give rise to an infinite number of scaling relations that constrain enormously the structure of the allowed theory.

Victor L'vov; Itamar Procaccia

1995-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

340

Refined topological amplitudes in N=1 flux compactification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the implication of refined topological string amplitudes in the supersymmetric N=1 flux compactification. They generate higher derivative couplings among the vector multiplets and graviphoton with generically non-holomorphic moduli dependence. For a particular term, we can compute them by assuming the geometric engineering. We claim that the Dijkgraaf-Vafa large N matrix model with the beta-ensemble measure directly computes the higher derivative corrections to the supersymmetric effective action of the supersymmetric N=1$ gauge theory.

Yu Nakayama

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

Conversion feasibility studies for the Grenoble high flux reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility studies for conversion of the High Flux Reactor (RHF) at Grenoble France have been performed at the Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). The uranium densities required for conversion of the RHF to reduced enrichment fuels were computed to be 7.9 g/cm{sup 3} with 20% enrichment, 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 29% enrichment, and 2.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 45% enrichment. Thermal flux reductions at the peak in the heavy water reflector were computed to be 3% with 45% enriched fuel and 7% with 20% enriched fuel. In each case, the reactor's 44 day cycle length was preserved and no changes were made in the fuel element geometry. If the cladding thickness could be reduced from 0.38 mm to 0.30 mm, the required uranium density with 20% enrichment would be about 6.0 g/cm{sup 3} and the thermal flux reduction at the peak in the heavy water reflector would be about 7%. Significantly higher uranium densities are required in the RHF than in heavy water reactors with more conventional designs because the neutron spectrum is much harder in the RHF. Reduced enrichment fuels with the uranium densities required for use in the RHF are either not available or are not licensable at the present time. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Mo, S.C.; Matos, J.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

Shapiro, S.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Sparks, Dennis O [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes {Gamma}{sub p}10{sup 23} m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2}. An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to {approx}0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in He and 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

346

Constraints on the ionizing flux emitted by T Tauri stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of an analysis of ultraviolet observations of T Tauri Stars (TTS). By analysing emission measures taken from the literature we derive rates of ionizing photons from the chromospheres of 5 classical TTS in the range ~10^41-10^44 photons/s, although these values are subject to large uncertainties. We propose that the HeII/CIV line ratio can be used as a reddening-independent indicator of the hardness of the ultraviolet spectrum emitted by TTS. By studying this line ratio in a much larger sample of objects we find evidence for an ionizing flux which does not decrease, and may even increase, as TTS evolve. This implies that a significant fraction of the ionizing flux from TTS is not powered by the accretion of disc material onto the central object, and we discuss the significance of this result and its implications for models of disc evolution. The presence of a significant ionizing flux in the later stages of circumstellar disc evolution provides an important new constraint on disc photoevaporation models.

R. D. Alexander; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Method of Characteristics for 2-D Multigroup and Pointwise Transport Calculations in SCALE/CENTRM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE 6 computes problem-dependent multigroup (MG) cross sections through a combination of the conventional Bondarenko shielding-factor method and a deterministic pointwise (PW) transport calculation of the fine-structure spectra in the resolved resonance and thermal energy ranges. The PW calculation is performed by the CENTRM code using a 1-D cylindrical Wigner-Seitz model with the white boundary condition instead of the real rectangular cell shape to represent a lattice unit cell. The pointwise fluxes computed by CENTRM are not exact because a 1-D model is used for the transport calculation, which introduces discrepancies in the MG self-shielded cross sections, resulting in some deviation in the eigenvalue. In order to solve this problem, the method of characteristics (MOC) has been applied to enable the CENTRM PW transport calculation for a 2-D square pin cell. The computation results show that the new BONAMI/CENTRM-MOC procedure produces very precise self-shielded cross sections compared to MCNP reaction rates.

Kim, Kang Seog [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Calculations of Induced Activity in the ATLAS Experiment for Nuclear Waste Zoning.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extensive calculations were performed with the general activation formula using the fluxes of high-energy hadrons and low-energy neutrons previously obtained from simulations with the GCALOR code of the ATLAS detector. Three sets of proton cross-sections were used for hadrons energy above 20 MeV: (a) one set calculated with the YIELDX code (i.e., the Silberberg-Tsao formula of partial proton spallation cross-sections), (b) one set calculated with the Rudstam formula, and (c) the â??best-estimate' dataset which was a compilation of the available experimental and calculated data. In the energy region below 20 MeV, neutron activation cross-sections were taken from evaluated nuclear data files. The activity of each nuclide for a predefined operation scenario (i.e., number and duration of irradiation and shutdown cycles) was normalized to reference values taken from the European or Swiss legislations, to obtain an aggregate estimate of the radiological hazard comparable with a nuclear waste zoning definition cr...

Morev, M N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - average solar-cosmic-ray fluxes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solar-cosmic-ray fluxes Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: average solar-cosmic-ray fluxes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Annales...

350

Unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow and the vibration of nuclear reactor components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a twophase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe. Measured momentum flux data has been machine processed by standard random vibration techniques ...

Yih, Tien Sieh

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance CO2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

statistical regression of EC energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) against available energy (net radiation, less soil heat flux). While incomplete (R2 0.77 for 1:1 line),...

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-sea co2 flux Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

co2 flux Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-sea co2 flux Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Scott Miller Atmospheric Sciences Research...

353

Flux Motion in Anisotropic Type-Ii Superconductors Near H(c2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux motion in anisotropic type-II superconductors is studied in the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory. Expressions for the flux-flow resistivity tensor (including all the longitudinal and Hall elements) are obtained...

HAO, ZD; Hu, Chia-Ren.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An experimental investigation of critical heat flux in subcooled internal flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the critical heat flux for subcooled refrigerant-11 and refrigerant-113 flowing upward in a vertical cylindrical tube. Critical heat flux (CHF) values are determined for a range of tube...

Shatto, Donald Patrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne high flux reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: argonne high flux reactor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Summary: Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor...

357

Gas flux and carbonate occurrence at a shallow seep of thermogenic natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

010-0184-0 ORIGINAL Gas flux and carbonate occurrence atof thermogenic natural gas Franklin S. Kinnaman & Justine B.comprehensive survey of gas flux at Brian Seep yielded a

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Detailed images of deposits identified...

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial heat flux Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is provided by Elsevier for the Summary: pipe, such as working temperature, heat flux, inclination angle, working fluid fill ratio (defined... , heat flux 5.0 kwm2 -40 kwm2 ,...

360

A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines Sofiane turbines (MCTs). Due to the submarine environment, maintenance operations are very hard, very costly current turbine, axial flux permanent magnet generator, design, optimization. Nomenclature MCT = Marine

Brest, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

C.E. Sanders

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

Simonen, Fredric A.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

PUBLISHED VERSION Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography

364

The estimation of neutrino flux produced by $\\mathbf{pep}$ reactions in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The experimental result of the solar neutrino flux at one AU produced by the $p+p+e \\rightarrow d+\

B. F. Irgaziev; V. B. Belyaev; Jameel-Un Nabi

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

CFD calculations of S809 aerodynamic characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state, two-dimensional CFD calculations were made for the S809 laminar-flow, wind-turbine airfoil using the commercial code CFD-ACE. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data from the Delft University 1.8 m x 1.25 m low-turbulence wind tunnel. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to-turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-{epsilon} model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Precipitation chemistry: its behavior and its calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this paper are twofold. The first of these is to present a rational basis for examining the aggregate set of scavenging-calculation techniques, and for guiding the reader in his course toward choosing the most appropriate technique for his particular application. The second purpose of this paper is to present a somewhat brief survey of our current understanding of scavenging and precipitation chemistry. Both objectives will be implemented by a flowchart approach, which attempts to draw the various facets of scavenging calculations together and present a generalized approach to the problem in total. The mathematical level of this paper is restricted to the presentation of the equations necessary to provide the reader with a basic appreciation of the fundamental concepts involved. References to more detailed mathematical treatments are cited at appropriate juncture points, for the reader interested in more detailed pursuit.

Hales, J.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Calculation of source terms for NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The source terms estimated for NUREG-1150 are generally based on the Source Term Code Package (STCP), but the actual source term calculations used in computing risk are performed by much smaller codes which are specific to each plant. This was done because the method of estimating the uncertainty in risk for NUREG-1150 requires hundreds of source term calculations for each accident sequence. This is clearly impossible with a large, detailed code like the STCP. The small plant-specific codes are based on simple algorithms and utilize adjustable parameters. The values of the parameters appearing in these codes are derived from the available STCP results. To determine the uncertainty in the estimation of the source terms, these parameters were varied as specified by an expert review group. This method was used to account for the uncertainties in the STCP results and the uncertainties in phenomena not considered by the STCP.

Breeding, R.J.; Williams, D.C.; Murfin, W.B.; Amos, C.N.; Helton, J.C.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

How to Calculate Molecular Column Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is con...

Mangum, Jeffrey G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Spatial variability in soil heat flux at three Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2008 Accepted 18 April 2008 Keywords: Energy balance Soil heat flux Available energy Eddy variability in soil heat flux contributing to energy balance closure (EBC), by deploying a mobile energySpatial variability in soil heat flux at three Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems Changliang Shao a

Chen, Jiquan

370

Dynamics of Airfoil Separation Control Using Zero-Net Mass-Flux Forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Airfoil Separation Control Using Zero-Net Mass-Flux Forcing Reni Raju and Rajat Mittal, Gainesville, Florida 32611 DOI: 10.2514/1.37147 Zero-net mass-flux jet based control of flow separation over using zero-net mass-flux actuation can either control/delay boundary layer separation or lead to global

Mittal, Rajat

371

Simple Models of Zero-Net Mass-Flux Jets for Flow Control Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple Models of Zero-Net Mass-Flux Jets for Flow Control Simulations Reni Raju Dynaflow Inc for modeling the dynamics of zero- net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators, the computational costs associated-flow model. 1. INTRODUCTION Zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators or "synthetic jets" have potential

Mittal, Rajat

372

Concentrations and Snow-Atmosphere Fluxes of Reactive Nitrogen at Summit, Greenland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Concentrations and Snow-Atmosphere Fluxes of Reactive Nitrogen at Summit, Greenland J. W. Munger AT SUMMIT, GREENLAND 2 Abstract. Concentrations and fluxes of NOy (total reactive nitrogen), ozone concentra at Summit, Greenland. Median NOy concentrations declined from 947 ppt in May to 444 ppt by July. NOy fluxes

373

Mean and Variability of Air-Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sea heat Fluxes) Project: blended product planned activity: daily, 1º-grid, mid 1950's ­ present currently available: daily, 1º-grid, 1988-2003 #12;OAFlux (Objectively Analyzed Air-sea Heat Fluxes) For the GlobalMean and Variability of Air-Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean Lisan Yu Woods Hole Oceanographic

Yu, Lisan

374

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

375

Biophysical regulations of carbon fluxes of a steppe and a cultivated cropland in semiarid Inner Mongolia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biophysical regulations of carbon fluxes of a steppe and a cultivated cropland in semiarid Inner amount of grasslands in Inner Mongolia of Northern China has been converted to cropland. The conversions, such as energy and material fluxes, associated with the land conversions. The carbon fluxes, including net

Chen, Jiquan

376

Sensitivity of Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet variations to geothermal heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet variations to geothermal heat flux David Pollard a sheet to geothermal heat flux is investigated, using a coupled climate­ice sheet model with various prescribed values and patterns of geothermal heat flux. The sudden growth of major ice across the Eocene

377

Momentum Flux Budget across the AirSea Interface under Uniform and Tropical Cyclone Winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Momentum Flux Budget across the Air­Sea Interface under Uniform and Tropical Cyclone Winds YALIN into ocean currents is equal to the flux from air (wind stress). However, when the surface wave field grows the momentum flux budget across the air­sea interface under both uniform and idealized TC winds. The wave

Rhode Island, University of

378

Analytic calculation of properties of holographic superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate analytically properties of holographic superconductors in the probe limit. We analyze the range $1/2 3/2$. We also obtain the frequency dependence of the conductivity by solving analytically the wave equation of electromagnetic perturbations. We show that the real part of the DC conductivity behaves as $e^{-\\Delta_g /T}$ and estimate the gap $\\Delta_g$ analytically. Our results are in good agreement with numerical results.

George Siopsis; Jason Therrien

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

Nielsen, Steven O.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Calculations of Heat-Capacities of Adsorbates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 14, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1976 Calculations of heat capacities of adsorbates W. R. Lawrence and R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 2 September 1975) The phonon... the substrate has a perfect (100) surface and the adsorbate goes down as a solid monolayer in registry with the substrate. The quasiharmonic approximation was used, and the results for Ne adsorbates were considerably different from those obtained...

LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalystPathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search

383

Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Friedmann equation is derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the constant in the curvature term determined by matching with the present values of the Hubble parameter and energy density. General relativity is needed only for the luminosity distance, to describe how the curvature of space, determined by the energy density, can change the intensity of light by changing the area of the sphere to which the light has spread. Thirty-one problems are included.

Thomas F. Jordan

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Control Dewar Subcooler Heat Exchanger Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculations done to size the control dewar subcooler were done to obtain a sufficient subcooler size based on some conservative assumptions. The final subcooler design proposed in the design report will work even better because (1) It has more tubing length, and (2) will have already subcooled liquid at the inlet due to the transfer line design. The subcooler design described in the 'Design Report of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid for the Fermilab D0 Detector Upgrade' is the final design proposed. A short description of this design follows. The subcooler is constructed of 0.50-inch OD copper tubing with 1.0-inch diameter fins. It has ten and one half spirals at a 11.375-inch centerline diameter to provide 31 feet of tubing length. The liquid helium supply for the solenoid flows through the subcooler and then is expanded through a J-T valve. The subcooler spirals are immersed in the return two phase helium process stream. The return stream is directed over the finned tubing by an annulus created by a 10-inch pipe inside a 12-inch pipe. The transfer line from the refrigerator to the control dewar is constructed such that the liquid helium supply tube is in the refrigerator return stream, thereby subcooling the liquid up to the point where the u-tubes connect the transfer line to the control dewar. The subcooler within the control dewar will remove the heat picked up in the helium supply u-tube/bayonets. The attached subcooler/heat exchanger calculations were done neglecting any subcooling in the transfer line. All heat picked up in the transfer line from the refrigerator storage dewar to the control dewar is absorbed by the supply stream. The subcooler was sized such that the two phase supply fluid is subcooled at 1.7 atm pressure and when expanded through a JT valve to 1.45 atm pressure it is at a saturated liquid state. The calculations apply during steady state operation and at a flow rate of 16 g/s. The analysis of the heat exchanger was broken into two parts relating to the heat transfer mode taking place. The first part is considered the condensing part in which the helium supply stream is changed from two phase fluid to one phase liquid. The second part is the subcooling part where the liquid temperature is lowered, i.e.. subcooled. A summary of the calculations and results appears on the next page. The raw calculations follow the summary.

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

390

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Diffuse Gas Condensation Induced by Variations of the Ionizing Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The variation of an ionizing flux as a mechanism to stimulate the condensation of a diffuse gas is considered. To illustrate this effect, two situations are examined: one on the context of pregalactic conditions, and the other on the context of the actual interstellar medium. We focus our attention on flash-like variations; that is, during a ``short'' period of time the ionizing flux is enhanced in comparison to the pre- and post-flash values. In both cases the cause of the induced phase change is the same: the enhancement of the cooling rate by the increase in the electron density caused by the momentary increase of ionizing flux. After the passing of the flash, the cooling rate remains enhanced due to the ``inertia of the ionization''. In the first case (metal free gas) the cooling rate is enhanced due to the fact that the increase of the electron density makes possible the gas phase formation of H_2 by the creation of the intermediaries H^- and H^+_2. We show that after the passing of the photo-ionizing flash a cloud near thermo-chemical equilibrium at ~8000 K may be induced to increase its H_2 content by many orders of magnitude, causing a rapid decrease of its temperature to values as low as 100 K. In the second case (solar abundances gas) the dominant cooling mechanism of the warm neutral gas (the excitation of heavy ions by electron impacts) is proportional to the electron density. We show that, for the expected states of the warm interstellar gas, ionizing flashes may induce the phase transition from the warm to the cool phase. The results indicate that the mechanism of induced condensation studied here might play a relevant role in the gas evolution of the diffuse gas in both, the pregalactic and the actual interstellar medium conditions.

Antonio Parravano; Catherine Pech

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

Gantt, D.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Landau, Abrikosov, Hofstadter: Magnetic Flux Penetration in a Lattice Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic flux penetration in superconductors involves a rich variety of subtle phenomena, much of which is still poorly understood. Here these complexities are studied by formulating the Ginzburg-Landau equations as a lattice gauge theory. Their solutions are compared and contrasted with the (heuristic) Landau model of type I superconductivity, and the (perturbative) Abrikosov model for type II superconductors. Novelties arise as the continuum limit is approached, related to an effect discovered by Hofstadter. Various cautionary remarks pertinent to large-scale simulations are made.

David J. E. Callaway

1993-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Blue Springs, MO)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

Okamoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: okamoto@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Nagatani, Yukinori [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy conservation. In this program, the salt metal interactions were studies and the emissions at laboratory scale at OSU were monitored. The goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding, based on first principles, of the pollutant formation that occurs when the salts are used in furnaces. This information will be used to control process parameters so that emissions are consistently below the required levels. The information obtained in these experiments will be used in industrial furnaces at aluminum plants and which will help in optimizing the process.

Yogeshwar Sahai

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon| ArgonneHigh Flux

399

Cosmic Ray Sun Shadow in Soudan 2 Underground Muon Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. We report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a $3.3\\sigma$ shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

Soudan 2 Collaboration

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

400

Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascade SierraStatusGeothermalpower.jpgGas Flux Sampling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating theDepartmentSensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and

402

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

403

Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads During this webinar, Building America Research Team IBACOS...

404

The determination of neutron flux in the Texas A & M triga reactor during pulse and steady-state operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-state operation. Neutron flux measurement during a pulse presents an additional problem in that the flux levels vary during the rapid rise and fall in reactor power. The power level transient of the reactor was followed, using the current output of a boron-10... as a flux monitor only at low power. levels or neutron fluxes. The antimony flux monitor in the steady-state flux measurement showed the same type of increase in flux magni- tude as that of the pulse measurement. The high flux values at steady...

O'Donnell, John Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Multi-Fuel Boiler Efficiency Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to calculate the heat losses, a complete stack analysis is required. In 1956 when Buna's paper was published, stack analysis was done by Orsat analysis which gave the composition of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen. Nitrogen was assumed to make... up the difference. It was known that sulfur dioxide (if present) would be absorbed with carbon dioxide. Table 2 shows the components in the stack gas and the analysis of the combustion air. The total analysis of the stack gas is estimated by a...

Likins, M. R., Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

Lu, Jun-Qiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

SB EE Calculator | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards A(SAPC) WorkingB.ProgramCalculator

408

USAID Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH

409

CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR THE MOST REACTIVE DEGRADED CONFIGURATIONS OF THE FFTF SNF CODISPOSAL WP CONTAINING AN INTACT IDENT-69 CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this calculation is to perform additional degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed in a 5-Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the most reactive degraded configurations of the codisposal WP with an almost intact Ident-69 container (breached and flooded but otherwise non-degraded) containing intact FFTF SNF pins. The configurations have been identified in a previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the present evaluations include additional relevant information that was left out of the original calculations. The additional information describes the exact distribution of fissile material in each container (DOE 2002a). The effects of the changes that have been included in the baseline design of the codisposal WP (CRWMS M&O 2000) are also investigated. The calculation determines the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for selected degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. These calculations will support the demonstration of the technical viability of the design solution adopted for disposing of MOX (FFTF) spent nuclear fuel in the potential repository. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2002b) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310M2 in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-000010 REV 01 (BSC 2002).

D.R. Moscalu

2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Structural design criteria for high heat flux components.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high temperature design rules of the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC), are applied to first wall designs with high heat flux. The maximum coolant pressure and surface heat flux capabilities are shown to be determined not only by the mechanical properties of the first wall material but also by the details of the blanket design. In a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket, the maximum primary stress in the first wall is controlled by many of the geometrical parameters of the blanket, such as, first wall span, first wall curvature, first wall thickness, side wall thickness, and second wall thickness. The creep ratcheting lifetime of the first wall is also shown to be controlled by many of the same geometrical parameters as well as the coolant temperature. According to most high temperature design codes, the time-dependent primary membrane stress allowable are based on the average temperature (ignoring thermal stress). Such a procedure may sometimes be unconservative, particularly for embrittled first walls with large temperature gradients. The effect of secondary (thermal) stresses on the accumulation of creep deformation is illustrated with a vanadium alloy flat plate first wall design.

Majumdar, S.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Predicting low-frequency radio fluxes of known extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Close-in giant extrasolar planets (''Hot Jupiters'') are believed to be strong emitters in the decametric radio range. Aims. We present the expected characteristics of the low-frequency magnetospheric radio emission of all currently known extrasolar planets, including the maximum emission frequency and the expected radio flux. We also discuss the escape of exoplanetary radio emission from the vicinity of its source, which imposes additional constraints on detectability. Methods. We compare the different predictions obtained with all four existing analytical models for all currently known exoplanets. We also take care to use realistic values for all input parameters. Results. The four different models for planetary radio emission lead to very different results. The largest fluxes are found for the magnetic energy model, followed by the CME model and the kinetic energy model (for which our results are found to be much less optimistic than those of previous studies). The unipolar interaction model does not predict any observable emission for the present exoplanet census. We also give estimates for the planetary magnetic dipole moment of all currently known extrasolar planets, which will be useful for other studies. Conclusions. Our results show that observations of exoplanetary radio emission are feasible, but that the number of promising targets is not very high. The catalog of targets will be particularly useful for current and future radio observation campaigns (e.g. with the VLA, GMRT, UTR-2 and with LOFAR).

J. -M. Grießmeier; P. Zarka; H. Spreeuw

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

412

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for portable high-precision quantum sensors.

Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170?000?cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Three dimensional neutronics calculation comparison study for a fusion breeder with large channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tokamak reactor is characterized by a toroidal geometry with large ports and channels. The three dimensional calculation seems necessary for the prediction of the neutronics parameters of the calculation. People have been attempting to simulate the configuration by one dimensional model. Assuming that the neutronics parameters such as tritium breeding ratio depends almost only on the primary 14 MeV neutron number entering the blanket, the following approximate scheme was proposed: {Alpha} = {Sigma}W{sub i}{sm_bullet}{Alpha}{sub i}, where {Alpha} represents the total value of a parameter; {Alpha}{sub i} is a partial value contributed from the i`th part of the blanket and is calculated by a 1-D cylindrical model; W{sub i} is the fusion number entering the i`th part of the blanket through the first wall. This scheme seems reasonable for a pure fusion reactor with similar inboard and outboard blankets, since neutron flux angular distribution is strongly forward and the mutual influence between similar blankets is weak. A study on influence between inboard and outboard blankets showed a rather strong influence between blankets in a fusion breeder, where the partial blankets are quite different in neutronics characteristics. The explanation is that the neutron source from fission and n,2n reactions in the outboard blanket causes considerable neutron leakage through the inner surface when it faces an {open_quote}inferior{close_quote} inboard blanket.

Huang, J.H.; Xie, Z.Y.; You, C.L. [Southwestern Inst. of Physics, Chengdu (China)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

González, Matthias; Commerçon, Benoît; Masson, Jacques

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

Kohring, M.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION IN COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equation in cooling load calculations. The performance of nine different procedures (the four methods and

Michal Duška; Martin Barták; František Drkal; Jan Hensen

420

Radiation Damage Calculations for the FUBR and BEATRIX Irradiations of Lithium Compounds in EBR-II and FFTF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Breeder Reactor (FUBR) and Breeder Exchange Matrix (BEATRIX) experiments were cooperative efforts by members of the International Energy Agency to investigate the irradiation behavior of solid breeder materials for tritium production to support future fusion reactors. Lithium ceramic materials including Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with varying {sup 6}Li enrichments from 0 to 95% were irradiated in a series of experiments in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR II) and in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) over a period of about 10 years from 1982 to 1992. These experiments were characterized in terms of the nominal fast neutron fluences and measured {sup 6}Li burnup factors, as determined by either mass spectrometry or helium measurements. Radiation damage in these compounds is caused by both the {sup 6}Li-burnup reaction and by all other possible neutron reactions with the atoms in the compound materials. In this report, displacements per atom (dpa) values have been calculated for each type of material in each of the various irradiations that were conducted. Values up to 11% {sup 6}Li-burnup and 130 dpa are predicted for the longest irradiations. The dpa cross sections were calculated for each compound using the SPECOMP computer code. Details of the dpa calculations are presented in the report. Total dpa factors were determined with the SPECTER computer code by averaging the dpa cross sections over the measured or calculated neutron flux spectra for each series of irradiations. Using these new calculations, previously measured radiation damage effects in these lithium compounds can be compared or correlated with other irradiation data on the basis of the dpa factor as well as {sup 6}Li-burnup.

LR Greenwood

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

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421

MHD simulations of the magnetorotational instability in a shearing box with zero net flux. II. The effect of transport coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the influence of the choice of transport coefficients (viscosity and resistivity) on MHD turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in accretion disks. We follow the methodology described in paper I: we adopt an unstratified shearing box model and focus on the case where the net vertical magnetic flux threading the box vanishes. For the most part we use the finite difference code ZEUS, including explicit transport coefficients in the calculations. However, we also compare our results with those obtained using other algorithms (NIRVANA, the PENCIL code and a spectral code) to demonstrate both the convergence of our results and their independence of the numerical scheme. We find that small scale dissipation affects the saturated state of MHD turbulence. In agreement with recent similar numerical simulations done in the presence of a net vertical magnetic flux, we find that turbulent activity (measured by the rate of angular momentum transport) is an increasing function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm for all values of the Reynolds number Re that we investigated. We also found that turbulence disappears when the Prandtl number falls below a critical value Pm_c that is apparently a decreasing function of Re. For the limited region of parameter space that can be probed with current computational resources, we always obtained Pm_c>1. We conclude that the magnitudes of the transport coefficients are important in determining the properties of MHD turbulence in numerical simulations in the shearing box with zero net flux, at least for Reynolds numbers and magnetic Prandtl numbers that are such that transport is not dominated by numerical effects and thus can be probed using current computational resources.

S. Fromang; J. Papaloizou; G. Lesur; T. Heinemann

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Flux and Photon Spectral Index Distributions of Fermi-LAT Blazars and Contribution to the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a determination of the distributions of gamma-ray flux - the so called LogN-LogS relation - and photon spectral index for the 352 blazars detected with a greater than approximately seven sigma detection threshold and located above {+-} 20{sup o} Galactic latitude by the Large Area Telescope of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in its first year catalog. Because the flux detection threshold depends on the photon index, the observed raw distributions do not provide the true LogN-LogS counts or the true distribution of the photon index. We use the non-parametric methods developed by Efron and Petrosian to reconstruct the intrinsic distributions from the observed ones which account for the data truncations introduced by observational bias and includes the effects of the possible correlation among the two variables. We demonstrate the robustness of our procedures using a simulated data set of blazars and then apply these to the real data and find that for the population as a whole the intrinsic flux distribution can be represented by a broken power law of slopes -2.37 {+-} 0.13 and -1.70 {+-} 0.26, and the intrinsic photon index distribution can be represented by a Gaussian with mean 2.41 {+-} 0.13 and 1{sigma} width of 0.25 {+-} 0.03. We also find the intrinsic distributions for the sub-populations of BL Lac and FSRQs type blazars separately. We then calculate the contribution of blazars to the diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation to be 28% {+-} 19%.

Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

423

Efficient Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems, II: Quantum-Classical Comparison, Flux Network, and Robustness Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following the calculation of optimal energy transfer in thermal environment in our first paper (Wu et al., New J. Phys., 2010, 12, 105012), full quantum dynamics and leading-order `classical' hopping kinetics are compared in the seven-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. The difference between these two dynamic descriptions is due to higher-order quantum corrections. Two thermal bath models, classical white noise (the Haken-Strobl-Reineker model) and quantum Debye model, are considered. In the seven-site FMO model, we observe that higher-order corrections lead to negligible changes in the trapping time or in energy transfer efficiency around the optimal and physiological conditions (2% in the HSR model and 0.1% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). However, using the concept of integrated flux, we can identify significant differences in branching probabilities of the energy transfer network between hopping kinetics and quantum dynamics (26% in the HSR model and 32% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). This observation indicates that the quantum coherence can significantly change the distribution of energy transfer pathways in the flux network with the efficiency nearly the same. The quantum-classical comparison of the average trapping time with the removal of the bottleneck site, BChl 4, demonstrates the robustness of the efficient energy transfer by the mechanism of multi-site quantum coherence. To reconcile with the latest eight-site FMO model, the quantum-classical comparison with the flux network analysis is summarized in the appendix. The eight-site FMO model yields similar trapping time and network structure as the seven-site FMO model but leads to a more disperse distribution of energy transfer pathways.

Jianlan Wu; Fan Liu; Jian Ma; Robert J. Silbey; Jianshu Cao

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields. [STEALTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A code for calculating ultrasonic fields has been developed by revisng the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. This code may be used in a wide variety of situations in which a detailed knowledge of a propagating wave field is required. Among the potential used are: interpretation of pulse-echo or pitch-catch ultrasonic signals in complicated geometries; ultrasonic transducer modeling and characterization; optimization and evaluation of transducer design; optimization and reliability of inspection procedures; investigation of the response of different types of reflectors; flaw modeling; and general theoretical acoustics. The code is described, and its limitations and potential are discussed. A discussion of the required input and of the general procedures for running the code is presented. Three sample problems illustrate the input and the use of the code.

Johnson, J.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

LMR thermal hydraulics calculations in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of thermal hydraulics computer codes have been developed by various organizations in the US. These codes cover an extensive range of purposes from within-assembly-wise pin temperature calculations to plant wide transient analysis. The codes are used for static analysis, for analysis of protected anticipated transients, and for analysis of a wide range of unprotected transients for the more recent inherently safe LMR designs. Some of these codes are plant-specific codes with properties of a specific plant built into them. Other codes are more general and can be applied to a number of plants or designs. These codes, and the purposes for which they have been used, are described.

Dunn, F.E.; Malloy, D.J.; Mohr, D.

1987-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

Calculation of the scattering function of a multichannel scintillation detector used to record high-energy photon radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method of calculating the scattering function for a linear array of detectors. The authors consider the detector arrangement which in the best way utilizes the radiation flux but which to the greatest extent is affected by the scattering of radiation from one detector to another: optically separated scintillatorsf in the form of parallelepipeds are assumed to be closely packed in a linear array and directed toward the radiation source. In order to obtain estimates of the scattering function with an accuracy of 3-5% for x close to zero at radiation not less than 2 MeV, the leakage of secondary electrons are taken into account.

Zav'yalkin, F.M.; Osipov, S.P.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Waldmeier effect and the flux transport solar dynamo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We confirm that the evidence for the Waldmeier effect WE1 (the anti-correlation between rise times of sunspot cycles and their strengths) and the related effect WE2 (the correlation between rise rates of cycles and their strengths) is found in different kinds of sunspot data. We explore whether these effects can be explained theoretically on the basis of the flux transport dynamo models of sunspot cycles. Two sources of irregularities of sunspot cycles are included in our model: fluctuations in the poloidal field generation process and fluctuations in the meridional circulation. We find WE2 to be a robust result which is produced in different kinds of theoretical models for different sources of irregularities. The Waldmeier effect WE1, on the other hand, arises from fluctuations in the meridional circulation and is found only in the theoretical models with reasonably high turbulent diffusivity which ensures that the diffusion time is not more than a few years.

Karak, Bidya Binay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Trapped-flux internal-dipole superconducting motor/generator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new class of motor/generator (M/G) utilizes the magnetic flux trapping capability of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs). The rotor, consists of a cylindrical shell composed of HTS segments. These segments act as trapped-field magnets, magnetized in such a way that a dipole magnetic field is produced in the interior of the shell. A stator coil assembly is placed in the interior of the shell and current passing through the conductors of the coil produce a rotational torque, either as a hysteresis motor or as a synchronous motor. The coil may be either conventional, with copper wires and an iron core, or composed of superconductors and can be used to establish the trapped fields in the HTSs.

Hull, J. R.

1998-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Acoustic waves in random ensembles of magnetic fluxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To analyze the observational data and provide the appropriate diagnostic procedure for photospheric manifestation of solar oscillations it is necessary to take into account strong inhomogeneity of solar atmosphere with respect to distribution of magnetic fields. We study the collective phenomena in the propagation of acoustic waves and unsteady wave-packets through quite regions, sunspots and plages, including time-dependent response of these regions to solar oscillations, the energy transfer mechanisms, frequency shift effects and reradiation of the acoustic waves in higher layers of atmosphere. We show that the dynamics of differently magnetized regions, their dispersion properties, and their response to the propagation of acoustic waves are completely different. We describe the effects caused by the specific distribution and randomness of magnetic flux tubes, which can be observed and which can provide the tools for diagnostic goals.

Ryutova, M.P.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

431

High Flux Commercial Illumination Solution with Intelligent Controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0003241 for developing a high efficiency LED-based luminaire. A novel light engine module (two versions: standard and super), power supply and luminaire mechanical parts were designed and tested. At steady-state, the luminaire luminous flux is 3156 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy 97.4 LPW and CRI (Ra) 88 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3507K. When the luminaire is fitted with the super version of the light engine the efficacy reaches 130 LPW. In addition, the luminaire is provided with an intelligent control network capable of additional energy savings. The technology developed during the course of this project has been incorporated into a family of products. Recently, the first product in the family has been launched.

Camil Ghiu

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pyroprocessing of Fast Flux Test Facility Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electrorefined uranium products exceeded 99%.

B.R. Westphal; G.L. Fredrickson; G.G. Galbreth; D. Vaden; M.D. Elliott; J.C. Price; E.M. Honeyfield; M.N. Patterson; L. A. Wurth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Pyroprocessing of fast flux test facility nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electro-refined uranium products exceeded 99%. (authors)

Westphal, B.R.; Wurth, L.A.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Galbreth, G.G.; Vaden, D.; Elliott, M.D.; Price, J.C.; Honeyfield, E.M.; Patterson, M.N. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Fast Flux Test Facility built on safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

No other high-tech industry has grown as fast as the nuclear industry. The information available to the general public has not kept pace with the rapid growth of nuclear data---its growth has outpaced its media image and the safety of nuclear facilities has become a highly debated issue. This book is an attempt to bridge the gap between the high-tech information of the nuclear industry and its understanding by the general public. It explains the three levels of defense at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and why these levels provide an acceptable margin to protect the general public and on-site personnel, while achieving FFTF's mission to provide research and development for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Monte Carlo calculation of delayed gamma dose rate in complex geometry using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the delayed gamma dose rate problem formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed gamma transport equations take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the flux coupling step required in conventional calculations and makes it easier to handle complex, multidimensional problems, especially those that call for Monte Carlo calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method in complex geometry are illustrated by its application in the Monte Carlo solution of a practical design problem.

Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Characterizing Vertical Mass Flux Profiles in Aeolian Saltation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*) - 0.4133 (r^2=0.65). The values of beta ranged from 6.11 ? 17.83 for all the experiments. The Rouse profiles calculated using this approach predict very similar vertical distributions to the observed data and predicted 86% and 81% of the observed...

Farrell, Eugene

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects on the Gamma-Ray Burst Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reanalyze the prompt muon neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), at the example of the often used reference Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux, in terms of the particle physics involved. We first reproduce this reference flux treating synchrotron energy losses of the secondary pions explicitly. Then we include additional neutrino production modes, the neutrinos from muon decays, the magnetic field effects on all secondary species, and flavor mixing with the current parameter uncertainties. We demonstrate that the combination of these effects modifies the shape of the original Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux significantly, and changes the normalization by a factor of three to four. As a consequence, the gamma-ray burst search strategy of neutrino telescopes may be based on the wrong flux shape, and the constraints derived for the GRB neutrino flux, such as the baryonic loading, may in fact be already much stronger than anticipated.

Philipp Baerwald; Svenja Hümmer; Walter Winter

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

The power distribution and neutron fluence measurements and calculations in the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 research reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power density distribution in a reactor has significant influence on core structures and pressure vessel mechanical resistance, as well as on the physical characteristics of nuclear fuel. This quantity also has an effect on the leakage neutron and photon field. This issue has become of increasing importance, as it touches on actual questions of the VVER nuclear power plant life time extension. This paper shows the comparison of calculated and experimentally determined pin by pin power distributions. The calculation has been performed with deterministic and Monte Carlo approaches. This quantity is accompanied by the neutron and photon flux density calculation and measurements at different points of the light water zero-power (LR-0) research reactor mock-up core, reactor built-in component (core barrel), and reactor pressure vessel and model. The effect of the different data libraries used for calculation is discussed. (authors)

Kostal, M.; Juricek, V.; Rypar, V.; Svadlenkova, M. [Research Center Rez Ltd., 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Cvachovec, F. [Univ. of Defence, Kounicova 65, 662 10 Brno (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ab initio calculation of the Hoyle state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the hydrogen burning of stars heavier than our sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle [1] as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago [2,3], nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy. These lattice simulations provide insight into the structure of this unique state and new clues as to the amount of fine-tuning needed in nature for the production of carbon in stars.

Evgeny Epelbaum; Hermann Krebs; Dean Lee; Ulf-G. Meißner

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Variability of primary production and air-sea CO 2 flux in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from Global Dataand a profile-based climatology, J. Geophys. Res. , 109,The data sets and flux climatologies, NCAR Tech. Note, NCAR/

Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial flux machine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Michigan Technological University Collection: Engineering 55 A Millimeter-Scale Electric Generator Matthew K. Senesky and Seth R. Sanders Summary: be described as an axial flux...

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial flux permanent Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 37 A Millimeter-Scale Electric Generator Matthew K. Senesky and Seth R. Sanders Summary: be described as an axial flux...

448

Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

Holcomb, G.R.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - angular flux equation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 Summary: , steady-state axisymmetric angular momentum transport equation equates angular momentum flux through... -integrated torque, then the...

451

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeolian sediment flux Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aeolian sediment flux Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Aeolian sediment transport pathways and aerodynamics...

452

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Fluor Hanford Fast Flux Test Facility Recertification- October 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Fluor Hanford Fast Flux Test Facility is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

453

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Lujan Neutron Scattering...

454

High-Flux Stress Testing of Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study involved developing methods to expose transparent encapsulant materials to high (40 to 45 UV suns) optical fluxes of UV radiation to enable rapid evaluation of materials.

Kempe, M. D.; Kilkenny, M.; Moricone, T. J.; Zhang, J. Z.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goldberg, E.D. , 1976. Methane production and consumption inanaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature, 407 , 623-626.profiles indicate in situ methane flux from underlying gas

Berg, Richard D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative rn-222 flux Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with alternating critical current density R. G. Mints Summary: Self-generated flux in Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density R. G. Mints... -generated...

457

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

Duncan, R.V.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - active flux based Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 12 QUIET SUN MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORT: I. MUTUAL HELICITY FLUX B. T. Welsch 1 and D. W. Longcope...

459

Enhancing the precision and accuracy within and among AmeriFlux site measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for AmeriFlux QA/QC at Oregon State University. The major objective of this project is to contribute to the AmeriFlux network by continuing to build consistency in AmeriFlux measurements by addressing objectives stated in the AmeriFlux strategic plan and self evaluation, the North American Carbon Program, and the US Carbon Cycle Science Program. The project directly contributes to NACP and CCSP goals to establish an integrated, near-real time network of observations to inform climate change science.

Law, Bev

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

460

Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane flux from underlying gas hydrate. Geology , 24 (7),overlying the Blake Ridge gas hydrates. In Proceedings ofgas transport in shallow sediments of an accretionary complex, Southern Hydrate

Berg, Richard D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vls-pgm calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV and RPV cavity of the VVER-440 reacto rand located axially at the position of maximum power and at the position of the weld. Both of these methods (the effective source and the adjoint function) are briefly described in the present paper. The paper also describes their application to the solution of fast neutron fluence and detectors activities for the VVER-440 reactor. (authors)

Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING wpn10-14asep10-07aeecbg10-08a.pdf More...

464

TDHF fusion calculations for spherical+deformed systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a formalism to carry out TDHF calculations of fusion cross sections for spherical + deformed nuclei. The procedure incorporates the dynamic alignment of the deformed nucleus into the calculation of the fusion cross section. The alignment results from multiple E2/E4 Coulomb excitation of the ground state rotational band. Implications for TDHF fusion calculations are discussed. TDHF calculations are done in an unrestricted three-dimensional geometry using modern Skyrme force parametrizations.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming Nicholas R. Kirchner UI 2 Calculations with MATLAB Standard Calculations and Variables Matrices and Vectors 3 Graphing NRK;Matrices and Vectors, Definitions MATLAB is short for MATrix LABoratory. It was built for high-speed matrix

Weinberger, Hans

466

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing master calculation list  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This supporting document has been prepared to make the Master Calculation List readily retrievable. The list gives the status of the calculation (as-built, not used, applied, etc.), the calculation title, its originator, comments, and report number under which it was issued. Tank 241-C-106 has been included on the High Heat Load Watch List.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG Master of Science Thesis Carlo reactor physics criticality calculations. This is achieved by optimising the number of neutron for more efficient Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations, giving results with errors that can

Haviland, David

468

Entropy Calculations and the Third Law of Thermodynamics Chemistry 223  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entropy Calculations and the Third Law of Thermodynamics Chemistry 223 1. Entropy Calculations I We heat of fusion, sublimation, or vaporization) is added to the system, with no resulting change, 2014 #12;Entropy Calculations and the Third Law -2- Chemistry 223 STiT f = T0 Ti CP,i(T, P, N) T d

Ronis, David M.

469

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and human pulmonary deposition calculations for Nuclear Site 201, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determined the plutonium-aerosol fluxes from the soil to quantify (1) the extent of potential human exposure by deep-lung retention of alpha-emitting particles; (2) the source term should there be any significant, long-term, transport of plutonium aerosols; and (3) the resuspension factor and rate so that, for the first time at any nuclear site, one may calculate how long it will take for wind erosion to carry away a significant amount of the contaminated soil. High-volume air samplers and cascade impactors were used to characterize the plutonium aerosols. Meteorological flux-profile methods were used to calculate dust and plutonium aerosol emission rates. A floorless wind tunnel (10-m long) was used to examine resuspension under steady-state, high wind speed. The resuspension factor was two orders of magnitude lower than the other comparable sites at NTS and elsewhere, and the average resuspension rate of 5.3 x 10/sup -8//d was also very low, so that the half-time for resuspension by wind erosion was about 36,000 y.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LENR, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M. [NECP Laboratory, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., Xi'an Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge of the amount and distribution of radiogenic heating in the mantle is crucial for understanding the dynamics of the Earth, including its thermal evolution, the style and planform of mantle convection, and the energetics of the core. Although the flux of heat from the surface of the planet is robustly estimated, the contributions of radiogenic heating and secular cooling remain poorly defined. Constraining the amount of heat-producing elements in the Earth will provide clues to understanding nebula condensation and planetary formation processes in early Solar System. Mantle radioactivity supplies power for mantle convection and plate tectonics, but estimates of mantle radiogenic heat production vary by a factor of more than 20. Recent experimental results demonstrate the potential for direct assessment of mantle radioactivity through observations of geoneutrinos, which are emitted by naturally occurring radionuclides. Predictions of the geoneutrino signal from the mantle exist for several established estimates of mantle composition. Here we present novel analyses, illustrating surface variations of the mantle geoneutrino signal for models of the deep mantle structure, including those based on seismic tomography. These variations have measurable differences for some models, allowing new and meaningful constraints on the dynamics of the planet. An ocean based geoneutrino detector deployed at several strategic locations will be able to discriminate between competing compositional models of the bulk silicate Earth.

Ond?ej Šrámek; William F. McDonough; Edwin S. Kite; Vedran Leki?; Steve Dye; Shijie Zhong

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

475

Knot energy in unstretching ergodic magnetic flux tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently Titov et al [ApJ \\textbf{693},(2009) and ApJ (2007)] have made use of a covariant model to investigate magnetic reconnection of astrophysical plasmas. Earlier R Ricca [Phys Rev A (1991)] has used another covariant formalism, to investigated vortex filaments and solitons. This formalism, called Ricci rotation coefficients (RRC), is applied here, to the Chui and Moffatt [PRSA (1995)] knotted magnetic flux tube (MFT) Riemann metric in the case of vanishing stretch. It is shown that, the vanishing of some components of the (RRC) leads to unstretching knotted tubes. Computing of magnetic knot energy in terms of the RCC, shows that, uniform, unstretching and constant cross-section tubes leads to a marginal dynamo action over magnetic surfaces. Recent investigation on the role of stretching in plasma dynamo action showed that in diffusive media [Phys Plasma \\textbf{14} (2008)], unstretching unknotted tubes would not support fast dynamo action. This result was generalized here to much more general knotted MF...

de Andrade, Garcia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Multistage axial-flux PM machine for wheel direct drive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of direct-drive wheel motors must comply with diameter restriction due to housing the motor in a wheel rim and allow the achievement of very high torque density and overload capability. Slotless axial-flux permanent magnet machines (AFPMs) prove to be the best candidate for application in electric vehicles as direct-drive wheel motors, as in comparison with conventional machines they allow designs with higher compactness, lightness and efficiency. The paper presents a newly conceived AFPM which has a multistage structure and a water-cooled ironless stator. In the proposed new topology of the machine the space formerly occupied by the toroidal core becomes a water duct, which removes heat directly from the interior surface of the stator winding. The high efficiency of the machine cooling arrangement allows long-term 100% overload operation and great reduction of the machine weight. The multistage structure of the machine is suited to overcome the restriction on the machine diameter and meet the torque required at the wheel shaft. The paper gives guidelines for the design of a multistage AFPM with water-cooled ironless stator, and describes characteristics of a two-stage prototype machine rated 215 N{center_dot}m, 1,100 r/min.

Caricchi, F.; Crescimbini, F.; Mezzetti, F.; Santini, E. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza (Italy). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza (Italy). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy flux of Alfven waves in weakly ionized plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overshooting convective motions in the solar photosphere are frequently proposed as the source for the excitation of Alfv\\'en waves. However, the photosphere is a) very weakly ionized, and, b) the dynamics of the plasma particles in this region is heavily influenced by the plasma-neutral collisions. The purpose of this work is to check the consequences of these two facts on the above scenario and their effects on the electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the ions and electrons in the photosphere are both un-magnetized; their collision frequency with neutrals is much larger than the gyro-frequency. This implies that eventual Alfv\\'en-type electromagnetic perturbations must involve the neutrals as well. This has the following serious consequences: i) in the presence of perturbations, the whole fluid (plasma + neutrals) moves; ii) the Alfv\\'en velocity includes the total (plasma + neutrals) density and is thus considerably smaller compared to the collision-less case; iii) the perturbed velocity of a unit volume, which now includes both plasma and neutrals, becomes much smaller compared to the ideal (collision-less) case; and iv) the corresponding wave energy flux for the given parameters becomes much smaller compared to the ideal case.

J. Vranjes; S. Poedts; B. P. Pandey; B. De Pontieu

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation of surface flux adjustments made to the initial NCEP re-analysis-1 products. During the state estimation the boundary current regions, they are consistent with known large-scale deficiencies in the NCEP products

480

Quasi-local energy-momentum and energy flux at null infinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The null infinity limit of the gravitational energy-momentum and energy flux determined by the covariant Hamiltonian quasi-local expressions is evaluated using the NP spin coefficients. The reference contribution is considered by three different embedding approaches. All of them give the expected Bondi energy and energy flux.

Xiaoning Wu; Chiang-Mei Chen; James M. Nester

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves S waves. Our results show that the contributions to the total energy flux from these additional terms as well as non- linearity. The partitioning of the incident internal wave energy over the course

Fringer, Oliver B.

482

Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk December 2002. [1] Soils constitute the largest terrestrial source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed

483

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate simulating reflectors (BSRs) imply the potential existence of gas hydrates offshore southwestern Taiwan that the fluxes are very high in offshore southwestern Taiwan. The depths of the SMI are different at sites GH6

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

484

Flux tubes as the origin of Net Circular Polarization in Sunspot Penumbrae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ a 3-dimensional magnetohydrostatic model of a horizontal flux tube, embedded in a magnetic surrounding atmosphere, to successfully reproduce the azimuthal and center-to-limb variations of the Net Circular Polarization observed in sunspot penumbrae. This success is partly due to the realistic modeling of the interaction between the flux tube and the surrounding magnetic field.

J. M. Borrero; L. R. Bellot Rubio; D. A. N. Mueller

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

485

Dipole trapped spheromak in a prolate flux conserver M. R. Brown,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dipole trapped spheromak in a prolate flux conserver M. R. Brown,a C. D. Cothran, J. Fung, M. Chang reports the observation and characterization of a spheromak formed in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. The spheromak is studied in a prolate tilt unstable 0.4 m diameter, 0.6 m length copper flux conserver in SSX

Brown, Michael R.

486

Energy flux as a tool in locating tsunami secondary Kowalik Zygmunt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy flux as a tool in locating tsunami secondary sources Kowalik Zygmunt Institute Marine waves. Using these tsunami events we demonstrate that sudden changes caused by higher energy pulses in the intermittent tsunami wave trains can be assessed by energy fluxes. Therefore, to delineate the regions

Kowalik, Zygmunt

487

From sedimentary records to sediment budgets: Multiple approaches to catchment sediment flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From sedimentary records to sediment budgets: Multiple approaches to catchment sediment flux.M., Germany Abstract This paper reviews the traditional approach to sediment budget studies in geomorphology sensing (LiDAR), geophysics and sediment-based dating techniques for flux rate estimation. The precision

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

488

Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators: Karen Humes of quantifying the magnitude, timing, distribution and coupling of carbon and water fluxes in mountainous forestlands. This includes one segment of the continuum of carbon and water flow from the "forest to the sea

Walden, Von P.

489

Slag Metal Reactions in Binary CaF2-Metal Oxide Welding Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Slag Metal Reactions in Binary CaF2-Metal Oxide Welding Fluxes Some otherwise chemically stable fluxes may decompose into suboxides in the presence of welding arcs, thereby providing higher levels of 0 2 in weld metal than those oxides which do not form suboxides ABSTRACT. The stability of metal

Eagar, Thomas W.

490

Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P1-030 Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium) and thick (~500 m) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied. For Ne plasmas, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation are consistent

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory