National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for visible irradiance atmospheric

  1. Copper smelters and atmospheric visibility in the southwest, seasonal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nochumson, D.H.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    Seasonal results from a study which evaluated the effects of sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/) emitted from 11 copper smelters on atmospheric visibility in 14 national parks and wilderness areas are presented. In addition two alternative strategies for controlling SO/sub x/ are compared. They are supplementary control systems (SCS) and continuous emission controls (CEC). The objective of each strategy is not to improve visibility but is to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). SCS is a strategy that has been used by almost all of the 11 copper smelters. It reduces SO/sub x/ emissions during adverse meteorological conditions through production curtailment. SCS has not been successful at eliminating NAAQS violations. The emissions used for the SCS control alternative are based upon actual copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions and operating conditions during 1979. The year 1979 was selected because it is fairly representative of production levels, though highly variable, from 1965 to 1978 and copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions during the latter half of the 1970s. In more recent years, the copper industry has been economically depressed and copper smelter production and SO/sub x/ emissions have been lower. The southwestern states are implementing the CEC strategy to control SO/sub x/ emissions from copper smelters as part of their state implementation plans. For production levels typical of 1979, the CEC regulations would require about a two-thirds reduction in SO/sub x/ emissions from that allowed under SCS. The study estimates the effect of this reduction upon the improvement of visibility in southwestern national parks and wilderness areas.

  2. About Effective? Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important...

  3. Photodegradation of aniline by goethite doped with boron under ultraviolet and visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guanglong; Liao, Shuijiao; College of Basic Sciences of Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 ; Zhu, Duanwei; Liu, Linghua; Cheng, Dongsheng; Zhou, Huaidong

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Goethite modified by boron was prepared by sol-gel method in presence of boron acid at the low temperature. {yields} B-goethite has slight red shift in the band gap transition beside their stronger light absorption compared with pristine goethite. {yields} The results showed that semiconductor photocatalytic reaction mechanism should exist in the process of aniline degradation with goethite and B-goethite as photocatalyst. -- Abstract: In the present study, goethite and goethite doped with boron (B-goethite) were employed to detect the presence or absence of semiconductor photocatalytic reaction mechanism in the reaction systems. B-goethite was prepared by sol-gel method in presence of boron acid in order to improve its photocatalystic efficiency under the ultraviolet and visible light irradiation. The optical properties of goethite and B-goethite were characterized by ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra and the result indicated that B-goethite has slight red shift in the band gap transition beside their stronger light absorption compared with pristine goethite. Degradation of aniline was investigated in presence of goethite and B-goethite in aqueous solution. It was found that the B-goethite photocatalyst exhibited enhanced ultraviolet and visible light photocatalytic activity in degradation of aniline compared with the pristine goethite. The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of B-goethite was discussed.

  4. Surface effects and phase stability in metal oxides nanoparticles under visible irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, Pier Carlo Carbonaro, C. M. Corpino, R. Chiriu, D. Stagi, L.

    2014-10-21

    The light induced phase transformation between stable phases of metal oxides nanoparticles is analyzed. The surrounding atmosphere as well as the defect density at the surface play a fundamental role. It has been found that in oxygen poor chamber atmosphere the phase transformation is favored, while the phase transition cannot be achieved if the defects at the surface are properly passivated. The phase transition is activated by intragap irradiation, able to activate the F- center at the surface connected to oxygen vacancies, and promoting the activation of the surface and the nucleation of neighboring crystallites. The phase transition was studied in Titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and in Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}): Maghemite is subjected to a phase transformation to α−Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite), Anatase nanoparticles converts to Rutile. The general mechanism of the phase transition and, more in general, the possibility to optically control the surface activity of metal oxides is discussed.

  5. Synthesis and magnetic characterization of magnetite obtained by monowavelength visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yulong [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science, Taiyuan 030001 (China) [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017 (China); Wei, Yu, E-mail: weiyu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Sun, Yuhan, E-mail: yhsun@sxicc.ac.cn [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science, Taiyuan 030001 (China)] [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Wang, Jing [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017 (China)] [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite was synthesized under monowavelength LED irradiation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different wavelength irradiations led to distinctive characteristics of magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle sizes of magnetite were controlled by different irradiation wavelengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wavelength affects the magnetic characteristics of magnetite. -- Abstract: Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by aerial oxidation Fe{sup II}EDTA solution under different monowavelength light-emitting diode (LED) lamps irradiation at room temperature. The results of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show the formation of magnetite nanoparticle further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and the difference in crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are nearly spherical in shape based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Average crystallite sizes of magnetite can be controlled by different irradiation light wavelengths from XRD and TEM: 50.1, 41.2, and 20.3 nm for red, green, and blue light irradiation, respectively. The magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples were investigated. Saturation magnetization values of magnetic nanoparticles were 70.1 (sample M-625), 65.3 (sample M-525), and 58.2 (sample M-460) emu/g, respectively.

  6. Calibrating Pyrgeometers Outdoors Independent from the Reference Value of the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hickey, J. R.; Grobner, J.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.

    2006-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for the calibration of thermopile pyrgeometers in the absence of a reference for measurement of atmospheric longwave irradiance. This is referred to as the incoming longwave irradiance in this article. The method is based on an indoor calibration using a low-temperature blackbody source to obtain the calibration coefficients that determine the pyrgeometer's radiation characteristics. From these coefficients the outgoing irradiance of the pyrgeometer can be calculated. The pyrgeometer is then installed outdoors on an aluminum plate that is connected to a circulating temperature bath. By adjusting the temperature bath to the approximate value of the effective sky temperature, the pyrgeometer's body temperature is lowered changing the pyrgeometer's thermopile output. If the incoming longwave irradiance is stable, the slope of the outgoing irradiance versus the pyrgeometer's thermopile output is the outdoor net irradiance responsivity (RSnet), independent of the absolute value of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. The indoor calibration coefficients and the outdoor RSnet are then used in the pyrgeometer equation to calculate the incoming longwave irradiance. To evaluate this method, the calculated irradiance using the derived coefficients was compared to the irradiance measured using a pyrgeometer with direct traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This is maintained at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Switzerland. Based on results from four pyrgeometers calibrations, this method suggests measurement agreement with the WISG to within +/- 3 W/m2 for all sky conditions.

  7. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

    2012-08-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

  8. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

  9. Preparation of aluminum foil-supported nano-sized ZnO thin films and its photocatalytic degradation to phenol under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Feng . E-mail: cefpeng@scut.edu.cn; Wang Hongjuan; Yu Hao; Chen Shuihui

    2006-11-09

    The zinc oxide thin films on aluminum foil have been successfully prepared by sol-gel method with methyl glycol as solvent. The film was characterized by means of XRD, TG, UV-vis, SEM and AFM, which show that the ZnO/Al film is formed by a layer of ZnO nano-sized particles with average diameter of 52.2 nm. Under the initial concentration of 20 mg/L phenol solution (500 mL) and visible light irradiation time of 3 h, more than 40% of the initial phenol was totally mineralized using two pieces of ZnO/Al thin film as photocatalyst with an efficient irradiation area of 400 cm{sup 2}. It is a promising visible light responded photocatalyst for the activation of O{sub 2} at room temperature to degrade organic pollutants.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O composite catalyst with enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Biyu; Zhang, Shengsen; Yang, Siyuan; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Shanqing; Peng, Feng

    2014-08-15

    The prepared g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O composite exhibited the enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation due to the stronger ability in separation of electronhole pairs, which was proven by the transient photocurrent measurement. - Highlights: The coupled Cu{sub 2}O with g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} of narrow-band-gap semiconductor has been designed. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O is prepared via an alcohol-aqueous based on chemical precipitation method. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O exhibits the enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible-light. The enhanced photocatalytic activity is proven by the transient photocurrent test. A mechanism for the visible-light-driven photocatalysis of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O is revealed. - Abstract: To overcome the drawback of low photocatalytic efficiency brought by electronhole pairs recombination and narrow photo-response range, a novel g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O composite photocatalyst was designed and prepared successfully. Compared with bare Cu{sub 2}O and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O composite exhibited significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity for acid orange-II (AO-II) degradation under visible light irradiation. Based on energy band positions, the mechanism of enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity was proposed.

  11. Synthesis of ZnO nanorodnanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia; Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-03-15

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by solgel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorodnanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorodnanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 C against time. Highlights: Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  12. Copper(II) imidazolate frameworks as highly efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingtian; Luo, Deliang; Yang, Chengju; He, Shiman; Chen, Shangchao; Lin, Jiawei; Zhu, Li; Li, Xin

    2013-07-15

    Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were synthesized by a hydrothermal (or precipitation) reaction. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultravioletvisible spectroscopy (UVvis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG). Meanwhile, the photocatalytic activities of the samples for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol and degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation were also investigated. The results show that the as-prepared samples exhibit better photocatalytic activities for the reduction of carbon dioxide into methanol with water and degradation of MB under visible light irradiation. The orthorhombic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap of 2.49 eV and green (G) color has the best photocatalytic activity for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol, 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h, which is about three times as large as that of monoclinic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap 2.70 eV and blue (J) color. The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts fitted well to the apparent first-order rate equation and the apparent rate constants for the degradation of MB over G, J and P (with pink color) are 0.0038, 0.0013 and 0.0016 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The synergistic effects of smallest band gap and orthorhombic crystal phase structure are the critical factors for the better photocatalytic activities of G. Moreover, three frameworks can also be stable up to 250 C. The investigation of Cu-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks maybe provide a design strategy for a new class of photocatalysts applied in degradation of contaminations, reduction of CO{sub 2}, and even water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen under visible light. - Graphical abstract: Carbon dioxide was reduced into methanol with water over copper(II) imidazolate frameworks under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: Three copper

  13. Response of the upper atmosphere to variations in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial far ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of nitric oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the atmosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  14. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreto, H. F. R. E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F. E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F. E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugo, A. B. E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Gaia, R.

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  15. The effects of hydrothermal temperature on the photocatalytic performance of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} for hydrogen generation under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Fei; Zhu, Rongshu; Song, Kelin; Niu, Minli; Ouyang, Feng; Cao, Gang

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} (120, 140, 160, 180, and 200 °C) was prepared. • The activities splitting water to hydrogen under visible light were evaluated. • The activity achieved the best when hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C. • The activity order is related to the surface morphology and surface defects. - Abstract: A series of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photocatalysts were successfully synthesized using the hydrothermal method with different hydrothermal temperatures (120, 140, 160, 180, and 200 °C) and characterized by various analysis techniques, such as UV–vis, XRD, SEM, BET and PL. The results indicated that these photocatalysts had a similar band gap. The hydrothermal temperature had a huge influence on the properties of the photocatalysts such as the BET surface area, the total pore volume, the average pore diameter, the defects and the morphology. The photocatalytic activities of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} were evaluated based on photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible-light irradiation. The activity order is attributed to the coefficient of the surface morphology and the surface defects. The hydrogen production efficiency achieved the best when the hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C. On the basis of the characterization of the catalysts, the effects of the hydrothermal temperature on the photocatalytic activity of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} were discussed.

  16. Titania Composites with 2 D Transition Metal Carbides as Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production under Visible-Light Irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Peng, Rui; Hood, Zachary D.; Naguib, Michael; Adhikari, Shiba P.; Wu, Zili

    2016-05-24

    In the MXenes family of two-dimensional transition-metal carbides there were successful demonstrations of co-catalysts with rutile TiO2 for visible-light-induced solar hydrogen production from water splitting. The physicochemical properties of Ti3C2Tx MXene coupled with TiO2 were investigated by a variety of characterization techniques. The effect of the Ti3C2Tx loading on the photocatalytic performance of the TiO2/Ti3C2Tx composites was elucidated. Moreover, with an optimized Ti3C2Tx content of 5 wt %, the TiO2/Ti3C2Tx composite shows a 400 % enhancement in the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction compared with that of pure rutile TiO2. We also expanded our exploration to other MXenes (Nb2CTx and Ti2CTx)more » as co-catalysts coupled with TiO2, and these materials also exhibited enhanced hydrogen production. These results manifest the generality of MXenes as effective co-catalysts for solar hydrogen production.« less

  17. Effect of long duration UV irradiation on diamondlike carbon surfaces in the presence of a hydrocarbon gaseous atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedo, A.; Wahlstroem, P.; Scheer, J. A.; Wurz, P.; Tulej, M.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the effect of long duration UV irradiation (up to 2905 min) of flight quality diamondlike carbon charge state conversion surfaces for application in space research in the presence of a hydrocarbon atmosphere were done. An isopropanol atmosphere was used for simulating the hydrocarbon gaseous environment for an instrument on a satellite in space. Charge state conversion surfaces are used in neutral particle sensing instruments where neutral atoms have to be ionized prior to the analysis. A narrow-band (126{+-}5 nm) discharge lamp and a broad-band deuterium lamp (112-370 nm) were used as sources of UV radiation. The UV irradiation of a surface results in the desorption of some volatiles present on the surface and the decomposition of others. Desorption of volatiles, mostly water, is observed for both UV sources. The decomposition of the hydrocarbons and the subsequent build-up of a hydrocarbonaceous layer is only observed for the broad-band UV lamp, which is more representative for the space environment. Unfortunately, the hydrocarbonaceous layer cannot be removed thermally, i.e., it is permanent, and causes a degradation of the performance of the charge state conversion surfaces. With the present measurements we can quantify the UV influence at which the degradation of the conversion surfaces becomes noticeable.

  18. The role of adsorption in decomposition of dyes on TiO{sub 2} and N-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts under UV and visible light irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bubacz, Kamila; Tryba, Beata; Morawski, Antoni W.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Influence of pH and zeta potential of TiO{sub 2} based photocatalysts on the adsorption and degradation of MB under UV irradiation. Highlights: ? Adsorption of dyes on TiO{sub 2}/N accelerated their decomposition under visible light. ? pH of solution and the PZC of the TiO{sub 2} surface influence the adsorption of dyes. ? Under UV irradiation oxidation of pollutants with OH radicals is the most powerful. -- Abstract: Photoactivities of TiO{sub 2} based photocatalysts towards dyes decomposition was studied by consider their adsorption abilities. It was proved that zeta potential and PZC (point zero charge) of photocatalyst surface as well as pH of solution strongly influenced adsorption of tested dyes, Methylene Blue (MB) and Reactive Red 198 (RR198). These dyes underwent the photocatalytic decomposition by two ways, OH radicals attack and direct oxidation with photogenerated holes. The latter one is more efficient in case of better contact of pollutant with the photocatalysts surface and is dominant under visible light irradiation, where insignificant amount of OH radicals is formed. The former one is powerful under UV irradiation and is a key factor in decomposition of dyes regardless of their adsorption abilities.

  19. ARM - Measurement - Visibility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsVisibility ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Visibility The greatest horizontal distance in a given direction at which it is just possible to see and identify with the unaided eye (a) in the daytime, a prominent dark object against the sky at the horizon, and (b) at night, a moderately intense light source. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is

  20. Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-05-15

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy, Stark broadening, and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However, the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

  1. Photocatalytic splitting of water under visible-light irradiation over the NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Xinde; Ye Hongqi; Liu Hui; Ma Chenxia; Zhao Zhi

    2010-01-15

    A new visible-light-response photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration crystallized in a cubic system with the space group Fd3m was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} showed high photocatalytic activities for H{sub 2} evolution from pure water under visible light irradiation (lambda>400 nm). Changes in the photocatalytic activity with the calcination temperature of Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} and the amount of NiOx loaded indicated that the combination of highly crystallized Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} and a high dispersion of NiOx particles led to high photocatalytic activity. The high photocatalytic performance of NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} supported the existing view that the photocatalytic activity correlated with the lattice distortion. Density functional theory calculation indicated that strong dispersion from the hybridized In 5s 5p orbitals at the bottom of the conduction band was responsible for the high activity of photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: A new visible-light-response photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration was developed. DFT calculation indicated that strong dispersion from the hybridized In 5s 5p orbitals was responsible for the high photocatalytic activity.

  2. Solids irradiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Marvin E.; Pierce, Jim D.; Whitfield, Willis J.

    1979-01-01

    A novel facility for irradiation of solids embodying pathogens wherein solids are conveyed through an irradiation chamber in individual containers of an endless conveyor.

  3. Apparatus and method to control atmospheric water vapor composition and concentration during dynamic cooling of biological tissues in conjunction with laser irradiations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. Samuel; Milner, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling of skin surface with millisecond cryogen spurts is an effective method for establishing a controlled temperature distribution in tissue and protecting the epidermis from nonspecific thermal injury during laser mediated dermatological procedures. Control of humidity level, spraying distance and cryogen boiling point is material to the resulting surface temperature. Decreasing the ambient humidity level results in less ice formation on the skin surface without altering the surface temperature during the cryogen spurt. For a particular delivery nozzle, increasing the spraying distance to 85 millimeters lowers the surface temperature. The methodology comprises establishing a controlled humidity level in the theater of operation of the irradiation site of the biological tissues before and/or during the cryogenic spray cooling of the biological tissue. At cold temperatures calibration was achieved by mounting a thermistor on a thermoelectric cooler. The thermal electric cooler was cooled from from 20.degree. C. to about -20.degree. C. while measuring its infrared emission.

  4. Atmospheric Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced by ...

  5. Tissue irradiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  6. Irradiation subassembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  7. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr.; Shannon, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  8. Visibility of a spacetime singularity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-02-15

    We investigate here the causal structure of spacetime in the vicinity of a spacetime singularity. The particle and energy emission from such ultradense regions forming in gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud is governed by the nature of nonspacelike paths near the same. These trajectories are examined to show that if a null geodesic comes out from the singularity, then there exist families of future-directed nonspacelike curves which also necessarily escape from the same. The existence of such families is crucial to the physical visibility of the singularity. We do not assume any underlying symmetries for the spacetime, and earlier considerations on the nature of causal trajectories emerging from a naked singularity are generalized and clarified.

  9. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  10. Synthesis of visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst via surface organic modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Dong Xu Yao Hou Bo; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

    2007-05-15

    A visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the surface organic modification to sol-gel-hydrothermal synthesized TiO{sub 2}. The surface hydroxyls of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles reacted with the active -NCO groups of tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) to form a surface complex that was confirmed by the FT-IR and XPS spectra. Due to the existence of surface complex, the absorption edge of as-prepared TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} nanomaterial extended well into visible region. Compared with unmodified TiO{sub 2} and Degussa P25, the TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts showed higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the surface organic modification to TiO{sub 2}. The surface hydroxyls of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles reacted with the active -NCO groups of tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) to form a surface complex. The TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts showed higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation.

  11. Visible Light Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Technologies Place: Albuquerque, New York Zip: 87113 Product: New Mexico-based LED lighting fixture maker. References: Visible Light Solar Technologies1 This article is...

  12. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is

  13. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is

  14. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which spectrally resolved radiant energy at wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above

  15. Facile preparation of sphere-like copper ferrite nanostructures and their enhanced visible-light-induced photocatalytic conversion of benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yu; Wu, Yanbo; Xu, Hongfeng; Fu, Jie; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Spinel CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres were successfully synthesized via a facile method. CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres showed high photocatalytic activity toward benzene. Ethyl acetate, carboxylic acid and aldehyde were the intermediate products. - Abstract: Spinel copper ferrite nanospheres with diameters of about 116 nm were synthesized in high yield via a facile solvothermal route. The prepared nanospheres had cubic spinel structure and exhibited good size uniformity and regularity. The band-gap energy of CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres was calculated to be about 1.69 eV, indicating their potential visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity. The dramatically enhanced photocatalytic activity of the CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres was evaluated via the photocatalytic conversion of benzene under Xe lamp irradiation. By using the in situ FTIR technique, ethyl acetate, carboxylic acid and aldehyde could be regarded as the intermediate products, and CO{sub 2} was produced as the final product during the reaction process. This study provided new insight into the design and preparation of functional nanomaterials with sphere structure in high yield, and the as-grown architectures demonstrated an excellent ability to remove organic pollutants in the atmosphere.

  16. Comparison of Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements J. J. Michalsky and J. Schlemmer Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York B. C. Bush, S. Leitner, D. Marsden, and F. P. J. Valero Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California R. Dolce and A. Los Kipp & Zonen, Inc. Bohemia, New York and Delft The Netherlands E. G. Dutton Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

  17. PROCESS FOR CONTINUOUSLY SEPARATING IRRADIATION PRODUCTS OF THORIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hatch, L.P.; Miles, F.T.; Sheehan, T.V.; Wiswall, R.H.; Heus, R.J.

    1959-07-01

    A method is presented for separating uranium-233 and protactinium from thorium-232 containing compositions which comprises irradiating finely divided particles of said thorium with a neutron flux to form uranium-233 and protactinium, heating the neutron-irradiated composition in a fluorine and hydrogen atmosphere to form volatile fluorides of uranium and protactinium and thereafter separating said volatile fluorides from the thorium.

  18. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore » and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  19. Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania for visible-light driven phenol degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin; Highfield, James; Pehkonen, Simo O.; Pichat, Pierre; Chen, Zhong

    2012-12-15

    A dual-phase material (DP-160) comprising hydrated titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) and anatase (TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized in a low-temperature one-pot process in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) as the N-source. The unique structure exhibits strong visible light absorption. The chromophore is linked to Ti-N bonds derived from both surface sensitization and sub-surface (bulk) doping. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) and textural studies by N{sub 2} physisorption, the composite exists as mesoporous particles with a grain size of {approx}20 nm and mean pore diameter of 3.5 nm, responsible for the high surface area ({approx}180 m{sup 2}/g). DP-160 demonstrated photocatalytic activity in the degradation of phenol under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The activity of the composite was further enhanced by a small addition (0.001 M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which also gave rise to some visible light activity in the control samples. This effect is believed to be associated with the surface peroxo-titanate complex. GC-MS analyses showed that the intermediate products of phenol degradation induced by visible light irradiation of DP-160 did not differ from those obtained by UV (band-gap) irradiation of TiO{sub 2}. The overall performance of the composite is attributed to efficient excitation via inter-band states (due to N-doping), surface sensitization, improved adsorptive properties of aromatic compounds due to the N-carbonaceous overlayer, and the presence of heterojunctions that are known to promote directional charge transfer in other mixed-phase titanias like Degussa P25. - graphical abstract: Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania photocatalyst showing extended visible light absorption and efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature one-pot synthesis of visible light active dual phase photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dual phase consists of

  20. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; et al

    2000-06-13

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radical heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of gas puff imaging to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence.

  1. Efficient visible-light photocatalytic performance of cuprous oxide porous nanosheet arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xianghua; Wang, Jianqiang; Cao, Minhua

    2015-10-15

    Graphical Abstract: We demonstrated a facile and efficient process for fabricating Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh. Benefiting from the 1D array structure and porous structure, the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O sample exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh were synthesized via the facile and efficient process. • The Cu{sub 2}O sample exhibited the 1D array structure and porous nanosheet morphology. • The as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: One-dimensional nanostructures are of great interest for a wide range of applications. In this work, we demonstrated the fabrication of visible-light-responsive Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays. The synthesis involved the growth of Cu(OH){sub 2} nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh by solution-based corrosion and thermal transformation of Cu(OH){sub 2} nanosheet to Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheets on Cu mesh. Benefiting from the one dimensional array structure and porous structure, the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation.

  2. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in broad bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4{mu}m, that comes directly from the Sun without being scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere, passes through a unit area perpendicular to the direction from the Sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments

  3. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4{mu}m, that comes directly from the Sun without being scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere, passes through a unit area perpendicular to the direction from the Sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments

  4. Visible light driven photocatalysis and antibacterial activity of AgVO{sub 3} and Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Anamika; Dutta, Dimple P.; Ballal, A.; Tyagi, A.K.; Fulekar, M.H.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Ag/AgVO{sub 3} and pure AgVO{sub 3} nanowires synthesized by sonochemical process. Characterization done using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET analysis. Visible light degradation of RhB by Ag/AgVO{sub 3} within 45 min. Antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} demonstrated. - Abstract: Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires and AgVO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized in aqueous media via a facile sonochemical route. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, BrunauerEmmettTeller surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersion X-ray spectrum analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results revealed that inert atmosphere promotes the formation of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires. The photocatalytic studies revealed that the Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires exhibited complete photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B within 45 min under visible light irradiation. The antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires was tested against Escherechia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum growth inhibitory concentration value was found to be 50 and 10 folds lower than for the antibiotic ciprofloxacin for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. The antibacterial properties of the ?-AgVO{sub 3} nanorods prove that in case of the Ag dispersed Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires, the enhanced antibacterial action is also due to contribution from the AgVO{sub 3} support.

  5. Synthesis of supported silver nano-spheres on zinc oxide nanorods for visible light photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saoud, Khaled; Alsoubaihi, Rola; Bensalah, Nasr; Bora, Tanujjal; Bertino, Massimo; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: Synthesis of supported Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods using open vessel microwave reactor. Use of the Ag/ZnO NPs as an efficient visible light photocatalyst. Complete degradation of methylene blue in 1 h with 0.5 g/L Ag/ZnO NPs. - Abstract: We report the synthesis of silver (Ag) nano-spheres (NS) supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods through two step mechanism, using open vessel microwave reactor. Direct reduction of ZnO from zinc nitrates was followed by deposition precipitation of the silver on the ZnO nanorods. The supported Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were then characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, photoluminescence and UVvis spectroscopy. The visible light photocatalytic activity of Ag/ZnO system was investigated using a test contaminant, methylene blue (MB). Almost complete removal of MB in about 60 min for doses higher than 0.5 g/L of the Ag/ZnO photocatalyst was achieved. This significant improvement in the photocatalytic efficiency of Ag/ZnO photocatalyst under visible light irradiation can be attributed to the presence of Ag nanoparticles on the ZnO nanoparticles which greatly enhances absorption in the visible range of solar spectrum enabled by surface plasmon resonance effect from Ag nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis of novel photocatalytic RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites with visible light photoactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jianfeng; Li, Xianfu; Huang, Weishi; Li, Na; Ye, Mingxin

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: A facile method for preparation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets supported indium vanadate (InVO{sub 4}) photocatalysts is reported. The visible light response and adsorption ability of RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites is greatly improved, which can effectively remove methyl orange and Cr (VI) from water. - Highlights: Supramolecular photocatalyst of RGO-InVO{sub 4} was achieved. Reduction of GO and preparation of RGO-InVO{sub 4} was simultaneous. The prepared RGO-InVO{sub 4} shows high photocatalytic activity and adsorption capacity under visible light. In situ growth of uniform InVO{sub 4} particles on RGO sheets is facile and efficient - Abstract: In this study, we report a facile method for preparation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets supported indium vanadate (InVO{sub 4}) photocatalysts. A wide range of characterization techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Thermogravimetric analysis and Transmission electron microscopy were applied to characterize the obtained composites. The results indicated that the composites consist of uniformly dispersed InVO{sub 4} nanocrystals on RGO sheets. Visible light responses of RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites are greatly improved as compared with the bulk InVO{sub 4}. The as-prepared RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites can effectively remove methyl orange and Cr (VI) from water under visible light irradiation, which can be used as novel photocatalysts for environmental protection.

  7. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P.; Crawford, Mary H.

    1996-01-01

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  8. Visible light photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol using vanadium and nitrogen co-doped TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, R.; Kothari, D. C.; Patel, N.; Miotello, A.

    2013-02-05

    Vanadium and Nitrogen were codoped in TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst by Sol-gel method to utilize visible light more efficiently for photocatalytic reactions. A noticeable shift of absorption edge to visible light region was obtained for the singly-doped namely V-TiO{sub 2}, N-TiO{sub 2} and codoped V-N-TiO{sub 2} samples in comparison with undoped TiO{sub 2}, with smallest band gap obtained with codoped-TiO{sub 2}. The photocatalytic activities for all TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were tested by 4-chlorophenol (organic pollutant) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that codoped TiO{sub 2} exhibits the best photocatalytic activity, which could be attributed to the synergistic effect produced by V and N dopants.

  9. INFERENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS CLOUDS IN AN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; De Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole; Zsom, Andras; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Heng, Kevin; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Gillon, Michael; Barclay, Thomas; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-10-20

    We present new visible and infrared observations of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b to determine its atmospheric properties. Our analysis allows us to (1) refine Kepler-7b's relatively large geometric albedo of Ag = 0.35 0.02, (2) place upper limits on Kepler-7b thermal emission that remains undetected in both Spitzer bandpasses and (3) report a westward shift in the Kepler optical phase curve. We argue that Kepler-7b's visible flux cannot be due to thermal emission or Rayleigh scattering from H{sub 2} molecules. We therefore conclude that high altitude, optically reflective clouds located west from the substellar point are present in its atmosphere. We find that a silicate-based cloud composition is a possible candidate. Kepler-7b exhibits several properties that may make it particularly amenable to cloud formation in its upper atmosphere. These include a hot deep atmosphere that avoids a cloud cold trap, very low surface gravity to suppress cloud sedimentation, and a planetary equilibrium temperature in a range that allows for silicate clouds to potentially form in the visible atmosphere probed by Kepler. Our analysis does not only present evidence of optically thick clouds on Kepler-7b but also yields the first map of clouds in an exoplanet atmosphere.

  10. Ag@AgHPW as a plasmonic catalyst for visible-light photocatalytic degradation of environmentally harmful organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Cao, Minhua Li, Na; Su, Shuangyue; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Jiangqiang; Li, Xianghua; Hu, Changwen

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW12O40 (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant, which show a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: A new visible-light driven photocatalyst Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was designed. The photocatalyst shows a high activity for the degradation of methyl blue. The high activity can be ascribed to the synergy of photoexcited AgHPW and Ag. - Abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant. They show strong absorption in the visible region because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag NPs. This plasmonic photocatalyst shows a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which could be attributed to the highly synergy of photoexcited Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (AgHPW) and plasmon-excited Ag NPs and the confinement effects at interfaces between polyoxometalates (POMs) and silver. POM anions have redox ability and high photocatalytic activity, whereas Ag NPs could effectively accelerate the separation of electrons and holes, both of which contribute to their high activity.

  11. Light extinction in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laulainen, N.

    1992-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

  12. Erbium and nitrogen co-doped SrTiO{sub 3} with highly visible light photocatalytic activity and stability by solvothermal synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jing; Wei, Yuelin; Huang, Yunfang; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Xuanqing; Sun, Zhixian; Wu, Ying; Tao, Xinling; Fan, Leqing; Wu, Jihuai

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Er/N co-doped SrTiO{sub 3} was prepared by a solvothermal process at low temperature. • The co-doping induces the band gap narrowing and prominent absorbance in visible light region. • The samples show excellent catalytic activity and stability under visible light irradiation. - Abstract: Erbium–nitrogen co-doped SrTiO{sub 3} photocatalysts have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The resulting samples were analyzed by FE-SEM, XRD, BET-surface area and UV–vis. The UV–vis absorption spectra of these powders indicated that erbium–nitrogen co-doped SrTiO{sub 3} possessed stronger absorption bands in the visible light region in comparison with that of pure SrTiO{sub 3}. The occurrence of the erbium–nitrogen co-doped cubic SrTiO{sub 3} induced the higher photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under irradiation by ultraviolet light and visible light, respectively, being superior to that of pure SrTiO{sub 3} and commercial TiO{sub 2} (P-25) powders. In addition, the Er–N co-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (initial molar ratios of Sr/Er/N = 1:0.015:0.1, designated as S5) sample showed the best photocatalytic activity with the degradation rate as high as 98% after 30 min under the visible light irradiation. After five cycles, the photocatalytic activity of the S5 catalyst showed no significant decrease, which indicated that the photocatalysts were stable under visible light irradiation.

  13. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Crawford, M.H.

    1996-09-17

    The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1{lambda}) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%. 5 figs.

  14. MASSIVE LEAKAGE IRRADIATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wigner, E.P.; Szilard, L.; Christy, R.F.; Friedman, F.L.

    1961-05-30

    An irradiator designed to utilize the neutrons that leak out of a reactor around its periphery is described. It avoids wasting neutron energy and reduces interference with the core flux to a minimum. This is done by surrounding all or most of the core with removable segments of the material to be irradiated within a matrix of reflecting material.

  15. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  16. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  17. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  18. Visible light activated photocatalytic behaviour of rare earth modified commercial TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobaldi, D.M.; Seabra, M.P.; Labrincha, J.A.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: RE gave more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface. RE gave the modified and fired samples a high specific surface area. Photocatalytic activity was assessed in gassolid phase under visible-light exposure. Thermal treated RE-TiO{sub 2}s showed a superior visible-light photocatalytic activity. La-TiO{sub 2} was the best performing photocatalyst. - Abstract: A commercial TiO{sub 2} nanopowder, Degussa P25, was modified with several rare earth (RE) elements in order to extend its photocatalytic activity into the visible range. The mixtures were prepared via solid-state reaction of the precursor oxides, and thermally treated at high temperature (900 and 1000 C), with the aim of investigating the photocatalytic activity of the thermally treated samples. This thermal treatment was chosen for a prospective application as a surface layer in materials that need to be processed at high temperatures. The photocatalytic activity (PCA) of the samples was assessed in gassolid phase monitoring the degradation of isopropanol (IPA) under visible-light irradiation. Results showed that the addition of the REs lanthanum, europium and yttrium to TiO{sub 2} greatly improved its photocatalytic activity, despite the thermal treatment, because of the presence of more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface, together with a higher specific surface area (SSA) of the modified and thermally treated samples, with regard to the unmodified and thermally treated Degussa P25. The samples doped with La, Eu and Y all had excellent PCA under visible-light irradiation, even higher than the untreated Degussa P25 reference sample, despite their thermal treatment at 900 C, with lanthanum producing the best results (i.e. the La-, Eu- and Y-TiO{sub 2} samples, thermally treated at 900 C, had, respectively, a PCA equal to 26, 27 and 18 ppm h{sup ?1} in terms of acetone formation versus 15 ppm h{sup ?1} for the 900 C

  19. Electrically Injected UV-Visible Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Changyi; Li, Qiming; Liu, Sheng; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting -Shan; Chow, Weng W.; Leung, Benjamin; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    There is strong interest in minimizing the volume of lasers to enable ultracompact, low-power, coherent light sources. Nanowires represent an ideal candidate for such nanolasers as stand-alone optical cavities and gain media, and optically pumped nanowire lasing has been demonstrated in several semiconductor systems. Electrically injected nanowire lasers are needed to realize actual working devices but have been elusive due to limitations of current methods to address the requirement for nanowire device heterostructures with high material quality, controlled doping and geometry, low optical loss, and efficient carrier injection. In this project we proposed to demonstrate electrically injected single nanowire lasers emitting in the important UV to visible wavelengths. Our approach to simultaneously address these challenges is based on high quality III-nitride nanowire device heterostructures with precisely controlled geometries and strong gain and mode confinement to minimize lasing thresholds, enabled by a unique top-down nanowire fabrication technique.

  20. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olbright, Gregory R.; Jewell, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  1. Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, ... Introduction Generally, radiation codes for general circulation models (GCMs) include, ...

  2. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium ... The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the ...

  3. A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  4. ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Atmospheric Heat Budget shows where the atmospheric heat energy comes from and where it goes. Practically all this energy ultimately comes from the sun in the form of the ...

  5. Template synthesis of Ag/AgCl microrods and their efficient visible light-driven photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hua; Xiao, Liang; Huang, Jianhua

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: Preparation ofAg/AgCl microrods by reaction of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} microrods with NaCl solution. Generation of metallic Ag is induced by the ambient light in the synthesis process. Ag/AgCl shows excellent visible light-driven photodegradation of organic dyes. - Abstract: Ag/AgCl microrods, aggregated by nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 100 nm to 2 ?m, were prepared by an ion-exchange reaction at 80 C between Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} template and NaCl solution. The existence of metallic Ag species was confirmed by XRD, DRS and XPS measurements. Ag/AgCl microrods showed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B and methylene blue under visible light irradiation. The degradation rate constants of rhodamine B and methylene blue are 0.176 and 0.114 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The cycling photodegradation experiments suggest that Ag/AgCl microds could be employed as stable plasmonic photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes under visible light irradiation.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan -

  7. A proposed visible FEL Facility at Boeing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    A 1-kW average power, visible wavelength FEL is described, based on a 120-MeV, 0.1. A macropulse average current linac operating at a duty factor of 0. 6% and having average beam power of 70 kW. The accelerator will employ a demonstrated photoinjector, 18-MeV, 433-MHz linac as an injector, followed by a 1300-MHz longitudinal phase space {open_quotes} linearizer,{close_quotes} a magnetic buncher chicane, and seven 1300-MHz, pulsed traveling wave linac sections. The magnets used to transport the beam from the linac to the FEL centerline, the 5-m THUNDER wiggler, and the optical resonator will be reclaimed from previous FEL demonstration experiments. We expect to attain pulse lengths of 7 ps for 3.5 nC, with minimal distortion of the pulse profile and normalized rms emittance of 7.5 {+-} 2.5 {pi} mm-mr. FELEX projects a laser conversion efficiency of 4.3 %, yielding average output of 3 kW.

  8. Interpretation of solar irradiance monitor measurements through analysis of 3D MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscuoli, S.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2014-06-20

    Measurements from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment mission indicate that solar spectral irradiance at visible and IR wavelengths varies in counter phase with the solar activity cycle. The sign of these variations is not reproduced by most of the irradiance reconstruction techniques based on variations of surface magnetism employed so far, and it is not yet clear whether SIM calibration procedures need to be improved or if instead new physical mechanisms must be invoked to explain such variations. We employ three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere to investigate the dependence of solar radiance in SIM visible and IR spectral ranges on variations of the filling factor of surface magnetic fields. We find that the contribution of magnetic features to solar radiance is strongly dependent on the location on the disk of the features, which are negative close to disk center and positive toward the limb. If features are homogeneously distributed over a region around the equator (activity belt), then their contribution to irradiance is positive with respect to the contribution of HD snapshots, but decreases with the increase of their magnetic flux for average magnetic flux larger than 50 G in at least two of the visible and IR spectral bands monitored by SIM. Under the assumption that the 50 G snapshots are representative of quiet-Sun regions, we thus find that the Spectral Irradiance can be in counter-phase with the solar magnetic activity cycle.

  9. DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

    1959-12-22

    A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

  10. UV-visible spectroscopy of macrocyclic alkyl, nitrosyl and halide complexes of cobalt and rhodium. Experiment and calculation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hull, Emily A.; West, Aaron C.; Pestovsky, Oleg; Kristian, Kathleen E.; Ellern, Arkady; Dunne, James F.; Carraher, Jack M.; Bakac, Andreja; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, transition metal complexes (NH3)5CoX2+ (X = CH3, Cl) and L(H2O)MX2+, where M = Rh or Co, X = CH3, NO, or Cl, and L is a macrocyclic N4 ligand are examined by both experiment and computation to better understand their electronic spectra and associated photochemistry. Specifically, irradiation into weak visible bands of nitrosyl and alkyl complexes (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L(H2O)MIIIX2+ (X = CH3 or NO) leads to photohomolysis that generates the divalent metal complex and ˙CH3 or ˙NO, respectively. On the other hand, when X = halide or NO2, visible light photolysis leads to dissociation of X– and/ormore » cis/trans isomerization. Computations show that visible bands for alkyl and nitrosyl complexes involve transitions from M–X bonding orbitals and/or metal d orbitals to M–X antibonding orbitals. In contrast, complexes with X = Cl or NO2 exhibit only d–d bands in the visible, so that homolytic cleavage of the M–X bond requires UV photolysis. UV-Vis spectra are not significantly dependent on the structure of the equatorial ligands, as shown by similar spectral features for (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L1(H2O)CoCH32+.« less

  11. STM Images of Atomic-Scale Carbon Nanotube Defects Produced by Ar+ Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osvath, Z.; Vertesy, G.; Tapaszto, L.; Weber, F.; Horvath, Z.E.; Gyulai, J.; Biro, L.P.

    2005-09-27

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed on graphite (HOPG) substrate were irradiated with Ar+ ions of 30 keV, using a low-dose of D 5x1011 ions/cm2. The irradiated samples were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ambient conditions. Atomic resolution STM images reveal individual nanotube defects, which appear as hillocks of 1-2 angstroms in height, due to the locally changed electronic structure. After annealing at 450 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere, the irradiated MWCNTs were investigated again by STM. The effect of the heat treatment on the irradiation-induced nanotube defects is also discussed.

  12. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana; Pop, Nicolina; Calinoiu, Delia

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  13. Supercritical-assistant liquid crystal template approach to synthesize mesoporous titania/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites with high visible-light driven photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chen; Li, Youji Xu, Peng; Li, Ming; Huo, Pingxiang

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: We investigate the influence of mesoporous titania content upon the visible-light driven photocatalytic performance of MPT/MWCNTs in phenol degradation. - Highlights: • MPT/MWCNTs were fabricated by liquid-crystal template in supercritical CO{sub 2}. • MPT/MWCNTs show high visible-light driven photoactivity for phenol degradation. • MPT/MWCNTs also show high reusable photoactivity under visible irradiation. • MPT content can control visible-light driven photoactivity of MPT/MWCNTs. • MPT is not easily broken away from from MPT/MWCNT composites. - Abstract: Mesoporous titania (MPT) was deposited onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by deposition of titanium sol containing liquid-crystal template with assistant of supercritical CO{sub 2}. The products were characterized with various analytical techniques to determine their structural, morphological, optical absorption and photocatalytic properties. The results indicate that in photocatalytic degradation of phenol under visible light, the mixtures or composites of MPT and MWCNT show the high efficiency because of synergies between absorbing visible light, releasing electrons and facilitating transfer of charge carriers of MWCNTs and providing activated centers of MPT. Because of the mutual constraint between MPT and MWCNTs on the photocatalytic efficiency, the optimal loading of MPT in MPT/MWCNT-3 for phenol degradation is 48%. Because the intimate contact between MWCNTs and MPT is more beneficial to electron transformation, photoactivity of mixture is lower than that of composites with high reusable performance. The optimum conditions of phenol degradation were obtained.

  14. Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is an atmospheric general circulation model that solves equations for atmospheric dynamics and physics. CAM is an outgrowth of the Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and was developed as a joint collaborative effort between NCAR and several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. CAM contains several alternative approaches for advancing the atmospheric dynamics. One of these approaches uses a finite-volume method originally developed by personnel atmore » NASNGSFC, We have developed a scalable version of the finite-volume solver for massively parallel computing systems. FV-CAM is meant to be used in conjunction with the Community Atmosphere Model. It is not stand-alone.« less

  15. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  16. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  17. FOOD IRRADIATION REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leyse, C.F.; Putnam, G.E.

    1961-05-01

    An irradiation apparatus is described. It comprises a pressure vessel, a neutronic reactor active portion having a substantially greater height than diameter in the pressure vessel, an annular tank surrounding and spaced from the pressure vessel containing an aqueous indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution of approximately 600 grams per liter concentration, means for circulating separate coolants through the active portion and the space between the annular tank and the pressure vessel, radiator means adapted to receive the materials to be irradiated, and means for flowing the indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution through the radiator means.

  18. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  19. Atmosphere to Electrons

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Wind Forecast Improvement Project The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a public private partnership consortium including DOE, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...

  20. Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance | Department of Energy Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy Performance Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy Performance June 13, 2016 - 1:18pm Addthis bto_uptakepost_062216.png by Andrew Burr, U.S. Department of Energy On May 26, Better Buildings announced an historic partnership with The CoStar Group, one of the largest providers of information to real estate decision-makers in the country, to increase the visibility of

  1. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, James Irvin

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  2. Highly efficient photocatalysis of p-type Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} under visible-light illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Xian; Li, Yan Yan, Jian-Jun; Wang, Cheng-Wei

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: Kesterite CZTS nanocrystal powder was synthesized by one-pot method. First successful use CZTS nanocrystal powder as photocatalyst. CZTS shows an efficient photocatalysis under visible light irradiation. CZTS photocatalyst having excellent stability. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}, as a very promising p-type semiconductor material, has been extensively used in the study of solar cells owing to its suitable band gap (1.11.5 eV), large absorption coefficient of 10{sup 4} cm{sup ?1} in the visible spectrum, good photo stability, nontoxicity and relative abundance of the component elements. In this paper, we have successfully synthesized p-type kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanocrystal powder by facile one-pot method, and made our first successful attempt to use Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanocrystal powder as a photocatalyst to degradation methyl orange under visible-light irradiation. The exciting results show that in the visible light region, Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanocrystal powder possesses an excellent photocatalytic performance of K = 0.0317 min{sup ?1}, nearly about 6 times of well known commercial P25 titania powder performance under the same conditions, which suggests that the p-type kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanocrystal would be a promising candidate of photocatalyst.

  3. Synthesis of Mn-intercalated layered titanate by exfoliation-flocculation approach and its efficient photocatalytic activity under visible-light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jie; Tian, Yanlong; Chang, Binbin; Li, Gengnan; Xi, Fengna; Dong, Xiaoping

    2012-12-15

    A novel Mn-intercalated layered titanate as highly active photocatalyst in visible-light region has been synthesized via a convenient and efficient exfoliation-flocculation approach with divalent Mn ions and monolayer titanate nanosheets. The 0.91 nm interlayer spacing of obtained photocatalyst is in accordance with the sum of the thickness of titanate nanosheet and the diameter of Mn ions. The yellow photocatalyst shows a spectral response in visible-light region and the calculated band gap is 2.59 eV. The photocatalytic performance of this material was evaluated by degradation and mineralization of an aqueous dye methylene blue under visible-light irradiation, and an enhanced photocatalytic activity in comparison with protonated titanate as well as the P25 TiO{sub 2} and N-doped TiO{sub 2} was obtained. Additionally, the layered structure is retained, no dye ions intercalating occurs during the photocatalysis process, and a {approx}90% photocatalytic activity can be remained after reusing 3 cycles. - Graphical abstract: Mn-intercalated layered titanate as a novel and efficient visible-light harvesting photocatalyst was synthesized via a convenient and efficient exfoliation-flocculation approach in a mild condition. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn-intercalated titanate has been prepared by exfoliation-flocculation approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The as-prepared catalyst shows spectral response in the visible-light region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment at certain temperature enables formation of Mn-doped TiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dye can be degradated effectively by the catalyst under visible light irradiation.

  4. Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the largest providers of information to real estate decision-makers in the country, to increase the visibility of energy performance data in CoStar's online property database. ...

  5. Visible Reflectivity System for High-Pressure Studies. (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Visible Reflectivity System for ... OSTI Identifier: 1073453 Report Number(s): SAND2013-2893J Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748 DOE ...

  6. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health of the Nation's Electric Grid | Department of Energy Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid September 26, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editor's note: This post has been edited to correct the deadline for application submissions. WASHINGTON - As part of the Administration's commitment to improve the reliability and

  7. Lighting Retrofit Improving Visibility, Saving Energy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Retrofit Improving Visibility, Saving Energy Lighting Retrofit Improving Visibility, Saving Energy August 27, 2010 - 10:05am Addthis New LED lighting fixtures (right) emit a whiter light than existing high-pressure sodium cobra head streetlights (left) and don't spill light onto nearby houses. | Photos courtesy of the City of Muscatine New LED lighting fixtures (right) emit a whiter light than existing high-pressure sodium cobra head streetlights (left) and don't spill light onto

  8. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. I. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS VIA THE SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Workman, Jared E-mail: jworkman@coloradomesa.edu

    2014-08-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical, and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension, and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag, and magnetic drag), and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag acts non-uniformly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulations of atmospheric circulation. We also find that hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction have dissimilar phase signatures and affect the flow in fundamentally different ways, implying that using Rayleigh drag to mimic magnetic drag is inaccurate. We exhaustively lay down the theoretical formalism (dispersion relations, governing equations, and time-dependent wave solutions) for a broad suite of models. In all situations, we derive the steady state of an atmosphere, which is relevant to interpreting infrared phase and eclipse maps of exoplanetary atmospheres. We elucidate a pinching effect that confines the atmospheric structure to be near the equator. Our suite of analytical models may be used to develop decisively physical intuition and as a reference point for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric circulation.

  9. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn vanadate nanosheets and visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methyl blue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z. Xie, Y.K.; Pei, Y.Q.; Jiang, Y.X.; Yu, H.Y.; Cai, Z.Y.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. The formation of Mn vanadate nanosheets can be controlled by growth conditions. Mn vanadate nanosheets exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using ammonium metavanadate and Mn acetate as the raw materials, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the Mn vanadate nanosheets are composed of monoclinic MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicates that the nanosheets have the average thickness of about 50 nm, length of 210 ?m and width of 800 nm to 2 ?m. The growth process of the Mn vanadate nanosheets has also been discussed based on the analysis of the roles of the growth conditions on the formation of the Mn vanadate nanosheets. The nanosheets show good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. About 72.96% MB can be degraded after visible light irradiation for 1 h over 10 mg Mn vanadate nanosheets in 10 mL MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup ?1}.

  11. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  12. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  13. Photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol in aqueous solution by visible light sensitive N-F-codoped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindan, Kadarkarai; Murugesan, Sepperumal; Maruthamuthu, Pitchai

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation for the visible light photocatalytic process of N and F codoped TiO{sub 2}. Highlights: ? Visible light sensitive N-F-codoped TiO{sub 2}. ? Photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol. ? Effect of oxidants on photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol. ? PMS is a more efficient oxidant for the photodegradation of PCP. - Abstract: In this present study, N-F-codoped titanium dioxide nanocatalyst (NFTO) has been synthesized by simple solgel assisted solvothermal method for the effective utilization of visible light in photocatalytic reactions. Structural characterization of the photocatalyst is analyzed by XRD, UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), SEM and TEM. Moreover the chemical statuses of NFTO are gathered by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that a high surface area with photoactive anatase phase crystalline is obtained. In addition, nitrogen and fluorine atoms are doped into TiO{sub 2} crystal lattice to extend the visible light absorption and higher photocatalytic activity. The photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol in aqueous solution is examined under visible light irradiation, the addition of oxidants such as PMS, PDS and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is analyzed in detail. The rate of photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol is obtained in the following order: PMS > PDS > H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  14. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  15. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  16. Preparation, characterization of the Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles and their photocatalytic activity under visible-light illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Jizhou; Li Aidong; Zhai Haifa; Gong Youpin; Li Hui; Wu Di

    2009-08-15

    This paper describes a novel catalyst of the Ta-doped ZnO nanocrystals prepared by a modified polymerizable complex method using the water-soluble tantalum precursor as the sources of Ta. The catalysts were characterized by means of various analytical techniques as a function of Ta content (x=0-4 mol%) systematically. A remarkable advantage of the results was confirmed that dopant Ta enhanced the visible-light absorption of ZnO and the low-solubility tantalum doping could restrain the growth of crystal and minish the particle size. The relationship between the physicochemical property and the photocatalytic performance was discussed, and it was found that the photocatalytic activity in the photochemical degradation of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation (lambda>=420 nm) was dependent on the contents of the dopant, which could affect the particle size, concentration of surface hydroxyl groups and active hydrogen-related defect sites, and the visible-light absorption. The highest photocatalytic activity was obtained for the 1.0 mol% Ta-doped ZnO sample. - Graphical abstract: The addition of the tantalum into ZnO prepared by a modified polymerizable complex method not only restrains the growth of crystal, minish the particle size, but also changes the nanocrystal morphology.

  17. Controlled synthesis of T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} and enhanced visible light responsive photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Shuying; Yu, Chongfei; Li, Yukun; Li, Yihui; Sun, Jianhui; Geng, Xiaofei

    2014-03-15

    A novel T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} microcrystal photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant SDBS in the present study. Having received well characterization with the aid of various techniques and the results showed that the SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}, which had a unique T shape and belonged to the monoclinic family. The fast exchange dynamics between the surfactants bound to the Bi{sup 3+} seed surface and the free VO{sub 3}{sup ?} in the solution significantly increase the rate of heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of the prepared T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was evaluated by the degradation of Methylene Blue solution under visible light irradiation, 17% and 47% higher decolorization rates than the commercial P25 and BiVO{sub 4} synthesized without SDBS, respectively. Meanwhile, it has been found that the degradation kinetics of MB fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} also displayed high photocatalytic performance for metronidazole degradation. -- Graphical abstract: H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecules function as electron trapping reagent to react with e{sup ?} to enhance the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of MB in the BiVO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system under visible light irradiation. Highlights: T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was synthesized using SDBS as a structure-directing surfactant. SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}. The T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} had a better visible-light photocatalytic activity. Degradation kinetics of MB by BiVO{sub 4} fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics.

  18. Final Report on MEGAPIE Target Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Dai

    2015-06-30

    Megawatt pilot experiment (MEGAPIE) was successfully performed in 2006. One of the important goals of MEGAPIE is to understand the behaviour of structural materials of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in flowing LBE (liquid lead-bismuth eutectic) environment by conducting post-irradiation examination (PIE). The PIE includes four major parts: non-destructive test, radiochemical analysis of production and distribution of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE, analysis of LBE corrosion effects on structural materials, T91 and SS 316L steels, and mechanical testing of the T91 and SS 316L steels irradiated in the lower part of the target. The non-destructive test (NDT) including visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement was performed in the proton beam window area of the T91 calotte of the LBE container, the most intensively irradiated part of the MEGAPIE target. The visual inspection showed no visible failure and the ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in thickness in the beam window area. Gamma mapping was also performed in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The gamma mapping results were used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. Radiochemical analysis of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE is to improve the understanding of the production and distribution of radionuclides in the target. The results demonstrate that the radionuclides of noble metals, 207Bi, 194Hg/Au are rather homogeneously distributed within the target, while radionuclides of electropositive elements are found to be deposited on the steel-LBE interface. The corrosion effect of LBE on the structural components under intensive irradiation was investigated by metallography. The results show that no evident corrosion damages. However, unexpected deep

  19. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osuka, Hisao; Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5, Takayama-cho, Ikoma-shi, Nara 630-0192 ; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; CREST, JST, Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 ; Hirota, Shun; CREST, JST, Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase showed light sensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New FT-IR bands were observed with light irradiation of the Ni-A state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR g-values of the Ni-A state shifted upon light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The light-induced state converted back to the Ni-A state under the dark condition. -- Abstract: [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm{sup -1} of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm{sup -1} in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g{sub x} = 2.30, g{sub y} = 2.23 and g{sub z} = 2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  20. Surface nanostructuring and optical activation of lithium fluoride crystals by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mussi, V.; Granone, F.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Marolo, T.; Montereali, R.M.

    2006-03-06

    We present results on simultaneous nanostructuring and optical activation of lithium fluoride crystals by 800 eV off-normal Ar{sup +} sputtering at different ion doses. The samples were studied by atomic force microscopy and optical spectroscopy. After ion irradiation smoothening of the initial random roughness is achieved and well-defined self-organized ripple structures appear, having a mean periodicity of 30 nm and a mean height of 3 nm. The simultaneous optical activation of the irradiated samples is due to the stable formation of electronic defects with intense photoluminescence in the visible spectral range.

  1. UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Demory, Brice-Olivier E-mail: demory@mit.edu

    2013-11-10

    Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric albedo.

  2. New synthesis of excellent visible-light TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst using a very simple method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Danzhen Huang Hanjie; Chen Xu; Chen Zhixin; Li Wenjuan; Ye Dong; Fu Xianzhi

    2007-09-15

    An excellent visible-light-responsive (from 400 to 550 nm) TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst was prepared by a simple wet method. Hydrazine was used as a new nitrogen resource in this paper. Self-made amorphous titanium dioxide precursor powders were dipped into hydrazine hydrate, and calcined at low temperature (110 deg. C) in the air. The TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} was successfully synthesized, following by spontaneous combustion. The photocatalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), transmission electron microscope (TEM), UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrometer (DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of XPS indicated that N atoms were incorporated into the lattice of the titania crystal during the combustion of hydrazine on the surface of TiO{sub 2}. Ethylene was selected as a target pollutant under visible-light excitation to evaluate the activity of this photocatalyst. The newly prepared TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst with strong photocatalytic activity and high photochemical stability under visible-light irradiation was firstly demonstrated in the experiment. - Graphical abstract: The excellent visible-light-responsive (from 400 to 550 nm) TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst was prepared by a simple wet method. Hydrazine was used as a new nitrogen resource in this paper. In the experiment, a strong photocatalytic activity with high photochemical stability under visible-light irradiation was demonstrated.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of F-N-W-codoped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst with enhanced visible light response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiaoliang; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 ; Qin, Haibo; Yang, Xingyong; Zhang, Qiaoxin; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Anatase F-N-W-codoped TiO{sub 2} was prepared by a solgel-hydrothermal method. ? Under visible illumination, carbon removal rate of RB reached 94% using F-7NW-TiO{sub 2}. ? F, N and W dopants narrowed band gap and lowed charge pairs recombination rate. ? There were W{sub x}Ti{sub 1?x}O{sub 2}, O-Ti-N and valence variation of W ions existing. -- Abstract: Anatase F-N-W-codoped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully prepared by a method combining solgel with hydrothermal treatment. Effects of F, N and W ion dosage concentration on the crystallinity, morphology, grain size and chemical status of the photocatalyst were investigated. The results showed that the F-7NW-TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst composed of uniform ellipsoidal particles around 20 nm in length and 10 nm in width, and the photocatalyst displayed enhanced visible-light absorption and photocatalytic activities. Using the photocatalyst and under visible irradiation for 1.5 h, the decoloration percent of RB and carbon removal rate were about 98% and 94% respectively, which were much higher than that of commercial P25, TiO{sub 2}, N-W-TiO{sub 2} and F-TiO{sub 2}. The high visible-light photocatalytic activity of F-7NW-TiO{sub 2} might result from narrowing the band gap and lowing charge pairs recombination rate for the W{sub x}Ti{sub 1?x}O{sub 2}, O-Ti-N and valence variation of W ions existing.

  4. EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS (REVISION 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2013-09-13

    Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Revision 1 adds a comparison with results of a study of tritium exposed EPDM. The amount of gas produced by the gamma irradiation was found to be equivalent to about 280 days exposure to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere. The glass transition temperature of the tritium exposed EPDM rose about 10 ?C. over 280 days, while no glass transition temperature change was observed for gamma irradiated EPDM. This means that gamma irradiation in deuterium cannot be used as a surrogate for tritium exposure.

  5. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. . Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/NaTaO{sub 3} organicinorganic hybrid nanocomposite: High-performance and recyclable visible light driven photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Bharat; Surendar, T.; Shanker, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: High-performance and recyclable visible-light driven g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/NaTaO{sub 3} hybrid nanocomposite photocatalysts have been prepared by a facile ultrasonic dispersion method. The hybrid nanocomposite photocatalyst can be promising photocatalytic material for practical application in water splitting and environmental remediation. - Highlights: Novel g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/NaTaO{sub 3} nanocomposites as a high performance and recyclable photocatalysts. These catalysts exhibited significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity under UVvisible light irradiation. More attractively, dramatic activity is generated under visible light irradiation due to the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} loaded. Interestingly, the as-prepared hybrid nanocomposites possess high reusability. - Abstract: Novel g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/NaTaO{sub 3} hybrid nanocomposites have been prepared by a facile ultrasonic dispersion method. Our results clearly show the formation of interface between NaTaO{sub 3} and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and further loading of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} did not affect the crystal structure and morphology of NaTaO{sub 3}. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/NaTaO{sub 3} nanocomposites exhibited enhanced photocatalytic performance for the degradation of Rhodamine B under UVvisible and visible light irradiation compared to pure NaTaO{sub 3} and Degussa P25. Interestingly, the visible light photocatalytic activity is generated due to the loading of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. A mechanism is proposed to discuss the enhanced photocatalytic activity based on trapping experiments of photoinduced radicals and holes. Under visible light irradiation, electron excited from the valance band (VB) to conduction band (CB) of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} could directly inject into the CB of NaTaO{sub 3}, making g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/NaTaO{sub 3} visible light driven photocatalyst. Since the as-prepared hybrid nanocomposites possess high reusability therefore it can be promising photocatalyst for environmental

  7. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity of visible-light-driven plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaojuan Tang, Duanlian; Tang, Fan; Zhu, Yunyan; He, Changfa; Liu, Minghua Lin, Chunxiang; Liu, Yifan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: A plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst has been successfully synthesized. Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibit high visible light photocatalytic activity. Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst is stable and magnetically separable. - Abstract: A visible-light-driven plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has been successfully synthesized via a depositionprecipitation and photoreduction through a novel one-pot process. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were employed to investigate the crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology, and optical properties of the as-prepared nanocomposites. The photocatalytic activities of the nanocomposites were evaluated by photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol under visible light. The results demonstrated that the obtained Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibited higher photocatalytic activity as compared to pure ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In addition, the sample photoreduced for 20 min and calcined at 500 C achieved the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, the Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has high stability under visible light irradiation and could be conveniently separated by using an external magnetic field.

  8. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  9. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  10. When will low-contrast features be visible in a STEM X-ray spectrum image?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-02-03

    When will a small or low-contrast feature, such as an embedded second-phase particle, be visible in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray map? This work illustrates a computationally inexpensive method to simulate X-ray maps and spectrum images (SIs), based upon the equations of X-ray generation and detection. To particularize the general procedure, an example of nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) containing nm-sized Y2Ti2O7 embedded precipitates in ferritic stainless steel matrix is chosen. The proposed model produces physically appearing simulated SI data sets, which can either be reduced to X-ray dot maps or analyzed via multivariate statistical analysis. Comparison to NFAmore » X-ray maps acquired using three different STEM instruments match the generated simulations quite well, despite the large number of simplifying assumptions used. A figure of merit of electron dose multiplied by X-ray collection solid angle is proposed to compare feature detectability from one data set (simulated or experimental) to another. The proposed method can scope experiments that are feasible under specific analysis conditions on a given microscope. As a result, future applications, such as spallation proton–neutron irradiations, core-shell nanoparticles, or dopants in polycrystalline photovoltaic solar cells, are proposed.« less

  11. When will low-contrast features be visible in a STEM X-ray spectrum image?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-02-03

    When will a small or low-contrast feature, such as an embedded second-phase particle, be visible in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray map? This work illustrates a computationally inexpensive method to simulate X-ray maps and spectrum images (SIs), based upon the equations of X-ray generation and detection. To particularize the general procedure, an example of nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) containing nm-sized Y2Ti2O7 embedded precipitates in ferritic stainless steel matrix is chosen. The proposed model produces physically appearing simulated SI data sets, which can either be reduced to X-ray dot maps or analyzed via multivariate statistical analysis. Comparison to NFA X-ray maps acquired using three different STEM instruments match the generated simulations quite well, despite the large number of simplifying assumptions used. A figure of merit of electron dose multiplied by X-ray collection solid angle is proposed to compare feature detectability from one data set (simulated or experimental) to another. The proposed method can scope experiments that are feasible under specific analysis conditions on a given microscope. As a result, future applications, such as spallation proton–neutron irradiations, core-shell nanoparticles, or dopants in polycrystalline photovoltaic solar cells, are proposed.

  12. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, Otto A.; Stencel, Joseph R.

    1990-01-01

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  13. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  14. Visibility of two-dimensional layered materials on various substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Müller, M. R. E-mail: knoch@iht.rwth-aachen.de; Gumprich, A.; Ecik, E.; Kallis, K. T.; Winkler, F.; Kardynal, B.; Petrov, I.; Kunze, U.; Knoch, J. E-mail: knoch@iht.rwth-aachen.de

    2015-10-14

    For the investigation of 2D layered materials such as graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and their heterostructures, dedicated substrates are required to enable unambiguous identification through optical microscopy. A systematic study is conducted, focusing on various 2D layered materials and substrates. The simulated colors are displayed and compared with microscopy images. Additionally, the issue of defining an appropriate index for measuring the degree of visibility is discussed. For a wide range of substrate stacks, layer thicknesses for optimum visibility are given along with the resulting sRGB colors. Further simulations of customized stacks can be conducted using our simulation tool, which is available for download and contains a database featuring a wide range of materials.

  15. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  16. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  17. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  18. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  19. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  20. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Richard P.; Lott, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  1. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  2. TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene nanocomposite via a facile in-situ hydrothermal solgel strategy for visible light photodegradation of eosin Y

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yingliang; Pei, Fuyun Lu, Ruijuan; Xu, Shengang; Cao, Shaokui

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene is synthesized via in-situ hydrothermal solgel strategy. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are chemically anchored on N-graphene nanosheets. The band gap of TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene is red-shifted from neat TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. 5-NGT nanocomposite has the best visible light photodegradation performance. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene nanocomposites are synthesized via a facile in-situ hydrothermal solgel strategy in order to improve the photocatalytic efficiency for pollutant photodegradation under visible light irradiation. The as-prepared nanocomposites are respectively characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Results indicated that neat TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have an average diameter about 6.70 nm while TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene nanocomposites synthesized through in-situ hydrothermal solgel strategy bear an average diameter of ?1 nm and are anchored on N-graphene nanosheets via chemical bonding. Both neat TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and chemically anchored TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene nanocomposites take on the crystal type of anatase. The band gap of TiO{sub 2}/N-graphene nanocomposites is red-shifted compared with neat TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The evaluation of photodegradation performance under visible light irradiation suggested that the nanocomposite with 5 wt% N-graphene content has the best visible light photodegradation performance.

  3. Metal-free g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalyst by sulfuric acid activation for selective aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ligang; Liu, Di; Guan, Jing; Chen, Xiufang; Guo, Xingcui; Zhao, Fuhua; Hou, Tonggang; Mu, Xindong

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: A novel visible-light-driven acid-modified g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared. The texture, electronic and surface property were tuned by acid modification. Acid-modified g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} shows much higher activity for photocatalytic activity. Acid sites on the surface of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} favor efficient charge separation. - Abstract: In this work, modification of graphitic carbon nitride photocatalyst with acid was accomplished with a facile method through reflux in different acidic substances. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-based material was found to be a metal-free photocatalyst useful for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol with dioxygen as the oxidant under visible light irradiation. Acid modification had a significant influence on the photocatalytic performance of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Among all acid tested, sulfuric acid-modified g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} showed the highest catalytic activity and gave benzaldehyde in 23% yield for 4 h under visible light irradiation, which was about 2.5 times higher than that of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The acid modification effectively improved surface area, reduced structural size, enlarged band gap, enhanced surface chemical state, and facilitated photoinduced charge separation, contributing to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. It is hoped that our work can open promising prospects for the utilization of metal free g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-based semiconductor as visible-light photocatalyst for selective organic transformation.

  4. Double-shelled plasmonic Ag-TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres toward visible light-active photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} into solar fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Shichao; Wang, Meng; Li, Ping; Tu, Wenguang; Zhou, Yong; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Double-shelled hollow hybrid spheres consisting of plasmonic Ag and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through a simple reaction process. The analysis reveals that Ag nanoparticles were dispersed uniformly in the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle shell. The plasmonic Ag-TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere proves to greatly enhance the photocatalytic activity toward reduction of CO{sub 2} into renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH{sub 4}) in the presence of water vapor under visible-light irradiation. The possible formation mechanism of the hollow sphere and related plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic performance were also briefly discussed.

  5. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, P.K.

    1995-04-05

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium.

  6. Photoreactivity of ZnO nanoparticles in visible light: Effect of surface states on electron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baruah, Sunandan; Dutta, Joydeep; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Ghosh, Barnali; Pal, Samir Kumar; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2009-04-01

    Wide band gap metal oxide semiconductors such as zinc oxide (ZnO) show visible band photolysis that has been employed, among others, to degrade harmful organic contaminants into harmless mineral acids. Metal oxides show enhanced photocatalytic activity with the increase in electronic defects in the crystallites. By introducing defects into the crystal lattice of ZnO nanoparticles, we observe a redshift in the optical absorption shifting from the ultraviolet region to the visible region (400-700 nm), which is due to the creation of intermediate defect states that inhibit the electron hole recombination process. The defects were introduced by fast nucleation and growth of the nanoparticles by rapid heating using microwave irradiation and subsequent quenching during the precipitation reaction. To elucidate the nature of the photodegradation process, picosecond resolved time correlated single photon count (TCSPC) spectroscopy was carried out to record the electronic transitions resulting from the de-excitation of the electrons to their stable states. Photodegradation and TCSPC studies showed that defect engineered ZnO nanoparticles obtained through fast crystallization during growth lead to a faster initial degradation rate of methylene blue as compared to the conventionally synthesized nanoparticles.

  7. Fe ion-implanted TiO{sub 2} thin film for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impellizzeri, G. Scuderi, V.; Sanz, R.; Privitera, V.; Romano, L.; Sberna, P. M.; Arcadipane, E.; Scuderi, M.; Nicotra, G.; Bayle, M.; Carles, R.; Simone, F.

    2014-11-07

    This work shows the application of metal ion-implantation to realize an efficient second-generation TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. High fluence Fe{sup +} ions were implanted into thin TiO{sub 2} films and subsequently annealed up to 550?C. The ion-implantation process modified the TiO{sub 2} pure film, locally lowering its band-gap energy from 3.2?eV to 1.61.9?eV, making the material sensitive to visible light. The measured optical band-gap of 1.61.9?eV was associated with the presence of effective energy levels in the energy band structure of the titanium dioxide, due to implantation-induced defects. An accurate structural characterization was performed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The synthesized materials revealed a remarkable photocatalytic efficiency in the degradation of organic compounds in water under visible light irradiation, without the help of any thermal treatments. The photocatalytic activity has been correlated with the amount of defects induced by the ion-implantation process, clarifying the operative physical mechanism. These results can be fruitfully applied for environmental applications of TiO{sub 2}.

  8. Visible light-induced photocatalytic properties of WO{sub 3} films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imai, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Maiko; Oka, Nobuto; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2012-05-15

    The authors examined the photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} films (thickness 500-600 nm) deposited on a fused quartz substrate heated at 350-800 deg. C by dc reactive magnetron sputtering using a W metal target under the O{sub 2} gas pressure from 1.0 to 5.0 Pa. Films deposited at 800 deg. C under 5.0 Pa have excellent crystallinity of triclinic, P1(1) structure and a large surface area, as confirmed by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Exposure of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) adsorbed onto the film surface to ultraviolet, visible, or standard fluorescence light induces oxidative photocatalytic decomposition indicated by a decrease in CH{sub 3}CHO concentration and generation of CO{sub 2} gas. For all three types of irradiation, concentration ratio of decreased CH{sub 3}CHO to increased CO{sub 2} is about 1:1, suggesting the possible presence of intermediates. The sputter-deposited WO{sub 3} film can be a good candidate as a visible light-responsive photocatalyst.

  9. Optimal measurement of surface shortwave irradiance using current instrumentation -- the ARM experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, J.; Rubes, M.; Stoffel, T.; Wesley, M.; Splitt, M.; DeLuisi, J.

    1997-03-01

    Shortwave (solar) measurements of surface irradiance for clear sky conditions disagree with a number of different models. Betts used the European Center for Medium-range Forecasts (ECMWF) shortwave model to calculate surface irradiance that were 5-10 percent higher than measurements. Wild used a different formulation of the ECMWF shortwave model, but found that the model overpredicted clear-sky shortwave and average of 3 percent. Ding and Wang used data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and found that the GENESIS GCM shortwave model, likewise, overpredicted clear-sky irradiance by about 4 percent. To help resolve the measurement dilemma, reference instruments were deployed in April 1996 at the Southern Great Plains ARM site central facility very near the shortwave measurements. The rest of the paper describes the experiment undertaken to ascertain total horizontal shortwave irradiance at the surface, including a separation of the direct normal and diffuse horizontal components. Results and a discussion of same concludes the paper.

  10. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  11. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    1993-07-04

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  12. Spectroscopic study of gold nanoparticle formation through high intensity laser irradiation of solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Takahiro Sato, Shunichi; Herbani, Yuliati; Ursescu, Daniel; Banici, Romeo; Dabu, Razvan Victor

    2013-08-15

    A spectroscopic study of the gold nanoparticle (NP) formation by high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation of a gold ion solution was reported. The effect of varying energy density of the laser on the formation of gold NPs was also investigated. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of the gold nanocolloid in real-time UV-visible absorption spectra during laser irradiation showed a distinctive progress; the SPR absorption peak intensity increased after a certain irradiation time, reached a maximum and then gradually decreased. During this absorption variation, at the same time, the peak wavelength changed from 530 to 507 nm. According to an empirical equation derived from a large volume of experimental data, the estimated mean size of the gold NPs varied from 43.4 to 3.2 nm during the laser irradiation. The mean size of gold NPs formed at specific irradiation times by transmission electron microscopy showed the similar trend as that obtained in the spectroscopic analysis. From these observations, the formation mechanism of gold NPs during laser irradiation was considered to have two steps. The first is a reduction of gold ions by reactive species produced through a non-linear reaction during high intensity laser irradiation of the solution; the second is the laser fragmentation of produced gold particles into smaller pieces. The gold nanocolloid produced after the fragmentation by excess irradiation showed high stability for at least a week without the addition of any dispersant because of the negative charge on the surface of the nanoparticles probably due to the surface oxidation of gold nanoparticles. A higher laser intensity resulted in a higher efficiency of gold NPs fabrication, which was attributed to a larger effective volume of the reaction.

  13. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  14. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gero, Jonathan; Ermold, Brian; Gaustad, Krista; Koontz, Annette; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth’s atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols. The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3–19.2 μm (520–3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3–25.0 μm (400–3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  15. An Interoperability Testing Study: Automotive Inventory Visibility and Interoperability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Nenad; Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Frechette, Simon; Jones, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between the NIST and Korean Business-to-Business Interoperability Test Beds to support a global, automotive-industry interoperability project. The purpose of the collaboration is to develop a methodology for validation of interoperable data-content standards implemented across inventory visibility tools within an internationally adopted testing framework. In this paper we describe methods (1) to help the vendors consistently implement prescribed message standards and (2) to assess compliance of those implementations with respect to the prescribed data content standards. We also illustrate these methods in support of an initial proof of concept for an international IV&I scenario.

  16. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  17. CHARACTERISTIC SIZE OF FLARE KERNELS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED CONTINUA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin; Cao, Wenda

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we present a new approach to estimate the formation height of visible and near-infrared emission of an X10 flare. The sizes of flare emission cores in three wavelengths are accurately measured during the peak of the flare. The source size is the largest in the G band at 4308 A and shrinks toward longer wavelengths, namely the green continuum at 5200 A and NIR at 15600 A, where the emission is believed to originate from the deeper atmosphere. This size-wavelength variation is likely explained by the direct heating model as electrons need to move along converging field lines from the corona to the photosphere. Therefore, one can observe the smallest source, which in our case is 0.''65 {+-} 0.''02 in the bottom layer (represented by NIR), and observe relatively larger kernels in upper layers of 1.''03 {+-} 0.''14 and 1.''96 {+-} 0.''27, using the green continuum and G band, respectively. We then compare the source sizes with a simple magnetic geometry to derive the formation height of the white-light sources and magnetic pressure in different layers inside the flare loop.

  18. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energys lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worlds premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the

  19. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  20. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites ...

  2. ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research Conducting climate research focused on issues of national and global importance is one of the primary objectives of the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD)-a field division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. ORAU partners with ATDD-and in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as government agencies, universities, and private

  3. ARM - Sources of Atmospheric Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Atmospheric carbon represented a steady state system, where influx equaled outflow, before the Industrial Revolution. Currently, it is no longer a steady state system because the

  4. Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite...

  5. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (HFIR). Irradiation of the capsules was conducted for post-irradiation examination (PIE) metallography. PDF icon Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR...

  6. Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations S. Kato Center for Atmospheric Sciences Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction Recent development of remote sensing instruments by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM?) Program provides information of spatial and temporal variability of cloud structures. However it is not clear what cloud properties are required to express complicated cloud

  7. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of the metastable Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} synthesized by a high-temperature quenching method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Hefeng; Huang Baibiao; Dai Ying; Qin Xiaoyan; Zhang Xiaoyang; Wang Zeyan; Jiang Minhua

    2009-08-15

    Metastable Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} samples were synthesized by a high-temperature quenching method using alpha-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and anatase TiO{sub 2} as raw materials. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples was measured with the photodegradation of methyl orange at room temperature under visible light irradiation. The Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} samples exhibited good absorption in the visible light region with a band gap of about 2.38 eV and the band structure of Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} was studied. Photodegradation against methyl orange was much better than alpha-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} prepared by the same way. The photocatalytic activity of Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} samples is supposed to be associated with the hybridized Bi 6s and O 2p orbitals. In addition, the dispersive characteristic of Bi 6s orbital in the hybridized valence band facilitates the mobility of the photogenerated carriers and hampers their recombination. - Graphical abstract: Metastable Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} samples were successfully synthesized by a quenching process. Photodegradation against methyl orange showed high visible-light activity and it was supposed to be associated with its corresponding band structure.

  8. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energys Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  9. Effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babitha, K.K.; Priyanka, K.P.; Sreedevi, A.; Ganesh, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2014-12-15

    The effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles was investigated. Ceria nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, ultravioletvisible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Ultravioletvisible absorption spectra, photoluminescence and Raman spectra of beam irradiated samples were modified, and shifted to blue region, which were attributed to quantum size effect. Systematic observations found that nonstoichiometry, defects and size reduction caused by beam irradiation have great influence on optical band gap, blue shift, photoluminescence and Raman band modifications. Moreover, electron beam irradiation is a suitable technique to enhance the structural and optical properties of nanoceria by controlling the particle size, which may lead to potentially useful technological applications. - Highlights: Investigated effect of beam irradiation on CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles Beam irradiation caused size reduction and surface modification. It increases microstrain, decreases d-spacing and broadens XRD peaks. It also modifies optical band gap, absorption, PL and Raman bands.

  10. Synthesis and photocatalytic performance of an efficient Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Yinghua; Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Cui, Wenquan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: The plasmatic Ag@AgBr sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts. Ag@AgBr greatly increased visible light absorption for K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The plamonic photocatalysts exhibited enhanced activity for the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Ag@AgBr nanoparticle-sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts (Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}) were prepared by a facile precipitationphotoreduction method. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanocomposites were evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The composites exhibited excellent visible light absorption, which was attributable to the surface plasmon effect of Ag nanoparticles. The Ag@AgBr was uniformly scattered on the surface of K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and possessed sizes in the range of 2050 nm. The loading amount of Ag@AgBr was also studied, and was found to influence the absorption spectra of the resulting composites. Approximately 95.9% of RhB was degraded by Ag@AgBr (20 wt.%)/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} after irradiation for 1 h. The stability of the material was also investigated by performing consecutive runs. Additionally, studies performed using radical scavengers indicated that O{sub 2}{sup ?} and Br{sup 0} acted as the main reactive species. Based on the experimental results, a photocatalytic mechanism for organics degradation over Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} photocatalysts was proposed.

  11. Analysis of clear hour solar irradiation for seven Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.; Sahami, K.

    1995-12-31

    Hourly global and diffuse irradiation and corresponding surface meteorological data have been analyzed for the seven Canadian stations at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto, and Winnipeg. The variation of the most probable clear hour values of clearness index k{sub t}, diffuse index k{sub d}, direct beam index k{sub b}, and Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} with solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth are obtained. Values of these quantities are presented which are consistent with the attenuation and scattering of solar radiation by the atmosphere which is expected. The most probable values of {beta} tend to be lower than the average values of {beta} recently reported by Gueymard. The data indicate a drift in the calibration of the instruments used for measurements of the irradiation data for the stations at Goose Bay and Resolute. The data for the other five stations indicate that the instrument calibration is maintained over the years of the data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  13. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

    2012-01-01

    Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

  14. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  15. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  16. Polyport atmospheric gas sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic

    1995-01-01

    An atmospheric gas sampler with a multi-port valve which allows for multi, sequential sampling of air through a plurality of gas sampling tubes mounted in corresponding gas inlet ports. The gas sampler comprises a flow-through housing which defines a sampling chamber and includes a gas outlet port to accommodate a flow of gases through the housing. An apertured sample support plate defining the inlet ports extends across and encloses the sampling chamber and supports gas sampling tubes which depend into the sampling chamber and are secured across each of the inlet ports of the sample support plate in a flow-through relation to the flow of gases through the housing during sampling operations. A normally closed stopper means mounted on the sample support plate and operatively associated with each of the inlet ports blocks the flow of gases through the respective gas sampling tubes. A camming mechanism mounted on the sample support plate is adapted to rotate under and selectively lift open the stopper spring to accommodate a predetermined flow of gas through the respective gas sampling tubes when air is drawn from the housing through the outlet port.

  17. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  18. Synthesis and characterization of some metal oxide nanocrystals by microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashad, M.; Gaber, A.; Abdelrahim, M. A.; Abdel-Baset, A. M.; Moharram, A. H.

    2013-12-16

    Copper oxide and cobalt oxide (CuO, Co3O4) nanocrystals (NCs) have been successfully prepared in a short time using microwave irradiation. The resulted powders of nanocrystals (NCs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements are also studied. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and UVvisible absorption spectroscopy of both kind of nanoparticels are illustrated. Optical absorption analysis indicated the direct band gap for both kinds of nanocrystals.

  19. Facile Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Under {gamma}-Irradiation: Effect of Chitosan Concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, N. M.; Radiman, S.; Ahmad, A.; Idris, H.; Lim, H. N.; Khiew, P. S.; Chiu, W. S.; Tan, T. K.

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, a biopolymer, low molecular weight chitosan had been utilized as a 'green' stabilizing agent for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles under {gamma}-irradiation. The as-synthesized silver nanoparticles have particle diameters in the range of 5 nm-30 nm depending on the percentage of chitosan used (0.1 wt%, 0.5 wt%, 1.0 wt% and 2.0 wt%). It was found that the yield of the silver nanoparticles was in accordance with the concentration of chitosan presence in the solution due to the reduction by the chitosan radical during irradiation. The highly stable chitosan encapsulated silver nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Visible spectrophotometer (UV-VIS) and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD)

  20. Generation kinetics of color centers in irradiated poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, J. S.; Li, C. L.; Lee, Sanboh; Chou, K. F.

    2011-09-15

    The transient absorbance of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) irradiated with gamma rays at elevated temperatures has been investigated. The absorbance in the ultraviolet and visible range increases with gamma ray dose. A bathochromic shift in transmission spectra emerges significantly upon irradiation. A first-order generation model is proposed to analyze the kinetics of color centers during annealing. The activation energy of the color center increases with increasing gamma ray dose. The equilibrium behavior of color centers in PMP is similar to that of vacancies in metals, and the formation energy of color centers in PMP decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. However, annealable color centers are not observed in this study.

  1. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, James Edward

    2016-03-01

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  2. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2006-06-06

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  3. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, III, James Edward

    2009-03-17

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  4. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, III, James E.

    2011-02-08

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  5. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, James Edward

    2013-12-10

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity great than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelenths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  6. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, III, James E.

    2010-08-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  7. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2011-12-20

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  8. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  9. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  10. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  11. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile Facility, GERB, and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST) Beginning in January 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) began supporting RADAGAST to provide the first well-sampled direct esti- mates of the energy balance across the atmosphere. The experiment is part of an ongoing international study of the West African monsoon system and Saharan dust storms. Stationed outside the Niger Meteo- rological Office at the Niamey International Airport, the AMF is located

  13. The influence of mixed and phase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin D.; Vogelmann A.

    2011-10-13

    The influence of mixed-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. An Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in one-minute averages throughout April-May 2008 from the ARM Climate Research Facility's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow. This study examines spectral irradiance measurements made under single-layer, overcast cloud decks having geometric thickness < 3000 m. Cloud optical depth is retrieved from irradiance in the interval 1022-1033 nm. The contrasting surface radiative influences of mixed-phase clouds and liquid-water clouds are discerned using irradiances in the 1.6-{micro}m window. Compared with liquid-water clouds, mixed-phase clouds during the Arctic spring cause a greater reduction of shortwave irradiance at the surface. At fixed conservative-scattering optical depth (constant optical depth for wavelengths {lambda} < 1100 nm), the presence of ice water in cloud reduces the near-IR surface irradiance by an additional several watts-per-meter-squared. This additional reduction, or supplemental ice absorption, is typically {approx}5 W m{sup -2} near solar noon over Barrow, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle. However, for some cloud decks this additional absorption can be as large as 8-10 W m{sup -2}.

  14. RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  15. Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-11-20

    The Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) is a real-time emergency response modeling capability designed to advise Emergency Managers of the path, timing, and projected impacts from an atmospheric release. TRAC evaluates the effects of both radiological and non-radiological hazardous substances, gases and particulates. Using available surface and upper air meteorological information, TRAC realistically treats complex sources and atmospheric conditions, such as those found in mountainous terrain. TRAC calculates atmospheric concentration, deposition, and dose for more thanmore » 25,000 receptor locations within 80 km of the release point. Human-engineered output products support critical decisions on the type, location, and timing of protective actions for workers and the public during an emergency.« less

  16. (Chemistry of the global atmosphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marland, G.

    1990-09-27

    The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

  17. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  18. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutronmore » irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.« less

  19. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  20. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-16-027 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  2. AUDIT REPORT Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility OAI-M-16-10 May 2016 U.S. ... Audit Report on the "Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility" ...

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-16-037 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    01 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-16-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-15-069 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  6. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion...

  7. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Name: National Oceanic and...

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER ...

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research ...

  10. Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search DOE Data Explorer Search Results Page 1 of 70 Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" 697 results for: "atmospheric radiation ...

  11. Direct normal irradiance related definitions and applications: The circumsolar issue

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blanc, P.; Espinar, B.; Geuder, N.; Gueymard, C.; Meyer, R.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Reinhardt, B.; Renne, D.; Segupta, M.; Wald, L.; et al

    2014-10-21

    The direct irradiance received on a plane normal to the sun, called direct normal irradiance (DNI), is of particular relevance to concentrated solar technologies, including concentrating solar thermal plants and concentrated photovoltaic systems. Following various standards from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the DNI definition is related to the irradiance from a small solid angle of the sky, centered on the position of the sun. Half-angle apertures of pyrheliometers measuring DNI have varied over time, up to ≈10°. The current recommendation of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for this half-angle is 2.5°. Solar concentrating collectors have an angular acceptancemore » function that can be significantly narrower, especially for technologies with high concentration ratios. The disagreement between the various interpretations of DNI, from the theoretical definition used in atmospheric physics and radiative transfer modeling to practical definitions corresponding to specific measurements or conversion technologies is significant, especially in the presence of cirrus clouds or large concentration of aerosols. Under such sky conditions, the circumsolar radiation—i.e. the diffuse radiation coming from the vicinity of the sun—contributes significantly to the DNI ground measurement, although some concentrating collectors cannot utilize the bulk of it. These issues have been identified in the EU-funded projects MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate-Interim Implementation) and SFERA (Solar Facilities for the European Research Area), and have been discussed within a panel of international experts in the framework of the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) program of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA’s) Task 46 “Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting”. In accordance with these discussions, the terms of reference related to DNI are specified here. The important role of circumsolar radiation is

  12. Direct normal irradiance related definitions and applications: The circumsolar issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, P.; Espinar, B.; Geuder, N.; Gueymard, C.; Meyer, R.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Reinhardt, B.; Renne, D.; Segupta, M.; Wald, L.; Wilbert, S.

    2014-10-21

    The direct irradiance received on a plane normal to the sun, called direct normal irradiance (DNI), is of particular relevance to concentrated solar technologies, including concentrating solar thermal plants and concentrated photovoltaic systems. Following various standards from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the DNI definition is related to the irradiance from a small solid angle of the sky, centered on the position of the sun. Half-angle apertures of pyrheliometers measuring DNI have varied over time, up to ≈10°. The current recommendation of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for this half-angle is 2.5°. Solar concentrating collectors have an angular acceptance function that can be significantly narrower, especially for technologies with high concentration ratios. The disagreement between the various interpretations of DNI, from the theoretical definition used in atmospheric physics and radiative transfer modeling to practical definitions corresponding to specific measurements or conversion technologies is significant, especially in the presence of cirrus clouds or large concentration of aerosols. Under such sky conditions, the circumsolar radiation—i.e. the diffuse radiation coming from the vicinity of the sun—contributes significantly to the DNI ground measurement, although some concentrating collectors cannot utilize the bulk of it. These issues have been identified in the EU-funded projects MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate-Interim Implementation) and SFERA (Solar Facilities for the European Research Area), and have been discussed within a panel of international experts in the framework of the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) program of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA’s) Task 46 “Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting”. In accordance with these discussions, the terms of reference related to DNI are specified here. The important role of circumsolar radiation is evidenced

  13. Spitzer and z' secondary eclipse observations of the highly irradiated transiting brown dwarf KELT-1b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Fortney, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Bruns, Jacob M.; Showman, Adam P.; Eastman, Jason; Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2014-03-10

    We present secondary eclipse observations of the highly irradiated transiting brown dwarf KELT-1b. These observations represent the first constraints on the atmospheric dynamics of a highly irradiated brown dwarf, the atmospheres of irradiated giant planets at high surface gravity, and the atmospheres of brown dwarfs that are dominated by external, rather than internal, energy. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure secondary eclipse depths of 0.195% ± 0.010% at 3.6 μm and 0.200% ± 0.012% at 4.5 μm. We also find tentative evidence for the secondary eclipse in the z' band with a depth of 0.049% ± 0.023%. These measured eclipse depths are most consistent with an atmosphere model in which there is a strong substellar hotspot, implying that heat redistribution in the atmosphere of KELT-1b is low. While models with a more mild hotspot or even with dayside heat redistribution are only marginally disfavored, models with complete heat redistribution are strongly ruled out. The eclipse depths also prefer an atmosphere with no TiO inversion layer, although a model with TiO inversion is permitted in the dayside heat redistribution case, and we consider the possibility of a day-night TiO cold trap in this object. For the first time, we compare the IRAC colors of brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters as a function of effective temperature. Importantly, our measurements reveal that KELT-1b has a [3.6] – [4.5] color of 0.07 ± 0.11, identical to that of isolated brown dwarfs of similarly high temperature. In contrast, hot Jupiters generally show redder [3.6] – [4.5] colors of ∼0.4, with a very large range from ∼0 to ∼1. Evidently, despite being more similar to hot Jupiters than to isolated brown dwarfs in terms of external forcing of the atmosphere by stellar insolation, KELT-1b appears to have an atmosphere most like that of other brown dwarfs. This suggests that surface gravity is very important in controlling the atmospheric systems of substellar mass bodies.

  14. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  15. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. (Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1990-09-24

    The traveler served as a member of the two-man US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored team who visited the Prometey Complex in Leningrad to assess the potential for expanded cooperative research concerning integrity of the primary pressure boundary in commercial light-water reactors. The emphasis was on irradiation embrittlement, structural analysis, and fracture mechanics research for reactor pressure vessels. At the irradiation seminar in Cologne, presentations were made by German, French, Finnish, Russian, and US delegations concerning many aspects of irradiation of pressure vessel steels. The traveler made presentations on mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and on important aspects of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program results of irradiated fracture mechanics tests.

  17. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  18. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  19. Band alignment in visible-light photo-active CoO/SrTiO{sub 3} (001) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Hosung; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2014-12-28

    Epitaxial oxide heterostructures are of fundamental interest in a number of problems ranging from oxide electronics to model catalysts. The epitaxial CoO/SrTiO{sub 3} (001) heterostructure on Si(001) has been recently studied as a model oxide catalyst for water splitting under visible light irradiation (Ngo et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 084901 (2013)). We use density functional theory to investigate the valence band offset at the CoO/SrTiO{sub 3} (001) interface. We examine the mechanism of charge transfer and dielectric screening at the interface and demonstrate that charge transfer is mediated by the metal-induced gap states in SrTiO{sub 3}, while the dielectric screening at the interface is largely governed by the ionic polarization of under-coordinated oxygen. Based on this finding, we argue that strain relaxation in CoO plays a critical role in determining the band offset. We find that the offsets of 1.36–1.10 eV, calculated in the Schottky-limit are in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 1.20 eV. In addition, we investigate the effect of the Hubbard correction, applied on the Co 3d states, on the dipole layer and potential shift at the interface.

  20. Controlled preparation of Ag–Cu{sub 2}O nanocorncobs and their enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Siyuan; Zhang, Shengsen; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Fang, Yueping; Peng, Feng

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The corncob-like Ag–Cu{sub 2}O nanostructure with suitably exposed Ag surface exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity than Ag@Cu{sub 2}O nanocables and Cu{sub 2}O nanowires. - Highlights: • Ag–Cu{sub 2}O nanocorncobs have been controllably prepared by a simple synthesis. • The possible formation mechanism of Ag–Cu{sub 2}O has been studied. • Ag–Cu{sub 2}O exhibits noticeable improved photocurrent compared with the pure Cu{sub 2}O NWs. • Ag–Cu{sub 2}O with suitably exposed Ag surface shows much higher photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Novel corncob-like nano-heterostructured Ag–Cu{sub 2}O photocatalyst has been controllably prepared by adjusting the synthetic parameters, and the possible formation mechanism has been also studied. The photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performances demonstrated that the as-prepared Ag–Cu{sub 2}O nanocorncobs exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than both pure Cu{sub 2}O nanowires and cable-like Ag@Cu{sub 2}O nano-composites. It was concluded that Ag–Cu{sub 2}O nanocorncobs with suitably exposed Ag surface not only effectively inhibit the recombination of electron–hole pairs but also suitably increase the active sites of electronic conduction, and thus increasing the photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation.

  1. Characterization and visible light photocatalytic mechanism of size-controlled BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jian; Guo, Renqing; Fang, Liang; Dong, Wen; Zheng, Fengang; Shen, Mingrong

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles showed the size-dependent photocatalytic properties, and the corresponding photocatalytic mechanism for the pollutant degradation was proposed. - Highlights: Size-controlled BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by solgel method. The hydroxyl radicals were the main reactive species responsible for the pollutant degradation. BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles showed the size-dependent photocatalytic properties. - Abstract: BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles with controlled particle size were synthesized via solgel method. The samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscope, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption technique and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra. Photocatalytic activity of BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles was further examined by monitoring the degradation of Rhodamine B dye in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. Through the calculation of band position and a number of diagnostic experiments, the photocatalytic mechanism of BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles was proposed in this study. It was found that the hydroxyl radicals originated from the photogenerated electrons were the main reactive species responsible for the pollutant degradation. Moreover, with the variations of annealing temperature and time, the average crystallite size, specific surface area and crystallinity of BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles could be changed, which thus affected the photocatalytic activity of the corresponding samples.

  2. A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum Pilewskie, Peter University of Colorado ... We describe the development of a new solar reference spectrum for radiation and climate ...

  3. Enterprise Assessments, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Irradiated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fuels Examination Laboratory - April 2015 April 2015 Review of the Safety-Significant Ventilation Systems at the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory Operated by UT-Battelle...

  4. Comparison of irradiation creep and swelling of an austenitic alloy irradiated in FFTF and PFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Munro, B.; Adaway, S.; Standring, J.

    1999-10-01

    comparative irradiation of identically constructed creep tubes in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Prototypic Fast Reactor (PFR) shows that differences in irradiation conditions arising from both reactor operation and the design of the irradiation vehicle can have a significant impact on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic stainless steels. In spite of these differences, the derived creep coefficients fall within the range of previously observed values for 316 SS.

  5. Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO: An efficient visible-light-sensitized composite with its application in photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; School of Chemistry and Material Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 ; Wang, Mingliang; Xu, Chunxiang; Chen, Shifu; Fu, Xianliang

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The free OH radicals generated in the VB of ZnO play the primary role in the visible-light photocatalytic degradation of RhB in Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO system. The accumulated electrons in the CB of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} can be transferred to O{sub 2} adsorbed on the surface of the composite semiconductors and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yields. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reacts with electrons in succession to produce active OH to some extent. Display Omitted Highlights: ? Efficient visible-light-sensitized Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO composites were successfully prepared. ? Effect of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} content on the catalytic activity of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO is studied in detail. ? Rate constant of RhB degradation over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}(3.0 wt.%)/ZnO is 3 times that of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. ? The active species in RhB degradation are examined by adding a series of scavengers. ? Visible light degradation mechanism of RhB over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO is systematically studied. -- Abstract: The efficient visible-light-sensitized Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO composites with various weight percents of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were prepared by a facile ball milling method. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, DRS, SEM, EDS, XPS, and BET specific area. The OH radicals produced during the photocatalytic reaction was detected by the TAPL technique. The photocatalytic property of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. Significantly, the results revealed that the photocatalytic activity of the composites was much higher than that of pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and ZnO. The rate constant of RhB degradation over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}(3.0 wt.%)/ZnO is 3 times that of single-phase Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The optimal percentage of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the composite is 3.0 wt.%. It is proposed that the OH radicals produced in the valence band of ZnO play the leading role in the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B by

  6. BiFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} core-shell structured nanocomposites as visible-active photocatalysts and their optical response mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shun; Lin Yuanhua; Li Jingfeng; Nan Cewen; Zhang Boping

    2009-03-01

    Anatase titania-coated bismuth ferrite nanocomposites (BiFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}) have been fabricated via a hydrothermal approach combined with a hydrolysis precipitation processing. Analysis of the microstructure and phase composition reveals that a core-shell BiFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} structure can be formed, which results in a significant redshift in the UV-vis absorption spectra as compared to a simple mechanical mixture of BiFeO{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} nanopowders. The core-shell structured BiFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites exhibit higher photocatalytic activity for photodegradation of Congo red under visible-light ({lambda}>400 nm) irradiation, which should be attributed to the enhancement of the quantum efficiency by separating the electrons and holes effectively. The obtained BiFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites can be used as potential visible-light driven photocatalysts.

  7. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Robertson, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has one irradiation experiment in reactor and five experiments in the design or construction stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on ten experiments.

  8. AGR-1 Post Irradiation Examination Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew

    2015-08-01

    The post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-1 experiment was a multi-year, collaborative effort between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the performance of UCO (uranium carbide, uranium oxide) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel fabricated in the U.S. and irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL to a peak burnup of 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom. This work involved a broad array of experiments and analyses to evaluate the level of fission product retention by the fuel particles and compacts (both during irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to simulate reactor accident conditions), investigate the kernel and coating layer morphology evolution and the causes of coating failure, and explore the migration of fission products through the coating layers. The results have generally confirmed the excellent performance of the AGR-1 fuel, first indicated during the irradiation by the observation of zero TRISO coated particle failures out of 298,000 particles in the experiment. Overall release of fission products was determined by PIE to have been relatively low during the irradiation. A significant finding was the extremely low levels of cesium released through intact coatings. This was true both during the irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to temperatures as high as 1800°C. Post-irradiation safety test fuel performance was generally excellent. Silver release from the particles and compacts during irradiation was often very high. Extensive microanalysis of fuel particles was performed after irradiation and after high-temperature safety testing. The results of particle microanalysis indicate that the UCO fuel is effective at controlling the oxygen partial pressure within the particle and limiting kernel migration. Post-irradiation examination has provided the final body of data that speaks to the quality of the AGR-1 fuel, building

  9. RERTR-7 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-7A, was designed to test several modified fuel designs to target fission densities representative of a peak low enriched uranium (LEU) burnup in excess of 90% U-235 at peak experiment power sufficient to generate a peak surface heat flux of approximately 300 W/cm2. The RERTR-7B experiment was designed as a high power test of 'second generation' dispersion fuels at peak experiment power sufficient to generate a surface heat flux on the order of 230 W/cm2.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-7A and RERTR-7B experiments through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analyses, thermal analyses and hydraulic testing results.

  10. RERTR-10 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez

    2011-05-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-10 was designed to further test the effectiveness of modified fuel/clad interfaces in monolithic fuel plates. The experiment was conducted in two campaigns: RERTR-10A and RERTR-10B. The fuel plates tested in RERTR-10A were all fabricated by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and were designed to evaluate the effect of various Si levels in the interlayer and the thickness of the Zr interlayer (0.001”) using 0.010” and 0.020” nominal foil thicknesses. The fuel plates in RERTR-10B were fabricated by Friction Bonding (FB) with two different thickness Si layers and Nb and Zr diffusion barriers.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-10A/B experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  11. AFIP-3 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielle M Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-3 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-3 experiment was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-3 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  12. AFIP-3 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielle M Perez

    2011-04-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-3 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-3 experiment was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-3 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  13. AFIP-3 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielle M Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-3 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-3 experiment was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-3 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  14. Improving the Ni I atomic model for solar and stellar atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieytes, M. C.; Fontenla, J. M. E-mail: johnf@digidyna.com

    2013-06-01

    Neutral nickel (Ni I) is abundant in the solar atmosphere and is one of the important elements that contribute to the emission and absorption of radiation in the spectral range between 1900 and 3900 Å. Previously, the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling (SRPM) models of the solar atmosphere only considered a few levels of this species. Here, we improve the Ni I atomic model by taking into account 61 levels and 490 spectral lines. We compute the populations of these levels in full NLTE using the SRPM code and compare the resulting emerging spectrum with observations. The present atomic model significantly improves the calculation of the solar spectral irradiance at near-UV wavelengths, which is important for Earth atmospheric studies, and particularly for ozone chemistry.

  15. Visible light photoreduction of CO.sub.2 using heterostructured catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matranga, Christopher; Thompson, Robert L; Wang, Congjun

    2015-03-24

    The method provides for use of sensitized photocatalyst for the photocatalytic reduction of CO.sub.2 under visible light illumination. The photosensitized catalyst is comprised of a wide band gap semiconductor material, a transition metal co-catalyst, and a semiconductor sensitizer. The semiconductor sensitizer is photoexcited by visible light and forms a Type II band alignment with the wide band gap semiconductor material. The wide band gap semiconductor material and the semiconductor sensitizer may be a plurality of particles, and the particle diameters may be selected to accomplish desired band widths and optimize charge injection under visible light illumination by utilizing quantum size effects. In a particular embodiment, CO.sub.2 is reduced under visible light illumination using a CdSe/Pt/TiO2 sensitized photocatalyst with H.sub.2O as a hydrogen source.

  16. Increasing Reliability of the Nation’s Power Grid through Greater Visibility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Deputy Under Secretary for Science and Energy Adam Cohen today announced new funding that will build on recent progress in giving system operators greater visibility into the health of the...

  17. Visible Light Absorption of N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using (LR/RT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using (LRRT)-TDDFT and Active Space EOMCCSD Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Visible Light Absorption of N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using ...

  18. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup 1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  19. Polymer surfaces graphitization by low-energy He{sup +} ions irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geworski, A.; Lazareva, I.; Gieb, K.; Koval, Y.; Mller, P. [Department of Physics, Universitt Erlangen-Nrnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    The electrical and optical properties of surfaces of polyimide and AZ5214e graphitized by low-energy (1?keV) He{sup +} irradiation at different polymer temperatures were investigated. The conductivity of the graphitized layers can be controlled with the irradiation temperature within a broad range and can reach values up to ?1000?S/cm. We show that the electrical transport in low-conducting samples is governed by thermally activated hopping, while the samples with a high conductivity show a typical semimetallic behavior. The transition from thermally activated to semimetallic conductance governed by the irradiation temperature could also be observed in optical measurements. The semimetallic samples show an unusually high for graphitic materials carrier concentration, which results in a high extinction coefficient in the visible light range. By analyzing the temperature dependence of the conductance of the semimetallic samples, we conclude that the scattering of charge carriers is dominated by Coulomb interactions and can be described by a weak localization model. The transition from a three to two dimensional transport mechanism at low temperatures consistently explains the change in the temperature dependence of the conductance by cooling, observed in experiments.

  20. ARM: Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN): solar irradiances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN): solar irradiances Title: ARM: Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN): solar irradiances Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN): solar ...

  1. PLUTONIUM-238 RECOVERY FROM IRRADIATED NEPTUNIUM TARGETS USING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PLUTONIUM-238 RECOVERY FROM IRRADIATED ... and purifying 238Pu and unconverted 237Np post irradiation is by anion exchange (IX). ...

  2. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use ...

  3. ARM: Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR): upwelling irradiance at 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR): upwelling irradiance at 3-meter height Title: ARM: Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR): upwelling irradiance at 3-meter height Multi-Filter Radiometer ...

  4. Spatial correlation of energy deposition events in irradiated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    events in irradiated liquid water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spatial correlation of energy deposition events in irradiated liquid water You are accessing a ...

  5. Spatial correlation of energy deposition events in irradiated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    events in irradiated liquid water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spatial correlation of energy deposition events in irradiated liquid water Monte Carlo electron ...

  6. Production of high Resoulution Irradiance Data for Central America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    irradiance (GHI) and direct irradiance (DNI) data sets for the countries of Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. Much of our initial effort focused on building up...

  7. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- Gamma Irradiation Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for irradiating solid and liquid samples, allowing a wide range of tests to determine the effects of radiation on materials. Typically, the Gamma Irradiation Facility is used to...

  8. Post Irradiation Examination of Stainless Steel Cladding from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Post Irradiation Examination of Stainless Steel Cladding from In-Reactor Permeation Experiment Post Irradiation Examination of Stainless Steel Cladding from In-Reactor Permeation ...

  9. Radiochemistry Results from the IER-163 COMET Irradiation (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Radiochemistry Results from the IER-163 COMET Irradiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiochemistry Results from the IER-163 COMET Irradiation The ...

  10. Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods...

  11. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong ...

  12. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells | Department of Energy Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential

  13. Photo-oxidation of polymer-like amorphous hydrogenated carbon under visible light illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxamusa, Salmaan; Laurence, Ted; Worthington, Matthew; Ehrmann, Paul

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), a polymer-like network typically synthesized by plasma chemical vapor deposition, has long been understood to exhibit optical absorption of visible light (λ > 400 nm). In this report we explain that this absorption is accompanied by rapid photo-oxidation (within minutes) that behaves in most respects like classic polymer photo-oxidation with the exception that it occurs under visible light illumination rather than ultraviolet illumination.

  14. Photo-oxidation of polymer-like amorphous hydrogenated carbon under visible light illumination

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baxamusa, Salmaan; Laurence, Ted; Worthington, Matthew; Ehrmann, Paul

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), a polymer-like network typically synthesized by plasma chemical vapor deposition, has long been understood to exhibit optical absorption of visible light (? > 400 nm). In this report we explain that this absorption is accompanied by rapid photo-oxidation (within minutes) that behaves in most respects like classic polymer photo-oxidation with the exception that it occurs under visible light illumination rather than ultraviolet illumination.

  15. LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interferometer (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer Synchrotron or FEL X-ray mirrors are required to deliver an X-ray beam from its source to an experiment location, without contributing significantly to wave front distortion. Accurate mirror figure measurements are required prior

  16. The phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiations phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared radiations The phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared radiations Print Thursday, 18 February 2016 10:48 The nearly simultaneous Mott (electronic) and Peierls (structural) transitions in vanadium dioxide are of significant scientific interest and have tremendous technological promise in computing, memory, optics, and micromechanics. The cover features nanoscale-resolution maps of the Mott and

  17. Innovation in Improving Visibility into the Health of the Grid | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Innovation in Improving Visibility into the Health of the Grid Innovation in Improving Visibility into the Health of the Grid October 29, 2015 - 3:12pm Addthis David Ortiz David Ortiz Former Deputy Assistant Secretary, Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis I have previously written about synchrophasors. These are systems that measure the status of the electric power grid at high resolution and enable a wide range of applications that allow operators to manage their systems

  18. Video monitoring of atmospheric icing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wareing, J.B.; Chetwood, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past six years, EA Technology has been involved in the remote monitoring of test spans and samples of overhead transmission line conductors in the UK in areas chosen for their severe winter weather. The sites are unmanned and regularly suffer gales, blizzards and severe icing conditions. Test samples at the sites are monitored day and night using automate, computer and remotely controlled video and still cameras using both the visible and near infrared spectrum. Video and still picture data is stored on site for periodic collection. Meteorological and load force data is collected and also stored at these remote sites and is sent automatically by mobile phone link to a computer at the EA Technology center. All this data can also be monitored at any time at the center over 200 miles away.

  19. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  20. Iodine-131 in irradiated fuel at time of processing from December 1944 through December 1947

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeb, C.M.; Morgan, L.G.

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a record of the iodine-131 releases that were used as source terms in calculating the Phase 1 air pathway doses. The following table provides estimates of monthly iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere from the irradiated fuel processing plants for the time period December 1944 (the first month of dissolution of irradiated fuel from the Hanford Site) through December 1947. The estimated values of iodine-131 contained in the irradiated fuel at the time of processing were calculated using the best available information. Details of the calculations, including the assumptions required to obtain the values and the inherent uncertainties in the values, will be addressed in a Phase 2 HEDR report. The quantity of iodine-131 is released to the atmosphere is obtained by multiplying the calculated iodine-131 content of the fuel being dissolved by a release fraction. The actual release fraction value is uncertain. The release fractions assumed for iodine-131 were based on values that are expected to bound the actual release of iodine-131. The Phase 1 dose estimates from iodine-131 were based on a most probable release factor of 75% with an upward uncertainty bound of 85% and a lower uncertainty bound of 50%. The values shown in the table were input to the Phase 1 Modular Dose Calculation Model, which provided the air pathway doses. 1 tab.

  1. A TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF TITAN'S NORTH POLAR ATMOSPHERE FROM A SPECULAR REFLECTION OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Clark, Roger N.; Sotin, Christophe; Buratti, Bonnie J.; dmkovics, Mt; Appr, Thomas; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin H.; Le Moulic, Stphane; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2013-11-10

    Cassini/VIMS T85 observations of a solar specular reflection off of Kivu Lacus (87.4N 241.1E) provide an empirical transmission spectrum of Titan's atmosphere. Because this observation was acquired from short range (33,000 km), its intensity makes it visible within the 2.0, 2.7, and 2.8 ?m atmospheric windows in addition to the 5 ?m window where all previous specular reflections have been seen. The resulting measurement of the total one-way normal atmospheric optical depth (corresponding to haze scattering plus haze and gas absorption) provides strong empirical constraints on radiative transfer models. Using those models, we find that the total haze column abundance in our observation is 20% higher than the Huygens equatorial value. Ours is the first measurement in the 2-5 ?m wavelength range that probes all the way to the surface in Titan's arctic, where the vast majority of surface liquids are located. The specular technique complements other probes of atmospheric properties such as solar occultations and the direct measurements from Huygens. In breaking the degeneracy between surface and atmospheric absorptions, our measured optical depths will help to drive future calculations of deconvolved surface albedo spectra.

  2. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  4. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance All of the solar radiation, across the wavelength range of 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, coming directly from the sky except for solar radiation coming directly from the sun and the circumsolar irradiance within approximately three degrees of the sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments

  5. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  6. Gamma-ray irradiated polymer optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, C.-C.; Wei, T.-Y.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, W.-S.; Wei, Y.-Y.

    2008-01-14

    Optical waveguides fabricated by gamma-ray irradiation on polymer through a gold mask are presented. The gamma-ray induced index change is found almost linearly dependent on the dose of the irradiation. And the measured propagation losses are low enough for practical application. Due to the high penetrability of gamma ray, uniform refractive index change in depth can be easily achieved. Moreover, due to large-area printing, the uniformity of waveguide made by gamma-ray irradiation is much better than that by e-beam direct writing.

  7. DEFRA Global Atmosphere Dept | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: SW1E 6DE Product: Atmosphere research department of the UK Department of Food and Rural Affairs. References: DEFRA - Global Atmosphere Dept.1 This article is a...

  8. Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. ...

  9. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  10. Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springston, Stephen R.; Lloyd, Judith; Zheng, Jun

    2007-10-23

    A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.