Sample records for visible emissions rhode

  1. Smoke and Visible Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes controls on smoke and visible emissions from certain sources.  This rule is not intended to preempt any more stringent controls on smoke and visible emissions provided in any...

  2. Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    More, R.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1761 EMISSION OF VISIBLE LIGHT BY HOT DENSE METALS ByDE-AC52-07NA27344. HI FAN Emission of Visible Light by HotABSTRACT We consider the emission of visible light by hot

  3. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour which is greater...

  4. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  5. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

  6. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

  7. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

  8. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

  9. Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state’s distribution grid....

  10. Forestry Policies (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's forests cover over half of the state's land area, and are managed by the Department of Environmental Management, Division of Forest Environment. The State issued its "Forest...

  11. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  12. Q:\\Awards\\External\\Rhodes\\Rhodes Application.docx The Rhodes Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Q:\\Awards\\External\\Rhodes\\Rhodes Application.docx The Rhodes Scholarship DUE DATE is permitted to publish an individual's name, Faculty, program, and award information. McMaster University's Convocation program and other award publications. Further information can be found in the General Academic

  13. Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's stormwater design and installation standards manual has been developed to describe mandatory and suggested stormwater design and performance criteria for applicants to the Department...

  14. Small-Scale Solar Grants (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

  15. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

  16. Rhodes Hall Ross Heart Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Emergency 315 315 26 Rhodes Hall Ross Heart Hospital James Cancer Hospital Martha Morehouse.m. James Cancer Hospital 7:10 a.m. Rhodes Hall 7:13 a.m. Ross Heart Hospital 7:15 a.m. Martha Morehouse

  17. Visible light stimulating dual-wavelength emission and O vacancy involved energy transfer behavior in luminescence for coaxial nanocable arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Lei, E-mail: nanoyang@qq.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hunan Province Key Laboratory for Spray Deposition Technology and Application, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Dong, Jiazhang; Jiang, Zhongcheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Pan, Anlian; Zhuang, Xiujuan [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a strategy to investigate O vacancy (V{sub O}) involved energy transfer and dual-wavelength yellow emission in coaxial nanocable. By electric field deposition and subsequent sol-gel template approach, ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu coaxial nanocable arrays are synthesized. After visible light excitation, system is promoted to O vacancy charge transfer state of V{sub O}(0/+). In the following cross relaxation, energy transfer from V{sub O} to the excitation energy level of Tb{sup 3+} in ZnO:Tb core area. While in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu shell area, energy transfer to the excitation energy level of Eu{sup 3+}. Subsequently, dual-wavelength emission is observed. By constructing nanocable with dual-wavelength emission, yellow luminescence is obtained. Adjust doping concentration of Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} in the range of 0.01–0.05, chromaticity coordinates of ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanocable stably stays at yellow region in color space except ZnO:Tb{sub 0.01}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sub 0.01}. As Vo states act as media in energy transfer process in nanocablers, visible light can stimulate dual-wavelength emissions. Yellow luminescent nanocable arrays will have great applications in light-emitting diode luminescence.

  18. Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R. (3777 Independence Ave., Bronx, NY 10463); Demos, Stavros G. (3550 Pacific Ave., Apt. 304, Livermore, CA 94550); Zhang, Gang (3 Rieder Rd., Edison, NJ 08817)

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

  19. Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in...

  20. Can a many-nucleon structure be visible in bremsstrahlung emission during $\\alpha$ decay?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P; Zou, Li-Ping

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze if the nucleon structure of the $\\alpha$ decaying nucleus can be visible in the experimental bremsstrahlung spectra of the emitted photons which accompany such a decay. We develop a new formalism of the bremsstrahlung model taking into account distribution of nucleons in the $\\alpha$ decaying nuclear system. We conclude the following: (1) After inclusion of the nucleon structure into the model the calculated bremsstrahlung spectrum is changed very slowly for a majority of the $\\alpha$ decaying nuclei. However, we have observed that visible changes really exist for the $^{106}{\\rm Te}$ nucleus ($Q_{\\alpha}=4.29$ MeV, $T_{1/2}$=70 mks) even for the energy of the emitted photons up to 1 MeV. This nucleus is a good candidate for future experimental study of this task. (2) Inclusion of the nucleon structure into the model increases the bremsstrahlung probability of the emitted photons. (3) We find the following tendencies for obtaining the nuclei, which have bremsstrahlung spectra more sensitive to the ...

  1. Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    emission, were also determined. An improved image of the weld pool can be obtained by operating within will require development of new sensor systems. As the "Yelding arc is a harsh environment, noncontacting to control joint tracking and weld E. W. KIM, C. ALLEMAND and T. W. EAGAR are with the Massachusetts

  2. Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

  3. Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: margaret.m@mail.ioffe.ru; Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  4. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Rhode Island as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    facilities in Rhode Island, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  6. The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Jobs Development Act provides an incremental reduction in the corporate income tax rate (9%) to companies creating jobs in Rhode Island. For every ten new jobs created for companies with fewer...

  7. Job Creation Guaranty Program (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RIEDC’s Job Creation Guaranty Program provides businesses looking to expand or relocate in Rhode Island with access to capital and credit. RIEDC guarantees loans by private lenders or guarantees...

  8. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

  9. Observation of enhanced visible and infrared emissions in photonic crystal thin-film light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y. F.; Li, K. H.; Hui, R. S. Y.; Choi, H. W., E-mail: hwchoi@hku.hk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals, in the form of closed-packed nano-pillar arrays patterned by nanosphere lithography, have been formed on the n-faces of InGaN thin-film vertical light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Through laser lift-off of the sapphire substrate, the thin-film LEDs conduct vertically with reduced dynamic resistances, as well as reduced thermal resistances. The photonic crystal plays a role in enhancing light extraction, not only at visible wavelengths but also at infrared wavelengths boosting heat radiation at high currents, so that heat-induced effects on internal quantum efficiencies are minimized. The observations are consistent with predictions from finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  10. Examining the temporal evolution of hypervelocity impact phenomena via high-speed imaging and ultraviolet-visible emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandy, J. D., E-mail: jt245@le.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Mihaly, J. M.; Adams, M. A.; Rosakis, A. J. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal evolution of a previously observed hypervelocity impact-induced vapor cloud [Mihaly et al., Int. J. Impact Eng. 62, 13 (2013)] was measured by simultaneously recording several full-field, near-IR images of the resulting emission using an OMA-V high-speed camera. A two-stage light-gas gun was used to accelerate 5?mg Nylon 6/6 right-cylinders to speeds between 5?km/s and 7?km/s to impact 1.5?mm thick 6061-T6 aluminum target plates. Complementary laser-side-lighting [Mihaly et al., Int. J. Impact Eng. 62, 13 (2013); Proc. Eng. 58, 363 (2013)] and front-of-target (without laser illumination) images were also captured using a Cordin ultra-high-speed camera. The rapid expansion of the vapor cloud was observed to contain a bright, emitting exterior, and a darker, optically thick interior. The shape of this phenomenon was also observed to vary considerably between experiments due to extremely high-rate (>250?000?rpm) of tumbling of the cylindrical projectiles. Additionally, UV-vis emission spectra were simultaneously recorded to investigate the temporal evolution of the atomic and molecular composition of the up-range, impact-induced vapor plume. A PI-MAX3 high-speed camera coupled to an Acton spectrograph was utilized to capture the UV-vis spectra, which shows an overall peak in emission intensity between approximately 6–10??s after impact trigger, corresponding to an increased quantity of emitting vapor/plasma passing through the spectrometer slit during this time period. The relative intensity of the numerous spectral bands was also observed to vary according to the exposure delay of the camera, indicating that the different atomic/molecular species exhibit a varied temporal evolution during the vapor cloud expansion. Higher resolution spectra yielded additional emission lines/bands that provide further evidence of interaction between fragmented projectile material and the 1?mmHg atmosphere inside the target chamber. A comparison of the data to down-range emission spectra also revealed differences in the relative intensities of the atomic/molecular composition of the observed vapor clouds.

  11. Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships Campus Level Competition --Cover Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships Campus Level Competition -- Cover Sheet Please submit this form with your Rhodes/Marshall Campus Application by Sept 3, 2013 to the Overseas Resource Center, Bechtel Address Permanent Phone MARSHALL Applicants Region through which you will apply Choice of universities

  12. Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesysRenewableStrategiesRhodes Marsh Geothermal

  13. Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsource History ViewRhodes Marsh

  14. Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

  15. Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

  16. THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE FY 2015 Allocation Cost or Classified.2% URI Budget & Financial Planning Office 9.17.14 Office:fringebenefits:office of sponsored projects: FY2015 Allocation #12;

  17. Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm.

  18. The Rhode Island state house--the competition (1890-1892)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Hilary A. (Hilary Ann)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of the design competition for the new State House in Providence, Rhode Island, which began in 1890 and ended in 1892. The competition was supervised by the Rhode Island State House Commission, a body formed ...

  19. UWMadison Campus Nomination Process for Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell Scholarships Information for Recommenders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    UWMadison Campus Nomination Process for Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell Scholarships Information to the Rhodes Scholarship, Marshall Scholarship, and/or Mitchell Scholarship from UWMadison. These scholarships fund postbaccalaureate study at the University of Oxford (Rhodes), any university in the UK (Marshall

  20. Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Mayrai Gindy, University of Rhode.3 Hazard Classification of the Federal Emergency Management Agency .............. 11 2.4 General Dam Design

  1. Timing of Late Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene tectonic events in Rhodes (Greece) inferred from magneto-biostratigraphy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Timing of Late Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene tectonic events in Rhodes (Greece) inferred from sequences on the island of Rhodes (Aegean fore-arc, Greece). Here, we present an integrated isotopic; Pliocene; Pleistocene; Rhodes; Greece; Mediterranean Sea 1. Introduction The island of Rhodes (Greece

  2. University of Rhode Island ELE 208: Intro to Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sendag, Resit

    University of Rhode Island ELE 208: Intro to Computing Systems Style Guidelines for Assembly. Furthermore, programs written following appropriate style guidelines are easier to write and debug than whether this becomes an easy or an impossible task. The following guidelines will help you write well

  3. ATHENS SANTORINI EPHESUS/KUSADASI RHODES MYKONOS KAVALA ISTANBUL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    ATHENS · SANTORINI · EPHESUS/KUSADASI RHODES · MYKONOS · KAVALA · ISTANBUL 7-NIGHT LUXURY CRUISE;Santorini, Greece V1 VOTEDONEOFTHEWORLD'S BESTCRUISELINES MAY14­22,2014 ATHENS·SANTORINI·EPHESUS or travel to the ancient city of Ephesus and walk through its beautifully preserved ruins. Savor

  4. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 29, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 29, 2007 Volume 4, Issue 7 Is today your lucky day? If you renew your membership in (or join) the URI Alumni Association before April 6, your name: Two season tickets for the 2007-2008 URI Men's Basketball home games; two season tickets for the 2007

  5. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 31, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    . To protect your privacy, log in is required. Thank you for taking the time to vote! Please URI first public family to their newly built home The URI College of Human Science and Services and South County HabitatUniversity of Rhode Island inAdvance March 31, 2005 Volume 2, Issue 7 There's no place like home

  6. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 30, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    . More... University Library wins national award for information forum series The University of Rhode with high-tech training The traditional Narragansett Indian culture plays a vital role in Wanda Hopkins Island Library has been selected to receive the 2006 Association of College and Research Libraries

  7. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island) The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island) The regulations state...

  10. Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFactIowaMontanaYorkOregonRhode Island

  11. Lincoln, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting ControlWyoming:Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump

  12. Scituate, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformation Evaluation,Schmid SiliconSchwenksville,HoleRhode

  13. Harrisville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio: EnergyWestOhio:Rhode Island: Energy

  14. Smithfield, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation SlimSloughCreekRhode Island: Energy

  15. Greenville, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa:Greenport, NewGCAMaine: EnergyNewRhode

  16. Foster, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbsSalonga, New York:Rhode Island: Energy

  17. Barrington, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtriaPower SystemsRhode Island: Energy Resources

  18. The visibility complex made visibly simple an introduction to 2D structures of visibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frédo

    . Then a sweeping algorithm that can build the complex in O(mlog(n)) where n is the size of the visibility graph when a line becomes tangent to three objects. This is shown in the video. The complex is build usingThe visibility complex made visibly simple an introduction to 2D structures of visibility Fr

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Rhode Island.

  20. ARM - Measurement - Visibility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM DatagovMeasurementsVisibility ARM Data

  1. Copyright C 2009 by J. Nickel, A.M. Ross, and D.H. Rhodes Trading Project Costs and Benefits in Multi-Attribute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 Copyright C 2009 by J. Nickel, A.M. Ross, and D.H. Rhodes Trading Project Costs and Benefits in Multi-Attribute Tradespace Exploration Julia Nickel1 , Adam M. Ross2 and Donna H. Rhodes3 1

  2. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination was initially projected. The work performed provided answers to a number of important questions. The first is that, with the investigated approaches, the maximum sustained emitter efficiencies are about 1.5 times that of a standard incandescent bulb. This was seen to be the case for both thick and thin emitters, and for both mono-layer and bi-layer designs. While observed VIS/NIR ratios represent improvements over standard incandescent bulbs, it does not appear sufficient to overcome higher cost (i.e. up to five times that of the standard bulb) and ensure commercial success. Another result is that high temperatures (i.e. 2650 K) are routinely attainable without platinum electrodes. This is significant for reducing material costs. A novel dual heating arrangement and insulated electrodes were used to attain these temperatures. Another observed characteristic of the emitter was significant grain growth soon after attaining operating temperatures. This is an undesirable characteristic that results in substantially less optical scattering and spectral selectivity, and which significantly limits emitter efficiencies to the values reported. Further work is required to address this problem.

  3. Tectonic and climatic controls on coastal sedimentation: The Late PlioceneMiddle Pleistocene of northeastern Rhodes, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of northeastern Rhodes, Greece Jean-Jacques Cornée a,, Pierre Moissette a , Sébastien Joannin a , Jean-Pierre Suc Athens, Greece e FRE 2761 Géologie des Systčmes Carbonatés, Université de Provence, case 67, 3 place of northeastern Rhodes (Greece) were deposited in an active tectonic setting. They provide an excellent

  4. renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    greenhouse gas emissions Waste-to-energy achieves the reduction of greenhouse gas emission through three separate mechanisms: 1) by generating electrical power or steam, waste-to-energy avoids carbon dioxide (CO2 mechanisms provide a true accounting of the greenhouse gas emission reduction potential of waste

  5. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  6. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er{sup 3+} induced by 980?nm excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo, E-mail: songzg@kmust.edu.cn; Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Under 980?nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}/{sup 4}S{sub 3/2} (green) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} (red) levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were observed from Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er{sup 3+} ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er{sup 3+} ions doping.

  7. Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight reflection and long-wave infrared (LWIR) thermal emission. During a 4-week period in summer 2011

  8. EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA J T Sims, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Ă? 2005, Elsevier Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Introduction Eutrophication describes in nutrient inputs. Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are the nutrients that drive most eutrophication processes

  9. Potential Water Use Conflicts Generated by Irrigated Agriculture in Rhode Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    Potential Water Use Conflicts Generated by Irrigated Agriculture in Rhode Island Arthur Gold. Drought stress regularly occurs in turf and nursery crops planted on loam and sandy loam soils. Epstein rain in the summer for sandy loam soils and after 6 days without rain on silt loam soils. Supplemental

  10. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22- Air Toxics (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum...

  11. Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

  12. Rules for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other Fluids To or Below the Ground Surface (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules to protect and preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State of Rhode Island (the “State”) and to prevent contamination of groundwater resources from the discharge...

  13. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27- Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe...

  14. 3D Visibility made visibly simple: an introduction to the Visibility Skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frédo

    .g. lighting sim­ ulation), the limits of umbra and penumbra, etc. Previ­ ous approaches have used coarse visible from a vertex of the scene and the limits of umbra and penumbra between two polygons. 1 are the limits of umbra and penumbra together with back­ projections which encode the topological aspect

  15. Presented at 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, University of Virginia, April 27, 2012 Abstract--The water quality in the West and Rhode Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented at 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, University of Virginia, April 27, 2012 Abstract-- The water quality in the West and Rhode Rivers (WRR), two mezohaline sub be the most cost-effective and sustainable alternative. I. INTRODUCTION HE West and Rhode rivers are two sub

  16. Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

  17. 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's pictureInformation Rhodes

  18. Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts RegionsPaul Bohn,Environmental ResearchRhode Island

  19. Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts RegionsPaul Bohn,Environmental ResearchRhode

  20. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  1. Systems of Systems and Emergent System Context Nirav B. Shah Dr. Donna H. Rhodes Prof. Daniel E. Hastings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Paper #85 Systems of Systems and Emergent System Context Nirav B. Shah Dr. Donna H. Rhodes Prof of systems of systems (SOS) is the emergent na- ture of the context of the SOS. In the spirit of Herbert that create the environment for goal attainment of a system. As SOS are sys- tems, they too have contexts

  2. Visible Light Communications: Recent Activities in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, James Jian-Qiang

    The Graduate School of System Design and Management, Keio University, Yokohama, Japan Smart Spaces: A Smart, visible light LEDs are beginning to be used in every home and office, which makes visible light LEDs ideal, and the market share of LED lighting will be more than 30 percent of total lighting market in 2016. Prediction

  3. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  4. 47th AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, May 1-4, 2006 Newport, Rhode Island Comparative Analysis of Computational Methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    in turbomachinery, helicopter blades in forward flight, wind turbines, flapping flight, flow control using synthetic47th AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, May 1-4, 2006 Newport, Rhode

  5. The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehan, Terry

    2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

  6. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island" "Emission type",

  7. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island" "Emission

  8. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island" "EmissionDakota"

  9. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island"Texas" "Emission

  10. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"RhodeVirginia" "Emission

  11. Visible spectrometer utilizing organic thin film absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiefenbruck, Laura C. (Laura Christine)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I modeled and developed a spectrometer for the visible wavelength spectrum, based on absorption characteristics of organic thin films. The device uses fundamental principles of linear algebra to reconstruct ...

  12. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41- Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These...

  13. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the...

  14. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9- Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.

  15. Relating productivity to visibility and lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of determining the appropriate light levels for visual tasks is a cost-benefit problem. Existing light level recommendations seriously underweight the importance of economic factors. Furthermore, the relative importance of the visibility factors in determining the optimal light levels appears inconsistent with the importance of these factors in determining visibility and visual performance. It is shown that calculations based on acuities give a lower limit of 100 to 200 lux for cost-effective light levels for office tasks. Upper limits are calculated from correlations of task performance to visibility levels. Visibility levels become progressively insensitive to luminance as luminance increases. Average power densities above 100 watts/m/sup 2/ are cost-effective only when visibility is very low. However, there is a 3-to-10 times larger increase in benefits from improving contrast or contrast sensitivity than from using more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. Contrast or contrast sensitivity can be improved by using forms with larger print, using xerographic copy instead of carbon or mimeo, making sure office workers have the right eyeglasses, or even by transferring workers with visual problems to less visually demanding tasks. Once these changes are made it is no longer cost-effective to use more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. This conclusion raises serious questions about recommendations that lead to greater than about 10 watts/m/sup 2/ of installed lighting for general office work.

  16. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

  17. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  18. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  19. Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

  20. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  1. The visible Smith-Purcell radiation search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Ulc, S. Wang, X.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here the results of an experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to search for the production of visible radiation from the Smith-Purcell effect using a 3 MeV electron beam. After running the experiment under a variety of conditions we were unable to isolate a definite signal from Smith-Parcell effect. Any Smith-Purcell signal present in the measured radiation was less than 10% of the background signal.

  2. State visibility in Q-bit space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Kracklauer

    2007-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study by comparison the structure of singlet type states in Q-bit space in the light of quantum and classical paradigms. It is shown that only the classical paradigm implies a variation in the visibility of correlation coefficients, that has been observed in fact in experiments. We conclude that Q-bit space in not a appropriate venue for an EPR test of quantum completeness.

  3. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Crawford, Mary H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  4. Seeing solar on campus : a visible photovoltaic installation on campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guarda, Daniel Jair Alves

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a methodology for selecting a site on the MIT campus for a visible solar photovoltaic installation. Visibility, solar exposure, advertising potential, aesthetics, interactivity and direct or important ...

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont. Together, these firms operated about 820 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, these firms operated approximately 739 mines. The estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1

  7. A Model of Visible QCD Axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukuda, Hajime; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We pursue a class of visible axion models where the axion mass is enhanced by strong dynamics in a mirrored copy of the Standard Model in the line of the idea put forward by Rubakov. In particular, we examine the consistency of the models with laboratory, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints. As a result, viable parameter regions are found, where the mass of the axion is of $O(100)$ MeV or above while the Peccei-Quinn breaking scale is at around $10^{3\\mbox{-}5}$ GeV.

  8. February 8th 2011 Visible light communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, James Jian-Qiang

    400 350 300 250 200 150100 150 200 150 150 200 x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m 2.5 800 600 700 500 400 200 150100 150 200 150 150 200 x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m 2.5 800 600 exchange RF Wireless channel PC or portable terminal Visible optical link LED solid state lighting unit #12

  9. A Model of Visible QCD Axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Fukuda; Keisuke Harigaya; Masahiro Ibe; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We pursue a class of visible axion models where the axion mass is enhanced by strong dynamics in a mirrored copy of the Standard Model in the line of the idea put forward by Rubakov. In particular, we examine the consistency of the models with laboratory, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints. As a result, viable parameter regions are found, where the mass of the axion is of $O(100)$ MeV or above while the Peccei-Quinn breaking scale is at around $10^{3\\mbox{-}5}$ GeV.

  10. Visible Light Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillage ofInformationVineyardEnergyViridasVishVisible

  11. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Crawford, M.H.

    1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1{lambda}) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%. 5 figs.

  12. Measurement of emission diameter as a function of time on foam z- pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazier, S.E.; Barber, T.L. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derzon, M.S.; Kellogg, J.W.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a streaked imaging capability to make time-resolved measurements of the emission size for low density foam z-pinches. By lens coupling visible emission from the z-pinch target to an array of fiber optics we obtained the emission profile in the visible as a function of time with radial resolution of 300 {mu}m. To measure the emission at temperatures greater than {approx}40 eV the source was slit-imaged or pin-hole imaged onto an x-ray filtered scintillator. Non-uniformities in both visible and x-ray emission were observed. We describe the diagnostics, the image unfold process, and results from the instrument for both visible and x-ray measurements.

  13. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Jewell, Jack L. (Bridgewater, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  14. Resonant Visible Light Modulation with Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Renwen; de Abajo, F Javier Garcia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast modulation and switching of light at visible and near-infrared (vis-NIR) frequencies is of utmost importance for optical signal processing and sensing technologies. No fundamental limit appears to prevent us from designing wavelength-sized devices capable of controlling the light phase and intensity at gigaherts (and even terahertz) speeds in those spectral ranges. However, this problem remains largely unsolved, despite recent advances in the use of quantum wells and phase-change materials for that purpose. Here, we explore an alternative solution based upon the remarkable electro-optical properties of graphene. In particular, we predict unity-order changes in the transmission and absorption of vis-NIR light produced upon electrical doping of graphene sheets coupled to realistically engineered optical cavities. The light intensity is enhanced at the graphene plane, and so is its absorption, which can be switched and modulated via Pauli blocking through varying the level of doping. Specifically, we explor...

  15. Sustained water cleavage by visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgarello, E.; Kiwi, J.; Pelizzetti, E.; Visca, M.; Graetzel, M.

    1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustained cleavage of water by 4 quanta of visible light is achieved in aqueous solutions by using a bifunctional redox catalyst composed of Pt and RuO/sub 2/ cosupported by colloidal TiO/sub 2/ particles. A photochemical model system containing Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/ as a sensitizer and methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) as an electron relay is used to test the effect of catalyst composition, sensitizer concentration, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of light-induced water decomposition. Electron relay free systems also exhibit high photoactivity. Direct band gap irradiation by uv light leads to efficient water cleavage in the absence of sensitizer and relay.

  16. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill...

  17. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    City - May 19, 2010 * Project Title - "Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow...

  18. Capturing All the Light: Panchromatic Visible Absorption for...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Capturing All the Light: Panchromatic Visible Absorption for Solar Photoconversion Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES...

  19. Packet loss visibility and packet prioritization in digital videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanumuri, Sandeep

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance comparison for videos with apparent compres-Prioritization in Digital Videos A Dissertation submitted inloss visibility,” Packet Video Workshop, Irvine, December

  20. Enhanced visible and near-infrared capabilities of the JET mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomanowski, B. A., E-mail: b.a.lomanowski@durham.ac.uk; Sharples, R. M. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Meigs, A. G.; Conway, N. J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Heesterman, P.; Kinna, D. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Center, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy diagnostic on JET has been upgraded with a new visible and near-infrared grating and filtered spectroscopy system. New capabilities include extended near-infrared coverage up to 1875 nm, capturing the hydrogen Paschen series, as well as a 2 kHz frame rate filtered imaging camera system for fast measurements of impurity (Be II) and deuterium D?, D?, D? line emission in the outer divertor. The expanded system provides unique capabilities for studying spatially resolved divertor plasma dynamics at near-ELM resolved timescales as well as a test bed for feasibility assessment of near-infrared spectroscopy.

  1. Visible Inequality, Status Competition and Conspicuous Consumption: Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Visible Inequality, Status Competition and Conspicuous Consumption: Evidence from India Punarjit representative micro data from India. I ...nd that a decrease in the level of visible inequality, ceteris paribus in one's social status due to parallel action of others. From a policy perspective, my ...ndings

  2. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Tai Ho (Los Alamos, NM); Williams, Arthur H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasmas generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  3. Introduction Dust aerosols affect visibility, perturb the radiative energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    Sunphotometer and air temperature from ground observations. Model Flow Chart GOES-8 06/28/00 1145 UTC -90 -80Introduction Dust aerosols affect visibility, perturb the radiative energy balance of the earth

  4. Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

  5. Visible and Infra-red Light Emission in Boron-Doped Wurtzite Silicon Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabbri, Filippo

    Silicon, the mainstay semiconductor in microelectronic circuitry, is considered unsuitable for optoelectronic applications owing to its indirect electronic band gap, which limits its efficiency as a light emitter. Here we ...

  6. CHARACTERISTIC SIZE OF FLARE KERNELS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED CONTINUA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we present a new approach to estimate the formation height of visible and near-infrared emission of an X10 flare. The sizes of flare emission cores in three wavelengths are accurately measured during the peak of the flare. The source size is the largest in the G band at 4308 A and shrinks toward longer wavelengths, namely the green continuum at 5200 A and NIR at 15600 A, where the emission is believed to originate from the deeper atmosphere. This size-wavelength variation is likely explained by the direct heating model as electrons need to move along converging field lines from the corona to the photosphere. Therefore, one can observe the smallest source, which in our case is 0.''65 {+-} 0.''02 in the bottom layer (represented by NIR), and observe relatively larger kernels in upper layers of 1.''03 {+-} 0.''14 and 1.''96 {+-} 0.''27, using the green continuum and G band, respectively. We then compare the source sizes with a simple magnetic geometry to derive the formation height of the white-light sources and magnetic pressure in different layers inside the flare loop.

  7. Z{sub eff} profile diagnostics using visible bremsstrahlung continuum for nonaxisymmetric plasmas with finite {beta} in large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, H. Y.; Dong, C. F. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Morita, S.; Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner-type visible spectrometer coupled with a charge-coupled device has been installed in large helical device (LHD) to measure visible bremsstrahlung continuum. A full vertical profile has been observed from the elliptical plasmas at horizontally elongated plasma cross section through a 44 fiber parallel array with vertical observation length of {approx}1 m. Line emissions can be easily eliminated by use of the visible spectrometer instead of an interference filter. A nonmonotonic bremsstrahlung emission profile, which is originated in the thick ergodic layer surrounding the main plasma, has been observed for normal discharges in all the magnetic configurations of LHD. After analyzing the detailed structure, the lower half of the vertical bremsstrahlung emission profile is found to be free of the strong edge bremsstrahlung emission in inwardly shifted magnetic configurations (R{sub ax{<=}}3.60 m). The nonmonotonic bremsstrahlung emission disappeared in extremely high-density discharges (n{sub e{>=}}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) because of the reduction of the plasma outside boundary. When the local emissivity is calculated using Abel inversion, the solution is very sensitive to the distortion of the magnetic surface structure. The influence of the magnetic surface distortion based on the finite {beta} effect is examined as error estimation in addition to unclear edge plasma boundary due to the presence of the ergodic layer. The result indicates that the determination of the normalized minor radius for each observation chord gives a larger influence on the Abel inversion rather than the determination of the chord length. When the observed chord-integrated bremsstrahlung intensity profile is flat, the resultant uncertainty seen in the bremsstrahlung emissivity profile becomes large, in particular, at the plasma center. The Z{sub eff} profile calculated with consideration of density and temperature profiles is verified in neutral-beam-heated discharges with H{sub 2} and C pellet injections, where the Z{sub eff} values should be close to 1 and 6, respectively. Analysis on the flat and hollow electron density profiles results in a fairly flat Z{sub eff} profile.

  8. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  9. Bright and fast voltage reporters across the visible spectrum via electrochromic FRET (eFRET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Peng; Douglass, Adam D; Hochbaum, Daniel R; Brinks, Daan; Werley, Christopher A; Harrison, D Jed; Campbell, Robert E; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a palette of brightly fluorescent genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) with excitation and emission peaks spanning the visible spectrum, sensitivities from 6 - 10% Delta F/F per 100 mV, and half-maximal response times from 1 - 7 ms. A fluorescent protein is fused to an Archaerhodopsin-derived voltage sensor. Voltage-induced shifts in the absorption spectrum of the rhodopsin lead to voltage-dependent nonradiative quenching of the appended fluorescent protein. Through a library screen, we identified linkers and fluorescent protein combinations which reported neuronal action potentials in cultured rat hippocampal neurons with a single-trial signal-to-noise ratio from 6.6 to 11.6 in a 1 kHz imaging bandwidth at modest illumination intensity. The freedom to choose a voltage indicator from an array of colors facilitates multicolor voltage imaging, as well as combination with other optical reporters and optogenetic actuators.

  10. Algorithms for the Automatic Identification of MARFEs and UFOs in JET Database of Visible Camera Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algorithms for the Automatic Identification of MARFEs and UFOs in JET Database of Visible Camera Videos

  11. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPACT EMISSIONS HEV PHEV marginal power plant is a coalpower uses relatively little coal, but in other cases emissions

  12. Interactive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Categories and Subject Descriptors: I.3.5 [Com- puter Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object ModelingInteractive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches Naga K. Govindaraju culling in complex 3D environments. An occlusion- switch consists of two GPUs (graphics processing units

  13. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  14. GLAO IN THE VISIBLE: THE SAM EXPERIENCE Andrei Tokovinina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    -common-path errors were avoided. SAM can feed corrected images to its internal CCD detector, SAMI (4K×4K CCDGLAO IN THE VISIBLE: THE SAM EXPERIENCE Andrei Tokovinina Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena, Chile Abstract. The SOAR adaptive module (SAM) is going through science

  15. Accepted Manuscript Visible Models for Interactive Pattern Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    in interactive visual classification. The visible model of an object to be recognized is an abstraction classification, faster than unaided human classification, and that both machine and human performance improve Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 USA. He is now with the National Library of Medicine, Bldg. 38A, Rm. 10S

  16. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Visibility Preprocessing with Occluder Fusion for Urban Walkthroughs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the umbra (shadow volume) with respect to a given area light source. In contrast to occlusion from a point: · The umbra with respect to a polygonal area light source is not only bounded by planes, but also by reguli, i. For visibility from a point, the joint umbra of many occluders is the union of the umbrae of the individual

  18. Multipath Reflections Analysis on Indoor Visible Light Positioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Wenjun; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible light communication (VLC) has become a promising research topic in recent years, and finds its wide applications in indoor environments. Particularly, for location based services (LBS), visible light also provides a practical solution for indoor positioning. Multipath-induced dispersion is one of the major concerns for complex indoor environments. It affects not only the communication performance but also the positioning accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of multipath reflections on the positioning accuracy of indoor VLC positioning systems. Combined Deterministic and Modified Monte Carlo (CDMMC) approach is applied to estimate the channel impulse response considering multipath reflections. Since the received signal strength (RSS) information is used for the positioning algorithm, the power distribution from one transmitter in a typical room configuration is first calculated. Then, the positioning accuracy in terms of root mean square error is obtained and analyzed.

  19. Hydrogen generation under visible light using nitrogen doped titania anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, H.; Rumaiz, A.; Schulz, M.; Huang, C.P.; Sha, S. I.

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is among several energy sources that will be needed to replace the quickly diminishing fossil fuels. Free hydrogen is not available naturally on earth and the current processes require a fossil fuel, methane, to generate hydrogen. Electrochemical splitting of water on titania proposed by Fujishima suffers from low efficiency. The efficiency could be enhanced if full sun spectrum can be utilized. Using pulsed laser deposition technique we synthesized nitrogen doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}) thin films with improved visible light sensitivity. The photoactivity was found to be N concentration dependent. Hydrogen evolution was observed under visible light irradiation (wavelength > 390 nm) without the presence of any organic electron donor.

  20. Interference Visibility as a Witness of Entanglement and Quantum Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin Zhang; Arun Kumar Pati; Junde Wu

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum information and communication one looks for the non-classical features like interference and quantum correlations to harness the true power of composite systems. We show how the concept akin to interference is, in fact, intertwined in a quantitative manner to entanglement and quantum correlation. In particular, we prove that the difference in the squared visibility for a density operator before and after a complete measurement, averaged over all unitary evolutions, is directly related to the quantum correlation measure based on the measurement disturbance. For pure and mixed bipartite states the unitary average of the squared visibility is related to entanglement measure. This may constitute direct detection of entanglement and quantum correlations with quantum interference setups. Furthermore, we prove that for a fixed purity of the subsystem state, there is a complementarity relation between the linear entanglement of formation and the measurement disturbance. This brings out a quantitative difference between two kinds of quantum correlations.

  1. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  2. Reflection beamshifts of visible light due to graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermosa, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present theoretical calculations of reflection beamshifts, Goos-H\\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts, due to the presence of a monolayer graphene on a dielectric media when using a beam with wavelength in the visible range. Specifically, I look at beamshifts for different polarization states (p, s, $45^0$, $\\sigma^+$). The Goos-H\\"anchen shifts I calculated are in good agreement with results of a recent experiment. I will discuss other possible experimental routes to determine beamshifts in graphene.

  3. Visible light photon counters optimization for quantum information applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, J.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.; Estrada, J.; Bross, A.; /Fermilab; Ginther, G.; /Rochester U.; Buscher, V.; /Freiburg U.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the studies of the main parameters needed for optimal operation of Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) when used in quantum information systems. The isolation of the single photon signal is analyzed through the definition of a contamination parameter. A compromise in the minimization of this parameter for temperature, bias voltage and dark count variation must be achieved and this depends on the experimental conditions.

  4. A new list of thorium and argon spectral lines in the visible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Lovis; F. Pepe

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. We present a new list of thorium and argon emission lines in the visible obtained by analyzing high-resolution (R=110,000) spectra of a ThAr hollow cathode lamp. The aim of this new line list is to allow significant improvements in the quality of wavelength calibration for medium- to high-resolution astronomical spectrographs. Methods. We use a series of ThAr lamp exposures obtained with the HARPS instrument (High Accuracy Radial-velocity Planet Searcher) to detect previously unknown lines, perform a systematic search for blended lines and correct individual wavelengths by determining the systematic offset of each line relative to the average wavelength solution. Results. We give updated wavelengths for more than 8400 lines over the spectral range 3785-6915 A. The typical internal uncertainty on the line positions is estimated to be ~10 m/s (3.3 parts in 10^8 or 0.18 mA), which is a factor of 2-10 better than the widely used Los Alamos Atlas of the Thorium Spectrum (Palmer & Engleman 1983). The absolute accuracy of the global wavelength scale is the same as in the Los Alamos Atlas. Using this new line list on HARPS ThAr spectra, we are able to obtain a global wavelength calibration which is precise at the 20 cm/s level (6.7 parts in 10^10 or 0.0037 mA). Conclusions. Several research fields in astronomy requiring high-precision wavelength calibration in the visible (e.g. radial velocity planet searches, variability of fundamental constants) should benefit from using the new line list.

  5. Driving Down Diesel Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harley, Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland,”actions to clean up port truck emissions in Oakland serve asTurnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland,”

  6. Observation of two visible Dicke-superradiant transitions in atomic europium (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-123 Observation of two visible Dicke-superradiant transitions in atomic europium (*) C visible pour les raies de l'europium ŕ 03BB = 557,7 nm et 03BB = 545,3 nm. Le caractčre superradiant de report the first experimental evidence of visible superradiance for the europium lines at 03BB = 557.7 nm

  7. Visible Y -junction diode laser with mixed coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Poel, C.J.; Opschoor, J.; Valster, A.; Drenten, R.R. (Philips Research Laboratories, P. O. Box 80 000, 5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)); Andre, J.P. (Laboratoires d'Electronique et de Physique Applique, 3 Avenue Descartes, 94450 Limeil-Brevannes (France))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study and theoretical analysis of a phase-locked, visible, {lambda}=670 nm, 2-3 {ital Y}-junction semiconductor laser array are presented. In a ridgetype 2-3 {ital Y}-junction, AlInGaP/InGaP array, both in-phase and anti-phase array modes are observed to lase simultaneously. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a model based on the beam propagation method. The influence of the presence of both interferometric and evanescent coupling on the array modes is analyzed.

  8. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  9. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  10. Fiber optic interferometry: Statistics of visibility and closure phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Tatulli; A. Chelli

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferometric observations with three telescopes or more provide two observables: closure phase information together with visibilities measurements. When using single-mode interferometers, both observables have to be redefined in the light of the coupling phenomenon betwe en the incoming wavefront and the fiber. We introduce in this paper the estimator of both so-called modal visibility and modal closure phase. Then, we compute the statistics of the two observables in presence of partial correction by Adaptive Optics. From this theoretical analysis, data reduction process using classical least square minimization is investigated. In the framework of the AMBER instrument, the three beams recombiner of the VLTI, we simulate the observation of a single Gaussian source and we study the performances of the interferometer in terms of diameter measurements. We show that the observation is optimized, i.e. that the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the diameter is maximal, when the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the source is roughly 1/2 of the mean resolution of the interferometer. We finally point out that in the case of an observation with 3 telescopes, neglecting the correlation between the measurements leads to overestimate the SNR by a factor of $\\sqrt{2}$. We infer that in any cases, this value is an upper limit.

  11. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  12. Spatial and spectral filtering of supercontinuum emission generated in microstructure fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhou, Ping; Tarasevitch, A P; Linde, D von der [Institut fur Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Universitat Essen, Essen (Germany); Kondrat'ev, Yu N; Shevandin, V S; Dukel'skii, K V; Khokhlov, A V [All-Russian Scientific Centre 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute', St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bagayev, S N [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Smirnov, Valerii B [Russian Center of Laser Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The mode structure of supercontinuum emission generated by femtosecond pulses of Ti:sapphire laser radiation in microstructure fibres is studied. The long-wavelength (720 - 900 nm) and visible (400 - 600 nm) parts of supercontinuum are shown to be emitted in spectrally separable isolated spatial modes. These spectrally sliced single modes of supercontinuum emission possess a high spatial quality, verified by efficient nonlinear-optical frequency conversion. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. On the Detectability of Prompt Coherent GRB Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Macquart

    2007-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Both induced Compton scattering and induced Raman scattering strongly limit the observability of the extremely bright (emission recently predicted to emanate from gamma-ray bursts. Induced Compton scattering is the main limiting factor when the region around the progenitor is not dense but when one still considers the scattering effect of the a tenuous circumburst ISM. For a medium of density 0.01 n_{0.01} cm^{-3} and a path length L_{kpc} kpc and emission that is roughly isotropic in its rest frame the brightness temperature is limited to emission occurs. Thus, for a burst at distance D the predicted emission is only visible if the jet is ultra-relativistic, with Gamma > 10^3 (D/100 Mpc), or if the intrinsic opening angle of the emission is extremely small. Thus the presence or absence of such radio emission provides an excellent constraint on the Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow during the very early stages of its outburst. Induced Raman scattering imposes an even more stringent limit independent of the emission opening angle, but only effective if GRB emission must propagate through a dense progenitor wind within ~ 10^{15} cm from the blast center.

  14. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme: origins,assumptions behind emissions trading in non- market goods:eliminate the need for emissions trading in comparison to

  15. Synthesis of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Matsuda, Atsunori, E-mail: matsuda@ee.tut.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 °C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by sol–gel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 °C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 °C against time. Highlights: • Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. • Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. • Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. • Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. • Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  16. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal resolution. Published studies indicate higher emission rates from soils and animal wastes at higher temperatures, and temporal variation in fertilizer application. A recent inverse modeling study indicates temporal variation in regional NH{sub 3} emissions. Monthly allocation factors were derived to estimate monthly emissions from soils, livestock and wild animal waste based on annual emission estimates. Monthly resolution of NH{sub 3} emissions from fertilizers is based on fertilizer sales to farmers. Statewide NH{sub 3} emissions are highest in the late spring and early summer months.

  17. Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

  18. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  19. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  20. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  1. Excess Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

  2. Visible light photocatalytic activity in nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanobelts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Nyago Tafen; Lewis, James P. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Wang Jin; Wu Nianqiang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the electronic properties and photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanobelts. UV-visible spectra show enhanced absorption in the visible light range for nitrogen-doped nanobelts compared to the pristine sample. The nitrogen-doped nanobelts exhibit improved photocatalytic activity compared to the pristine sample upon visible light irradiation. Furthermore, the incorporation of nitrogen introduces localized states in the band gap.

  3. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in dbase iii plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Lighting Retrofit Improving Visibility, Saving Energy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and Emissions Estimates |

  7. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  8. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  9. Electrodeposition of hierarchical ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O nanorod films for highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, S. T.; Fan, G. H.; Liang, M. L.; Wang, Q. [Department of Optoelectronic Science, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Zhao, G. L., E-mail: zhaoguoliang@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high-performance visible-light-responsive photocatalytic materials has attracted widespread interest due to their potential applications in the environmental and energy industries. In this work, hierarchical ZnO nanorods films were successfully prepared on the stainless steel mesh substrates via a simple two-step seed-assisted electrodeposition route. Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles were then electrodeposited on the surface of ZnO nanorods to form the core-shell heterostructure. The synthesized ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectrophotometer. Due to the branched hierarchical morphologies and core-shell structure, ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O nanomaterials show a prominent visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance under the low-intensity light irradiation (40?mW/cm{sup 2}). The influence of some experimental parameters, such as Cu{sub 2}O loading amount, ZnO morphologies, the substrate type, and the PH of the Cu{sub 2}O precursor solution on ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O photocatalytic performance was evaluated.

  10. A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task under Ergonomic Constraints with a Manikin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task under Ergonomic Constraints with a Manikin, to assess an efficient path planner for a manikin for access and visibility task under ergonomic constraints a way to explore areas such as maintenance or ergonomics of the product that were traditionally ignored

  11. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Key goals were to assess the nature of these relationships as they varied between sensors

  12. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  13. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Aqueous Organic Contaminants by Semiconductors using Visible Light Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Photocatalytic Oxidation of Aqueous Organic Contaminants by Semiconductors using Visible Light semiconductor, InVO4, mechanically alloyed to TiO2, to shift photo-initiation into the visible range. 3, the ratio of semiconductors had no significant impact on the reaction rate. Long term goal - develop

  14. Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General System@utep.edu Abstract While global warming is a statistically confirmed long-term phenomenon, its most visible than the global warming itself. 1 Formulation of the Problem What is global warming. The term "global

  15. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  16. Modeling Traffic Flow Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappiello, Alessandra

    2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main topic of this thesis is the development of light-duty vehicle dynamic emission models and their integration with dynamic traffic models. Combined, these models

  17. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  18. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mass, membrane effects, fundamentals on permeability * DOC Pd:Pt ratios allow optimization * Gasoline emission control is amazing - Zone coating - Lower PGM with better...

  19. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  20. Identification of carbon sensitization for the visible-light photocatalytic titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. J.; Jhan, G. Y.; Cai, G. L.; Lin, C. S.; Wong, M. S.; Ke, S.-C.; Lo, H. H.; Cheng, C. L.; Shyue, J.-J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan and Graduate Institute of Optoelectronics Engineering, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors successfully synthesized titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanopowder with visible-light photocatalytic ability by low-pressure flat-flame metal organic chemical vapor condensation method. In order to confirm that carbon doping is a viable mechanism for the visible-light absorption of the powder prepared by this method, they modify the process by total exclusion of nitrogen usage to eliminate the nitrogen doping possibility. Since nitrogen is avoided in the process, the visible-light absorption cannot be due to nitrogen doping. They also found that the nanopowder formed has a single phase of anatase. Thus the nanopowder does not have anatase/rutile interface, and the authors can eliminate the possibility of visible-light absorption by the anatase/rutile interface. The visible-light absorption should thus be resort to the carbon doping. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies show the presence of several carbon related bonds except Ti-C bond. This suggests that the carbon does not incorporate into the TiO{sub 2} crystal and should locate on the surface of the nanopowder. Thus the carbon species act as a visible-light sensitizer for the TiO{sub 2} as a photocatalyst. Among all carbon bonds the C-C bond is believed to be responsible for the light absorption, since all other carbon related bonds are not chromophores. The visible-light TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis induced by carbon doping is confirmed and explained.

  1. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  2. Using the visibility complex for radiosity computation Rachel Orti Fredo Durand Stephane Rivi`ere Claude Puech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to be strictly recomputed. In computational geometry, a data structure called the visibility complex has recentlyUsing the visibility complex for radiosity computation Rachel Orti Fr´edo Durand St´ephane Rivi in those calculations. We propose the use of the visibility complex for radiosity calculations

  3. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  4. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier Redondo

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup \\`a la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute the flux of transversely polarised HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0-1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  5. EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullberg, G.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Resolution Computed Tomography of Positron Emitters,"of Dynamic Emission Computed Tomography," J. Nucl. Med. ~:IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY RECEIVED lAWRENCE

  6. Origin of photoactivity of oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2} under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, H.-H.; Gopal, Neeruganti O.; Ke, S.-C. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology Research Center, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 974-01, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As it is now well established that oxygen vacancies are spontaneously introduced during nitrogen doping of anatase TiO{sub 2}, there is a lively debate on whether nitrogen dopant or oxygen vacancy contributes to the visible light photoactivity of the doped catalyst. We showed that the coordinately unsaturated Ti site is integral to the visible light photoactivity in anatase oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2} catalyst. Accordingly, oxygen vacancies may contribute to the visible light photoactivities in N-doped TiO{sub 2} and other nonmetallic ion-doped TiO{sub 2} as well. A redox active visible light photocatalyst has been developed based on oxygen-deficient structure in anatase TiO{sub 2}.

  7. Graviweak Unification in the Visible and Invisible Universe and Inflation from the Higgs Field False Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Das; L. V. Laperashvili

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we develop the self-consistent $Spin(4,4)$-invariant model of the unification of gravity with weak $SU(2)$ interactions in the assumption of the existence of visible and invisible sectors of the Universe. It was shown that the consequences of the multiple point principle predicting two degenerate vacua in the Standard Model (SM) suggest a theory of Inflation, in which the inflaton field $\\sigma$ starts trapped in a cold coherent state in the "false vacuum" of the Universe at the value of the Higgs field's VEV $v\\sim 10^{18}$ GeV (in the visible world). Then the inflations of the two Higgs doublet fields, visible $\\phi$ and mirror $\\phi'$, lead to the emergence of the SM vacua at the Electroweak scales with the Higgs boson VEVs $v_1\\approx 246$ GeV and $v'_1=\\zeta v_1$ (with $\\zeta \\sim 100$) in the visible and invisible worlds, respectively.

  8. Creating supply chain visibility : a case study on extending Intel's Unit Level Traceability to customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Annie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to enable supply chain visibility for Intel products, the Customer Unit Level Traceability (ULT) Program was formed to help extend Intel's ULT capability to the customer level. Increased traceability of Intel ...

  9. The Source of the Helium Visible Lines in Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashi, A; Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We assume that the helium-I lines emitted by the massive binary system Eta Carinae are formed in the acceleration zone of the less-massive secondary star. We calculate the Doppler shift of the lines as a function of orbital phase and of several parameters of the binary system. We find that a good fit is obtained if the helium lines are formed in the region where the secondary wind speed is 430 km/sec. The acceptable binary eccentricity is in the range 0.9-0.95, and the inclination angle (the angle between a line perpendicular to the orbital plane and the line of sight) is in the range 40-55 degrees. Lower values of e require higher values of i, and vice versa. The binary system is oriented such that the secondary star is in our direction (closer to us) during periastron passage. The orbital motion can account in part to the Doppler shift of the peak in X-ray emission.

  10. The Source of the Helium Visible Lines in Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Kashi; Noam Soker

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We assume that the helium-I lines emitted by the massive binary system Eta Carinae are formed in the acceleration zone of the less-massive secondary star. We calculate the Doppler shift of the lines as a function of orbital phase and of several parameters of the binary system. We find that a good fit is obtained if the helium lines are formed in the region where the secondary wind speed is 430 km/sec. The acceptable binary eccentricity is in the range 0.9-0.95, and the inclination angle (the angle between a line perpendicular to the orbital plane and the line of sight) is in the range 40-55 degrees. Lower values of e require higher values of i, and vice versa. The binary system is oriented such that the secondary star is in our direction (closer to us) during periastron passage. The orbital motion can account in part to the Doppler shift of the peak in X-ray emission.

  11. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  12. Inductively coupled plasma chemistry examinations with visible acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffin, Kirk

    to be a powerful tool for plasma chemistry research. Introduction Inductively coupled plasma optical emission

  13. The effects of air pollution on visibility at Edwards AFB, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tongue, Jeffrey Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON VISIBILITY AT EDWARDS AFB, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JEFFREY SCOTT TONGUE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1987 Major Subject: Meteorology THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON VISIBILITY AT EDWARDS AFB, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JEFFREY SCOTT TONGUE Approved as to style and content by: Walter K. Henry (Chairman of Committee) Kenneth C. Brundidge...

  14. Using Visible and Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy to Characterize and Classify Soil Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Katrina Margarette

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    USING VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY TO CHARACTERIZE AND CLASSIFY SOIL PROFILES A Thesis by KATRINA MARGARETTE WILKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Soil Science USING VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY TO CHARACTERIZE AND CLASSIFY SOIL PROFILES A Thesis...

  15. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  16. Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

  17. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer Imaging of Line Emission Regions of beta Lyrae Using Differential Phase Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, H R; Tycner, C; Armstrong, J T; Zavala, R T; Benson, J A; Gilbreath, G C; Hindsley, R B; Hutter, D J; Johnston, K J; Jorgensen, A M; Mozurkewich, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an experiment to image the interacting binary star beta Lyrae with data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), using a differential phase technique to correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the interferometer phases. We take advantage of the fact that the visual primary of beta Lyrae and the visibility calibrator we used are both nearly unresolved and nearly centrally symmetric, and consequently have interferometric phases near zero. We used this property to detect and correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the phases of beta Lyrae and to obtain differential phases in the channel containing the Halpha emission line. Combining the Halpha-channel phases with information about the line strength, we recovered complex visibilities and imaged the Halpha emission using standard radio interferometry methods. We find that the results from our differential phase technique are consistent with those obtained from a more-standard analysis ...

  18. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M. [and others

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  19. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  20. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  1. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  2. Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Martinez-Oliveros; H. Moradi; A-C. Donea

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond with previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-ray, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time-distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential--field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant inverse correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

  3. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  4. ETA CARINAE ACROSS THE 2003.5 MINIMUM: ANALYSIS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Weis, K.; Bomans, D. J. [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Gull, T. R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stahl, O. [ZAH, Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Koenigstuhl, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: krister.nielsen@nasa.gov

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the visible through near-infrared spectrum of Eta Carinae ({eta} Car) and its ejecta obtained during the '{eta} Car Campaign with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT)'. This is a part of larger effort to present a complete {eta} Car spectrum, and extends the previously presented analyses with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) in the UV (1240-3159 A) to 10,430 A. The spectrum in the mid- and near-UV is characterized by the ejecta absorption. At longer wavelengths, stellar wind features from the central source and narrow-emission lines from the Weigelt condensations dominate the spectrum. However, narrow absorption lines from the circumstellar shells are present. This paper provides a description of the spectrum between 3060 and 10,430 A, including line identifications of the ejecta absorption spectrum, the emission spectrum from the Weigelt condensations and the P Cygni stellar wind features. The high spectral resolving power of VLT/UVES enables equivalent width measurements of atomic and molecular absorption lines for elements with no transitions at the shorter wavelengths. However, the ground-based seeing and contributions of nebular-scattered radiation prevent direct comparison of measured equivalent widths in the VLT/UVES and HST/STIS spectra. Fortunately, HST/STIS and VLT/UVES have a small overlap in wavelength coverage which allows us to compare and adjust for the difference in scattered radiation entering the instruments' apertures. This paper provides a complete online VLT/UVES spectrum with line identifications and a spectral comparison between HST/STIS and VLT/UVES between 3060 and 3160 A.

  5. Back-action effects in an all-optical model of dynamical Casimir emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Carusotto; S. De Liberato; D. Gerace; C. Ciuti

    2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a theoretical study of the optical properties of a three-level emitter embedded in an optical cavity including the non-rotating wave terms of the light-matter interaction Hamiltonian. Rabi oscillations induced by a continuous wave drive laser are responsible for a periodic time-modulation of the effective cavity resonance, which results in a significant dynamical Casimir emission. A clear signature of the back-action effect of the dynamical Casimir emission onto the drive laser is visible as a sizable suppression of its absorption.

  6. Emission and transport of cesium-137 from boreal biomass burning in the summer of 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strode, S.; Ott, Lesley E.; Pawson, Steven; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    While atmospheric concentrations of cesium-137 have decreased since the nuclear testing era, resuspension of Cs-137 during biomass burning provides an ongoing emission source. The summer of 2010 was an intense biomass burning season in western Russia, with high levels of particulate matter impacting air quality and visibility. A radionuclide monitoring station in western Russia shows enhanced airborne Cs-137 concentrations during the wildfire period. Since Cs-137 binds to aerosols, satellite observations of aerosols and fire occurrences can provide a global-scale context for Cs-137 emissions and transport during biomass burning events.

  7. Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these regulations is to establish water quality standards for the state's surface waters. These standards are intended to restore, preserve and enhance the physical, chemical and...

  8. The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

  9. Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663 (Million Cubicper3.61

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors forA2. For9,250Net WithdrawalsYear

  11. Standard practice for visible penetrant testing using the Water-Washable process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice describes procedures for visible liquid penetrant examination utilizing the water-washable process. It is a nondestructive practice for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. This practice can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics, and certain nonporous plastics, and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides the following references: 1.2.1 A reference by which visible penetrant examination procedures using the water-washable process can be reviewed to ascertain their applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the visible, water-washable liquid penetrant examination of materials and parts. Agreement between the u...

  12. Standard practice for visible penetrant testing using Solvent-Removable process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for visible penetrant examination utilizing the solvent-removable process. It is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics and certain nonporous plastics and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a visible penetrant examination method using the solvent-removable process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the visible, solvent-removable liquid penetrant examination of materials and parts. Agreeme...

  13. Controlled spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Seung Lee; Mary A. Rohrdanz; A. K. Khitrin

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of spontaneous emission is studied by a direct computer simulation of the dynamics of a combined system: atom + radiation field. The parameters of the discrete finite model, including up to 20k field oscillators, have been optimized by a comparison with the exact solution for the case when the oscillators have equidistant frequencies and equal coupling constants. Simulation of the effect of multi-pulse sequence of phase kicks and emission by a pair of atoms shows that both the frequency and the linewidth of the emitted spectrum could be controlled.

  14. Optimal irreversible stimulated emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

  15. Photocatalytic activity of nitrogen doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Songwang [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Gao Lian [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: liangaoc@online.sh.cn

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work provides the design and synthesis of nitrogen doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles working as efficient photocatalysts under visible light irradiation. Nitrogen doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are synthesized through the surface nitridation of rutile nanoparticles, which have been prepared in advance. The experimental results show that the nitrogen element is easily doped into the lattice of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and its doping amount increases with the decrease of nanocrystallite size. The photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles under visible light irradiation is correlated not only with the amount of doped nitrogen element but also with the morphology and crystallinity of nanoparticles.

  16. Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania for visible-light driven phenol degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Highfield, James, E-mail: James_Highfield@ices.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Pehkonen, Simo O. [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)] [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Pichat, Pierre [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)] [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Schreyer, Martin K. [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Chen, Zhong, E-mail: aszchen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-phase material (DP-160) comprising hydrated titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) and anatase (TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized in a low-temperature one-pot process in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) as the N-source. The unique structure exhibits strong visible light absorption. The chromophore is linked to Ti-N bonds derived from both surface sensitization and sub-surface (bulk) doping. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) and textural studies by N{sub 2} physisorption, the composite exists as mesoporous particles with a grain size of {approx}20 nm and mean pore diameter of 3.5 nm, responsible for the high surface area ({approx}180 m{sup 2}/g). DP-160 demonstrated photocatalytic activity in the degradation of phenol under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The activity of the composite was further enhanced by a small addition (0.001 M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which also gave rise to some visible light activity in the control samples. This effect is believed to be associated with the surface peroxo-titanate complex. GC-MS analyses showed that the intermediate products of phenol degradation induced by visible light irradiation of DP-160 did not differ from those obtained by UV (band-gap) irradiation of TiO{sub 2}. The overall performance of the composite is attributed to efficient excitation via inter-band states (due to N-doping), surface sensitization, improved adsorptive properties of aromatic compounds due to the N-carbonaceous overlayer, and the presence of heterojunctions that are known to promote directional charge transfer in other mixed-phase titanias like Degussa P25. - graphical abstract: Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania photocatalyst showing extended visible light absorption and efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature one-pot synthesis of visible light active dual phase photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dual phase consists of nanoscale titanate and anatase titania phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst displays high activity in degrading phenol under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanisms for the sensitization to visible light are considered.

  17. Atomic Entanglement vs Photonic Visibility for Quantum Criticality of Hybrid System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. X. Huo; Ying Li; Z. Song; C. P. Sun

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize the novel quantum phase transition for a hybrid system consisting of an array of coupled cavities and two-level atoms doped in each cavity, we study the atomic entanglement and photonic visibility in comparison with the quantum fluctuation of total excitations. Analytical and numerical simulation results show the happen of quantum critical phenomenon similar to the Mott insulator to superfluid transition. Here, the contour lines respectively representing the atomic entanglement, photonic visibility and excitation variance in the phase diagram are consistent in the vicinity of the non-analytic locus of atomic concurrences.

  18. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM anda mar- ket-based emissions trading program called theimpacts cre- ated by emissions trading programs that affect

  19. Graphene Coating Coupled Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

  20. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  1. Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for all countries High cost effectiviness:High cost effectiviness: International Emission trading Fairness NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450 ppmGDP SAS CPA WEU NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450

  2. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup \\`a la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute the flux of transversely polarised HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully io...

  3. X-ray emission from Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, J U; Wolk, S J; Dennerl, K; Burwitz, V

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first unambiguous detection of X-ray emission originating from Saturn with a Chandra observation, duration 65.5 ksec with ACIS-S3. Beyond the pure detection we analyze the spatial distribution of X-rays on the planetary surface, the light curve, and some spectral properties. The detection is based on 162 cts extracted from the ACIS-S3 chip within the optical disk of Saturn. We found no evidence for smaller or larger angular extent. The expected background level is 56 cts, i.e., the count rate is (1.6 +- 0.2) 10^-3 cts/s. The extracted photons are rather concentrated towards the equator of the apparent disk, while both polar caps have a relative photon deficit. The inclination angle of Saturn during the observation was -27 degrees, so that the northern hemisphere was not visible during the complete observation. In addition, it was occulted by the ring system. We found a small but significant photon excess at one edge of the ring system. The light curve shows a small dip twice at identical phases,...

  4. Temporary Housing Mission Overview Temporary Housing is a highly visible mission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Temporary Housing Mission Overview · Temporary Housing is a highly visible mission. · Success requires teamwork (FEMA/COE/State/Local) and advanced planning. · FEMA's steps to providing housing relief assistance (home repair limits, rental limits, self-help Manufactured Housing Units (MHU) on private sites

  5. Enhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Venki

    determined by x-ray crystallography except at very high resolution. The scattering of neutrons by hydrogenEnhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin Fong and structurally, direct visu- alization of them by using crystallography is difficult. Neutron crys- tallography

  6. Gain dispersion in Visible Light Photon Counters as a function of counting rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A.; /Fermilab; Buscher, V.; /Freiburg U.; Estrada, J.; /Fermilab; Ginther, G.; /Rochester U.; Molina, J.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of light signals using Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC), that indicate an increase in gain dispersion as the counting rate increases. We show that this dispersion can be understood on the basis of a recent observation of localized field reduction in VLPCs at high input rates.

  7. A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery; published 30 January 2004. [1] Solar radiation assessment by satellite is constrained by physical Composition and Structure: Transmission and scattering of radiation; KEYWORDS: solar radiation, satellite

  8. Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances Petr microwave methods. The method should be useful for long-term monitoring of the melt area of the Greenland of MODIS retrievals of the western portion of the Greenland ice sheet over the period 2000 to 2006

  9. Development of SiGe arrays for visible-near IR imaging applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Ashok K.

    SiGe based focal plane arrays offer a low cost alternative for developing visible- near-infrared focal plane arrays that will cover the spectral band from 0.4 to 1.6 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based foal plane ...

  10. Development of low dark current SiGe-detector arrays for visible-NIR imaging sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Ashok K.

    SiGe based Focal Plane Arrays offer a low cost alternative for developing visible- NIR focal plane arrays that will cover the spectral band from 0.4 to 1.6 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based IRFPA's will take ...

  11. Characterization of sige-detector arrays for visible-NIR imaging sensor applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Ashok K.

    SiGe based focal plane arrays offer a low cost alternative for developing visible- near-infrared focal plane arrays that will cover the spectral band from 0.4 to 1.6 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based foal plane ...

  12. MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells Jagadeesh Setti micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased Rv 6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer

  13. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  14. Fuels, Engines & Emissions | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels, Engines, Emissions SHARE Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Fuels, Engines, and Emissions research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is helping identify ways to increase...

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

  16. 6, 57735796, 2006 Vehicular emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be partly responsible for lower CO2 and higher CO and NO emission factors. Also, a fast reduction the emission (in g/km) of key and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO, NMHC, dur-10 of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO20 and CO2

  17. 4, 507532, 2004 Emission uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and Physics Discussions Impact of different emission inventories on simulated tropospheric ozone over China The importance of emission inventory uncertainty on the simulation of summertime tro- pospheric Ozone over China has been analyzed using a regional chemical transport model. Three independent emissions inventories

  18. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  19. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  20. Gas Turbine Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry ??? ? (1...., "Authority to Construct for Badger Creek Limited," Kern County Air Pollution Control District, Bakersfield.. Ca., June 20, 1989. 3) Wark, K. and Warner, C. F., Air Pollution - Its Origin and Control, Harper and Row, New York, New York, 1976, pp. 453...

  1. Analysis of Emission Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Danielewicz

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electric Vehicle Emissions Inspection Exemption Vehicles powered exclusively by electricity are exempt from state emissions control inspections. For more information, see the Rhode...

  3. Dye Surface Coating Enables Visible Light Activation of TiO2 Nanoparticles Leading to Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Eric

    Dye Surface Coating Enables Visible Light Activation of TiO2 Nanoparticles Leading to Degradation that an alizarin red S ~ARS! dye coating on TiO2 nanoparticles enables visible light activation coatings on TiO2 nanoparticles can serve to enhance imaging, by clearly showing that dye coatings on TiO2

  4. Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd. Lewis, R. Arnone, and R. Brewin (2013), Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans

  5. Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Marcel

    Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance, J. The algorithms are found to be valid both in coastal and oceanic waters, and largely insensitive to regional

  6. Comparison and detection of total and available soil carbon fractions using visible/near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    . With the advent of visible/near-infrared-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR-DRS) to infer on soil C fractionsComparison and detection of total and available soil carbon fractions using visible/near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy D.V. Sarkhot a,1,2 , S. Grunwald a, , Y. Ge b,3 , C.L.S. Morgan c,4

  7. X-ray Spontaneous Emission Control By 1D-PBG Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andre, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, CNRS, Universite Paris 6, UMR 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris CEDEX 05 (France)

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of the decay rate of an excited atom through the photonic mode density (PMD) was pointed out at radiofrequency by Purcell in 1946. Nowadays the development of sophisticated photonic band structures makes it possible to monitor the PMD at shorter radiation wavelengths and then to manipulate the spontaneous emission of atoms in the hard region of the electromagnetic spectrum especially in the visible domain. In this communication we study the possibility of monitoring the x-ray emission by means of one-dimensional photonic band structures such as periodic multilayer systems. Enhancement or inhibition of soft x-ray emissions seems now to be feasible by means of the state-of-the art in x-ray optics.

  8. Role of size and defects in ultrafast broadband emission dynamics of ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Liu, Mingzhao; Sfeir, Matthew Y., E-mail: msfeir@bnl.gov [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As wide bandgap materials are nanostructured for optoelectronics and energy technologies, understanding how size and defects modify the carrier dynamics becomes critical. Here, we examine broadband ultraviolet-visible subpicosecond emission dynamics of prototypical ZnO in bulk, nanowire and nanosphere geometries. Using a high-sensitivity transient emission Kerr-based spectrometer, we probe exciton dynamics in the low fluence regime to determine how defects states impact thermalization and recombination rates. In contrast to steady-state measurements, we transiently identify low-energy emission features that originate from localized excitonic states rather than mid-gap states, characterized by distinct recombination kinetics, and correlate to longer thermalization times. These states are critical for understanding the overall excited state lifetime of materials in this size regime, where crystallinity rather than dimensionality plays a primary role in dictating recombination dynamics.

  9. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Verity Instruments, Inc., 2901 Eisenhower Street, Carrollton, Texas 75007 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  10. Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions Zero Emission transportation goals Zero Emission MAP makes available technical assistance to states and cities to support the growth of zero emission mobility markets. 1 Research shows

  11. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV– Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV–Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will ex examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the UV-Visible spectroscopy studies. The use of TRLFS to examine Cm and U will provide data to evaluate lifetime, peak location, and peak ratios (mainly for U). The bases for the spectroscopic techniques have been investigated, providing fundamental evidence for the application’s utility.

  12. Absolute intensity calibration of flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectrometer using radial profiles of visible and extreme ultraviolet bremsstrahlung continuum emitted from high-density plasmas in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong Chunfeng; Wang Erhui [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A precise absolute intensity calibration of a flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in wavelength range of 60-400 A is carried out using a new calibration technique based on radial profile measurement of the bremsstrahlung continuum in Large Helical Device. A peaked vertical profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum has been successfully observed in high-density plasmas (n{sub e}{>=} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) with hydrogen ice pellet injection. The absolute calibration can be done by comparing the EUV bremsstrahlung profile with the visible bremsstrahlung profile of which the absolute value has been already calibrated using a standard lamp. The line-integrated profile of measured visible bremsstrahlung continuum is firstly converted into the local emissivity profile by considering a magnetic surface distortion due to the plasma pressure, and the local emissivity profile of EUV bremsstrahlung is secondly calculated by taking into account the electron temperature profile and free-free gaunt factor. The line-integrated profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum is finally calculated from the local emissivity profile in order to compare with measured EUV bremsstrahlung profile. The absolute intensity calibration can be done by comparing measured and calculated EUV bremsstrahlung profiles. The calibration factor is thus obtained as a function of wavelength with excellent accuracy. It is also found in the profile analysis that the grating reflectivity of EUV emissions is constant along the direction perpendicular to the wavelength dispersion. Uncertainties on the calibration factor determined with the present method are discussed including charge-coupled device operation modes.

  13. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. ”ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions

  14. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  16. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  17. Visibility of cold atomic gases in optical lattices for finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, Alexander [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig Maximilian Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany); Pelster, Axel [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In nearly all experiments with ultracold atoms time-of-flight pictures are the only data available. In this paper we present an analytical strong-coupling calculation for those time-of-flight pictures of bosons in a three-dimensional optical lattice in the Mott phase. This allows us to determine the visibility, which quantifies the contrast of peaks in the time-of-flight pictures, and we suggest how to use it as a thermometer.

  18. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  19. Infrared Emission from AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Sanders

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared observations of complete samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) have shown that a substantial fraction of their bolometric luminosity is emitted at wavelengths ~8-1000microns. In radio-loud and Blazar-like objects much of this emission appears to be direct non-thermal synchrotron radiation. However, in the much larger numbers of radio-quiet AGN it is now clear that thermal dust emission is responsible for the bulk of radiation from the near-infrared through submillimeter wavelengths. Luminous infrared-selected AGN are often surrounded by powerful nuclear starbursts, both of which appear to be fueled by enormous supplies of molecular gas and dust funneled into the nuclear region during the strong interaction/merger of gas rich disks. All-sky surveys in the infrared show that luminous infrared AGN are at least as numerous as optically-selected AGN of comparable bolometric luminosity, suggesting that AGN may spend a substantial fraction of their lifetime in a dust-enshrouded phase. The space density of luminous infrared AGN at high redshift may be sufficient to account for much of the X-Ray background, and for a substantial fraction of the far-infrared background as well. These objects plausibly represent a major epoch in the formation of spheroids and massive black holes (MBH).

  20. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  1. A statistical correlation of sunquakes based on their seismic, white light, and X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buitrago-Casas, J C; Lindsey, C; Calvo-Mozo, B; Krucker, S; Glesener, L; Zharkov, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the transient seis- mic emission, i.e., sunquakes, from some solar flares. Some theories associate high-energy electrons and/or white-light emission with sunquakes. High-energy charged particles and their subsequent heating of the photosphere and/or chro- mosphere could induce acoustic waves in the solar interior. We carried out a correlative study of solar flares with emission in hard-X rays (HXRs), enhanced continuum emission at 6173{\\AA}, and transient seismic emission. We selected those flares observed by RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) with a considerable flux above 50 keV between January 1, 2010 and June 26, 2014. We then used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO/HMI) to search for excess visible continuum emission and new sunquakes not previously reported. We found a total of 18 sunquakes out of 75 investigated. All of the sunquakes were associated with a enhancement of th...

  2. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode

  3. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  4. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California, 1982. 26. R. E. Simkins, "Evaporative runningevapora- tive emissions. Simkins concluded that runningis consis- tent with Simkins’ result. Weuse EPA’sestimates

  5. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland’s 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of...

  6. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and...

  7. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation....

  8. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simkins, "Evaporative running loss emissions," NIPER- 266,soak emissionsoccur. Running losses are evaporative lossesdiurnal, hot soak, running loss), and gasoline station and

  9. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  10. Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost from Mobile Source Emission Reduction Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschein, Perry S.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost From Mobilehave tested various emissions trading policies to supplementAn Analysis of EPA's Emissions Trading Program, 6 YALE J. ON

  11. Silicate emission in Orion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cesarsky; A. P. Jones; J. Lequeux; L. Verstraete

    2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present mid-infrared spectro-imagery and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Orion bar and of a region in the Orion nebula. These observations have been obtained in the Guaranteed Time with the Circular Variable Filters of the ISO camera (CAM-CVF) and with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS), on board the European Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Our data shows emission from amorphous silicate grains from the entire HII region and around the isolated O9.5V star Theta2 Ori A. The observed spectra can be reproduced by a mixture of interstellar silicate and carbon grains heated by the radiation of the hot stars present in the region. Crystalline silicates are also observed in the Orion nebula and suspected around Theta2 Ori A. They are probably of interstellar origin. The ionization structure and the distribution of the carriers of the Aromatic Infrared Bands (AIBs) are briefly discussed on the basis of the ISO observations.

  12. Direct comparison of EUV and visible-light interferometries Kenneth A. Goldberg*a, Patrick Naulleaua, SangHun Leea,b, Chang Changa,b, Cynthia Bresloffc,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct comparison of EUV and visible-light interferometries Kenneth A. Goldberg*a, PatrickĂ? EUV imaging systems provide the first direct comparisons of visible-light and at-wavelength EUV-coated Schwarzschild objectives are discussed. Favorable agreement has been achieved between EUV and visible-light

  13. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer Imaging of Line Emission Regions of beta Lyrae Using Differential Phase Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. R. Schmitt; T. A. Pauls; C. Tycner; J. T. Armstrong; R. T. Zavala; J. A. Benson; G. C. Gilbreath; R. B. Hindsley; D. J. Hutter; K. J. Johnston; A. M. Jorgensen; D. Mozurkewich

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an experiment to image the interacting binary star beta Lyrae with data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), using a differential phase technique to correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the interferometer phases. We take advantage of the fact that the visual primary of beta Lyrae and the visibility calibrator we used are both nearly unresolved and nearly centrally symmetric, and consequently have interferometric phases near zero. We used this property to detect and correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the phases of beta Lyrae and to obtain differential phases in the channel containing the Halpha emission line. Combining the Halpha-channel phases with information about the line strength, we recovered complex visibilities and imaged the Halpha emission using standard radio interferometry methods. We find that the results from our differential phase technique are consistent with those obtained from a more-standard analysis using squared visibilities (V^2's). Our images show the position of the Halpha emitting regions relative to the continuum photocenter as a function of orbital phase and indicate that the major axis of the orbit is oriented along p.a.=248.8+/-1.7 deg. The orbit is smaller than previously predicted, a discrepancy that can be alleviated if we assume that the system is at a larger distance from us, or that the contribution of the stellar continuum to the Halpha channel is larger than estimated. Finally, we also detected a differential phase signal in the channels containing HeI emission lines at 587.6 and 706.5nm, with orbital behavior different from that of the Halpha, indicating that it originates from a different part of this interacting system.

  14. Emission projections for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Section 812 Second Prospective Clean Air Act cost/benefit analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James H. Wilson, Jr.; Maureen A. Mullen; Andrew D. Bollman (and others) [E.H. Pechan & Associates, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the analysis, methods, and results of the recently completed emission projections. There are several unique features of this analysis. One is the use of consistent economic assumptions from the Department of Energy's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005) projections as the basis for estimating 2010 and 2020 emissions for all sectors. Another is the analysis of the different emissions paths for both with and without CAAA scenarios. Other features of this analysis include being the first EPA analysis that uses the 2002 National Emission Inventory files as the basis for making 48-state emission projections, incorporating control factor files from the Regional Planning Organizations (RPOs) that had completed emission projections at the time the analysis was performed, and modeling the emission benefits of the expected adoption of measures to meet the 8-hr ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), the Clean Air Visibility Rule, and the PM2.5 NAAQS. This analysis shows that the 1990 CAAA have produced significant reductions in criteria pollutant emissions since 1990 and that these emission reductions are expected to continue through 2020. CAAA provisions have reduced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by approximately 7 million t/yr by 2000, and are estimated to produce associated VOC emission reductions of 16.7 million t by 2020. Total oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission reductions attributable to the CAAA are 5, 12, and 17 million t in 2000, 2010, and 2020, respectively. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission benefits during the study period are dominated by electricity-generating unit (EGU) SO{sub 2} emission reductions. These EGU emission benefits go from 7.5 million t reduced in 2000 to 15 million t reduced in 2020. 16 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen/s)Velocity (km/s) #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;The

  16. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  17. Nanosecond-scale timing jitter in transition edge sensors at telecom and visible wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antia Lamas-Linares; Brice Calkins; Nathan A. Tomlin; Thomas Gerrits; Adriana E. Lita; Joern Beyer; Richard P. Mirin; Sae Woo Nam

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition edge sensors (TES) have the highest reported efficiencies (>98%) for detection of single photons in the visible and near infrared. Experiments in quantum information and foundations of physics that rely critically on this efficiency have started incorporating these detectors into con- ventional quantum optics setups. However, their range of applicability has been hindered by slow operation both in recovery time and timing jitter. We show here how a conventional tungsten-TES can be operated with jitter times of < 4 ns, well within the timing resolution necessary for MHz clocking of experiments, and providing an important practical simplification for experiments that rely on the simultaneous closing of both efficiency and locality loopholes.

  18. Emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless indium halide lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, M.; Hochi, A.; Horii, S.; Matsuoka, T. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrodeless HID lamp excited by microwave has been intensively investigated because of its long life, high efficacy and environmental aspect. This study reports excellent emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless HID lamp containing indium halides. The authors investigate InI and InBr as ingredients, and measure the microwave excited spectra and luminous intensities of lamps which are made from spherical silica glass in 10--40 mm outer diameter and with various amounts of halides. It is well known that such indium halides in the usual metal-halide lamps have strong blue line emission at 410 and 451nm. But, in the authors` microwave excited lamps, continuous spectrum can be observed in addition in the visible region. Increasing input of power of microwave makes this continuous spectrum stronger. Below 1kW microwave input power, the spectrum of InBr lamp almost resembled the CIE standard illuminant D65. As a consequence of the spectrum, they found that the color rendering and the duv of InBr lamp were excellent as high as 95 and smaller than 0.002, respectively, in the region of 400--800W input power. The efficacy higher than 100 lm/W was further achieved at 400W. The authors confirm that the microwave excited indium halides lamps can be applicable to many fields of lighting.

  19. Emission Inventories and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D. G.; van Aardenne, John; Battye, Bill; Garivait, Savitri; Grano, D.; Guenther, Alex; Klimont, Z.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lu, Zifeng; Maenhout, Greet; Ohara, Toshimasa; Parrish, David J.; Smith, Steven J.; Vallack, Harry

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Executive Body to the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution took the decision to establish the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP) in December 2004, it was on the basis of a growing understanding of the issues surrounding the hemispheric and intercontinental transport of air pollutants. It was recognised that whilst current regional emissions on their own created pollution levels that exceeded internationally-agreed air quality objectives, hemispheric transport could exacerbate local and regional air quality problems.Two particular pollutants of concern, and the focus of this report, are ozone and particulate matter (PM), known for their detrimental impacts on human health (these impacts and others are described in Chapter 5). There was well-documented evidence for the intercontinental transport of ozone and PM but, at that time, the significance of this intercontinental influence on the design of air pollution control policies was not well understood. The European Union, in drawing up its Thematic Strategy on Clean Air for Europe during 2004, became aware of the significance of intercontinental transport and the importance of sources of pollution beyond its borders and sphere of influence, in meeting its air quality goals.

  20. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. I. Argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boffard, John B., E-mail: jboffard@wisc.edu; Lin, Chun C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Culver, Cody [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold [Varian Semiconductor Equipment, Applied Materials Inc., Gloucester, MA 01939 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from excited atomic states are ubiquitous in material processing plasmas. The highly energetic photons can induce surface damage by driving surface reactions, disordering surface regions, and affecting bonds in the bulk material. In argon plasmas, the VUV emissions are due to the decay of the 1s{sub 4} and 1s{sub 2} principal resonance levels with emission wavelengths of 104.8 and 106.7?nm, respectively. The authors have measured the number densities of atoms in the two resonance levels using both white light optical absorption spectroscopy and radiation-trapping induced changes in the 3p{sup 5}4p?3p{sup 5}4s branching fractions measured via visible/near-infrared optical emission spectroscopy in an argon inductively coupled plasma as a function of both pressure and power. An emission model that takes into account radiation trapping was used to calculate the VUV emission rate. The model results were compared to experimental measurements made with a National Institute of Standards and Technology-calibrated VUV photodiode. The photodiode and model results are in generally good accord and reveal a strong dependence on the neutral gas temperature.

  1. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission ReductionPotential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission ReductionPotential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction

  2. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In almost all cases, the emissions related to traded fuelsextraction (F Er ) and production (F Pr ) emissions (i.e. ,the net effect of emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top),

  3. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  4. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that energy use and CO2 emissions in developed countries w icap-and-trade program for CO2 emissions from the electricalout and "sequester" the CO2 emissions, though the cost and

  5. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimated to produce CO2 emission reductions ranging frombetween low CO2 emissions and the reductions in the auto usea 16 percent reduction in CO2 traffic emissions within the

  6. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Cementfor Fuel Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron andElectricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron

  7. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

  8. A versatile femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy setup with tunable pulses in the visible to near infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Liangdong [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Liu, Weimin [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Fang, Chong, E-mail: Chong.Fang@oregonstate.edu [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a versatile and efficient setup to perform femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Technical innovations are implemented to achieve the wavelength tunability for both the picosecond narrowband Raman pump pulse and femtosecond broadband Raman probe pulse. Using a simplified one-grating scheme in a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor followed by a two-stage noncollinear optical parametric amplifier, we tune the Raman pump pulse from ca. 480 to 750?nm. To generate the suitable Raman probe pulse in tandem, we rely on our recently demonstrated broadband up-converted multicolor array technique that readily provides tunable broadband laser sidebands across the visible to near-infrared range. This unique setup has unparalleled flexibility for conducting FSRS. We measure the ground-state Raman spectra of a cyclohexane standard using tunable pump-probe pairs at various wavelengths across the visible region. The best spectral resolution is ?12?cm{sup ?1}. By tuning the pump wavelength closer to the electronic absorption band of a photoacid pyranine in water, we observe the pre-resonantly enhanced Raman signal. The stimulated Raman gain of the 1627?cm{sup ?1} mode is increased by over 15 times.

  9. Composition, Mineralogy, and Porosity of Multiple Asteroid Systems from Visible and Near-infrared Spectral Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Sean S; Emery, Joshua P; Enriquez, J Emilio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the SOAR telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA IRTF with the SpeX spectragraph. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. We perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- ...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongyul [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chi Won [Nano Fusion Technology Division, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

  11. Surface photoelectric and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of zinc antimonate-based photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Shaojun; Li, Guoqiang; Zhang, Yang [Key Laboratory of Photovoltaic Materials of Henan Province and School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute of Physics for Microsystems, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhang, Weifeng, E-mail: wfzhang@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Photovoltaic Materials of Henan Province and School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute of Physics for Microsystems, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? N-doped and pristine ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} photocatalysts were synthesized by a facile method. ? N-doped ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} shows a significant enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. ? The N-doped ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} shows the reduced surface photovoltage signals. - Abstract: The N-doped and pristine ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} photocatalysts were synthesized by a facile method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy, surface photovoltage spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activities of the prepared samples were evaluated from the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under full arc and visible light irradiation of Xe lamp. The XRD and UV–vis results indicated that the N-doping did not change the crystal structure, but decrease the band gap in comparison with the pristine one. The N-doped ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} shows the reduced surface photovoltage signals and the significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity under two irradiation conditions.

  12. Wide-angle ITER-prototype tangential infrared and visible viewing system for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C. J., E-mail: lasnier@LLNL.gov; Allen, S. L.; Ellis, R. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Morris, K.; Seppala, L. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Crabtree, K. [College of Optics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging system with a wide-angle tangential view of the full poloidal cross-section of the tokamak in simultaneous infrared and visible light has been installed on DIII-D. The optical train includes three polished stainless steel mirrors in vacuum, which view the tokamak through an aperture in the first mirror, similar to the design concept proposed for ITER. A dichroic beam splitter outside the vacuum separates visible and infrared (IR) light. Spatial calibration is accomplished by warping a CAD-rendered image to align with landmarks in a data image. The IR camera provides scrape-off layer heat flux profile deposition features in diverted and inner-wall-limited plasmas, such as heat flux reduction in pumped radiative divertor shots. Demonstration of the system to date includes observation of fast-ion losses to the outer wall during neutral beam injection, and shows reduced peak wall heat loading with disruption mitigation by injection of a massive gas puff.

  13. Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Regulations A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and...

  14. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a variety of photoexcitation sources including synchrotron emission, femtosecond laser pulses and conventional UV lamp emission. Each source has advantages, for example, fs...

  15. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from Advanced Technologies Effects of Advanced Combustion Technologies on Particulate Matter Emissions Characteristics Efficient Emissions Control for Multi-Mode Lean DI Engines...

  16. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using...

  17. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  18. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

  19. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top), production (F Pr )Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO 2 Emissions (Carbonfrom the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally

  20. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Estimating Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides fromStandards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides),

  1. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

  2. Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

  3. Discovery of 10 micron silicate emission in quasars. Evidence of the AGN unification scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Siebenmorgen; M. Haas; E. Kr"ugel; B. Schulz

    2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the unified scheme, AGN are surrounded by a dust-torus, and the observed diversity of AGN properties results from the different orientations relative to our line of sight. The strong resonance of silicate dust at 10 micron is therefore, as expected, seen in absorption towards many type-2 AGN. In type-1 AGN, it should be seen in emission because the hot inner surface of the dust torus becomes visible. However, this has not been observed so far, thus challenging the unification scheme or leading to exotic modifications of the dust-torus model. Here we report the discovery of the 10 micron silicate feature in emission in two luminous quasars with the Infrared Spectrograph of the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  4. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T. [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  5. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    category includes California-owned power plants out- sideCalifornia Air ResourcesBoard, "Uncontrolled and controlled power-plantsCalifornia. First, we include emissions from out-state coal power plants.

  6. The Value of Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.

    This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here-to-fore neglected component: its value as a hedge against uncertainty. Much analysis has been done of the Kyoto Protocol and ...

  7. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  8. Trading quasi-emission permits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the design of environmental policies for a regulator that has incomplete information on firms' emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in cities with numerous small polluting sources). ...

  9. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  10. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

  11. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt...

  12. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  13. Diesel Emission Control Technology Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conf. 5-06 However, despite considerable increases in vehicle mass, power, and capacity, CO2 emissions have still dropped. 5 To sell European cars into the US market, a minimum of...

  14. Why do some intermediate polars show soft X-ray emission? A survey of XMM-Newton spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Evans; Coel Hellier

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a systematic analysis of the XMM-Newton X-ray spectra of intermediate polars (IPs) and find that, contrary to the traditional picture, most show a soft blackbody component. We compare the results with those from AM Her stars and deduce that the blackbody emission arises from reprocessing of hard X-rays, rather than from the blobby accretion sometimes seen in AM Hers. Whether an IP shows a blackbody component appears to depend primarily on geometric factors: a blackbody is not seen in those that have accretion footprints that are always obscured by accretion curtains or are only visible when foreshortened on the white-dwarf limb. Thus we argue against previous suggestions that the blackbody emission characterises a separate sub-group of IPs which are more akin to AM Hers, and develop a unified picture of the blackbody emission in these stars.

  15. Investigation of the photoactivity of pristine and mixed phase N-doped titania under visible and solar irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Barnali [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Nair, Ranjith G. [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology-Silchar, Silchar, Assam 788010 (India); Rajbongshi, Bijumani [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Samdarshi, S.K., E-mail: drsksamdarshi@rediffmail.com [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen doped titania nano-particles were synthesized by sol–gel method with an aim to investigate the impact of doping in titanium matrix and the titania phases on their photocatalytic activity under visible and solar irradiation. The structural, optical and chemical characterization of the prepared materials were done using X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, UV–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The samples were calcined at different temperatures (200 °C–600 °C) to obtain different phases. All the samples showed red-shift in the visible region attributable to the doping of nitrogen in the titania matrix. The samples calcined at low temperatures showed high photocatalytic activity compared to the high temperature samples. The enhancement in the visible light activity may be attributed to the large amount of nitrogen present in the surface region of the catalyst and reduced carrier recombination. Among the high temperature samples the high activity may be due to the presence of mixed phase as well. - Highlights: • Pristine and mixed phases of N doped titania synthesized at different temperatures. • High visible light photoactivity exhibited by pristine rutile phase and mixed phase. • Role of surface N in rutile and matrix embedded N in other samples corroborated.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of substitutional and interstitial nitrogen-doped titanium dioxides with visible light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Feng [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)], E-mail: cefpeng@scut.edu.cn; Cai Lingfeng; Yu Hao; Wang Hongjuan; Yang Jian [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Both substitutional and interstitial nitrogen-doped titanium dioxides (N-TiO{sub 2}) were prepared. Their surface states were clarified by XPS spectra of N 1s, O 1s and Ti 2p. The results of photocatalysis show that both substitutional and interstitial N impurities greatly enhance the photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} in visible light. Moreover, the visible light activity of interstitial N-doped TiO{sub 2} is higher than that of substitutional N-doped TiO{sub 2}. The microwave synthesis presented in this paper is a promising and practical method to produce interstitial nitrogen-doped photocatalysts with high visible light activity. - Graphical abstract: Both substitutional and interstitial N impurities can enhance the photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} in visible light; moreover, the visible light activity of interstitial N-doped TiO{sub 2} is higher than that of substitutional N-doped TiO{sub 2}.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Converted White-Light-Emitting Diodes," Jap. J. Appl.doped III-N Light-Emitting Diodes," Appl. Phys. Lett. , 84 (in Packaging High Power Light Emitting Diode Arrays," Appl.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride andHigh-pressure mercury lamp LED Luxeon white 5 W LED Cree LRpressure mercury lamps; some Cree LEDs have even comparable

  19. Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from GaN:Tb 3+ Powders and Thin Films Deposited by MOVPE andHirata, "Eu 3+ Activated GaN Thin Films Grown on Sapphire byTb 3+ in GaN Powders and Thin Films," ECS Trans. , J. Laski,

  20. Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of Single Crystal GaN Substrate using Hydride VaporZnO Nanowire on a p-GaN Substrate," J. Phys. Chem. C , 114Grown on GaN Nanocrystalline Powder Substrate," J. Cryst.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium Nitride Doped With Europium," J. Appl. Phys. , 95Electroluminescence of Europium-doped Gallium Oxide ThinLuminescence Properties of Europium– terbium Double

  2. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  3. Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    SrTiO{sub 3} powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl{sub 2} and Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO{sub 3} structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNO{sub x} ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

  4. Visible Photoluminescence from Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide Microdisks Coupled to High Quality Whispering Gallery Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Radulaski; Thomas M. Babinec; Kai Müller; Konstantinos G. Lagoudakis; Jingyuan Linda Zhang; Sonia Buckley; Yousif A. Kelaita; Kassem Alassaad; Gabriel Ferro; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of cubic (3C) silicon carbide microdisk resonators with high quality factor modes at visible and near infrared wavelengths (600 - 950 nm). Whispering gallery modes with quality factors as high as 2,300 and corresponding mode volumes V ~ 2 ({\\lambda}/n)^3 are measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy at room temperature. We obtain excellent correspondence between transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarized resonances simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and those observed in experiment. These structures based on ensembles of optically active impurities in 3C-SiC resonators could play an important role in diverse applications of nonlinear and quantum photonics, including low power optical switching and quantum memories.

  5. Ultrathin metal-semiconductor-metal resonator for angle invariant visible band transmission filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Yong Lee, Jae; Jay Guo, L., E-mail: guo@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present transmission visible wavelength filters based on strong interference behaviors in an ultrathin semiconductor material between two metal layers. The proposed devices were fabricated on 2?cm?×?2?cm glass substrate, and the transmission characteristics show good agreement with the design. Due to a significantly reduced light propagation phase change associated with the ultrathin semiconductor layer and the compensation in phase shift of light reflecting from the metal surface, the filters show an angle insensitive performance up to ±70°, thus, addressing one of the key challenges facing the previously reported photonic and plasmonic color filters. This principle, described in this paper, can have potential for diverse applications ranging from color display devices to the image sensors.

  6. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are provided for enhancing the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium such as tissue, water and smoke. Examples of such an object include a vein located below the skin, a mine located below the surface of the sea and a human in a location covered by smoke. The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the utilization of structured illumination. In the specific application of this invention to image the veins in the arm or other part of the body, the issue of how to control the intensity of the image of a metal object (such as a needle) that must be inserted into the vein is also addressed.

  7. UV-modulated one-dimensional photonic-crystal resonator for visible lights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S. Y.; Yang, P. H.; Liao, C. D.; Chieh, J. J.; Chen, Y. P.; Horng, H. E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H. C. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nan-kai Institute of Technology, Nantou County 542, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional photonic-crystal (A/SiO{sub 2}){sub 6}/ZnO/(SiO{sub 2}/A){sub 6} resonators at visible lights are fabricated and characterized, where A may be ZnO or indium tin oxide. Owing to the absorption of ultraviolet (UV) light by the ZnO layers, the refractive index of ZnO layers is changed temporally. This fact led to a temporary shifting of the forbidden band and the resonant mode of the resonator under UV irradiation. Besides, via adjusting the thickness of the ZnO defect layer, the resonant wavelength is manipulated. These experimental data show good consistence with simulated results.

  8. Single-photon detection timing jitter in a visible light photon counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burm Baek; Kyle S. McKay; Martin J. Stevens; Jungsang Kim; Henry H. Hogue; Sae Woo Nam

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) offer many attractive features as photon detectors, such as high quantum efficiency and photon number resolution. We report measurements of the single-photon timing jitter in a VLPC, a critical performance factor in a time-correlated single-photon counting measurement, in a fiber-coupled closed-cycle cryocooler. The measured timing jitter is 240 ps full-width-at-half-maximum at a wavelength of 550 nm, with a dark count rate of 25 000 counts per second. The timing jitter increases modestly at longer wavelengths to 300 ps at 1000 nm, and increases substantially at lower bias voltages as the quantum efficiency is reduced.

  9. Tailoring Metallodielectric Structures for Super Resolution and Superguiding Applications in the Visible and Near IR Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Ceglia, D; Cappeddu, M G; Centini, M; Akozbek, N; DOrazio, A; Haus, J W; Bloemer, M J; Scalora, M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss propagation effects in realistic, transparent, metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structures in the context of negative refraction and super-resolution in the visible and near infrared ranges. In the resonance tunneling regime, we find that for transverse-magnetic incident polarization, field localization effects contribute to a waveguiding phenomenon that makes it possible for the light to remain confined within a small fraction of a wavelength, without any transverse boundaries, due to the suppression of diffraction. This effect is related to negative refraction of the Poynting vector inside each metal layer, balanced by normal refraction inside the adjacent dielectric layer: The degree of field localization and material dispersion together determine the total momentum that resides within any given layer, and thus the direction of energy flow. We find that the transport of evanescent wave vectors is mediated by the excitation of quasi-stationary, low group velocity surface waves responsible for...

  10. A holographic bound on the total number of computations in the visible Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice H. P. M. van Putten

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Information and encoding are central to holographic imaging of matter and fields within a two-surface. We consider the probability of detection of particles inside star-like holographic screens defined by their propagators. Imaging a point particle of mass m hereby requires I = 2 pi mr in log2 bits on a spherical screen or radius r. Encoding the three hairs of mass, charge, angular momentum and radiation requires a minimum of four bits. This formulation leads directly to Reissner-Nordstrom black holes and extremal Kerr black holes for minimal screens, that envelope event horizons. Applied to the cosmological event horizon, the total number of computations in the visible Universe is found to be bounded by 10e121.

  11. Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC Vivian Hoffman, J Chisholm I. Introduction The GVRD environmental objectives are achieved. Emissions reduction credit trading (or emissions trading) is an example Valley (LFV). Section III describes the market-based instruments of emissions trading and facility

  12. Atmospheric Mercury: Emissions, Transport/Fate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global...) Is "emissions trading" workable and ethical? Is the recently promulgated Clean Air Mercury

  13. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  14. Visible light photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol using vanadium and nitrogen co-doped TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, R.; Kothari, D. C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Patel, N.; Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, I-38123 Povo ( Trento) (Italy)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Vanadium and Nitrogen were codoped in TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst by Sol-gel method to utilize visible light more efficiently for photocatalytic reactions. A noticeable shift of absorption edge to visible light region was obtained for the singly-doped namely V-TiO{sub 2}, N-TiO{sub 2} and codoped V-N-TiO{sub 2} samples in comparison with undoped TiO{sub 2}, with smallest band gap obtained with codoped-TiO{sub 2}. The photocatalytic activities for all TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were tested by 4-chlorophenol (organic pollutant) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that codoped TiO{sub 2} exhibits the best photocatalytic activity, which could be attributed to the synergistic effect produced by V and N dopants.

  15. Ag@AgHPW as a plasmonic catalyst for visible-light photocatalytic degradation of environmentally harmful organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Cao, Minhua, E-mail: caomh@bit.edu.cn; Li, Na; Su, Shuangyue; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Jiangqiang; Li, Xianghua; Hu, Changwen

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW12O40 (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant, which show a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • A new visible-light driven photocatalyst Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was designed. • The photocatalyst shows a high activity for the degradation of methyl blue. • The high activity can be ascribed to the synergy of photoexcited AgHPW and Ag. - Abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant. They show strong absorption in the visible region because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag NPs. This plasmonic photocatalyst shows a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which could be attributed to the highly synergy of photoexcited Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (AgHPW) and plasmon-excited Ag NPs and the confinement effects at interfaces between polyoxometalates (POMs) and silver. POM anions have redox ability and high photocatalytic activity, whereas Ag NPs could effectively accelerate the separation of electrons and holes, both of which contribute to their high activity.

  16. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  17. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  18. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management has adopted California's LEV regulations applicable to passenger vehicles, light-duty...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41- Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx...

  1. Absorption and Emission Spectra of an higher-dimensional Reissner-Nordström black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eylee Jung; D. K. Park

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorption and emission problems of the brane-localized and bulk scalars are examined when the spacetime is a $(4+n)$-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole. Making use of an appropriate analytic continuation, we compute the absorption and emission spectra in the full range of particle's energy. For the case of the brane-localized scalar the presence of the nonzero inner horizon parameter $r_-$ generally enhances the absorptivity and suppresses the emission rate compared to the case of the Schwarzschild phase. The low-energy absorption cross section exactly equals to $4\\pi r_+^2$, two-dimensional horizon area. The effect of the extra dimensions generally suppresses the absorptivity and enhances the emission rate, which results in the disappearance of the oscillatory pattern in the total absorption cross section when $n$ is large. For the case of the bulk scalar the effect of $r_-$ on the spectra is similar to that in the case of the brane-localized scalar. The low-energy absorption cross section equals to the area of the horizon hypersurface. In the presence of the extra dimensions the total absorption cross section tends to be inclined with a positive slope. It turns out that the ratio of the {\\it missing} energy over the {\\it visible} one decreases with increase of $r_-$.

  2. New Double Soft Emission Theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freddy Cachazo; Song He; Ellis Ye Yuan

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behavior of the tree-level S-matrix of a variety of theories as two particles become soft. By analogy with the recently found subleading soft theorems for gravitons and gluons, we explore subleading terms in double soft emissions. We first consider double soft scalar emissions and find subleading terms that are controlled by the angular momentum operator acting on hard particles. The order of the subleading theorems depends on the presence or not of color structures. Next we obtain a compact formula for the leading term in a double soft photon emission. The theories studied are a special Galileon, DBI, Einstein-Maxwell-Scalar, NLSM and Yang-Mills-Scalar. We use the recently found CHY representation of these theories in order to give a simple proof of the leading order part of all these theorems

  3. Making the margin visible : out-of -school literacy practices among Mexican heritage English learners in an English-only district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows-Goodwill, Shivani Linda

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    living room three distinct shelving areas were dedicated towas occupied by built-in shelving, filled with books andtwo bedrooms consists of shelving. The more visible shelving

  4. Microwave emissions from police radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, John Michael

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM POLICE RADAR A Thesis by JOHN MICHAEL FINK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject...: Industrial Hygiene MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM POLICE RADAR A Thesis by JOHN MICHAEL FINK Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE John P. Wag (Chair of Committee) Jero e J. C...

  5. Locomotive emission study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work for the report involved the estimation of the air pollution emissions arising from the operation of railroad locomotives in six non-attainment air management basins within California. The six air basins are the Bay Area, the Central Coast (which includes the North Central Coast and the South Central Coast basins), the South Coast, San Diego, San Joaquin, and the Sacramento Valley basins. In addition, the effort involved the development of information about the efficacy and cost of feasible control strategies for locomotive-generated air pollution emissions, for both long and short term implementation.

  6. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island"

  7. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island"Texas"

  8. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"Rhode Island"Texas"Utah"

  9. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"RhodeVirginia"

  10. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"RhodeVirginia"West Virginia"

  11. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,Jersey"RhodeVirginia"West

  12. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Yang, Xiaofan [ORNL; Debusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging conditions were provided by our collaborators at John Deere Power Systems. Among various zeolites reported here, CuFe-SSZ-13 offers the best NO{sub x} conversion activity in 150-650 C range and is hydrothermally stable when tested under accelerated aging conditions. It is important to note that Cu-SSZ-13 is now a commercial catalyst for NO{sub x} treatment on diesel passenger vehicles. Thus, our catalyst performs better than the commercial catalyst under fast SCR conditions. We initially focused on fast SCR tests to enable us to screen catalysts rapidly. Only the catalysts that exhibit high NO{sub x} conversion at low temperatures are selected for screening under varying NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio. The detailed tests of CuFe-SSZ-13 show that CuFe-SSZ-13 is more effective than commercial Cu-SSZ-13 even at NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio of 0.1. The mechanistic studies, employing stop-flow diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), suggest that high concentration of NO{sup +}, generated by heterobimetallic zeolites, is probably responsible for their superior low temperature NO{sub x} activity. The results described in this report clearly show that we have successfully completed the first step in a new emission treatment catalyst which is synthesis and laboratory testing employing simulated exhaust. The next step in the catalyst development is engine testing. Efforts are in progress to obtain follow-on funding to carry out scale-up and engine testing to facilitate commercialization of this technology.

  13. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  14. PPPL3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL­3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC­426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense projected heating of the reflective optics themselves to several hundred degrees Celsius. Tests of beryllium regions during operation and infrared measurement of the surface temperature of the first wall structures

  15. PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense projected heating of the reflective optics themselves to several hundred degrees Celsius. Tests of beryllium regions during operation and infrared measurement of the surface temperature of the first wall structures

  16. Self-heating in a GaN based heterostructure field effect transistor: Ultraviolet and visible Raman measurements and simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    Self-heating in a GaN based heterostructure field effect transistor: Ultraviolet and visible Raman online 8 December 2006 We report direct self-heating measurements for AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field density can be commensurately high, collisional energy loss from electrons to the crystal leads to self-heating

  17. Design and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification of Specific Proteins in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    for selective enrichment of tag peptides. Another cysteine peptide enrichment and isotope tagging scheme hasDesign and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification spectrometry is most useful when quantitative data is also obtained. We recently introduced isotope

  18. Optical Wireless based on High Brightness Visible LEDs Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Hugh Liu, Chi-Ho Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Grantham

    and encoded with audio or data signal. Hence, an LED indicator lamp or traffic light can become an information for incandescent lamps [3,4]. This advancement has led to the production of large- area full-color LED displaysOptical Wireless based on High Brightness Visible LEDs Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Hugh Liu, Chi

  19. Distribution of unresolvable anisotropic microstructures revealed in visibility-contrast images using x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashiro, Wataru; Harasse, Sebastien; Kawabata, Katsuyuki; Kuwabara, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Momose, Atsushi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Talbot interferometry has been widely used as a technique for x-ray phase imaging and tomography. We propose a method using this interferometry for mapping distribution of parameters characterizing anisotropic microstructures, which are typically of the order of {mu}m in size and cannot be resolved by the imaging system, in a sample. The method uses reduction in fringe visibility, which is caused by such unresolvable microstructures, in moire images obtained using an interferometer. We applied the method to a chloroprene rubber sponge sample, which exhibited uniaxial anisotropy of reduced visibility. We measured the dependencies of reduced visibility on both the Talbot order and the orientation of the sample and obtained maps of three parameters and their anisotropies that characterize the unresolvable anisotropic microstructures in the sample. The maps indicated that the anisotropy of the sample's visibility contrast mainly originated from the anisotropy of the microstructure elements' average size. Our method directly provides structural information on unresolvable microstructures in real space, which is only accessible through the ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering measurements in reciprocal space, and is expected to be broadly applied to material, biological, and medical sciences.

  20. Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related primarily to pigmenta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (400­1000 nm) is related physiology and relationships between plants and their growth environment. We studied reflectance of two co collected from 24 sites and white spruce from 30 sites. Overall, reflectance spectra of the two species were

  1. Bringing Visibility to Rural Users in Cote d'Ivoire Mariya Zheleva, Paul Schmitt, Morgan Vigil and Elizabeth Belding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belding-Royer, Elizabeth M.

    from Cote d'Ivoire with an emphasis on understanding how population density impacts the use of cellularBringing Visibility to Rural Users in Cote d'Ivoire Mariya Zheleva, Paul Schmitt, Morgan Vigil a cellular traffic dataset provided by Orange in Cote d'Ivoire with the goal of identifying distinctions

  2. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Soulez, Gilles [Department of Radiology, University of Montreal Hospital (CHUM), Quebec H2L 2M1 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Roy, David [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Cloutier, Guy [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in concordance with the literature for vascular and abdominal tissues. Conclusions: The mimicked abdominal tissues, AAA wall, and surrounding thrombus were developed to match imaging features of in vivo MR, CT, and ultrasound examinations. This phantom should be of value for image calibration, segmentation, and testing of endovascular devices for AAA endovascular repair.

  3. Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    range: 1-10 mm Gamma-Ray range: 10 mm - 8 positron annihilation #12;Positron Emission Tomography #12;P.E.T. measures Concentration of Radioactivity 1) Gamma-rays escape from body: External detection possible. 2) Two gamma rays emitted at 180 when a positron annihilates: The annihilation occured somewhere

  4. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  5. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    and inversely proportional to the square of frequency and to temperature to the power 1.5. It is therefore discusses incoher­ ent emission from thermal plasma in the non­flaring so­ lar atmosphere; other relevant. The opacity of this mecha­ nism is proportional to the product of the electron and ion charge densities

  6. High energy emission from microquasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Fender; Tom Maccarone

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The microquasar phenomenon is associated with the production of jets by X-ray binaries and, as such, may be associated with the majority of such systems. In this chapter we briefly outline the associations, definite, probable, possible, and speculative, between such jets and X-ray, gamma-ray and particle emission.

  7. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  8. Crushing of interstellar gas clouds in supernova remnants II. X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Orlando; F. Bocchino; G. Peres; F. Reale; T. Plewa; R. Rosner

    2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    AIMS. We study and discuss the time-dependent X-ray emission predicted by hydrodynamic modeling of the interaction of a SNR shock wave with an interstellar gas cloud. The scope includes: 1) to study the correspondence between modeled and X-ray emitting structures, 2) to explore two different physical regimes in which either thermal conduction or radiative cooling plays a dominant role, and 3) to investigate the effects of the physical processes at work on the emission of the shocked cloud in the two different regimes. METHODS. We use a detailed hydrodynamic model, including thermal conduction and radiation, and explore two cases characterized by different Mach numbers of the primary shock: M = 30 in which the cloud dynamics is dominated by radiative cooling and M = 50 dominated by thermal conduction. From the simulations, we synthesize the expected X-ray emission, using available spectral codes. RESULTS. The morphology of the X-ray emitting structures is significantly different from that of the flow structures originating from the shock-cloud interaction. The hydrodynamic instabilities are never clearly visible in the X-ray band. Shocked clouds are preferentially visible during the early phases of their evolution. Thermal conduction and radiative cooling lead to two different phases of the shocked cloud: a cold cooling dominated core emitting at low energies and a hot thermally conducting corona emitting in the X-ray band. The thermal conduction makes the X-ray image of the cloud smaller, more diffuse, and shorter-lived than that observed when thermal conduction is neglected.

  9. Soot scattering measurements in the visible and near-infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHU,JINYU; CHOI,MUN YOUNG; MULHOLLAND,GEORGE W.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering to extinction cross-section ratios, {rho}{sub se} were measured using the NIST Large Agglomerate Optics Facility for soot produced from ethene and acetylene laminar diffusion flames. Measurements were performed using light sources at 543.5 nm, 632.8 nm and 856 nm. The average scattering to extinction cross-section ratios for these wavelengths are equal to 0.246, 0.196, and 0.196 for ethene and 0.316, 0.230, and 0.239 for acetylene. The 856 nm measurements represent the longest wavelength for which accurate scattering measurements have been performed for soot. The size distribution and fractal properties of the two soots were determined to assess the effects of limited acceptance angle range, finite size of the sensor, and departure from cosine response on the uncertainty in the measurement of {rho}{sub se} The expanded relative uncertainty (95% confidence level) was found to be {+-}6% at the two visible wavelengths and {+-}8% at 856 nm. Both the magnitude and wavelength dependence of {rho}{sub se} for the present experiments are significantly different from those reported by Krishnan et al. for overfire soot produced using a turbulent flame. The results are compared with the predictions of fractal optics.

  10. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  11. Evaluation of the Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC at cryogenic temperature using a visible hybrid H2RG focal plane array in 32 channel readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    Evaluation of the Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC at cryogenic temperature using a visible hybrid H2RG focal, Hilo, HI 96720, USA ABSTRACT Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) has developed a new CMOS device known of FPA drive electronics to operate visible and infrared imaging detectors with a fully digital interface

  12. Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er 3+ /Yb 3. 8 (2011) 087804 Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er3 State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA (Received 24 May 2011) An optical temperature

  13. REPRODUCING VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF LUNAR ROCKS DIRECTLY FROM THEIR END-MEMBER SPECTRA: IMPORTANCE OF ILMENITE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroi, Takahiro

    REPRODUCING VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF LUNAR ROCKS DIRECTLY FROM THEIR END as a solid foundation for lunar science and explo- ration. The visible and near-infrared spectroscopy, 15555, 70017, and 70035 have been prepared for analysis. Bidirectional reflectance spectra (0.28- 2.6 µm

  14. Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    might eventually offer the greatest benefits at competitive costs if gasoline prices and battery life gasoline prices, low- emiss may (1) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when powered by electricity instead of gasoline

  15. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium

  16. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires...

  17. Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britter, Rex E.

    Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

  18. Photon emission within the linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Wunderlich; B. Kampfer

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft-photon emission rates are calculated within the linear sigma model. The investigation is aimed at answering the question to which extent the emissivities map out the phase structure of this particular effective model of strongly interacting matter.

  19. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  20. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  1. Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

    Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

  2. Emission trading with absolute and intensity caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jaemin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kyoto Protocol introduced emission trading to help reduce the cost of compliances for the Annex B countries that have absolute caps. However, we need to expand the emission trading to cover developing countries in order ...

  3. Reducing Emissions in Plant Flaring Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , lowering emissions and maximizing production. Saving energy and reducing emissions are the internal requirements for every division of this major corporation. To achieve the public goals the company set, they issued a five year plan called Methods on Energy...

  4. Quantifying avoided emissions from renewable generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Gabriel R. (Gabriel Rodriguez)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying the reduced emissions due to renewable power integration and providing increasingly accurate emissions analysis has become more important for policy makers in the age of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and ...

  5. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U., E-mail: heyer@ifas-hamburg.de; Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  6. Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foss, B . "Carbon Emissions Trading is New Weapon to BattleBehavior and the Emission Trading Market, Resources andof Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading." The Journal of

  7. anthropogenic mercury emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anthropogenic emission of mercury is directly adopted from global mercury emission inventory Pacyna et al., 2005. The anthropogenic emissions are shown in annual averaged...

  8. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kean, A.J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculation of diesel truck emission factors proceeded viaheavy-duty diesel truck ammonia emission rates prior to SCRto the diesel truck ammonia emission factor, the light-duty

  9. Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. Abstract: Green emission at around 500...

  10. Optimization of an Advanced Passive/Active Diesel Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration Units Active Diesel Emission Control Systems...

  11. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  12. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  13. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

  14. A Grid-Based Mobile Sources Emissions Inventory Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yi; Niemeier, Debbie; Kear, Tom

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exhaust process and running loss LDA: Light-duty autos.loss, and evaporative running loss emissions. Hot soakmultiple day emissions. Running loss emissions occur due to

  15. Impact of Real-World Driving Characteristics on Vehicular Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NESAMANI, K.S.; SUBRAMANIAN, K.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. and Mohan, M. , Emission Estimates and Trends (1990-Evo]ving Motor Nehicle Emission Modeling, Tlransportation P]Testing Automotive Exhaust Emission, Society of Automobile

  16. Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in trade (EET) and therefore equals emissions embodied inexports (EEE) less emissions embodied in imports (EEI).re?ects the net export of emissions and a negative value

  17. The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Moving Forward with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moving Forward with Assessing the Emissions and Health Effects of New Diesel Technology The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Moving Forward with Assessing the Emissions and...

  18. Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Varalakshmi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reciprocation internal combustion engines - Exhaust emissionReciprocating internal combustion engines - Exhaust emissionOn the emissions from internal-combustion engines: A review.

  19. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tax increases, larger solar collector/absorption chillerphotovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energy storagecapacity of solar thermal collectors carbon emissions

  20. Effects of Biodiesel on NOx Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A presentation about the effects of biodiesel on nitrogen oxide emissions presented at the ARB Biodiesel Workshop June 8, 2005.

  1. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial inventories calculated global emissions by large geographic areas (Vfkhelyi, 1985), with very little spatial to compile regional to global inventories of anthropogenic emissions. This discussion is by no means

  2. Motorcycle Emissions System Multireflection Optics for non-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Motorcycle Emissions System Multireflection Optics for non- contact measurement of small emissions-2580 FAX 2587 · e-mail dstedman @ DU.edu · www.feat.biochem.du.edu #12;End view of six-pass optical system #12;#12;#12;#12;Side view of ramp and optics #12;#12;#12;Motorcycle Emissions · Measurement of 90cc

  3. CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Chapter 5 CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION Stephen M. White This article reviews the use of gyroresonance emission at radio wavelengths to measure coronal magnetic fields. Keywords: Sun, solar corona, solar magnetic fields, solar radio emission Introduction Since the realization

  4. Asbestos Emission Control Plan Dakota County, Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County, Minnesota Prepared for University of Minnesota Revised: July 22, 2009 UMP005460 #12;Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County.0.doc iii Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County, Minnesota Revised: July 22, 2009

  5. Controlling the dynamics of spontaneous emission from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    of spontaneous emission from quantum dots by photonic crystals Peter Lodahl1 , A. Floris van Driel2 , Ivan S emission can be manipulated10,11 . Photonic crystals provide such an environment: they strongly modify study spontaneous emission from semiconductor quantum dots embedded in inverse opal photonic crystals16

  6. 8, 34053430, 2008 Climate and emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions The role of climate and emission changes in future air quality over.russell@ce.gatech.edu) 3405 #12;ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al

  7. Reading for Thursday Emissions scenario summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    emissions, for year 2000 #12;USA ­ CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion (2005) US EPA #12;#12;#12;Decreasing 13C strongly suggests that the source of atmospheric CO2 is fossil carbon #12;Line of evidence #1Reading for Thursday · Emissions scenario summary: ­ Read pages 3-6 · IPCC Chapter 11 (Regional

  8. 5, 90979126, 2005 VOC emissions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation pyrolysis J. P. Greenberg et al. Title Page Discussions Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation J. P. Greenberg, H is licensed under a Creative Commons License. 9097 #12;ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation

  9. 4, 66916718, 2004 VOC emissions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen 1 , H. Hakola 1.tarvainen@fmi.fi) 6691 #12;ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract

  10. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  11. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  12. Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 1 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 EMISSIONS REDUCTION IMPACT OF RENEWABLES October 2012 Jeff Haberl, Bahman Yazdani, Charles Culp Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University p. 2 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012... Do TCEQ: Vince Meiller, Bob Gifford ERCOT: Warren Lasher USEPA: Art Diem, Julie Rosenberg ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS p. 3 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 RENEWABLES Solar PV Solar Thermal Hydro Biomass Landfill Gas Geothermal p. 4...

  13. Fluidized bed controls refinery emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulally, I.F.; Kersey, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1983, two fluidized bed, waste heat boilers entered into service at the Ashland Petroleum Company refinery site in Ashland, Kentucky. These fluidized bed units are coupled to the regeneration end of a newly developed reduced crude conversion (RCC) process and served the purpose of reducing CO, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions while recuperating waste heat from the regenerator process off gases.

  14. Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 9 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 10 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 WIND PROJECTS IN TEXAS Completed, Announced, and Retired Wind Projects in Texas, as of December 2011 p. 11 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012... Laboratory ? 2012 p. 24 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 25 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 NOx REDUCTIONS FROM WIND POWER New 2010 Annual eGrid for NOx Emissions West Zone North Zone Houston Zone South Zone Unit: lbs of NOx/MWh Unit: lbs...

  15. Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. Stephen P Holland. Emissions taxes versus intensityindustry’s greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental Research2008. John CV Pezzey. Emission taxes and tradeable permits a

  16. Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission J.-K. Lee March 9 A B S T R AC T We report the discovery of H2 line emission associated with 6.67-GHz methanol emission was found associated with an ultracompact H II region IRAS 14567­5846 and isolated methanol maser

  17. Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

  18. XX--ray Emission from O Starsray Emission from O Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    XX--ray Emission from O Starsray Emission from O Stars David CohenDavid Cohen Swarthmore College windstheir magnetically channeled winds 2.2. After ~1After ~1 MyrMyr XX--ray emission is weaker andray emission is weaker and softer: embedded wind shocks in early Osofter: embedded wind shocks in early O

  19. Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On-Road Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 2 1.2 Emission Regulations 2 1.3 Emissions Contributions of "Non Estimates 70 6.3 Fuel Economy Data for School Buses Observed at the Rock Quarry Road Site 75 6.4 Diesel

  20. Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic eects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic, are increasing due to human activities. Our analysis suggests that a third of global anthropogenic N2O emission the remainder. Over 80% of aquatic anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere mid

  1. Temperature dependence of the threshold current for InGaAlP visible laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M.; Shiozawa, H.; Itaya, K.; Hatakoshi, G.; Uematsu, Y. (Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corp., Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 210 (JP))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of the threshold current for InGaAlP visible light laser diodes is investigated from the aspect of gain-current characteristics. The cavity length dependence of light output power versus current characteristic was evaluated for a 40 {mu}m width InGaP-InBaAlP broad-stripe laser in the temperature range between {minus} 70 and 90{degrees} C, which had about a 670 nm oscillation wavelength at room temperature. The threshold-current density dependence on the cavity length shows that a linear-gain approximation is suitable for this system. A minimum threshold-current density at 860 A/cm{sup 2} was achieved at room temperature with a cavity length of 1160 {mu}m, which is the lowest value ever reported for this material. The linear-gain parameters {beta} and {ital J}{sub 0} depended on the temperature with the characteristic temperature of about 200 K, which is considered to be the intrinsic characteristic temperature of the threshold current for this active-layer material. The internal quantum efficiency, derived from the cavity length dependence of the differential quantum efficiency, decreased in the temperature range higher than {minus}10{degrees} C, which affected the excess threshold-current increase and the decrease in the characteristic temperature at this temperature range. The theoretical calculation, considering a one-dimensional band structure model, showed that this excess increase of the threshold current was found to be attributed to the electron overflow current into the p-type cladding layer.

  2. Laser-induced ultrafast electron emission from a field emission tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brett Barwick; Chris Corder; James Strohaber; Nate Chandler-Smith; Cornelis Uiterwaal; Herman Batelaan

    2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a field emission tip electron source that is triggered with a femtosecond laser pulse can generate electron pulses shorter than the laser pulse duration (~100 fs). The emission process is sensitive to a power law of the laser intensity, which supports an emission mechanism based on multiphoton absorption followed by over-the-barrier emission. Observed continuous transitions between power laws of different orders are indicative of field emission processes. We show that the source can also be operated so that thermionic emission processes become significant. Understanding these different emission processes is relevant for the production of sub-cycle electron pulses.

  3. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  4. Investigation of mechanisms for He-I emission radial profile broadening in a weakly ionized cylindrical helium plasma with recombining edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Brandt, C.; Hudson, B.; Nishijima, D.; Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California–San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)] [University of California–San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Kumar, D. [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St., Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)] [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St., Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of He-I line emission are used to study the causes of emission profile broadening radially across the cylinder of a weakly ionized helium plasma. The plasma consists of an ionizing core (r < 2 cm) surrounded by a recombining edge (r > 2 cm) plasma. The brightness profiles of low-n EUV He-I resonance lines are shown to be strongly radially broadened due to opacity. The brightness profiles of high-n visible lines are also found to be strongly radially broadened, but dominantly due to edge recombination. Visible low-n lines are less strongly radially broadened, apparently by a combination of both recombination and EUV opacity. The low-n visible He-I line ratio method with central opacity correction is found to calculate central electron density and temperature well, with poor agreement at the edge, as expected for recombining plasma. In the recombining edge, high-n Boltzmann analysis is found to accurately measure the cold (T{sub e} < 0.2 eV) edge temperature. Near the core, however, high-n Boltzmann analysis can be complicated by electron-impact excitation, giving incorrect (T{sub e}? 0.1 eV) apparent temperatures. Probe measurements were not able to capture the cold edge temperature accurately, probably due to large potential fluctuations, even when using fast triple probe measurements. Fast spectroscopic measurements show that this discrepancy is not explained by recombining plasma alternating with ionizing plasma in the edge region.

  5. EXTENDED X-RAY EMISSION IN THE VICINITY OF THE MICROQUASAR LS 5039: PULSAR WIND NEBULA?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, Martin; Kargaltsev, Oleg [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Pavlov, George G.; Chang, Chulhoon; Garmire, Gordon P., E-mail: martin.durant@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LS 5039 is a high-mass binary with a period of 4 days, containing a compact object and an O-star, one of the few high-mass binaries detected in {gamma}-rays. Our Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observation of LS 5039 provided a high-significance ({approx}10{sigma}) detection of extended emission clearly visible for up to 1' from the point source. The spectrum of this emission can be described by an absorbed power-law model with photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.3, somewhat softer than the point-source spectrum {Gamma} = 1.44 {+-} 0.07, with the same absorption, N{sub H} = (6.4 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The observed 0.5-8 keV flux of the extended emission is {approx_equal} 8.8 x 10{sup -14} erg s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} or 5% of the point-source flux; the latter is a factor of {approx}2 lower than the lowest flux detected so far. Fainter extended emission with comparable flux and a softer ({Gamma} {approx} 3) spectrum is detected at even greater radii (up to 2'). Two possible interpretations of the extended emission are a dust scattering halo and a synchrotron nebula powered by energetic particles escaping the binary. We discuss both of these scenarios and favor the nebula interpretation, although some dust contribution is possible. We have also found transient sources located within a narrow stripe south of LS 5039. We discuss the likelihood of these sources to be related to LS 5039.

  6. Thermal Dust Emission from Proplyds, Unresolved Disks, and Shocks in the Orion Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; John Bally; Ralph Y. Shuping; Mark Morris; Marc Kassis

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new 11.7 micron mosaic image of the Orion nebula obtained with T-ReCS on Gemini South. The map includes the BN/KL region, the Trapezium, and OMC-1 South. Excluding BN/KL, we detect 91 point sources, with 27 known proplyds and over 30 ``naked'' stars showing no extended structure in HST images. Within the region we surveyed, 80 percent of known proplyds show detectable emission, almost 40 percent of naked stars are detected at 11.7 micron, and the fraction of all visible sources with IR excess emission is roughly 50 percent. Thermal dust emission from stars with no extended structure in HST images means that they have dust disks comparable to the size of our solar system. Proplyds and stars with IR excess show a clear anti-correlation in their spatial distribution, with proplyds clustered close to theta1C, and other infrared sources found farther away. We suspect that the clustered proplyds trace the youngest 0.5 Myr age group associated with the Trapezium, while the more uniformly-distributed sources trace the older 1-2 Myr population of the ONC. This suggests that small disks persist for a few Myr in irradiated environments, and hints that hierarchical sub-clustering has been important. Within 30 arcsec of theta1C, all proplyds are detected at 11.7 micron. The star theta1D is associated with the most prominent mid-IR dust arc in the nebula. We propose that this arc is the consequence of theta1D being the closest member of the Trapezium to the background cloud. Finally, we detect dust emission from HH jets in Orion, including HH202, HH529, HH513, and HH514. This is the first detection of mid-IR continuum emission from dust in the body of a collimated HH jet or bow shock.

  7. Two Emission Mechanisms in the Fermi Bubbles: A Possible Signal of Annihilating Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the variation of the spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles with Galactic latitude. Far from the Galactic plane (|b| > 30 degrees), the observed gamma-ray emission is nearly invariant with latitude, and is consistent with arising from inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar radiation field by cosmic-ray electrons with an approximately power-law spectrum. The same electrons in the presence of microgauss-scale magnetic fields can also generate the the observed microwave "haze". At lower latitudes (b < 20 degrees), in contrast, the spectrum of the emission correlated with the Bubbles possesses a pronounced spectral feature peaking at 1-4 GeV (in E^2 dN/dE) which cannot be generated by any realistic spectrum of electrons. Instead, we conclude that a second (non-inverse-Compton) emission mechanism must be responsible for the bulk of the low-energy, low-latitude emission. This second component is spectrally similar to the excess GeV emission previously reported from the Galactic Center (GC), and also appears spatially consistent with a luminosity per volume falling approximately as r^-2.4, where r is the distance from the GC. We argue that the spectral feature visible in the low-latitude Bubbles is the extended counterpart of the GC excess, now detected out to at least 2-3 kpc from the GC. The spectrum and angular distribution of the signal is consistent with that predicted from ~10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to leptons, or from ~50 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to quarks, following a distribution similar to the canonical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. We also consider millisecond pulsars as a possible astrophysical explanation for the signal, as observed millisecond pulsars possess a spectral cutoff at approximately the required energy. Any such scenario would require a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars extending at least 2-3 kpc from the GC.

  8. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    per Btu of fuel input. Thus, improving fuel efficiency is a more effective greenhouse gas control strategy for power plants than for motor vehicles. 6.1.4 Woody Biomass The...

  9. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwo States CARLSBAD,Emilio G.Emily

  10. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFOR IMMEDIATEDurable

  11. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  12. Optical near-field induced visible response photoelectrochemical water splitting on nanorod TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thu Hac Huong Le; Mawatari, Kazuma; Pihosh, Yuriy; Kitamori, Takehiko [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawazoe, Tadashi; Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tosa, Masahiro [Micro-Nano Component Materials Group, Materials Engineering Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we report a way to induce the visible response of non-doped TiO{sub 2} in the photocatalytic electrochemical water splitting, which is achieved by utilizing the optical near-field (ONF) generated on nanorod TiO{sub 2}. The visible response is attributed to the ONF-induced phonon-assisted excitation process, in which TiO{sub 2} is excited by sub-bandgap photons via phonon energy. Our approach directly gets involved in the excitation process without chemical modification of materials; accordingly it is expected to have few drawbacks on the photocatalytic performance. This study may offer another perspective on the development of solar harvesting materials.

  13. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Providence, Rhode Island | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Tuesday, April 13, 2010 FUPWG held a utility energy service contract (UESC) workshop prior to the Spring 2010 meeting. The workshop materials are...

  14. Recovery Act State Memos Rhode Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC, received 15 million for a combined-cycle electricity generation plant fueled by landfill gas in Johnston. Funding Allocation Table (Figure 1) Total dollar amounts in this...

  15. Job Training Tax Credit (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Companies who invest in training opportunities for new or existing employees may take a corporate income tax credit equal to 50% of eligible training expenditures through the Job Training Tax...

  16. OF RHODE ISLAND Office of International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    or lockout in the course of a labor dispute at the place of employment. The Labor Condition Application

  17. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND HEALTH SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    . PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. URI Health Services is committed to protecting the privacy of your health or received about your past, present, or future health or condition, the provision of health care to you, or the payment for this health care that can be used to identify you. We provide you with this notice about our

  18. Rhode Island Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663(Million24,103 224,846

  19. Rhode Island Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663(Million24,103Thousand40

  20. Freedom Energy (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForkedFranklinFreedomFreedom Energy

  1. GEXA Corp. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXA Corp. (New Jersey) Jump to: navigation,GEXA

  2. Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsource History View New Pages

  3. Bluewater Wind Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirchBlockVIServicesValleyNew

  4. University of Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAGUnitilMichigan Jump to:Oldenburg

  5. Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze - Making theEngenhariaReynolds

  6. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

  7. The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Year) MSA Emissions from Driving (Lbs of CO2) Electricity (CO2 per Megawatt Hrs) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Cost MSA Emissions from Driving ElectricityEmissions from Driving (Lbs of CO2) Suburb-City Difference in Electricity (

  8. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  9. Novel visible-light-driven photocatalyst. Poly(p-phenylene)-catalyzed photoreductions of water, carbonyl compounds, and olefins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, Takuya; Kabumoto, Akira; Shiragami, Tsutomu; Ishitani, Osamu; Pac, Chyongjin; Yanagida, Shozo (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1990-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The insoluble yellow powder of poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) prepared by nickel-catalyzed polycondensation of the Grignard reagent from 1,4-dibromobenzene shows photocatalytic activity under visible light toward water, carbonyl compounds, and olefins. Water is photoreduced to H{sub 2} in the presence of amines as sacrificial electron donors. The H{sub 2} evolution is enhanced 3-20 times by noble-metal deposition, in which Ru deposition is the most effective.

  10. Nitrogen stabilized reactive sputtering of optimized TiO{sub 2-x} photocatalysts with visible light reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Le; Graham, Michael E.; Gray, Kimberly A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoreactive and visible light responsive nonstoichiometric mixed-phase titania was prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering. Trace amounts of nitrogen were added for process stabilization without being incorporated into the films. Based on the CO{sub 2} photoreduction tests and structural and optical characterization, the influence of the trace nitrogen on the sputtered nonstoichiometric TiO{sub 2} was studied and was compared to nitrogen-doped titania.

  11. Analysis of the empirical relations between visible solar radiation, the solar altitude and the transparency of the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Occhipinti, Antonio

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF THE EMPIRICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN VISUAL SOLAR RADIATION, THE SOLAR ALTITUDE AND THE TRANSPARENCY OF THE ATMOSPHERE A Thesis A. Garcia Occhipinti Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM Untverstty in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major Subject: Oceanography ANALYSIS OF THE EMPIRICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN VISIBLE SOLAR RADIATION, THE SOLAR ALTITUDE AND THE TRANSPARENCY OF THE ATMOSPHERE A Thesis A. Garcia Occhipinti...

  12. The emission spectra of radioweak quasars. I. The farinfrared emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martina Niemeyer; Peter L. Biermann

    1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We model farinfrared (FIR) spectra of radioweak quasars with the assumption that the emission is from heated dust, and that the heating is due to the central engine via energetic particles. These energetic particles are diffusing from a postulated source near the central engine through a tenuous galactic halo to arrive at the dust which is taken to be in molecular clouds in a disk configuration. This picture does not depend on a particular geometry of the disk such as warps. This concept can readily reproduce the range of observed mm/submm/FIR/IR spectra.

  13. Facile synthesis of novel Ag/AgI/BiOI composites with highly enhanced visible light photocatalytic performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Jing, E-mail: caojing@mail.ipc.ac.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Yijie; Lin, Haili; Xu, Benyan [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); Chen, Shifu, E-mail: chshifu@chnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel Ag/AgI/BiOI composites were controllably synthesized via a facile ion-exchange followed by photoreduction strategy by using hierarchical BiOI microflower as substrate. The as-prepared Ag/AgI/BiOI composites were studied by X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analyzer and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Under visible light (?>420 nm), Ag/AgI/BiOI displayed highly enhanced photocatalytic activities for degradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to the pure hierarchical BiOI, which was mainly ascribed to the highly efficient separation of electrons and holes through the closely contacted interfaces in the Ag/AgI/BiOI ternary system. - Graphical abstract: Ag/AgI/BiOI displayed excellent photocatalytic activities for methyl orange degradation under visible light, which was mainly ascribed to the highly efficient separation of electrons and holes through Z-scheme pathway. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Novel Ag/AgI/BiOI composites were successfully synthesized. • Ag/AgI/BiOI displayed higher visible light activities than those of pure BiOI and AgI. • ·O{sub 2}{sup ?} and h{sup +}, especially ·O{sub 2}{sup ?}, dominated the photodegradation process of MO. • A Z-scheme pattern was adopted for Ag/AgI/BiOI activity enhancement.

  14. Crystallographic Dependence of Visible-light Photoactivity in Epitaxial TiO2?xNx Anatase and Rutile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohsawa, Takeo; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Du, Yingge; Henderson, Michael A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-doped TiO2 materials have been shown to exhibit visible-light photoactivity, but the operative mechanism(s) are not well understood. Here we use structurally and compositionally well-defined epitaxial films of TiO2?xNx anatase (001) and rutile (110) (x~0.02) to show a qualitative difference between the visible-light activities for the two polymorphs. Holes generated by visible light at N sites in anatase (001) readily diffuse to the surface and oxidize adsorbed trimethyl acetate while the same in rutile (110) remain trapped in the bulk. In light of the low doping densities that can be achieved in phase-pure material, conventional wisdom suggests that holes should be trapped at N sites in both polymorphs. Although the detailed mechanism is not yet understood, these results suggest that the hole hopping probability is much higher along the [001] direction in N-doped anatase than along the [110] direction in N-doped rutile.

  15. Visible Light Photocatalysis with Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buzby,S.; Barakat, M.; Lin, H.; Ni, C.; Rykov, S.; Chen, J.; Shah, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via plasma assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Nitrogen dopant concentration was varied from 0 to 1.61 at. %. The effect of nitrogen ion doping on visible light photocatalysis has been investigated. Samples were analyzed by various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as the titanium precursor, while rf-plasma-decomposed ammonia was used as the source for nitrogen doping. The N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were deposited on stainless steel mesh under a flow of Ar and O2 gases at 600 {sup o}C in a tube reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples was tested by the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an aqueous solution using a visible lamp equipped with an UV filter. The efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of 2-CP was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results obtained revealed the formation of N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples as TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, and a corresponding increase in the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  16. Inhibition of uracil-DNA glycosylase increases SCEs in BrdU-treated and visible light-irradiated cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, A.; Hernandez, P.; Gutierrez, C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have approached the study of the ability of different types of lesions produced by DNA-damaging agents to develop sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by analyzing SCE levels observed in Allium cepa L cells with BrdU-substituted DNA and exposed to visible light (VL), an irradiation which produces uracil residues in DNA after debromination of bromouracil and enhances SCE levels but only above a certain dose. They have partially purified an uracil-DNA glycosylase activity from A. cepa L root meristem cells, which removes uracil from DNA, the first step in the excision repair of this lesion. This enzyme was inhibited in vitro by 6-amino-uracil and uracil but not by thymine. When cells exposed to VL, at a dose that did not produce per se an SCE increase, were immediately post-treated with these inhibitors of uracil-DNA glycosylase, a significant increase in SCE levels was obtained. Moreover, SCE levels in irradiated cells dropped to control level when a short holding time elapsed between exposure to VL and the beginning of post-treatment with the inhibitor. Thus, our results showed that inhibitors of uracil-DNA glycosylase enhanced SCE levels in cells with unifilarly BrdU-substituted DNA exposed to visible light; and indicated the existence of a very rapid repair of SCE-inducing lesions produced by visible light irradiation of cells with unifilarly BrdU-containing DNA.

  17. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  18. Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

  19. Relativistic Blastwaves and Synchrotron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Downes; P. Duffy; S. Komissarov

    2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic shocks accelerate particles by the first order Fermi mechanism. These particles then emit synchrotron emission in the post shock gas. We have developed a numerical code which integrates the relativistic Euler equations for fluid dynamics with a general equation of state, together with the Liouville equation for the accelerated particles. We present tests of this code and, in addition, we use it to study the gamma ray burst afterglow predicted by the fireball model, along with the hydrodynamics of a relativistic blastwave. We find that, while, broadly speaking, the behaviour of the emission is similar to that already predicted with semi-analytic approaches, the detailed behaviour is somewhat different. The ``breaks'' in the synchrotron spectrum behave differently with time, and the spectrum above the final break is harder than previously expected. These effects are due to the incorporation of the geometry of the (spherical) blastwave, along with relativistic beaming and adiabatic cooling of the energetic particles leading to a mix, in the observed spectrum, between recently injected "uncooled" particles and the older "cooled" population in different parts of the evolving, inhomogeneous flow.

  20. Emission estimates for air pollution transport models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D. G.

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of studies of energy consumption and emission inventories in Asia are discussed. These data primarily reflect emissions from fuel combustion (both biofuels and fossil fuels) and were collected to determine emissions of acid-deposition precursors (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) appropriate to RAINS-Asia regions. Current work is focusing on black carbon (soot), volatile organic compounds, and ammonia.

  1. Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ...

  2. low emissions | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    result in much lower emissions of pollutants compared to conventional coal combustion. This can be traced to the fundamental difference between gasification and...

  3. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional and Policy Lessons Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical,...

  4. PHEV Engine Cold Start Emissions Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cold Start Emissions Management Paul Chambon, Dr. David Smith Oak Ridge National Laboratory Dr. David Irick, Dean Deter The University of Tennessee Poster Location P-05 2 Managed...

  5. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that are applicable to biofuel policies and beyond. Thisso marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. EnergyIndirect emissions of biofuel policies Figure 1 provides a

  6. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory . Other full fuel cycle GHG emission models, such440 grams per mile on a full fuel cycle (or "well-to-wheel")

  7. Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans andor grants to projects aimed at reducing air emissions...

  8. The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 1 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2002deergore1.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  9. The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2002deergore2.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  10. Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Diesel Emission Control Frank Mao, Cheng G. Li, Ravi Ramanathan Dow Automotive 3900 Automation Ave. Auburn Hills, MI 48326 9272004 DEER2004 2 Outline of Presentation Dow...

  11. What can emission lines tell us?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Stasinska

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Generalities 2 Empirical diagnostics based on emission lines 3 Photoionization modelling 4 Pending questions 5 Appendix: Lists of useful lines and how to deal with them

  12. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NETL Agreement 13919 Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement 13919 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  13. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) - Cooperative multi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010...

  14. The late emission of thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente

    1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of late-time emission of Type Ia supernovae and its implications for the understanding of the explosions of C+O WDs is reviewed.

  15. Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices Todd J. Toops and Bruce G. Bunting Oak Ridge National Laboratory D. William Brookshear and Ke Nguyen University of Tennessee - Knoxville DEER...

  16. Emissions from US waste collection vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maimoun, Mousa A., E-mail: mousamaimoun@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Reinhart, Debra R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Gammoh, Fatina T. [Quality Department, Airport International Group, Amman (Jordan); McCauley Bush, Pamela [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Life-cycle emissions for alternative fuel technologies. ? Fuel consumption of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles. ? Actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles. ? Diesel-fueled waste collection vehicle emissions. - Abstract: This research is an in-depth environmental analysis of potential alternative fuel technologies for waste collection vehicles. Life-cycle emissions, cost, fuel and energy consumption were evaluated for a wide range of fossil and bio-fuel technologies. Emission factors were calculated for a typical waste collection driving cycle as well as constant speed. In brief, natural gas waste collection vehicles (compressed and liquid) fueled with North-American natural gas had 6–10% higher well-to-wheel (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to diesel-fueled vehicles; however the pump-to-wheel (PTW) GHG emissions of natural gas waste collection vehicles averaged 6% less than diesel-fueled vehicles. Landfill gas had about 80% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel. Biodiesel waste collection vehicles had between 12% and 75% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel depending on the fuel source and the blend. In 2011, natural gas waste collection vehicles had the lowest fuel cost per collection vehicle kilometer travel. Finally, the actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles consists of repetitive stops and starts during waste collection; this generates more emissions than constant speed driving.

  17. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ace30storey.pdf More Documents & Publications Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  18. ESR study on the visible photocatalytic mechanism of nitrogen-doped novel TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jiwei [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Jin Zhensheng, E-mail: jinzhensheng@henu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Feng Caixia; Yu Laigui; Zhang Jingwei; Zhang Zhijun [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible photocatalytic mechanism of nitrogen-doped novel TiO{sub 2} was studied by means of electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). It was found that, under visible light irradiation, the concentration of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancy (SETOV, V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}) of novel TiO{sub 2} remained unchanged, but that of nitrogen-doped novel TiO{sub 2} increased and returned to original state when the light was turned off. This implies that, aside from V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}} in bulk of nitrogen-doped novel TiO{sub 2}, oxygen vacancy without trapped electron (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}) was formed on its surface. V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}} as a surface electron trap captured photogenerated electron from the bulk to generate extra V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}, carrying out photocatalytic reaction on the surface. At the same time, nitrogen doping product NO was chemically adsorbed on the vicinity of V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}} and inhibited the attack of oxygen, allowing V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}} to remain stable in air. The synergistic action of the two kinds of active structures, i.e., bulk V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}-NO-Ti and surface V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}-NO-Ti, accounted for the visible photocatalytic activity of N-doped novel TiO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Synergistic action is realized between (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}){sub bulk} and (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}){sub surf} in the presence of active structures (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}){sub bulk}-NO-Ti and (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}){sub surf} -NO-Ti. Research Highlights: > The origin of visible photocatalytic activity of the N-TiO{sub 2} was studied by ESR. > (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}){sub bulk} and (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}){sub surf} formed in N-TiO{sub 2}. > (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}}){sub bulk} and (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}){sub surf} show a synergistic effect in visible photocatalytic. > TiO{sub 2} did not contain (V{sub o}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}}){sub surf}, so no visible photocatalytic activity.

  19. Controlled synthesis of T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} and enhanced visible light responsive photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Shuying; Yu, Chongfei; Li, Yukun [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Li, Yihui [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Sun, Jianhui, E-mail: sunjh@htu.cn [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Geng, Xiaofei [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} microcrystal photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant SDBS in the present study. Having received well characterization with the aid of various techniques and the results showed that the SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}, which had a unique T shape and belonged to the monoclinic family. The fast exchange dynamics between the surfactants bound to the Bi{sup 3+} seed surface and the free VO{sub 3}{sup ?} in the solution significantly increase the rate of heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of the prepared T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was evaluated by the degradation of Methylene Blue solution under visible light irradiation, 17% and 47% higher decolorization rates than the commercial P25 and BiVO{sub 4} synthesized without SDBS, respectively. Meanwhile, it has been found that the degradation kinetics of MB fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} also displayed high photocatalytic performance for metronidazole degradation. -- Graphical abstract: H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecules function as electron trapping reagent to react with e{sup ?} to enhance the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of MB in the BiVO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system under visible light irradiation. Highlights: • T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was synthesized using SDBS as a structure-directing surfactant. • SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}. • The T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} had a better visible-light photocatalytic activity. • Degradation kinetics of MB by BiVO{sub 4} fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics.

  20. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig (Setauket, NY); Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang (Sound Beach, NY); Radeka, Veljko (Bellport, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  1. Exhaust emission control and diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Christopher John; Upadhyay, Devesh

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A diesel engine emission control system uses an upstream oxidation catalyst and a downstream SCR catalyst to reduce NOx in a lean exhaust gas environment. The engine and upstream oxidation catalyst are configured to provide approximately a 1:1 ratio of NO to NO2 entering the downstream catalyst. In this way, the downstream catalyst is insensitive to sulfur contamination, and also has improved overall catalyst NOx conversion efficiency. Degradation of the system is determined when the ratio provided is no longer near the desired 1:1 ratio. This condition is detected using measurements of engine operating conditions such as from a NOx sensor located downstream of the catalysts. Finally, control action to adjust an injected amount of reductant in the exhaust gas based on the actual NO to NO2 ratio upstream of the SCR catalyst and downstream of the oxidation catalyst.

  2. Detaled description of spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marat Guryev

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The wave side of wave-photon duality, describing light as an electromagnetic field (EMF), is used in this article. EMF of spontaneous light emission (SE) of laser excited atom is calculated from first principles for the first time. This calculation is done using simple method of atomic quantum electrodynamics. EMF of SE is calculated also for three types of polyatomic light sources excited by laser. It is shown that light radiated by such sources can be coherent, which explains recent experiments on SE of laser excited atoms. Small sources of SE can be superradiant, which also conforms to experiment. Thus SE is shown not to be a random event itself. Random properties of natural light are simply explained as a result of thermal excitation randomness without additional hypotheses. EMF of SE is described by simple complex functions but not real ones.

  3. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  4. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

  5. A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task under Ergonomic Constraints with a Manikin in a Virtual Reality Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidault, Florence; Chedmail, Patrick; Pino, Laurent

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new method, based on a multi-agent system and on digital mock-up technology, to assess an efficient path planner for a manikin for access and visibility task under ergonomic constraints. In order to solve this problem, the human operator is integrated in the process optimization to contribute to a global perception of the environment. This operator cooperates, in real-time, with several automatic local elementary agents. The result of this work validates solutions brought by digital mock-up and that can be applied to simulate maintenance task.

  6. New Visible to Broadband Shortwave Conversions for Deriving Albedos from GOES-8 Over the ARM-SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011RNew Visible to Broadband Shortwave

  7. GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Donna

    GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion),2 China, Russia, Japan, India and Canada--accounted for more than 70 percent of energy-related CO2. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850­2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940

  8. PHYSICS 359 THERMIONIC EMISSION OF ELECTRONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landstreet, John D.

    PHYSICS 359 THERMIONIC EMISSION OF ELECTRONS INTRODUCTION: The electrical conductivity of metals of the process of thermionic emission of electrons is provided by the model of an essentially free electron gas at temperature T is then obtained by converting the energy distribution of Eq.(1) to a distribution over

  9. Tema: Emissions Inventories Titel: Denmark's National Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tema: Emissions Inventories Titel: Denmark's National Inventory Report - Submitted under the United;Arbejdsrapport fra DMU nr.: 127 Samfund og miljø ­ Emissions Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report Miljøundersøgelser & Energistyrelsen Maj 2000 #12;2 Data sheet Title: Denmark's National Inventory Report ­ Submitted

  10. Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Baur

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

  11. Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Meeting Ultra Fine Particles in the Atmosphere 15 March 2000 Engine Exhaust Particle Emissions: Some, low S fuel 1988 engine low S fuel 1979 Roadway study The new engine increased number emissions 10 of highly agglomerated solid carbonaceous material and ash and volatile organic and sulfur compounds

  12. Extended emission around GPS radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Stanghellini; C. P. O'Dea; D. Dallacasa; P. Cassaro; S. A. Baum; R. Fanti; C. Fanti

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended radio emission detected around a sample of GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources is discussed. Evidence for extended emission which is related to the GPS source is found in 6 objects out of 33. Three objects are associated with quasars with core-jet pc-scale morphology, and three are identified with galaxies with symmetric (CSO) radio morphology. We conclude that the core-jet GPS quasars are likely to be beamed objects with a continuous supply of energy from the core to the kpc scale. It is also possible that low surface brightness extended radio emission is present in other GPS quasars but the emission is below our detection limit due to the high redshifts of the objects. On the other hand, the CSO/galaxies with extended large scale emission may be rejuvenated sources where the extended emission is the relic of previous activity. In general, the presence of large scale emission associated with GPS galaxies is uncommon, suggesting that in the context of the recurrent activity model, the time scale between subsequent bursts is in general longer than the radiative lifetime of the radio emission from the earlier activity.

  13. The TRANSIMS Approach to Emission Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, M.J.; Smith, L.; Thayer, G.R.; Williams, M.D.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation systems play a significant role in urban air quality, energy consumption and carbon-dioxide emissions. Recently, it has been found that current systems for estimating emissions of pollutants from transportation devices lead to significant inaccuracies. Most of the existing emission modules use very aggregate representations of traveler behavior and attempt to estimate emissions on typical driving cycles. However, recent data suggests that typical driving cycles produce relatively low emissions with most emissions coming from off-cycle driving, cold-starts, malfunctioning vehicles, and evaporative emissions. TRANSIMS is a simulation system for the analysis of transportation options in metropolitan areas. It's major functional components are: (1) a population disaggregation module, (2) a travel planning module, (3) a regional microsimulation module, and (4) an environmental module. In addition to the major functional components, it includes a strong underpining of simulation science and an analyst's tool box. The purpose of the environmental module is to translate traveler behavior into consequent air quality. The environmental module uses information from the TRANSIMS planner and the microsimulation and it supports the analyst's toolbox. The TRANSIMS system holds the promise of a more complete description of the role of heterogeneity in transportation in emission estimation.

  14. 6, 48974927, 2006 A global emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    aerosol causes atmospheric warming through the direct aerosol effect, i.e. the trans- mission of absorbedACPD 6, 4897­4927, 2006 A global emission inventory of carbon aerosol for 1860­1997 C. Junker and C a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions A global emission inventory

  15. 7, 68436902, 2007 An Asian emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by increases in coal combustion in the power plants and industrial sectors. NMVOC emissions also rapidly, Nanjing, China 5 Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Kyoto, Japan Received: 26 March 2007 to inte- grate historical, present, and future emissions in Asia on the basis of a consistent methodology

  16. Projecting human development and CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate cumulative CO2 emissions during the period 2000 to 2050 from developed and developing countries based on the empirical relationship between CO2 per capita emissions (due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production) and corresponding HDI. In order to project per capita emissions of individual countries we make three assumptions which are detailed below. First, we use logistic regressions to fit and extrapolate the HDI on a country level as a function of time. This is mainly motivated by the fact that the HDI is bounded between 0 and 1 and that it decelerates as it approaches 1. Second, we employ for individual countries the correlations between CO2 per capita emissions and HDI in order to extrapolate their emissions. This is an ergodic assumption. Third, we let countries with incomplete data records evolve similarly as their close neighbors (in the emissions-HDI plane, see Fig. 1 in the main text) with complete time series of CO2 per capita emissions and HDI. Country-based emissions estimates a...

  17. Emissions from two methanol-powered buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullman, T.L.; Hare, C.T.; Baines, T.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from the two methanol-powered buses used in the California Methanol Bus Demonstration have been characterized. The M.A.N. SU 240 bus is powered by M.A.N.'s D2566 FMUH methanol engine, and utilizes catalytic exhaust aftertreatment. The GMC RTS II 04 bus is powered by a first-generation DDAD 6V-92TA methanol engine without exhaust aftertreatment. Emissions of HC, CO, NO/subX/, unburned methanol, aldehydes, total particulates, and the soluble fraction of particulate were determined for both buses over steady-state and transient chassis dynamometer test cycles. Emission levels from the M.A.N. bus were considerably lower than those from the GMC bus, with the exception of NO/subX/. Comparison of emission levels from methanol-and diesel-powered buses indicates that substantial reductions in emissions are possible with careful implementation of methanol fueling.

  18. RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melrose, Don

    I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn vanadate nanosheets and visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methyl blue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei@ahut.edu.cn; Xie, Y.K.; Pei, Y.Q.; Jiang, Y.X.; Yu, H.Y.; Cai, Z.Y.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. • The formation of Mn vanadate nanosheets can be controlled by growth conditions. • Mn vanadate nanosheets exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using ammonium metavanadate and Mn acetate as the raw materials, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the Mn vanadate nanosheets are composed of monoclinic MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicates that the nanosheets have the average thickness of about 50 nm, length of 2–10 ?m and width of 800 nm to 2 ?m. The growth process of the Mn vanadate nanosheets has also been discussed based on the analysis of the roles of the growth conditions on the formation of the Mn vanadate nanosheets. The nanosheets show good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. About 72.96% MB can be degraded after visible light irradiation for 1 h over 10 mg Mn vanadate nanosheets in 10 mL MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup ?1}.

  20. Electrochemically synthesized visible light absorbing vertically aligned N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube array films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antony, Rajini P. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Mathews, Tom, E-mail: dr.tom.mathews@gmail.com [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Ajikumar, P.K. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Krishna, D. Nandagopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Single step electrochemical synthesis of N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube array films. ? Effective substitutional N-doping achieved. ? Different N-concentrations were achieved by varying the N-precursor concentration in the electrolyte. ? Visible light absorption observed at high N-doping. -- Abstract: Visible light absorbing vertically aligned N-doped anatase nanotube array thin films were synthesized by anodizing Ti foils in ethylene glycol + NH{sub 4}F + water mixture containing urea as nitrogen source. Different nitrogen concentrations were achieved by varying the urea content in the electrolyte. The structure, morphology, composition and optical band gap of the nanotube arrays were determined by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. The substitution of O{sup 2?} ions by N{sup 3?} ions in the anion sublattice as well as the formulae of the doped samples was confirmed from the results of XPS. The optical band gap of the nanotube arrays was found to decrease with N-concentration. The sample with the highest concentration corresponding to the formula TiO{sub 1.83}N{sub 0.14} showed two regions in the Tauc's plot indicating the presence of interband states.