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Sample records for viscous liquid storage

  1. Ten themes of viscous liquid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeppe C. Dyre

    2006-12-06

    Ten "themes" of viscous liquid physics are discussed with a focus on how they point to a general description of equilibrium viscous liquid dynamics (i.e., fluctuations) at a given temperature. This description is based on standard time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for the density fields, stress tensor fields, potential energy density field, and fields quantifying molecular orientations. One characteristic aspect of the theory is that density has the appearance of a non-conserved field. Another characteristic feature is long-wavelength dominance of the dynamics, which not only simplifies the theory by allowing for an ultra-local Hamiltonian (free energy), but also explains the observed general independence of chemistry. Whereas there are no long-ranged static (i.e., equal-time) correlations in the model, there are important long-ranged dynamic correlations on the alpha time scale.

  2. Viscous Entrainment from a Nozzle: Singular Liquid Spouts Wendy W. Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardel, Margaret

    Viscous Entrainment from a Nozzle: Singular Liquid Spouts Wendy W. Zhang The Physics Department; published 28 October 2004) We analyze a long-wavelength model of viscous entrainment from a nozzle and show that, when appropriate large-scale boundary conditions are imposed, the entrainment transition can

  3. Experimental study of the atomization process for viscous liquids by meniscus perturbation and micro air jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Heejin, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to understand the atomization process in the specialized printing method which consists of the high frequency oscillating motion of a needle and a micro air jet. Highly viscous liquids, ...

  4. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive...

  5. Flow of the Viscous-Elastic Liquid in the Non- Homogeneous Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Babanly

    2009-06-17

    A problem on propagation of waves in deformable shells with flowing liquid is very urgent in connection with wide use of liquid transportation systems in living organisms and technology. It is necessary to consider shell motion equations for influence of moving liquid in cavity on the dynamics of a shell by solving such kind problems. Nowadays a totality of such problems is a widely developed field of hydrodynamics. However, a number of peculiarities connected with taking into account viscous-elastic properties of the liquid and inhomogeneity of the shell material generates considerable mathematical difficulties connected with integration of boundary value problems with variable coefficients. In the paper we consider wave flow of the liquid enclosed in deformable tube. The used mathematical model is described by the equation of motion of incompressible viscous elastic liquid combined with equation of continuity and dynamics equation for a tube inhomogeneous in length. It is accepted that the tube is cylindric, semi-infinite and rigidly fastened to the environment. At the infinity the tube is homogeneous. As a final result, the problem is reduced to the solution of Volterra type integral equation that is solved by sequential approximations method. Pulsating pressure is given at the end of the tube to determine the desired hydrodynamic functions.}

  6. An elastic, plastic, viscous model for slow shear of a liquid foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Marmottant; François Graner

    2007-07-06

    We suggest a scalar model for deformation and flow of an amorphous material such as a foam or an emulsion. To describe elastic, plastic and viscous behaviours, we use three scalar variables: elastic deformation, plastic deformation rate and total deformation rate; and three material specific parameters: shear modulus, yield deformation and viscosity. We obtain equations valid for different types of deformations and flows slower than the relaxation rate towards mechanical equilibrium. In particular, they are valid both in transient or steady flow regimes, even at large elastic deformation. We discuss why viscosity can be relevant even in this slow shear (often called "quasi-static") limit. Predictions of the storage and loss moduli agree with the experimental literature, and explain with simple arguments the non-linear large amplitude trends.

  7. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  8. Technology available for license: Charging of liquid energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology available for license: Charging of liquid energy storage media through radiolysis (ANL-IN-14-036) January 23, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint This technology utilizes radiolysis...

  9. Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Harper; Charles Powars

    2003-10-31

    Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

  10. A Xenon Condenser with a Remote Liquid Storage Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Slutsky; Y. -R. Yen; H. Breuer; A. Dobi; C. Hall; T. Langford; D. S. Leonard; L. J. Kaufman; V. Strickland; N. Voskanian

    2009-07-25

    We describe the design and operation of a system for xenon liquefaction in which the condenser is separated from the liquid storage vessel. The condenser is cooled by a pulse tube cryocooler, while the vessel is cooled only by the liquid xenon itself. This arrangement facilitates liquid particle detector research by allowing easy access to the upper and lower flanges of the vessel. We find that an external xenon gas pump is useful for increasing the rate at which cooling power is delivered to the vessel, and we present measurements of the power and efficiency of the apparatus.

  11. A multiscale variational approach to the kinetics of viscous classical liquids: The coarse-grained mean field approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-04-07

    A closed kinetic equation for the single-particle density of a viscous simple liquid is derived using a variational method for the Liouville equation and a coarse-grained mean-field (CGMF) ansatz. The CGMF ansatz is based on the notion that during the characteristic time of deformation a given particle interacts with many others so that it experiences an average interaction. A trial function for the N-particle probability density is constructed using a multiscale perturbation method and the CGMF ansatz is applied to it. The multiscale perturbation scheme is based on the ratio of the average nearest-neighbor atom distance to the total size of the assembly. A constraint on the initial condition is discovered which guarantees that the kinetic equation is mass-conserving and closed in the single-particle density. The kinetic equation has much of the character of the Vlasov equation except that true viscous, and not Landau, damping is accounted for. The theory captures condensation kinetics and takes much of the character of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the weak-gradient short-range force limit.

  12. Estimating the density scaling exponent of viscous liquids from specific heat and bulk modulus data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf R. Pedersen; Tina Hecksher; Bo Jakobsen; Thomas B. Schrřder; Nicoletta Gnan; Nicholas P. Bailey; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2009-04-22

    It was recently shown by computer simulations that a large class of liquids exhibits strong correlations in their thermal fluctuations of virial and potential energy [Pedersen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 015701 (2008)]. Among organic liquids the class of strongly correlating liquids includes van der Waals liquids, but excludes ionic and hydrogen-bonding liquids. The present note focuses on the density scaling of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., the fact their relaxation time tau at different densities rho and temperatures T collapses to a master curve according to the expression tau propto F(rho^gamma/T) [Schroder et al., arXiv:0803.2199]. We here show how to calculate the exponent gamma from bulk modulus and specific heat data, either measured as functions of frequency in the metastable liquid or extrapolated from the glass and liquid phases to a common temperature (close to the glass transition temperature). Thus an exponent defined from the response to highly nonlinear parameter changes may be determined from linear response measurements.

  13. Elastically Cooperative Activated Barrier Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Fluids. II. Thermal Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Mirigian; Kenneth S. Schweizer

    2014-02-20

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in the preceding paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of an activation volume that grows with cooling, which is correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically-extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement.

  14. To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Discrete Viscous Threads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardetzky, Max

    of viscous liquid polymers (often incorporating recycled materials) are entangled to form nonwoven fabric

  15. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  16. Decompaction and fluidization of a saturated and confined granular medium by injection of a viscous liquid or gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    in fluidized beds under gravity is perhaps the most studied issue related to this case 26­37 . NeverthelessDecompaction and fluidization of a saturated and confined granular medium by injection of a viscous rely, are rather poorly understood and their study is in its infancy. The case of bubbling instability

  17. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Re

  18. Decommissioning and Dismantling of Liquid Waste Storage and Liquid Waste Treatment Facility from Paldiski Nuclear Site, Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvas, M. [AS ALARA, Leetse tee 21, Paldiski, 76806 (Estonia); Putnik, H. [Delegation of the European Commission to Russia, Kadashevskaja nab. 14/1 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nirvin, B.; Pettersson, S. [SKB, Box 5864, Stockholm, SE-102 40 (Sweden); Johnsson, B. [Studsvik RadWaste, Nykoping, SE-611 82 (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    The Paldiski Nuclear Facility in Estonia, with two nuclear reactors was owned by the Soviet Navy and was used for training the navy personnel to operate submarine nuclear reactors. After collapse of Soviet Union the Facility was shut down and handed over to the Estonian government in 1995. In co-operation with the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (PIERG) decommission strategy was worked out and started to implement. Conditioning of solid and liquid operational waste and dismantling of contaminated installations and buildings were among the key issues of the Strategy. Most of the liquid waste volume, remained at the Facility, was processed in the frames of an Estonian-Finnish co-operation project using a mobile wastewater purification unit NURES (IVO International OY) and water was discharged prior to the site take-over. In 1999-2002 ca 120 m{sup 3} of semi-liquid tank sediments (a mixture of ion exchange resins, sand filters, evaporator and flocculation slurry), remained after treatment of liquid waste were solidified in steel containers and stored into interim storage. The project was carried out under the Swedish - Estonian co-operation program on radiation protection and nuclear safety. Contaminated installations in buildings, used for treatment and storage of liquid waste (Liquid Waste Treatment Facility and Liquid Waste Storage) were then dismantled and the buildings demolished in 2001-2004. (authors)

  19. A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage Yuan Yang,a Guangyuan Zhengb and Yi Cui*ac Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy develop a new lithium/ polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

  20. Nonlinear viscous liquid jets from a rotating orifice E.I. PARAU2, S.P DECENT1, M.J.H. SIMMONS3, D.C.Y. WONG3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parau, Emilian I.

    Nonlinear viscous liquid jets from a rotating orifice E.I. PARAU2, S.P DECENT1, M.J.H. SIMMONS3, D@uea.ac.uk,decentsp@for.mat.bham.ac.uk Abstract. A liquid jet follows a curved trajectory when the orifice from which the jet emerges is rotating. Surface tension driven instabilities cause the jet to lose coherence and break to form droplets. The sizes

  1. A distribution of the temperature in a ring of the incompressible, viscous liquid with two free boundaries. Exact solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. F. Belmetsev; V. O. Bytev

    2009-11-13

    It has been found the exact solutions for nonstationary distribution of the temperature in the liquid ring with two viscosities and two free boundaries of the ring.

  2. Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim* and Nina MahootcheianAsl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim. The harvested Li metal could then be an energy source for Li-Liquid flow batteries by using water as the cathode in a Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) flow battery that can be used in a stationary energy storage application. Li

  3. Robotic Inspection System for Bulk Liquid Storage Tanks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartsell, D. R.; Hakes, K. J.

    1998-01-01

    for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) requires: drainage of the product; cleaning of the vessel with water or solvents; physical removal, collection and containment of petroleum and chemical waste residues, including the waste streams created by the cleaning...

  4. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  5. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ?6 wt% and ?50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the experiments. Overall, the combined experimental measurements and simulations indicate that hydrogen storage based on enhanced solubility in nano-confined liquids is unlikely to meet the storage densities required for practical use. Only low gravimetric capacities of < 0.5 wt% were achieved. More importantly, solvent filled scaffolds had lower volumetric capacities than corresponding empty scaffolds. Nevertheless, several of the composites measured did show significant (>~ 5x) enhanced hydrogen solubility relative to bulk solvent solubility, when the hydrogen capacity was attributed only to dissolution in the confined solvent. However, when the hydrogen capacity was compared to an empty scaffold that is known to store hydrogen by surface adsorption on the scaffold walls, including the solvent always reduced the hydrogen capacity. For the best composites, this reduction relative to an empty scaffold was ~30%; for the worst it was ~90%. The highest capacities were obtained with the largest solvent molecules and with scaffolds containing 3- dimensionally confined pore geometries. The simulations suggested that the capacity of the composites originated from hydrogen adsorption on the scaffold pore walls at sites not occupied by solvent molecules. Although liquid solvent filled the pores, not all of the adsorption sites on the pore walls were occupied due to restricted motion of the solvent molecules within the confined pore space.

  6. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  7. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  8. Phase change material storage heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goswami, D. Yogi (Gainesville, FL); Hsieh, Chung K. (Gainesville, FL); Jotshi, Chand K. (Gainesville, FL); Klausner, James F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1997-01-01

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  9. Viscoelastic response of Yukawa liquids and P. Hartmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    interparticle potential. A change from viscous to elastic response is observed with increasing frequency elasticity involves energy storage. Most soft materials are viscoelastic since they exhibit both dissipativeViscoelastic response of Yukawa liquids Z. DonkĂł,1 J. Goree,2 and P. Hartmann1 1 Research Institute

  10. Method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous colloids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.; Persoff, P.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1998-11-17

    A method is described for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous liquids where a viscous liquid solidifies at a controlled rate after injection into soil and forms impermeable isolation of the material enclosed within the subsurface barriers. The viscous liquid is selected from the group consisting of polybutenes, polysiloxanes, colloidal silica and modified colloidal silica of which solidification is controlled by gelling, cooling or cross-linking. Solidification timing is controlled by dilution, addition of brines, coating with alumina, stabilization with various agents and by temperature. 17 figs.

  11. Miscibility, solubility and retrograde prediction of methane in liquids. Liquid storage of natural gas (LSNG) for vehicle fuel. Annual report, July 15, 1992-July 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansoori, G.A.

    1994-07-01

    The primary focus of this project is to investigate the concept of liquid storage of natural gas (LSNG) for potential natural gas vehicle (NGV) application. The research work consists of developing accurate techniques for modeling of interfacial properties, miscibility and solubility of methane in liquids. By implementing this project it will be possible: To use natural gas as the fuel for internal combustion engines; To increase the gas tank capacity about 200% more over the compressed natural gas (CNG) scheme; To increase the octane-number of low quality liquid fuels through blending them with natural gas.

  12. Effects of NaCl, sucrose, and storage on rheological parameters of heat induced gels of liquid egg products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brough, Joan

    1988-01-01

    EFFECTS OF NaCl, SUCROSE, AND STORAGE ON RHEOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF HEAT INDUCED GELS OF LIQUID EGG PRODUCTS A Thesis by Joan Brough Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... and content by: C. W. Dill (Chair of Committee) F. A. Gardner (Member) R. L. Edwards (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Effects of NaC1, Sucrose, and Storage on Rheological Parameters of Heat Induced Gels of Liquid Egg...

  13. Long-lived tendrils viscous entrainment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardel, Margaret

    Long-lived tendrils in viscous entrainment Wendy W. Zhang Laura E. Schmidt* Physics & James Franck entrained by warm upwards flow in thermal boundary layer ·Entrainment stabilizes upwards flow Kumagai et al-layer liquid entrained as steady spout Cohen & Nagel 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. Cohen 2004 Phys. Rev. E Kleine

  14. APS/123-QED Force balance at the transition from selective withdrawal to viscous entrainment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardel, Margaret

    APS/123-QED Force balance at the transition from selective withdrawal to viscous entrainment Fran- uid from the upper layer is withdrawn, is thus succeeded by the viscous entrainment regime, in which) Selective withdrawal and viscous entrainment regimes (superposed images). Liquid is withdrawn at vol- ume

  15. Sampling and Analysis Plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105-KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.A.; Green, M.A.; Makenas, B.J.; Trimble, D.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) details the sampling and analyses to be performed on fuel canisters transferred to the Weasel Pit of the 105-KW fuel storage basin. The radionuclide content of the liquid and gas in the canisters must be evaluated to support the shipment of fuel elements to the 300 Area in support of the fuel characterization studies (Abrefah, et al. 1994, Trimble 1995). The following sections provide background information and a description of the facility under investigation, discuss the existing site conditions, present the constituents of concern, outline the purpose and scope of the investigation, outline the data quality objectives (DQO), provide analytical detection limit, precision, and accuracy requirements, and address other quality assurance (QA) issues.

  16. Zero Energy Communities with Central Solar Plants using Liquid Desiccants and Local Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.; Boranian, A.

    2012-08-01

    The zero energy community considered here consists of tens to tens-of-thousands of residences coupled to a central solar plant that produces all the community's electrical and thermal needs. A distribution network carries fluids to meet the heating and cooling loads. Large central solar systems can significantly reduce cost of energy vs. single family systems, and they enable economical seasonal heat storage. However, the thermal distribution system is costly. Conventional district heating/cooling systems use a water/glycol solution to deliver sensible energy. Piping is sized to meet the peak instantaneous load. A new district system introduced here differs in two key ways: (i) it continuously distributes a hot liquid desiccant (LD) solution to LD-based heating and cooling equipment in each home; and (ii) it uses central and local storage of both LD and heat to reduce flow rates to meet average loads. Results for piping sizes in conventional and LD thermal communities show that the LD zero energy community reduces distribution piping diameters meeting heating loads by {approx}5X and meeting cooling loads by {approx}8X for cooling, depending on climate.

  17. Melton Valley liquid low-level radioactive waste storage tanks evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The Melton Valley Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks (MVSTs) store the evaporator concentrates from the Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLLW) System at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The eight stainless steel tanks contain approximately 375,000 gallons of liquid and sludge waste. These are some of the newer, better-designed tanks in the LLLW System. They have been evaluated and found by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation to comply with all Federal Facility Agreement requirements for double containment. The operations and maintenance aspects of the tanks were also reviewed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in September 1994. This document also contains an assessment of the risk to the public and ORNL workers from a leak in one of the MVSTs. Two primary scenarios were investigated: (1) exposure of the public to radiation from drinking Clinch River water contaminated by leaked LLLW, and (2) exposure of on-site workers to radiation by inhaling air contaminated by leaked LLLW. The estimated frequency of a leak from one of the MVSTs is about 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} events per year, or about once in 1200 years (with a 95% confidence level). If a leak were to occur, the dose to a worker from inhalation would be about 2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} mrem (with a 95% confidence level). The dose to a member of the public through the drinking water pathway is estimated to be about 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} mrem (with a 95% confidence level). By comparison with EPA Safe Drinking Water regulations, the allowable lifetime radiation dose is about 300 mrem. Thus, a postulated LLLW leak from the MVSTs would not add appreciably to an individual`s lifetime radiation dose.

  18. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  19. Air Entrainment by a Viscous Jet Plunging into a Bath Elise Lorenceau and David Quere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggers, Jens

    Air Entrainment by a Viscous Jet Plunging into a Bath E´lise Lorenceau and David Que´re´ Physique 2004; published 13 December 2004) A liquid jet plunging into a container of liquid often entrains, we measure the amount of air entrained by a viscous jet over a wide range of parameters and explain

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-06-04

    This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

  1. Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W.M.

    Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by Jeffrey M. Aristoff, Jeffrey D. Leblanc, Annette E. Hosoi, and John W. M. Bush, Massachusetts Institute of Technology We examine the form of the viscous hydraulic of height 2­10 mm. Elegaard et al.1 first demonstrated that the axial symme- try of the viscous hydraulic

  2. Forming liquid sprays in compressed-gas energy storage systems for effective heat exchange

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Troy O.; Bell, Alexander; Bollinger, Benjamin R.

    2012-08-07

    In various embodiments, efficiency of energy storage and recovery systems compressing and expanding gas is improved via heat exchange between the gas and a heat-transfer fluid.

  3. Forming liquid sprays in compressed-gas energy storage systems for effective heat exchange

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Troy O; Bell, Alexander; Bollinger, Benjamin R; Shang, Andrew; Chmiel, David; Richter, Horst; Magari, Patrick; Cameron, Benjamin

    2013-07-02

    In various embodiments, efficiency of energy storage and recovery systems compressing and expanding gas is improved via heat exchange between the gas and a heat-transfer fluid.

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

  5. Preventing Buckling of Slender Cylindrical Structures by Internal Viscous Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Linshits; Amir D. Gat

    2015-02-10

    Viscous flows within an elastic structure apply stress on the solid-liquid interface. The stress-field created by the viscous flow can be utilized to counter stress created by external forces and thus may be applied as a tool for delaying the onset of structural failure. To illustrate this concept we study viscous flow within an elastic cylinder under compressive axial force. We obtain a closed-form expression showing an approximately linear relation between the critical buckling load and the liquid inlet pressure. Our results are validated by numerical computations. We discuss future research directions of fluid-solid composite materials which create flow under external stress, yielding enhanced resistance to structural failure.

  6. Lubricated viscous gravity currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowal, Katarzyna N.; Worster, M. Grae

    2015-02-10

    ) at their base. The presence of subglacial meltwater can be attributed to geothermal heating, frictional heating from glacier sliding, and ice melting under pressure from the weight of the ice † Email address for correspondence: K.Kowal@damtp.cam.ac.uk 2 K. N... -fed and a constant head was maintained in the reservoir. To minimize the amount Lubricated viscous gravity currents 15 mirror syringe pump reservoir glass sheet perspex sheet screen Golden Syrup Salt Solution 1 m Figure 6: Schematic of our experimental...

  7. A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy and new systems with low cost, high energy density and long cycle life are desired. In this article, we develop a new lithium/polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage, with lithium polysulfide (Li{sub 2}S{sub 8}) in ether solvent as a catholyte and metallic lithium as an anode. Unlike previous work on Li/S batteries with discharge products such as solid state Li{sub 2}S{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}S, the catholyte is designed to cycle only in the range between sulfur and Li{sub 2}S{sub 4}. Consequently all detrimental effects due to the formation and volume expansion of solid Li{sub 2}S{sub 2}/Li{sub 2}S are avoided. This novel strategy results in excellent cycle life and compatibility with flow battery design. The proof-of-concept Li/PS battery could reach a high energy density of 170 W h kg{sup -1} and 190 W h L{sup -1} for large scale storage at the solubility limit, while keeping the advantages of hybrid flow batteries. We demonstrated that, with a 5 M Li{sub 2}S{sub 8} catholyte, energy densities of 97 W h kg{sup -1} and 108 W h L{sup -1} can be achieved. As the lithium surface is well passivated by LiNO{sub 3} additive in ether solvent, internal shuttle effect is largely eliminated and thus excellent performance over 2000 cycles is achieved with a constant capacity of 200 mA h g{sup -1}. This new system can operate without the expensive ion-selective membrane, and it is attractive for large-scale energy storage.

  8. FIELD-DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-09-12

    Methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of aqueous spent fuel storage basins and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials were developed to assess the corrosion potential of a basin. this assessment can then be used to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to ascertain if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations and assist in evaluating general storage basin operations. The test kit was developed based on the identification of key physical, chemical and microbiological parameters identified using a review of the scientific and basin operations literature. The parameters were used to design bench scale test cells for additional corrosion analyses, and then tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters. The tools were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The sampling kit consisted of a total organic carbon analyzer, an YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

  9. Sampling and analysis plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105 KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1996-08-09

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the equipment,procedures and techniques for obtaining gas and liquid samples from sealed K West fuel canisters. The analytical procedures and quality assurance requirements for the subsequent laboratory analysis of the samples are also discussed.

  10. Liquid Water Storage, Distribution, and Removal from Diffusion Media in PEFCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    media DM of polymer electrolyte fuel cells PEFCs is a function of design geometry, surface geometry under the landings than cloth, resulting in a very high liquid saturation and eventual flooding. Available electronically August 28, 2006. The management of water within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

  11. Catenaries in viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Brato

    2015-01-01

    This work explores a simple model of a slender, flexible structure in a uniform flow, providing analytical solutions for the translating, axially flowing equilibria of strings subjected to a uniform body force and drag forces linear in the velocities. The classical catenaries are extended to a five-parameter family of curves. A sixth parameter affects the tension in the curves. Generic configurations are planar, represented by a single first order equation for the tangential angle. The effects of varying parameters on representative shapes, orbits in angle-curvature space, and stress distributions are shown. As limiting cases, the solutions include configurations corresponding to "lariat chains" and the towing, reeling, and sedimentation of flexible cables in a highly viscous fluid. Regions of parameter space corresponding to infinitely long, semi-infinite, and finite length curves are delineated. Almost all curves subtend an angle less than $\\pi$ radians, but curious special cases with doubled or infinite ra...

  12. Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

  13. Methods for the Safe Storage, Handling, and Disposal of Pyrophoric Liquids and Solids in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Quigley, David; Kuntamukkula, Murty; Simmons, Fred; Freshwater, David; Bigger, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Due to the inherent nature of pyrophoric substances to ignite spontaneously upon exposure to air, special precautions must be taken to ensure their safe handling and use. Pyrophoric gases (such as diborane, dichloroborane, phosphine, etc.) are typically the easiest class of pyrophoric substances to handle since the gas can be plumbed directly to the application and used remotely. Pyrophoric solids and liquids, however, require the user to physically manipulate them when transferring them from one container to another. Failure to follow proper safety precautions could result in serious injury or unintended consequences to laboratory personnel.12 Because of this danger, pyrophorics should be handled only by experienced personnel. Users with limited experience must be trained on how to handle pyrophoric reagents and consult with a knowledgeable staff member prior to performing the experimental task. The purpose of this article is three fold: 1) to provide guidelines and general safety precautions to avoid accidents, 2) describe proper techniques on how to successfully handle, store, and dispose of pyrophoric liquids and solids, and 3) illustrate best practices for working with this class of reactants in a laboratory environment.

  14. Viscous-poroelastic interaction as mechanism to create adhesion in frogs' toe pads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulchinsky, A

    2015-01-01

    The toe pads of frogs consist of soft hexagonal structures and a viscous liquid contained between and within the hexagonal structures. It has been hypothesized that this configuration creates adhesion by allowing for long range capillary forces, or alternatively, by allowing for exit of the liquid and thus improving contact of the toe pad. In this work we suggest interaction between viscosity and elasticity as a mechanism to create temporary adhesion, even in the absence of capillary effects or van der Waals forces. We initially illustrate this concept experimentally by a simplified configuration consisting of two surfaces connected by a liquid bridge and elastic springs. We then utilize poroelastic mixture theory and model frog's toe pads as an elastic porous medium, immersed within a viscous liquid and pressed against a rigid rough surface. The flow between the surface and the toe pad is modeled by the lubrication approximation. Inertia is neglected and analysis of the elastic-viscous dynamics yields a gove...

  15. Method for producing viscous hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poston, Robert S. (Winter Park, FL)

    1982-01-01

    A method for recovering viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels from a subterranean formation by drilling a well bore through the formation and completing the well by cementing a casing means in the upper part of the pay zone. The well is completed as an open hole completion and a superheated thermal vapor stream comprised of steam and combustion gases is injected into the lower part of the pay zone. The combustion gases migrate to the top of the pay zone and form a gas cap which provides formation pressure to produce the viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels.

  16. Targeting adequate thermal stability and fire safety in selecting ionic liquid-based electrolytes for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for energy storage L. Chancelier,a,b A.O. Diallo,c,d C.C. Santini,*a G. Marlair,*c T. Gutel,b S. Mailley,b C Abstract The energy storage market relating to lithium based systems regularly grows in size and expands for the promotion of a new generation of energy storage systems. These systems must be capable of addressing

  17. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Jeffrey W.

    2010-08-12

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

  18. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    impact of improved hydrogen storage may be through makingand M. Gardiner, Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies andReducing the liquid hydrogen storage dewar cost has only a

  19. Iterative Optimal and Adaptive Control of a Near Isothermal Liquid Piston Air Compressor in a Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    /expanders are crucial for the economical viability of a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system such as the one in the Com- pressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system for offshore wind turbine that has recently been proposed in [2], [5]. In the proposed CAES system, high pressure (20-30MPa) compressed air is stored

  20. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen...

  1. Spatially Heterogeneous Dynamics and Dynamic Facilitation in a Model of Viscous Silica Michael Vogel* and Sharon C. Glotzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    this behavior. The mode coupling theory [1] describes many aspects of dynamical behavior at high T is not only relevant in spin models [26], but also in a viscous equilibrium liquid. Finally, we show is still the understanding of the tremen- dous slowing down of molecular dynamics in supercooled liquids

  2. Numerical Methods for Incompressible Viscous Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    . The simplest viscous flow problems involve just one fluid in the laminar regime. The governing equations in nature and technological devices are turbulent. The tran- sition from laminar to turbulent flow phenomena, laminar or turbulent viscous flow is coupled with other processes, such as heat tra

  3. Shape transition and propulsive force of an elastic rod rotating in a viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian Qian; Thomas R. Powers; Kenneth S. Breuer

    2007-12-03

    The deformation of thin rods in a viscous liquid is central to the mechanics of motility in cells ranging from \\textit{Escherichia coli} to sperm. Here we use experiments and theory to study the shape transition of a flexible rod rotating in a viscous fluid driven either by constant torque or at constant speed. The rod is tilted relative to the rotation axis. At low applied torque, the rod bends gently and generates small propulsive force. At a critical torque, the rotation speed increases abruptly and the rod forms a helical shape with much greater propulsive force. We find good agreement between theory and experiment.

  4. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

  5. Excitation of fountain and entrainment instabilities at the interface between two viscous fluids using a beam of laser light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza Chraibi; Julien Petit; Régis Wunenburger; Jean-Pierre Delville

    2013-07-24

    We report on two instabilities called viscous fountain and viscous entrainment triggered at the interface between two liquids by the action of bulk flows driven by a laser beam. These streaming flows are due to light scattering losses in turbid liquids, and can be directed either toward or forward the interface. We experimentally and numerically investigate these interface instabilities and show that the height and curvature of the interface deformation at the threshold and the jet radius after interface destabilization mainly depend on the waist of the laser beam. Analogies and differences between these two instabilities are characterized.

  6. Solar energy storage through the homogeneous electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide : photoelectrochemical and photovoltaic approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathrum, Aaron John

    2011-01-01

    D ISSERTATION Solar Energy Storage through the Homogeneousthe development of solar energy storage via liquid fuels isis an attractive solar energy storage solution. The great

  7. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 şC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10-8 mol/s/cm2 were achieved.

  8. A High Temperature (400 to 650oC) Secondary Storage Battery Based on Liquid Sodium and Potassium Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Greg; Weber, Neill

    2007-06-08

    This STTR Phase I research program was on the development of high temperature (400 to 650 C), secondary batteries with roundtrip efficiency > 90% for integration with a 3 to 10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. In fulfillment of this objective, advanced planar high temperature rechargeable batteries, comprised of an alkali metal ion conducting, highly refractory, beta'' alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) sandwiched between liquid sodium (or potassium) anode and liquid metal salt cathode, were developed at MSRI. The batteries have been successfully demonstrated at a working temperature as high as 600 C. To our knowledge, so far no work has been reported in the literature on planar rechargeable batteries based on BASE, and results obtained in Phase I for the very first time demonstrated the viability of planar batteries, though relatively low temperature tubular-based sodium-sulfur batteries and ZEBRA batteries have been actively developed by very limited non U.S. companies. The results of this Phase I work have fulfilled all the goals and stated objectives, and the achievements showed much promise for further, substantial improvements in battery design and performance. The important results of Phase I are briefly described in what follows: (1) Both Na-BASE and K-BASE discs and tubes have been successfully fabricated using MSRI's patented vapor phase process. Ionic conductivity measurements showed that Na-BASE had higher ionic conductivity than K-BASE, consistence with the literature. At 500 C, Na-BASE conductivity is 0.36 S/cm, which is more than 20 times higher than 8YSZ electrolyte used for SOFC at 800 C. The activation energy is 22.58 kJ/mol. (2) CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, ZnCl{sub 2}, and AgCl were identified as suitable salts for Na/metal salt or K/metal salt electrochemical couples based on thermochemical data. Further open circuit voltage measurements matched those deduced from the thermochemical data. (3) Tubular cells with CuCl{sub 2} as the cathode and Na as the anode were constructed. However, it was discovered that CuCl{sub 2} was somewhat corrosive and dissolved iron, an element of the cathode compartment. Since protective coating technology was beyond this Phase I work scope, no further work on the CuCl{sub 2} cathode was pursued in Phase I. Notwithstanding, due to its very high OCV and high specific energy, CuCl{sub 2} cathode is a very attractive possibility for a battery capable of delivering higher specific energy with higher voltage. Further investigation of the Na-CuCl{sub 2} battery can be done by using suitable metal coating technologies developed at MSRI for high temperature applications. (4) In Phase I, FeCl{sub 2} and ZnCl{sub 2} were finalized as the potential cathodes for Na-metal salt batteries for delivering high specific energies. Planar Na-FeCl{sub 2} and Na-ZnCl{sub 2} cells were designed, constructed, and tested between 350 and 600 C. Investigation of charge/discharge characteristics showed they were the most promising batteries. Charge/discharge cycles were performed as many as 27 times, and charge/discharge current was as high as 500 mA. No failure was detected after 50 hours testing. (5) Three-cell planar stacks were designed, constructed, and evaluated. Preliminary tests showed further investigation was needed for optimization. (6) Freeze-thaw survival was remarkably good for planar BASE discs fabricated by MSRI's patented vapor phase process.

  9. Data Storage Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Anxiao "Andrew"

    I Data Storage #12;#12;Data Storage Edited by Prof. Florin Balasa In-Tech intechweb.org #12 Jakobovic Cover designed by Dino Smrekar Data Storage, Edited by Prof. Florin Balasa p. cm. ISBN 978-953-307-063-6 #12;V Preface Many different forms of storage, based on various natural phenomena, has been invented

  10. Upper Bounds on Coarsening Rates in Demixing Binary Viscous Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otto, Felix

    bounds on the energy landscape into bounds on the dynamics. The bounds on the energy landscape relate the energy functional (given by the driving ther- modynamics -- here interfacial energy) to the intrinsic of Applied Mathematics, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany 1 #12;1 Introduction 1.1 Background from

  11. Dilepton production in schematic causal viscous hydrodynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Taesoo; Han, Kyong Chol; Ko, Che Ming.

    2011-01-01

    transversal to the reaction plane, we derive a set of schematic equations from the Isreal-Stewart causal viscous hydrodynamics. These equations are then used to describe the evolution dynamics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions by taking the shear viscosity...

  12. Capillary-driven flow induced by a stepped perturbation atop a viscous film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Salez; Joshua D. McGraw; Oliver Bäumchen; Kari Dalnoki-Veress; Élie Raphaël

    2012-10-22

    Thin viscous liquid films driven by capillarity are well described in the lubrication theory through the thin film equation. In this article, we present an analytical solution of this equation for a particular initial profile: a stepped perturbation. This initial condition allows a linearization of the problem making it amenable to Fourier analysis. The solution is obtained and characterized. As for a temperature step in the heat equation, self-similarity of the first kind of the full evolution is demonstrated and a long-term expression for the excess free energy is derived. In addition, hydrodynamical fields are described. The solution is then compared to experimental profiles from a model system: a polystyrene nanostep above the glass transition temperature which flows due to capillarity. The excellent agreement enables a precise measurement of the capillary velocity for this polymeric liquid, without involving any numerical simulation. More generally, as these results hold for any viscous system driven by capillarity, the present solution may provide a useful tool in hydrodynamics of thin viscous films.

  13. Effect of gas velocity on the weakly nonlinear instability of a planar viscous sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li-Jun, E-mail: yanglijun@buaa.edu.cn; Chen, Pi-Min; Wang, Chen [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A weakly nonlinear spatial instability of a two-dimensional planar viscous sheet for sinuous disturbances in a co-flowing inviscid gas stream is investigated theoretically, with an emphasis on the effect of the surrounding gas velocity. The solutions of the second-order interface disturbances are derived and the wave deformation has been computed. The results indicate that the second-order surface disturbance of the fundamental sinuous mode is varicose, which causes the thinning and the subsequent breakup of the liquid sheet. The nonlinear behaviors of the planar sheet are quite sensitive to variations in gas-to-liquid velocity ratio. The deviation of the velocity ratio from the value of unity leads to a larger growth rate, a larger second-order initial amplitude, and a shorter breakup length, and therefore enhances the instability. The growth rates predicted by the present nonlinear analysis according to the shortest breakup length are generally smaller than the linear predictions and can better conform to the experimental measures of Barreras et al. [“Linear instability analysis of the viscous longitudinal perturbation on an air-blasted liquid sheets,” Atomization Sprays 11, 139 (2001)]. Furthermore, the wave deformations of the most unstable disturbances are presented. The nonlinear instability of the planar sheet for a fixed velocity difference is performed. An equal increase of the gas and liquid velocity reduces the spatial growth rate and increases the breakup length, but generally has no influences on the second-order initial amplitude and the wavelength of the disturbance.

  14. Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Misture

    2012-09-30

    Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

  15. Dispensing thin liquid films using dielectrophoresis R. Ahmed,1 T. N. Tombs,2 T. B. Jones,1 and P. Leas2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Thomas B.

    system using liquid dielectrophoresis to dispense thin films of viscous, insulating liquid onto rolls in evaporated metal on an insulating substrate. A thin coating of a low-surface energy material covering

  16. Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

    1986-01-01

    Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

  17. Viscous dark energy and generalized second law of thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; A. Sheykhi

    2011-03-05

    We examine the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in a non-flat universe in the presence of viscous dark energy. At first we assume that the universe filled only with viscous dark energy. Then, we extend our study to the case where there is an interaction between viscous dark energy and pressureless dark matter. We examine the time evolution of the total entropy, including the entropy associated with the apparent horizon and the entropy of the viscous dark energy inside the apparent horizon. Our study show that the generalized second law of thermodynamics is always protected in a universe filled with interacting viscous dark energy and dark matter in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon. Finally, we show that the the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled for a universe filled with interacting viscous dark energy and dark matter in the sense that we take into account the Casimir effect.

  18. Visualization of Solution Gas Drive in Viscous Oil, SUPRI TR-126

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, D.S.; Kovscek, A.R.

    2001-07-23

    Several experimental studies of solution gas drive are available in this report. Almost all of the studies have used light oil. Solution gas drive behavior, especially in heavy oil reservoirs, is poorly understood. Experiments were performed in which pore-scale solution gas drive phenomena were viewed in water/carbon dioxide and viscous oil/carbon dioxide systems. A new pressure vessel was designed and constructed to house silicon-wafer micromodels that previously operated at low (<3 atm) pressure. The new apparatus is used for the visual studies. Several interesting phenomena were viewed. The repeated nucleation of gas bubbles was observed at a gas-wet site occupied by dirt. Interestingly, the dissolution of a gas bubble into the liquid phase was previously recorded at the same nucleation site. Gas bubbles in both systems grew to span one ore more pore bodies before mobilization. Liquid viscosity affected the ease with which gas bubbles coalesced. More viscous solutions result in slower rates of coalescence. The transport of solid particles on gas-liquid interfaces was also observed.

  19. Direct liquid injection of liquid petroleum gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, D.J.; Phipps, J.R.

    1984-02-14

    A fuel injector and injection system for injecting liquified petroleum gas (LPG) into at least one air/fuel mixing chamber from a storage means that stores pressurized LPG in its liquid state. The fuel injector (including a body), adapted to receive pressurized LPG from the storage means and for selectively delivering the LPG to the air/fuel mixing chamber in its liquified state. The system including means for correcting the injector activation signal for pressure and density variations in the fuel.

  20. Viscous throughflow modeling for multistage compressor design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, M.A.; Gallimore, S.J. )

    1993-04-01

    An existing throughflow method for axial compressors, which accounts for the effects of spanwise mixing using a turbulent diffusion model, has been extended to include the viscous shear force on the endwall. The use of a shear force, consistent with a no-slip condition, on the annulus walls in the throughflow calculations allows realistic predictions of the velocity and flow angle profiles near the endwalls. The annulus wall boundary layers are therefore incorporated directly into the throughflow prediction. This eliminates the need for empirical blockage factors or independent annulus boundary layer calculations. The axisymmetric prediction can be further refined by specifying realistic spanwise variations of loss coefficient and deviation to model the three-dimensional endwall effects. The resulting throughflow calculation gives realistic predictions of flow properties across the whole span of a compressor. This is confirmed by comparison with measured data from both low and high-speed multistage machines. The viscous throughflow method has been incorporated into an axial compressor design system. The method predicts the meridional velocity defects in the endwall region and consequently blading can be designed that allows for the increased incidence, and low dynamic head, near the annulus walls.

  1. Characterisation of a small viscous flow turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemma, E.; Deam, R.T.; Toncich, D.; Collins, R.

    2008-10-15

    The result of experimental and numerical study that was undertaken to determine the performance characteristics of viscous flow turbines is presented. It is anticipated that these devices may find use in applications such as small power sources for electronic appliances and micro-combined heat and power applications. In the numerical work that was carried out to broaden the experimental results, commercial CFD solver Fluent 6.2 was used while accompanying software, Gambit 3.2, was used for performing the necessary pre-processing. The results of the experimental study indicate that the adiabatic efficiency of these machines is around 25%. The main reasons for the low efficiency have been identified to be, parasitic losses in the bearing, viscous losses in the end walls, and other dissipative losses in the plenum chamber that also significantly contribute to the low efficiencies of these devices. If these parasitic losses can be minimised the turbine could potentially operate with an adiabatic expansion efficiency close to the theoretical limit of around 40%. (author)

  2. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized ...

  3. Lubrication approximation for thin viscous films: asymptotic behavior of nonnegative solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tudorascu, Adrian

    Lubrication approximation for thin viscous films: asymptotic behavior of nonnegative solutions-order nonlinear de- generate parabolic equations of lubrication approximation for thin viscous film type. The weak

  4. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  5. Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen.Solid and liquid hydrogen carriers for use in hydrogen storage and delivery.

  6. Storage tracking refinery trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, J.

    1996-05-01

    Regulatory and marketplace shakeups have made the refining and petrochemical industries highly competitive. The fight to survive has forced refinery consolidations, upgrades and companywide restructurings. Bulk liquid storage terminals are following suit. This should generate a flurry of engineering and construction by the latter part of 1997. A growing petrochemical industry translates into rising storage needs. Industry followers forecasted flat petrochemical growth in 1996 due to excessive expansion in 1994 and 1995. But expansion is expected to continue throughout this year on the strength of several products.

  7. Materials and interfaces for catalysis, separation, storage, and environmental applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    the next generation of catalysts, separation processes, gas and liquid storage technologiesMaterials and interfaces for catalysis, separation, storage, and environmental applications Advanced materials and interfaces (including surfaces, thin films, and membranes) are a key to developing

  8. Fabrication and characterization of fibers with built-in liquid crystal channels and electrodes for transverse incident-light modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Lei

    We report on an all-in-fiber liquid crystal (LC) structure designed for the modulation of light incident transverse to the fiber axis. A hollow cavity flanked by viscous conductors is introduced into a polymer matrix, and ...

  9. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  10. Thin viscous sheets with inhomogeneous viscosity G. Pfingstag,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audoly, Basile

    such as drawing, coating, blowing, or extrusion. In nature, the earth crust can be considered as a viscous layer forcing include a rectangular floating sheet with one moving edge,9 or thin glass redraw.10

  11. Grid embedment as applied to viscous transonic airfoil flowfield analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher L.

    1981-01-01

    GRID EMBEDMENT AS APPLIED TO VISCOUS TRANSONIC AIRFOIL FLOWFIELD ANALYSIS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER L. REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM Uni ver si ty in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering GRID EMBEDMENT AS APPLIED TO VISCOUS TRANSONIC AIRFOIL FLOWFIELD ANALYSIS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER L, REED Approved as to style and content by: airma o o ittee (Member) ember Head...

  12. Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore Mohanty

    2012-03-31

    The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation includes 1.5% of an alkali, 0.4% of a nonionic surfactant, and 0.48% of a polymer. The secondary waterflood in a 1D sand pack had a cumulative recovery of 0.61 PV in about 3 PV injection. The residual oil saturation to waterflood was 0.26. Injection of tertiary alkaline-surfactant-polymer slug followed by tapered polymer slugs could recover almost 100% of the remaining oil. The tertiary alkali-surfactant-polymer flood of the 330 cp oil is stable in three-dimensions; it was verified by a flood in a transparent 5-spot model. A secondary polymer flood is also effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. The secondary polymer flood recovered about 0.78 PV of oil in about 1 PV injection. The remaining oil saturation was 0.09. The pressure drops were reasonable (<2 psi/ft) and depended mainly on the viscosity of the polymer slug injected. For the heavy crude oil (of viscosity 10,000 cp), low viscosity (10-100 cp) oil-in-water emulsions can be obtained at salinity up to 20,000 ppm by using a hydrophilic surfactant along with an alkali at a high water-to-oil ratio of 9:1. Very dilute surfactant concentrations (~0.1 wt%) of the synthetic surfactant are required to generate the emulsions. It is much easier to flow the low viscosity emulsion than the original oil of viscosity 10,000 cp. Decreasing the WOR reverses the type of emulsion to water-in-oil type. For a low salinity of 0 ppm NaCl, the emulsion remained O/W even when the WOR was decreased. Hence a low salinity injection water is preferred if an oil-in-water emulsion is to be formed. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil followed by tertiary injection of alkaline-surfactants is very effective. Waterflood has early water breakthrough, but recovers a substantial amount of oil beyond breakthrough. Waterflood recovers 20-37% PV of the oil in 1D sand pack in about 3 PV injection. Tertiary alkali-surfactant injection increases the heavy oil recovery to 50-70% PV in 1D sand packs. As the salinity increased, the oil recovery due to alkaline surfactant flood increased, but water-in-oil emulsion was p

  13. Metal-Air Electric Vehicle Battery: Sustainable, High-Energy Density, Low-Cost Electrochemical Energy Storage – Metal-Air Ionic Liquid (MAIL) Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-21

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: ASU is developing a new class of metal-air batteries. Metal-air batteries are promising for future generations of EVs because they use oxygen from the air as one of the battery’s main reactants, reducing the weight of the battery and freeing up more space to devote to energy storage than Li-Ion batteries. ASU technology uses Zinc as the active metal in the battery because it is more abundant and affordable than imported lithium. Metal-air batteries have long been considered impractical for EV applications because the water-based electrolytes inside would decompose the battery interior after just a few uses. Overcoming this traditional limitation, ASU’s new battery system could be both cheaper and safer than today’s Li-Ion batteries, store from 4-5 times more energy, and be recharged over 2,500 times.

  14. Viscous Flow in Ducts We want to study the viscous flow in ducts with various velocities, fluids and duct shapes. The basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Viscous Flow in Ducts We want to study the viscous flow in ducts with various velocities, fluids and duct shapes. The basic problem is this: Given the pipe geometry and its added components (e Fluid Mechanics (S 09) Viscous Flow in Ducts 2 103

  15. Collective modes and thermodynamics of the liquid state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Trachenko; V. V. Brazhkin

    2015-12-21

    Strongly interacting, dynamically disordered and with no small parameter, liquids took a theoretical status between gases and solids. We review different approaches to liquids and propose that liquids do not need classifying in terms of their proximity to gases and solids. Instead, they are a unique system in their own class with a notably mixed dynamical state in contrast to pure dynamical states of solids and gases. We start with explaining how the first-principles approach to liquids is an intractable, exponentially complex problem of coupled non-linear oscillators with bifurcations. This is followed by a reduction of the problem based on liquid relaxation time $\\tau$ representing non-perturbative treatment of strong interactions. On the basis of $\\tau$, solid-like high-frequency modes are predicted and we review related recent experiments. We demonstrate how these modes can be derived by generalizing either hydrodynamic or elasticity equations. We comment on the historical trend to approach liquids using hydrodynamics and compare it to an alternative solid-like approach. We subsequently discuss how collective modes evolve with temperature and how this affects liquid energy and other properties such as fast sound. Here, our emphasis is on real, rather than model, liquids. Highlighting the dominant role of high-frequency modes for liquid energy, we review a wide range of liquids: subcritical low-viscous liquids, supercritical state with two different dynamical and thermodynamic regimes separated by the Frenkel line, highly-viscous liquids and liquid-glass transition. We also discuss liquid-liquid phase transitions where the solid-like properties of liquids have become further apparent. We then discuss gas-like and solid-like approaches to quantum liquids and persisting theoretical problems. We list areas where interesting insights may appear and continue the extraordinary liquid story.

  16. Synchronized molecular-dynamics simulation for the thermal lubrication of a polymeric liquid between parallel plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01

    The Synchronized Molecular-Dynamics simulation which was recently proposed by authors [Phys. Rev. X {\\bf 4}, 041011 (2014)] is applied to the analysis of polymer lubrication between parallel plates. The rheological properties, conformational change of polymer chains, and temperature rise due to the viscous heating are investigated with changing the values of thermal conductivity of the polymeric liquid. It is found that at a small applied shear stress on the plate, the temperature of polymeric liquid only slightly increases in inverse proportion to the thermal conductivity and the apparent viscosity of polymeric liquid is not much affected by changing the thermal conductivity. However, at a large shear stress, the transitional behaviors of the polymeric liquid occur due to the interplay of the shear deformation and viscous heating by changing the thermal conductivity. This transition is characterized by the Nahme-Griffith number $Na$ which is defined as the ratio of the viscous heating to the thermal conducti...

  17. Dynamics of filaments and membranes in a viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Powers

    2009-12-08

    Motivated by the motion of biopolymers and membranes in solution, this article presents a formulation of the equations of motion for curves and surfaces in a viscous fluid. We focus on geometrical aspects and simple variational methods for calculating internal stresses and forces, and we derive the full nonlinear equations of motion. In the case of membranes, we pay particular attention to the formulation of the equations of hydrodynamics on a curved, deforming surface. The formalism is illustrated by two simple case studies: (1) the twirling instability of straight elastic rod rotating in a viscous fluid, and (2) the pearling and buckling instabilities of a tubular liposome or polymersome.

  18. Viscous quark-gluon plasma model through fluid QCD approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djun, T. P.; Soegijono, B.; Mart, T.; Handoko, L. T. E-mail: Laksana.tri.handoko@lipi.go.id

    2014-09-25

    A Lagrangian density for viscous quark-gluon plasma has been constructed within the fluid-like QCD framework. Gauge symmetry is preserved for all terms inside the Lagrangian, except for the viscous term. The transition mechanism from point particle field to fluid field, and vice versa, are discussed. The energy momentum tensor that is relevant to the gluonic plasma having the nature of fluid bulk of gluon sea is derived within the model. By imposing conservation law in the energy momentum tensor, shear viscosity appears as extractable from the equation.

  19. Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-23

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  20. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-03

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  1. Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipp, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    as the refrigerant) at -57?C or -70?F. In essence the storage device relies upon a system of creating phase change of carbon dioxide crystals to liquid and limited liquid to gas ex change. Carbon dioxide will store approximately 85 htu/lb dt'ring the solid... to liquid transformation. (Figure 7) In terms of space requirements, a storage vessel at 60 psig would require a tank capacity of 28 gallons per ton hour of storage. This includes a safety factor to allow storage space for carbon dioxide gas in the top...

  2. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  3. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01

    storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .example system based on log-structured storage 10.1 SystemA storage bottleneck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  4. Solar energy thermalization and storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1981-09-01

    A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

  5. Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohols for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    a renewed interest in hydrogen as a form of chemical energy storage. Hydrogen, which may be used in fuel attractive hydrogen storage media are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), because they have relatively simplify the conventional hydrogen storage process (10). The envisioned partial electrochemical

  6. Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number Ratul Dasgupta I will present some results on undular hydraulic jumps occurring in a two bores (in rivers), where the interface remains horizontal, the moderate Reynolds hydraulic jump shows a linear increase in height due to viscosity

  7. 6. Very viscous flows 6.1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    [check this, for example using (6.2)]. Suppose we know that the drag force D on a solid object moving interesting physical quantity to calculate is the resultant viscous drag on the sphere. If Reynolds number Re , a force (mass times acceleration) has dimensions MLT-2 , and a dynamic viscosity µ has dimensions ML-1 T-1

  8. A phase space analysis for nonlinear bulk viscous cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Acquaviva; Aroonkumar Beesham

    2015-05-08

    We consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with both viscous radiation and nonviscous dust. The former has a bulk viscosity which is proportional to an arbitrary power of the energy density, i.e. $\\zeta \\propto \\rho_v^{\

  9. Viscous Resuspension of a sediment caused by oscillating stratified flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallner, Johannes

    Viscous Resuspension of a sediment caused by oscillating stratified flows J. Wallner U. Schaflinger Abstract It is known that a sediment of settled particles can resuspend under the action of shear resuspension of a sediment in a Couette channel with harmonically oscillating walls. Numerical experiments

  10. Model Characterization of Magnetic Microrobot Navigating in Viscous Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Indeed most untethered microrobot propulsion schemes based on magnetic pulling have to face importantModel Characterization of Magnetic Microrobot Navigating in Viscous Environment Karim Belharet1.folio@ensi-bourges.fr,antoine.ferreira@ensi-bourges.fr Abstract. In this paper we aim to characterize and validate the system's dynamic model of a magnetic

  11. A NOTE ON VISCOUS SPLITTING OF DEGENERATE CONVECTIONDIFFUSION EQUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It thus provides a suitable ``L 1 type'' framework for analyzing numerical schemes for convection­diffusionA NOTE ON VISCOUS SPLITTING OF DEGENERATE CONVECTION­DIFFUSION EQUATIONS Steinar Evje, Kenneth possibly strongly degenerate convection­diffusion problems. Since we allow the equations to be strongly

  12. Design rules for pumping and metering of highly viscous fluids in microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Design rules for pumping and metering of highly viscous fluids in microfluidics Sarah L. Perry.1039/c0lc00035c The use of fluids that are significantly more viscous than water in microfluidics has a theoretical treatment for the flow of highly viscous fluids in deforming microfluidic channels, particularly

  13. Fail-safe storage rack for irradiated fuel rod assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, D.R.

    1993-03-23

    A fail-safe storage rack is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

  14. Viscous contributions to the pressure for potential flow analysis of capillary instability of two viscous fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    immersed in another liquid is subject to capillary instability. The capillary col- lapse can be described, as seen in Fig. 1. Capillary instability is responsible for drop formation in applications such as ink corresponding to the mode of maximum insta- bility is =4.51 2R, exceeding considerably the circumfer- ence

  15. Modelling carbon dioxide accumulation at Sleipner: Implications for underground carbon storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Modelling carbon dioxide accumulation at Sleipner: Implications for underground carbon storage Mike dioxide; Viscous flow; Gravity flow 1. Introduction Disposal of carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs;questions about the environmental benefits of this process concern the fate of the carbon dioxide over

  16. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  17. Rolling stones: The motion of a sphere down an inclined plane coated with a thin liquid film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bico,José

    Rolling stones: The motion of a sphere down an inclined plane coated with a thin liquid film J 2009 A spherical bead deposited on a smooth tilted dry plane wall rolls down the slope under that is coated with a thin layer of order 50­100 m of a viscous liquid. The steady motion of the sphere under

  18. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  19. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraft, Helmut (Liederbach, DE); Ledjeff, Konstantin (Bad Krozingen, DE)

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  20. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1986-04-08

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  1. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1985-06-18

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  2. Method for charging and discharging a latent-heat storage medium and heat storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreikenbohm, R.; Reusch, H.

    1982-12-28

    A heat storage unit is disclosed having a vertically cylindrical container accommodating a latent-heat storage medium and a conduit introducing a heat carrier liquid not miscible with the medium at the bottom of the container. The conduit has an exit nozzle which is located outside the axial center of the cylinder and nearly perpendicular to the radius of the cylinder so that the heat carrier liquid enters the cylinder at the bottom in a direction to cause the heat storage melt to be set into a rotary motion.

  3. Method for charging and discharging a latent-heat storage medium and heat storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreikenbohm, R.; Reusch, H.

    1981-10-13

    A heat storage unit is disclosed having a vertically cylindrical container accommodating a latent-heat storage medium and a conduit introducing a heat carrier liquid not miscible with the medium at the bottom of the container. The conduit has an exit nozzle which is located outside the axial center of the cylinder and nearly perpendicular to the radius of the cylinder so that the heat carrier liquid enters the cylinder at the bottom in a direction to cause the heat storage melt to be set into a rotary motion.

  4. A viscous instability in axially symmetric laminar shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakura, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    A viscous instability in shearing laminar axisymmetric hydrodynamic flows around a gravitating center is described. In the linearized hydrodynamic equations written in the Boussinesq approximation with microscopic molecular transport coefficients, the instability arises when the viscous dissipation is taken into account in the energy equation. Using the local WKB approximation, we derive a third-order algebraic dispersion equation with two modes representing the modified Rayleigh modes R+ and R-, and the third X-mode. We show that in thin accretion flows the viscosity destabilizes one of the Rayleigh modes in a wide range of wavenumbers, while the X-mode always remains stable. In Keplerian flows, the instability increment is found to be a few Keplerian rotational periods at wavelengths with $kr\\sim 10-50$. This instability may cause turbulence in astrophysical accretion discs even in the absence of magnetic field.

  5. Flow harmonics within an analytically solvable viscous hydrodynamic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshitaka Hatta; Jorge Noronha; Giorgio Torrieri; Bo-Wen Xiao

    2014-10-01

    Based on a viscous hydrodynamic model with anisotropically perturbed Gubser flow and isothermal Cooper-Frye freezeout at early times, we analytically compute the flow harmonics $v_n(p_T)$ and study how they scale with the harmonic number $n$ and transverse momentum, as well as the system size, shear and bulk viscosity coefficients, and collision energy. In particular, we find that the magnitude of shear viscous corrections grows linearly with $n$. The mixing between different harmonics is also discussed. While this model is rather simple as compared to realistic heavy-ion collisions, we argue that the scaling results presented here may be meaningfully compared to experimental data collected over many energies, system sizes, and geometries.

  6. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai; Bjoern Schenke

    2015-09-16

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that these coefficients provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations and the transport properties of the quark gluon plasma.

  7. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnai, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that these coefficients provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations and the transport properties of the quark gluon plasma.

  8. USE OF POLYMERS TO RECOVER VISCOUS OIL FROM UNCONVENTIONAL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall Seright

    2011-09-30

    This final technical progress report summarizes work performed the project, 'Use of Polymers to Recover Viscous Oil from Unconventional Reservoirs.' The objective of this three-year research project was to develop methods using water soluble polymers to recover viscous oil from unconventional reservoirs (i.e., on Alaska's North Slope). The project had three technical tasks. First, limits were re-examined and redefined for where polymer flooding technology can be applied with respect to unfavorable displacements. Second, we tested existing and new polymers for effective polymer flooding of viscous oil, and we tested newly proposed mechanisms for oil displacement by polymer solutions. Third, we examined novel methods of using polymer gels to improve sweep efficiency during recovery of unconventional viscous oil. This report details work performed during the project. First, using fractional flow calculations, we examined the potential of polymer flooding for recovering viscous oils when the polymer is able to reduce the residual oil saturation to a value less than that of a waterflood. Second, we extensively investigated the rheology in porous media for a new hydrophobic associative polymer. Third, using simulation and analytical studies, we compared oil recovery efficiency for polymer flooding versus in-depth profile modification (i.e., 'Bright Water') as a function of (1) permeability contrast, (2) relative zone thickness, (3) oil viscosity, (4) polymer solution viscosity, (5) polymer or blocking-agent bank size, and (6) relative costs for polymer versus blocking agent. Fourth, we experimentally established how much polymer flooding can reduce the residual oil saturation in an oil-wet core that is saturated with viscous North Slope crude. Finally, an experimental study compared mechanical degradation of an associative polymer with that of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide. Detailed results from the first two years of the project may be found in our first and second annual reports. Our latest research results, along with detailed documentation of our past work, can be found on our web site at http://baervan.nmt.edu/randy/. As an overall summary of important findings for the project, polymer flooding has tremendous potential for enhanced recovery of viscous oil. Fear of substantial injectivity reduction was a primary hurdle that limited application of polymer flooding. However, that concern is largely mitigated by (1) use of horizontal wells and (2) judicious injection above the formation parting pressure. Field cases now exist where 200-300-cp polymer solutions are injected without significant reductions in injectivity. Concern about costs associated with injection of viscous polymer solutions was a second major hurdle. However, that concern is reduced substantially by realization that polymer viscosity increases approximately with the square of polymer concentration. Viscosity can be doubled with only a 40% increase in polymer concentration. Up to a readily definable point, increases in viscosity of the injected polymer solution are directly related to increases in sweep efficiency and oil recovery. Previously published simulation results - suggesting that shear-thinning polymer solutions were detrimental to sweep efficiency - were shown to be unfounded (both theoretically and experimentally).

  9. Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas8of Energy

  10. Longitudinal Viscous Hydrodynamic Evolution for the Shattered Colour Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai; Tetsufumi Hirano

    2011-02-24

    We investigate hydrodynamic evolution of the quark gluon plasma for the colour glass condensate type initial conditions. We solve full second-order viscous hydrodynamic equations in the longitudinal direction to find that non-boost invariant expansion leads to visible deformation on the initial rapidity distribution. The results indicate that hydrodynamic evolution with viscosity plays an important role in determining parameters for the initial distributions.

  11. Note on the stability of viscous roll-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Blake; Noble, Pascal; Rodrigues, L Miguel; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The viscous shallow water equations with bottom drag are used to study the stability of roll-waves. In [17], the authors provided a set of spectral assumptions under which periodic wave trains of rather general viscous conservation laws were proved to be nonlinearly stable. Here, we focus on the spectral stability of viscous roll-waves and give a {\\it complete} description of the set of stable roll-waves from their onset at Froude number $\\approx 2$ up to the infinite-Froude limit. This paper is a physically oriented companion paper that extracts the physically relevant content from the rather long and technical paper [6]. We formulate stability results at the onset of the hydrodynamic instability and provide numerical results for intermediate and large Froude numbers. In particular, stable roll-waves at onset have asymptotically large periods whereas there are no stable roll-waves for large Froude numbers. Moreover, the stability region in parameter space for intermediate Froude numbers seems to be governed ...

  12. Energy storage, Thermal energy storage (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Energy storage, Thermal energy storage (TES) Ron Zevenhoven Ĺbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow 8, 20500 Turku 2/32 4.1 Energy storage #12;Energy storage - motivations Several reasons motivate the storage of energy, either as heat, cold, or electricity: ­ Supplies of energy are in many cases

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    of such an aquifer thermal storage system were studied andusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  15. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01

    AutoRAID hierarchical storage system,” in SOSP, 1995. [147]next-generation storage systems, and to use segments andclasses of distributed storage systems. Bibliography [1] D.

  16. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  18. Viscous corrections to anisotropic flow and transverse momentum spectra from transport theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumari, Salvatore; Greco, Vincenzo; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Viscous hydrodynamics is commonly used to model the evolution of the matter created in an ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collision. It provides a good description of transverse momentum spectra and anisotropic flow. These observables, however, cannot be consistently derived using viscous hydrodynamics alone, because they depend on the microscopic interactions at freeze-out. We derive the ideal hydrodynamic limit and the first-order viscous correction to anisotropic flow ($v_2$, $v_3$ and $v_4$) and momentum spectrum using a transport calculation. The linear response coefficient to the initial anisotropy, $v_n(p_T)/\\varepsilon_n$, depends little on $n$ in the ideal hydrodynamic limit. The viscous correction to the spectrum depends not only on the differential cross section, but also on the initial momentum distribution. This dependence is not captured by standard second-order viscous hydrodynamics. The viscous correction to anisotropic flow increases with $p_T$, but this increase is slower than usually assumed i...

  19. A study of the effects of converging and diverging flow on the instability of viscous fingers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wylie, Joel Albert

    1987-01-01

    displacement inevitably results in an instable boundary between the two fluids with fingers of the less viscous fluid penetrating into the more viscous one. This study gives an insight into the effects of converging and diverging flow regimes on the nature... provide some insight for answering this question. Although it is apparent that both converging and diverging flow take place during a solvent injection process, the effect of these two flow regimes on the amount of viscous fingering that takes place...

  20. Cool Storage Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    . This article covers three thermal storage topics. The first section catalogs various thermal storage systems and applications. Included are: load shifting and load leveling, chilled water storage systems, and ice storage systems using Refrigerant 22 or ethylene...

  1. Dynamical Model of Rocket Propellant Loading with Liquid Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muratov, Cyrill

    when liquid hydrogen is moved from a storage tank to an external tank via a transfer line. By employingDynamical Model of Rocket Propellant Loading with Liquid Hydrogen Viatcheslav V. Osipov MCT, Inc­evaporation of hydrogen, pressurization of the tanks, and liquid hydrogen and hydrogen vaporflows inthe presence

  2. Relativistic Viscous Fluid Description of Microscopic Black Hole Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Kapusta

    2001-05-25

    Microscopic black holes explode with their temperature varying inversely as their mass. Such explosions would lead to the highest temperatures in the present universe, all the way to the Planck energy. Whether or not a quasi-stationary shell of matter undergoing radial hydrodynamic expansion surrounds such black holes is been controversial. In this paper relativistic viscous fluid equations are applied to the problem. It is shown that a self-consistent picture emerges of a fluid just marginally kept in local thermal equilibrium; viscosity is a crucial element of the dynamics.

  3. Core assembly storage structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., Charles E. (Northridge, CA); Brunings, Jay E. (Chatsworth, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  4. Numerical Simulation of 3D Bubbles Rising in Viscous Liquids using a Front Tracking Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Ping

    Hua a , Jan F. Stene b and Ping Lin b a Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Science Park Road of High Performance Computing 1 Science Park Road, #01-01 The Capricorn Singapore 117528 Email address. Stene b and Ping Lin b a Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Science Park Road, #01

  5. Storage System and IBM System Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM® XIV® Storage System and IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller deliver high performance and smart management for SAP® landscapes IBM SAP International Competence Center #12;"The combination of the XIV Storage System and SAN Volume Controller gives us a smarter way to manage our storage. If we need

  6. An electrochemical investigation of the chemical diffusivity in liquid metal alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barriga, Salvador A. (Salvador Aguilar)

    2013-01-01

    The liquid metal battery has been shown to be a viable candidate for grid-scale energy storage, due to its fast kinetics and ability to be constructed from economically feasible materials. Various of the liquid metal couples ...

  7. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  8. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  9. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-tank heat exchanger 4000-psi pressure vessel rating #12;4 System Analysis of Physical Storage stresses ­ 5500 pressure cycles at 1.25 NWP (SAE J2579) Dynamic models for gaseous/liquid refueling) peak pressure 4 atm initial pressure, variable initial temperature Additional storage capacity with pre

  10. THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: REGULARITY AND LONG TIME BEHAVIOR OF WEAK SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugh, Mary

    THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: REGULARITY AND LONG TIME BEHAVIOR OF WEAK = - · (f(h) h) in one space dimension. This equation, derived from a `lubrication approximation', models from a `lubrication approximation', models surface tension dominated motion of thin viscous films

  11. On the settling of clouds of particles in viscous fluids Bloen Metzger, Maxime Nicolas & Elisabeth Guazzelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzger, Bloen

    particle of radius a settles in a viscous fluid of viscosity µ, the drag force D = -6µaU exerted). The amplitude of the generated flow field decays very slowly, like the inverse of the distance to the sphere. We of particles. When two identical spheres sediment in a viscous fluid, the fluid motion induced by the fall

  12. Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters Storage Ringsrlogo_t.gif

  13. Summary of On-Board Storage Models and Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burner uses depleted air split-off from spent cathode stream Burner exhaust expanded in gas turbine On-Board Hydrogen Storage System with a Liquid Carrier #12;3 Fuel Cell System with H2 Stored in a Liquid Carrier Enthalpy Wheel Spent H2 Fuel cell Stack Stack Coolant Compressor/Motor/Expandor Exhaust

  14. Cooling Flows of Self-Gravitating, Rotating, Viscous Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsen Shadmehri; Jamshid Ghanbari

    2002-04-06

    We obtain self-similar solutions that describe the dynamics of a self-gravitating, rotating, viscous system. We use simplifying assumptions; but explicitly include viscosity and the cooling due to the dissipation of energy. By assuming that the turbulent dissipation of energy is as power law of the density and the speed v_{rms} and for a power-law dependence of viscosity on the density, pressure, and rotational velocity, we investigate turbulent cooling flows. It has been shown that for the cylindrically and the spherically cooling flows the similarity indices are the same, and they depend only on the exponents of the dissipation rate and the viscosity model. Depending on the values of the exponents, which the mechanisms of the dissipation and viscosity determine them, we may have solutions with different general physical properties. The conservation of the total mass and the angular momentum of the system strongly depends on the mechanisms of energy dissipation and the viscosity model.

  15. Saturn in hot water: viscous evolution of the Enceladus torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alison J. Farmer

    2008-06-09

    The detection of outgassing water vapor from Enceladus is one of the great breakthroughs of the Cassini mission. The fate of this water once ionized has been widely studied; here we investigate the effects of purely neutral-neutral interactions within the Enceladus torus. We find that, thanks in part to the polar nature of the water molecule, a cold (~180 K) neutral torus would undergo rapid viscous heating and spread to the extent of the observed hydroxyl cloud, before plasma effects become important. We investigate the physics behind the spreading of the torus, paying particular attention to the competition between heating and rotational line cooling. A steady-state torus model is constructed, and it is demonstrated that the torus will be observable in the millimeter band with the upcoming Herschel satellite. The relative strength of rotational lines could be used to distinguish between physical models for the neutral cloud.

  16. Thermodynamics of viscous dark energy in an RSII braneworld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; A. Sheykhi

    2011-03-05

    We show that for an RSII braneworld filled with interacting viscous dark energy and dark matter, one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation in the form of the first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon. In addition, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon on the brane for both constant and time variable 5-dynamical Newton's constant $G_5$. These results hold regardless of the specific form of the dark energy. Our study further support that in an accelerating universe with spatial curvature, the apparent horizon is a physical boundary from the thermodynamical point of view.

  17. Energy Dissipation by Metamorphic Micro-Robots in Viscous Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Tad

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic robots could perform tasks with high spatial precision, such as acting on precisely-targeted cells in biological tissues. Some tasks may benefit from robots that change shape, such as elongating to improve chemical gradient sensing or contracting to squeeze through narrow channels. This paper evaluates the energy dissipation for shape-changing (i.e., metamorphic) robots whose size is comparable to bacteria. Unlike larger robots, surface forces dominate the dissipation. Theoretical estimates indicate that the power likely to be available to the robots, as determined by previous studies, is sufficient to change shape fairly rapidly even in highly-viscous biological fluids. Achieving this performance will require significant improvements in manufacturing and material properties compared to current micromachines. Furthermore, optimally varying the speed of shape change only slightly reduces energy use compared to uniform speed, thereby simplifying robot controllers.

  18. Thermal acidization and recovery process for recovering viscous petroleum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poston, Robert S. (Winter Park, FL)

    1984-01-01

    A thermal acidization and recovery process for increasing production of heavy viscous petroleum crude oil and synthetic fuels from subterranean hydrocarbon formations containing clay particles creating adverse permeability effects is described. The method comprises injecting a thermal vapor stream through a well bore penetrating such formations to clean the formation face of hydrocarbonaceous materials which restrict the flow of fluids into the petroleum-bearing formation. Vaporized hydrogen chloride is then injected simultaneously to react with calcium and magnesium salts in the formation surrounding the bore hole to form water soluble chloride salts. Vaporized hydrogen fluoride is then injected simultaneously with its thermal vapor to dissolve water-sensitive clay particles thus increasing permeability. Thereafter, the thermal vapors are injected until the formation is sufficiently heated to permit increased recovery rates of the petroleum.

  19. Parametric studies and optimisation of pumped thermal electricity storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McTigue, Joshua; White, Alexander; Markides, Christos N.

    2014-09-11

    comprehensive review of these technologies is given in Ref. [3]. TES systems suitable for large-scale 19 storage (i.e., > 100 MWh) include: cryogenic systems for which energy is stored within tanks of liquid air 20 or liquid nitrogen; pumped heat storage where... how the optimal design may vary when multiple objectives are considered. 34 35 2. Baseline Design 36 The outline design features of a hypothetical 2 MW PTES system with 16 MWh of storage is given in Ref. 37 [12]. A system of this size has been...

  20. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicente Garzó; William D. Fullmer; Christine M. Hrenya; Xiaolong Yin

    2015-11-12

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here, we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous more general treatment of the drag force [Garz\\'o \\emph{et al.}, J. Fluid Mech. \\textbf{712}, 129 (2012)], here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients $\\eta^*$ (shear viscosity), $\\kappa^*$ (thermal conductivity) and $\\mu^*$ (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature-dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient $\\gamma^*$ characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on $\\eta^*$ and $\\mu^*$ is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of $\\kappa^*$ is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  1. Shapes of sedimenting soft elastic capsules in a viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst-Holger Boltz; Jan Kierfeld

    2015-09-08

    Soft elastic capsules which are driven through a viscous fluid undergo shape deformation coupled to their motion. We introduce an iterative solution scheme which couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical rest shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the F\\"oppl-von-K\\'arm\\'an number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small F\\"oppl-von-K\\'arm\\'an number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical F\\"oppl-von-K\\'arm\\'an numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force. This type of instability should be observable for generic synthetic capsules. All shape bifurcations can be resolved in the force-velocity relation of sedimenting capsules, where up to three capsule shapes with different velocities can occur for the same driving force. All three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes are stable with respect to rotation during sedimentation.

  2. Photon Storage Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01

    Sessler, "Analysis of Photon Storage Cavities for a Free-configuration of coupled storage cavity and PEL cavity. TheFig. 2. A ring resonator storage cavity coupled through a

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    and Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"with solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a

  4. Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids— substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system during the day and released at night—when the sun is not shining—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

  5. Viscous corrections to anisotropic flow and transverse momentum spectra from transport theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Plumari; Giovanni Luca Guardo; Vincenzo Greco; Jean-Yves Ollitrault

    2015-02-13

    Viscous hydrodynamics is commonly used to model the evolution of the matter created in an ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collision. It provides a good description of transverse momentum spectra and anisotropic flow. These observables, however, cannot be consistently derived using viscous hydrodynamics alone, because they depend on the microscopic interactions at freeze-out. We derive the ideal hydrodynamic limit and the first-order viscous correction to anisotropic flow ($v_2$, $v_3$ and $v_4$) and momentum spectrum using a transport calculation. The linear response coefficient to the initial anisotropy, $v_n(p_T)/\\varepsilon_n$, depends little on $n$ in the ideal hydrodynamic limit. The viscous correction to the spectrum depends not only on the differential cross section, but also on the initial momentum distribution. This dependence is not captured by standard second-order viscous hydrodynamics. The viscous correction to anisotropic flow increases with $p_T$, but this increase is slower than usually assumed in viscous hydrodynamic calculations. In particular, it is too slow to explain the observed maximum of $v_n$ at $p_T\\sim 3$~GeV/c.

  6. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    varying solar energy inputs and thermal or power demands. Itusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  7. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01

    to MW/40 MWI-IR Battery Energy Storage Facility", proc. 23rdcompressed air, and battery energy storage are all only 65

  8. Liquid metal batteries : ambipolar electrolysis and alkaline earth electroalloying cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradwell, David (David Johnathon)

    2011-01-01

    Three novel forms of liquid metal batteries were conceived, studied, and operated, and their suitability for grid-scale energy storage applications was evaluated. A ZnlITe ambipolar electrolysis cell comprising ZnTe dissolved ...

  9. Initial surface deformations during impact on a liquid pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2014-01-01

    A tiny air bubble can be entrapped at the bottom of a solid sphere that impacts onto a liquid pool. The bubble forms due to the deformation of the liquid surface by a local pressure buildup inside the surrounding gas, as also observed during the impact of a liquid drop on a solid wall. Here we perform a perturbation analysis to quantitatively predict the initial deformations of the free surface of the liquid pool as it is approached by a solid sphere. We study the natural limits where the gas can be treated as a viscous fluid (Stokes flow) or as an inviscid fluid (potential flow). For both cases we derive the spatio-temporal evolution of the pool surface, and recover some of the recently proposed scaling laws for bubble entrapment. When inserting typical values for drop impact, we find that the bubble volume is mainly determined by the effect of gas viscosity.

  10. Synchronized molecular-dynamics simulation for the thermal lubrication of a polymeric liquid between parallel plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shugo Yasuda; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2015-03-25

    The Synchronized Molecular-Dynamics simulation which was recently proposed by authors [Phys. Rev. X {\\bf 4}, 041011 (2014)] is applied to the analysis of polymer lubrication between parallel plates. The rheological properties, conformational change of polymer chains, and temperature rise due to the viscous heating are investigated with changing the values of thermal conductivity of the polymeric liquid. It is found that at a small applied shear stress on the plate, the temperature of polymeric liquid only slightly increases in inverse proportion to the thermal conductivity and the apparent viscosity of polymeric liquid is not much affected by changing the thermal conductivity. However, at a large shear stress, the transitional behaviors of the polymeric liquid occur due to the interplay of the shear deformation and viscous heating by changing the thermal conductivity. This transition is characterized by the Nahme-Griffith number $Na$ which is defined as the ratio of the viscous heating to the thermal conduction at a characteristic temperature. When the Nahme-Griffith number exceeds the unity, the temperature of polymeric liquid increases rapidly and the apparent viscosity also exponentially decreases as the thermal conductivity decreases. The conformation of polymer chains is stretched and aligned by the shear flow for $Na1$.

  11. Normal shock solutions to the viscous shock layer equations including thermal, chemical, thermodynamic, and radiative nonequilibrium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mott, David Ray

    1993-01-01

    An existing axisymmetric body viscous shock layer code including chemical, thermal, and thermodynamic nonequilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative gasdynamic coupling is adapted to simulate the one-dimensional flow within a shock tube. A suitable...

  12. Anomalies in the theory of viscous energy losses due to shear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resonators. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalies in the theory of viscous energy losses due to shear in rotational MEMS resonators. In this paper, the effect of...

  13. Wake and wave resistance on viscous thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledesma-Alonso, René; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an external pressure disturbance, being displaced with a constant speed along the free surface of a viscous thin film, is studied theoretically in the lubrication approximation in one- and two-dimensional geometries. In the comoving frame, the imposed pressure field creates a stationary deformation of the interface - a wake - that spatially vanishes in the far region. The shape of the wake and the way it vanishes depend on both the speed and size of the external source and the properties of the film. The wave resistance, namely the force that has to be externally furnished in order to maintain the wake, is analysed in details. For finite-size pressure disturbances, it increases with the speed, up to a certain transition value above which a monotonic decrease occurs. The role of the horizontal extent of the pressure field is studied as well, revealing that for a smaller disturbance the latter transition occurs at higher speed. Eventually, for a Dirac pressure source, the wave resistance either sa...

  14. Beam energy scan using a viscous hydro+cascade model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpenko, Iu A; Huovinen, P; Petersen, H

    2013-01-01

    Following the experimental program at BNL RHIC, we perform a similar "energy scan" using 3+1D viscous hydrodynamics coupled to the UrQMD hadron cascade, and study the collision energy dependence of pion and kaon rapidity distributions and $m_T$-spectra, as well as charged hadron elliptic flow. To this aim the equation of state for finite baryon density from a Chiral model coupled to the Polyakov loop is employed for hydrodynamic stage. 3D initial conditions from UrQMD are used to study gradual deviation from boost-invariant scaling flow. We find that the inclusion of shear viscosity in the hydrodynamic stage of evolution consistently improves the description of the data for Pb-Pb collisions at CERN SPS, as well as of the elliptic flow measurements for Au-Au collisions in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at BNL RHIC. The suggested value of shear viscosity is $\\eta/s\\ge0.2$ for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=6.3\\dots39$ GeV.

  15. Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2008-01-08

    Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

  16. Viscous Fingering-like Instability of Cell Fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Callan-Jones; J. -F. Joanny; J. Prost

    2008-04-04

    We present a novel flow instability that can arise in thin films of cytoskeletal fluids if the friction with the substrate on which the film lies is sufficiently strong. We consider a two dimensional, membrane-bound fragment containing actin filaments that is perturbed from its initially circular state, where actin polymerizes at the edge and flows radially inward while depolymerizing in the fragment. Performing a linear stability analysis of the initial state due to perturbations of the fragment boundary, we find, in the limit of very large friction, that the perturbed actin velocity and pressure fields obey the very same laws governing the viscous fingering instability of an interface between immiscible fluids in a Hele-Shaw cell. A feature of this instability that is remarkable in the context of cell motility, is that its existence is independent of the strength of the interaction between cytoskeletal filaments and myosin motors, and moreover that it is completely driven by the free energy of actin polymerization at the fragment edge.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

  18. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  19. Thermal energy storage apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, P.E.

    1980-04-22

    A thermal energy storage apparatus and method employs a container formed of soda lime glass and having a smooth, defectfree inner wall. The container is filled substantially with a material that can be supercooled to a temperature greater than 5* F., such as ethylene carbonate, benzophenone, phenyl sulfoxide, di-2-pyridyl ketone, phenyl ether, diphenylmethane, ethylene trithiocarbonate, diphenyl carbonate, diphenylamine, 2benzoylpyridine, 3-benzoylpyridine, 4-benzoylpyridine, 4methylbenzophenone, 4-bromobenzophenone, phenyl salicylate, diphenylcyclopropenone, benzyl sulfoxide, 4-methoxy-4prmethylbenzophenone, n-benzoylpiperidine, 3,3pr,4,4pr,5 pentamethoxybenzophenone, 4,4'-bis-(Dimethylamino)-benzophenone, diphenylboron bromide, benzalphthalide, benzophenone oxime, azobenzene. A nucleating means such as a seed crystal, a cold finger or pointed member is movable into the supercoolable material. A heating element heats the supercoolable material above the melting temperature to store heat. The material is then allowed to cool to a supercooled temperature below the melting temperature, but above the natural, spontaneous nucleating temperature. The liquid in each container is selectively initiated into nucleation to release the heat of fusion. The heat may be transferred directly or through a heat exchange unit within the material.

  20. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  1. Distributed storage with communication costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Craig Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    5 Introduction to Coding for Distributed Storage The Repairflow graph for 1 repair with varying storage capac- itythe Capacity of Storage Nodes . . . 4.1 Characterizing

  2. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    dielectric semiconductor-liquid interfaces. J. Phys. Chem.rates across liquid-liquid interfaces. J. Phys. Chem.rates across liquid-liquid interfaces. 2. Relationships and

  3. Pumped Storage Hydropower

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to traditional hydropower, pumped-storage hydropower (PSH)—A type of hydropower that works like a battery, pumping water from a lower reservoir to an upper reservoir for storage and...

  4. Multiported storage devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Marcus Bryan

    2000-01-01

    and intelligence than the traditional block storage device. A multiported storage device allows application-specific code that we call filter applets to be downloaded to the device while still maintaining the simple block-level interface. The device contains...

  5. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in above- ground bunkers, each of which is about the size of a one-car garage. Spent Fuel Storage: Dual Purpose Cask Systems 8 Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation: Framework...

  6. Unit 35 - Raster Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 35, CC in GIS; Peuquet, Donna

    1990-01-01

    in GIS - 1990 Page 8 Unit 35 - Raster Storage GIS to whichNCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990 Page 9 Unit 35 - RasterStorage UNIT 35 IMAGES NCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990

  7. Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2013-12-01

    Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

  8. Accountable Storage Giuseppe Ateniese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Accountable Storage Giuseppe Ateniese Michael T. Goodrich Vassilios Lekakis Charalampos Papamanthou§ Evripidis Paraskevas§ Roberto Tamassia¶ Abstract We introduce Accountable Storage (AS), a framework allowing. Such protocols offer "provable storage insurance" to a client: In case of a data loss, the client can

  9. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.Estimating ground water storage changes in the Mississippistorage..

  10. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  11. Storage Ring Revised March 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994 8.1. Introduction -- 107 -- #12; 108 Storage Ring 8.2. Magnetic Design and Field Calculations 8.2.1. Conceptual Approach #12; Storage Ring 109 #12; 110 Storage Ring 8.2.2. Computer Aided Refined Pole Designs #12; Storage Ring 111 #12; 112 Storage Ring #12

  12. Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collette. Sébastien

    CH8 Divers 2 Agenda · Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS · Déploiement · VLAN ­ 802.1Q · Gestion d · Sécurisation de Windows · Sécurisation de UNIX · Qu'est-ce que... ­ Firewall, VPN, IDS/IPS, PKI Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN #12;3 Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN · Direct Attached Storage · Network Attached Storage · Storage

  13. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  14. Heavy liquid beneficiation developed for Alabama tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The tar sand deposits in the State of Alabama contain about 1.8 billion barrels of measured and more than 4 billion barrels of speculative in-place bitumen. A comprehensive research program is in progress for the separation of bitumen from these deposits. In general, Alabama tar sands are oil wetted, low grade and highly viscous in nature. In view of these facts, a beneficiation strategy has been developed to recover bitumen enriched concentrate which can be used as a feed material for further processing. Heavy liquid separation tests and results are discussed. A 77% zinc bromide solution, specific gravity of 2.4, was used for the tests. 2 figures.

  15. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  16. The motion of a viscous filament in a porous medium or Hele-Shaw cell: a physical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    The motion of a viscous filament in a porous medium or Hele-Shaw cell: a physical realisation of a thin filament of viscous fluid in a Hele- Shaw cell. The appropriate thin film analysis and use the Cauchy problem is well known to be ill-posed. In particular, we show that the motion of a thin filament

  17. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  18. Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators.1. Storing Solar Energy with Ammonia H2 / N2 gas liquid NH3 Heat Exchangers Power Generation (Steam Cycle Concentrator (Dish or Trough) Figure 1--1 : An overview of ammonia-based solar energy storage. (Sourced from

  19. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  20. Heat storage duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

  1. THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: REGULARITY AND LONG TIME BEHAVIOR OF WEAK SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugh, Mary

    THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: REGULARITY AND LONG TIME BEHAVIOR OF WEAK t = -# · (f(h)##h) in one space dimension. This equation, derived from a `lubrication approximation', models. This equation, derived from a `lubrication approximation', models surface tension dominated motion of thin

  2. Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow Erin flow on the alignment of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer solutions. Two different-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed using an anionic surfactant and a weakly binding polymer. It was determined

  3. Bulk viscous Zel'dovich fluid model and it's asymptotic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K., Rajagopalan Nair

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we have considered a flat FLRW universe with bulk viscous Zel'dovich as the cosmic component. Being considered the bulk viscosity as per the Eckart formalism, we have analyzed the evolution of the Hubble parameter and constrained the model with the Type Ia Supernovae data thus extracting the constant bulk viscous parameter and present Hubble parameter. Further we have analyzed the scale factor, equation of state and deceleration parameter. The model predicts the late time acceleration and is also compatible with the age of the universe as given by the oldest globular clusters. We have also studied the phase-space behavior of the model and found that a universe dominated by bulk viscous Zel'dovich fluid is stable. But on the inclusion of radiation component in addition to the Zel'dovich fluid, makes the model unstable. Hence, even though the bulk viscous Zel'dovich fluid dominated universe is a feasible one, the model as such failed to predict a prior radiation dominated phase.

  4. Fracture morphology and viscous transport J. Schmittbuhl, A. Steyer, L. Jouniaux and R. Toussaint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Fracture morphology and viscous transport J. Schmittbuhl, A. Steyer, L. Jouniaux and R. Toussaint, France Abstract The morphology of a fracture in a granite block is sampled using a high resolution is an accurate geometrical model of the fracture morphology on the basis of a spectral analysis. We also

  5. EFFECT OF VISCOUS GRAIN BRIDGING ON CYCLIC FATIGUE-CRACK GROWTH IN MONOLITHIC CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    EFFECT OF VISCOUS GRAIN BRIDGING ON CYCLIC FATIGUE-CRACK GROWTH IN MONOLITHIC CERAMICS AT ELEVATED crack under cyclic loading conditions at elevated temperatures in high-toughness, monolithic ceramics the frequency and temperature sensitivity not gen- erally observed in ceramics at room temperature. Solutions

  6. Thermal Expansion Models of Viscous Fluids Based on Limits of Free Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Expansion Models of Viscous Fluids Based on Limits of Free Energy S.E. Bechtel Department applied directly on the free energy formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes system. The method the reversible physical mechanisms governed by the gradient and Hessian of the free energy function take special

  7. Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Weakly Compressible Fluid Interacting with Viscous Weakly Compressible Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Weakly Compressible Fluid Interacting with Viscous Weakly@udel.edu, giorgio.bellotti@uniroma3.it 1. Objective Enhancement of Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS) Hydro/s) [2]. Study of the characteristics of hydro-acoustic waves generated by sudden sea bottom motion

  8. Culex quinquefasciatus Storage Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and hemolymph proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus . A and B:of typical storage proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus.Fourth-instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae and early pupae

  9. Transmission and Storage Operations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transmission and Storage Operations Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Mitigation Workshop Mary Savalle, PMP, LSSGB Compression Reliability Engineer November 12, 2014...

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01

    and R. W . BOOIll, "Superconductive Energy Storage Inducand H. A. Peterson, "Superconductive E nergy S torage forMeeting, Janua ry N. Mohan, "Superconductive Energy S torage

  11. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  12. Hydrogen Storage Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For transportation, the overarching technical challenge for hydrogen storage is how to store the amount of hydrogen required for a conventional driving range (>300 miles) within the vehicular...

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    thermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solarsolar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a buffer between time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal

  14. Method and apparatus for operating an improved thermocline storage unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copeland, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a thermocline storage unit in which an insulated barrier member is provided substantially at the interface region between the hot and cold liquids in the storage tank. The barrier member physically and thermally separates the hot and cold liquids substantially preventing any diffusing or mixing between them and substantially preventing any heat transfer therebetween. The barrier member follows the rise and fall of the interface region between the liquids as the tank is charged and discharged. Two methods of maintaining it in the interface region are disclosed. With the structure and operation of the present invention and in particular the significant reduction in diffusing or mixing between the hot and cold liquids as well as the significant reduction in the thermal heat transfer between them, the performance of the storage tank is improved. More specifically, the stability of the interface region or thermocline is enhanced and the thickness of the thermocline is reduced producing a corresponding increase in the steepness of the temperature gradient across the thermocline and a more efficiently operating thermocline storage unit.

  15. Method and apparatus for operating an improved thermocline storage unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copeland, R.J.

    1982-09-30

    A method and apparatus for operating a thermocline storage unit in which an insulated barrier member is provided substantially at the interface region between the hot and cold liquids in the storage tank. The barrier member physically and thermally separates the hot and cold liquids substantially preventing any diffusing or mixing between them and substantially preventing any heat transfer there between. The barrier member follows the rise and fall of the interface region between the liquids as the tank is charged and discharged. Two methods of maintaining it in the interface region are disclosed. With the structure and operation of the present invention and in particular the significant reduction in diffusing or mixing between the hot and cold liquids as well as the significant reduction in the thermal heat transfer between them, the performance of the storage tank is improved. More specifically, the stability of the interface region or thermocline is enhanced and the thickness of the thermocline is reduced producing a corresponding increase in the steepness of the temperature gradient across the thermocline and a more efficiently operating thermocline storage unit.

  16. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  17. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    Weekday Total Electricity Generation (Storage AdoptionWeekday Total Electricity Generation (Storage Adoptionrecovery and storage) utility electricity and natural gas

  18. Nonaqueous electrolyte for electrical storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwen, Alan B. (Melrose, MA); Yair, Ein-Eli (Waltham, MA)

    1999-01-01

    Improved nonaqueous electrolytes for application in electrical storage devices such as electrochemical capacitors or batteries are disclosed. The electrolytes of the invention contain salts consisting of alkyl substituted, cyclic delocalized aromatic cations, and their perfluoro derivatives, and certain polyatomic anions having a van der Waals volume less than or equal to 100 .ANG..sup.3, preferably inorganic perfluoride anions and most preferably PF.sub.6.sup.-, the salts being dissolved in organic liquids, and preferably alkyl carbonate solvents, or liquid sulfur dioxide or combinations thereof, at a concentration of greater than 0.5M and preferably greater than 1.0M. Exemplary electrolytes comprise 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate dissolved in a cyclic or acylic alkyl carbonate, or methyl formate, or a combination therof. These improved electrolytes have useful characteristics such as higher conductivity, higher concentration, higher energy storage capabilities, and higher power characteristics compared to prior art electrolytes. Stacked capacitor cells using electrolytes of the invention permit high energy, high voltage storage.

  19. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve crude oil storage program experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linn, J.; Neal, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Berndsen, J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The US Strategic Petroleum Reserve is currently storing nearly 600 million barrels of crude oil in 62 leached and one mined salt cavern in salt domes located in Texas and Louisiana. In more than 15 years of operation the oil reserve has had unique experiences in liquid hydrocarbon storage in a former salt mine, long term effects of underground storage on crude oil and pipelines, and long term effects of underground salt creep. This paper reviews significant experiences, technological accomplishments, and major problems that have been overcome. Long term geomechanical effects on mines including modeling and experience, unique gas and thermal effects on stored liquid hydrocarbons, corrosion in brine pipelines, and the slow closure of caverns due to salt creep are specifically addressed. Additionally, the unique conditions, and the lessons learned which led to the DOE decision to withdraw from the Weeks Island storage site are discussed.

  20. Ice Bear® Storage Module | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ice Bear Storage Module Ice Bear Storage Module Thermal Energy Storage for Light Commercial Refrigerant-Based Air Conditioning Units The Ice Bear storage technology was...

  1. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Home Energy Permalink Gallery Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy...

  2. Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Luis W.

    1956-01-01

    t No. W - 7 4 0 5 -eng-48 ,LIQUID HYDROGEN EUSBLE CHA,MBEEZSand 3erkeley to iind if liquid hydrogen could be used as thethat supezheated 'liquid hydrogen could be made to boil

  3. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  4. A grid-level alkali liquid metal battery recycling process : design, implementation, and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Dale Arlington, III

    2014-01-01

    The application of liquid metal batteries for large scale grid-level energy storage is being enabled through the development of research conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2006. A recycling ...

  5. Storage resource manager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perelmutov, T.; Bakken, J.; Petravick, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Storage Resource Managers (SRMs) are middleware components whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management on shared storage components on the Grid[1,2]. SRMs support protocol negotiation and reliable replication mechanism. The SRM standard supports independent SRM implementations, allowing for a uniform access to heterogeneous storage elements. SRMs allow site-specific policies at each location. Resource Reservations made through SRMs have limited lifetimes and allow for automatic collection of unused resources thus preventing clogging of storage systems with ''orphan'' files. At Fermilab, data handling systems use the SRM management interface to the dCache Distributed Disk Cache [5,6] and the Enstore Tape Storage System [15] as key components to satisfy current and future user requests [4]. The SAM project offers the SRM interface for its internal caches as well.

  6. ,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

  7. Influence of Controlled Viscous Dissipation on the Propagation of Strongly Nonlinear Waves in Stainless Steel Based Phononic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Herbold; V. F. Nesterenko; C. Daraio

    2005-12-22

    Strongly nonlinear phononic crystals were assembled from stainless steel spheres. Single solitary waves and splitting of an initial pulse into a train of solitary waves were investigated in different viscous media using motor oil and non-aqueous glycerol to introduce a controlled viscous dissipation. Experimental results indicate that the presence of a viscous fluid dramatically altered the splitting of the initial pulse into a train of solitary waves. Numerical simulations qualitatively describe the observed phenomena only when a dissipative term based on the relative velocity between particles is introduced.

  8. Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

    1982-07-01

    LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

  9. High pressure specific heat spectroscopy reveals simple relaxation behavior of glass forming molecular liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisa Anita Roed; Kristine Niss; Bo Jakobsen

    2015-06-11

    The frequency dependent specific heat has been measured under pressure for the molecular glass forming liquid 5-polyphenyl-4-ether in the viscous regime close to the glass transition. The temperature and pressure dependence of the characteristic timescale associated with the specific heat is compared to the equivalent timescale from dielectric spectroscopy performed under identical conditions. It is shown that the ratio between the two timescales is independent of both temperature and pressure. This observation is non-trivial and demonstrates the existence of specially simple molecular liquids in which different physical relaxation processes are both as function of temperature and pressure/density governed by the same underlying "inner clock." Furthermore, the results are discussed in terms of the recent conjecture that van der Waals liquids, like the measured liquid, comply to the isomorph theory.

  10. Hidden scale invariance in molecular van der Waals liquids: A simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Schrřder; Ulf R. Pedersen; Nicholas Bailey; Sřren Toxvćrd; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2009-09-18

    Results from molecular dynamics simulations of two viscous molecular model liquids -- the Lewis-Wahnstrom model of ortho-terphenyl and an asymmetric dumbbell model -- are reported. We demonstrate that the liquids have a ``hidden'' approximate scale invariance: Equilibrium potential energy fluctuations are accurately described by inverse power law (IPL) potentials, the radial distribution functions are accurately reproduced by the IPL's, and the radial distribution functions obey the IPL predicted scaling properties to a good approximation. IPL scaling of the dynamics also applies -- with the scaling exponent predicted by the equilibrium fluctuations. In contrast, the equation of state does not obey the IPL scaling. We argue that our results are general for van der Waals liquids, but do not apply, e.g., for hydrogen-bonded liquids.

  11. Energy Storage | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage SHARE Energy Storage Development Growing popularity and education about the benefits of alternative, sustainable transportation options-such as electric and hybrid...

  12. Secure Storage Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to clarify the challenges associated with storage for secure enclaves. The major focus areas for the report are: - review of relevant parallel filesystem technologies to identify assets and gaps; - review of filesystem isolation/protection mechanisms, to include native filesystem capabilities and auxiliary/layered techniques; - definition of storage architectures that can be used for customizable compute enclaves (i.e., clarification of use-cases that must be supported for shared storage scenarios); - investigate vendor products related to secure storage. This study provides technical details on the storage and filesystem used for HPC with particular attention on elements that contribute to creating secure storage. We outline the pieces for a a shared storage architecture that balances protection and performance by leveraging the isolation capabilities available in filesystems and virtualization technologies to maintain the integrity of the data. Key Points: There are a few existing and in-progress protection features in Lustre related to secure storage, which are discussed in (Chapter 3.1). These include authentication capabilities like GSSAPI/Kerberos and the in-progress work for GSSAPI/Host-keys. The GPFS filesystem provides native support for encryption, which is not directly available in Lustre. Additionally, GPFS includes authentication/authorization mechanisms for inter-cluster sharing of filesystems (Chapter 3.2). The limitations of key importance for secure storage/filesystems are: (i) restricting sub-tree mounts for parallel filesystem (which is not directly supported in Lustre or GPFS), and (ii) segregation of hosts on the storage network and practical complications with dynamic additions to the storage network, e.g., LNET. A challenge for VM based use cases will be to provide efficient IO forwarding of the parallel filessytem from the host to the guest (VM). There are promising options like para-virtualized filesystems to help with this issue, which are a particular instances of the more general challenge of efficient host/guest IO that is the focus of interfaces like virtio. A collection of bridging technologies have been identified in Chapter 4, which can be helpful to overcome the limitations and challenges of supporting efficient storage for secure enclaves. The synthesis of native filesystem security mechanisms and bridging technologies led to an isolation-centric storage architecture that is proposed in Chapter 5, which leverages isolation mechanisms from different layers to facilitate secure storage for an enclave. Recommendations: The following highlights recommendations from the investigations done thus far. - The Lustre filesystem offers excellent performance but does not support some security related features, e.g., encryption, that are included in GPFS. If encryption is of paramount importance, then GPFS may be a more suitable choice. - There are several possible Lustre related enhancements that may provide functionality of use for secure-enclaves. However, since these features are not currently integrated, the use of Lustre as a secure storage system may require more direct involvement (support). (*The network that connects the storage subsystem and users, e.g., Lustre s LNET.) - The use of OpenStack with GPFS will be more streamlined than with Lustre, as there are available drivers for GPFS. - The Manilla project offers Filesystem as a Service for OpenStack and is worth further investigation. Manilla has some support for GPFS. - The proposed Lustre enhancement of Dynamic-LNET should be further investigated to provide more dynamic changes to the storage network which could be used to isolate hosts and their tenants. - The Linux namespaces offer a good solution for creating efficient restrictions to shared HPC filesystems. However, we still need to conduct a thorough round of storage/filesystem benchmarks. - Vendor products should be more closely reviewed, possibly to include evaluation of performance/protection of select products. (Note, we are investigation the opti

  13. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  14. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Cooper, Alan Charles (Macungie, PA); Scott, Aaron Raymond (Allentown, PA)

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  15. Alternatives to reduce corrosion of carbon steel storage drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zirker, L.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    The major tasks of this research were (a) pollution prevention opportunity assessments on the overpacking operations for failed or corroded drums, (b) research on existing container corrosion data, (c) investigation of the storage environment of the new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Type II storage modules, (d) identification of waste streams that demonstrate deleterious corrosion affects on drum storage life, and (e) corrosion test cell program development. Twenty-one waste streams from five US Department of Energy (DOE) sites within the DOE Complex were identified to demonstrate a deleterious effect to steel storage drums. The major components of these waste streams include acids, salts, and solvent liquids, sludges, and still bottoms. The solvent-based waste streams typically had the shortest time to failure: 0.5 to 2 years. The results of this research support the position that pollution prevention evaluations at the front end of a project or process will reduce pollution on the back end.

  16. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  17. Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Liquid hydrogen, liquid methane or liquefied natural gas could form an extremely flammable mixtureGuidance Document Cryogenic Liquids [This is a brief and general summary. Read the full MSDS for more details before handling.] Introduction: All cryogenic liquids are gases at normal temperature

  18. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

    1987-01-01

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  19. Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services Martin Placek and Rajkumar Buyya}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. The Storage Exchange (SX) is a new platform allowing stor- age to be treated as a tradeable resource. Organisations with varying storage requirements can use the SX platform to trade and exchange

  20. Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher Yongdae Kim are witnessing a revival of Storage Service Providers (SSP) in the form of new vendors as well as traditional players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many companies are hesitating to outsource

  1. Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services Martin Placek and Rajkumar Buyya,raj}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. The Storage Exchange (SX) is a new platform allowing stor- age to be treated as a tradeable resource. Organisations with varying storage requirements can use the SX platform to trade and exchange

  2. A new reversal mode in exchange coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic disks: distorted viscous vortex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Ye, Li; Varea, Aďda; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastiŕ; del Valle, Nuria; Navau, Carles; López-Barbera, José Francisco; Buchanan, Kristen S.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sánchez, Alvar; et al

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic vortices have generated intense interest in recent years due to their unique reversal mechanisms, fascinating topological properties, and exciting potential applications. In addition, the exchange coupling of magnetic vortices to antiferromagnets has also been shown to lead to a range of novel phenomena and functionalities. Here we report a new magnetization reversal mode of magnetic vortices in exchange coupled Ir20Mn80/Fe20Ni80 microdots: distorted viscous vortex reversal. In contrast to the previously known or proposed reversal modes, the vortex is distorted close to the interface and viscously dragged due to the uncompensated spins of a thin antiferromagnet, which leads to unexpectedmore »asymmetries in the annihilation and nucleation fields. These results provide a deeper understanding of the physics of exchange coupled vortices and may also have important implications for applications involving exchange coupled nanostructures.« less

  3. Viscous boundary layers of radiation-dominated, relativistic jets. II. The free-streaming jet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of a radiation-dominated jet and its surroundings using the equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit. In a previous paper we considered the two-stream scenario, which treats the jet and its surroundings as distinct media interacting through radiation viscous forces. Here we present an alternative boundary layer model, known as the free-streaming jet model -- where a narrow stream of fluid is injected into a static medium -- and present solutions where the flow is ultrarelativistic and the boundary layer is dominated by radiation. It is shown that these jets entrain material from their surroundings and that their cores have a lower density of scatterers and a harder spectrum of photons, leading to observational consequences for lines of sight that look "down the barrel of the jet." These jetted outflow models may be applicable to the jets produced during long gamma-ray bursts and super-Eddington phases of tidal disruption events.

  4. Sagdeev potential approach for large amplitude compressional Alfvenic double layers in viscous plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Rizvi, H.; Ryu, C. M. [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Hyoja-Dong San 31, Pohang, KyungBuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Hyoja-Dong San 31, Pohang, KyungBuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Sagdeev’s technique is used to study the large amplitude compressional Alfvenic double layers in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma taking into account the small plasma ? and small values of kinematic viscosity. Dispersive effect raised by non-ideal electron inertia currents perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The range of allowed values of the soliton speed, M (Mach number), plasma ? (ratio of the plasma thermal pressure to the pressure in the confining magnetic field), and viscosity coefficient, wherein double layer may exist, are determined. In the absence of collisions, viscous dissipation modifies the Sagdeev potential and results in large amplitude compressional Alfvenic double layers. The depth of Sagdeev potential increases with the increasing Mach number and plasma ?, however, decreases with the increasing viscosity. The double layer structure increases with the increasing plasma ?, but decreases with increasing viscous dissipation ?(tilde sign)

  5. A study of numerical methods to solve quasi one-dimensional, unsteady, compressible viscous flow with shock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goy, Matthieu Pierre Bernard

    1994-01-01

    The numerical simulation of a quasi one-dimensional internal flow in a subsonicsupersonic nozzle is obtained. Shocks due to high pressure ratio are computed for both inviscid and viscous flows, using an original two point subsonic-supersonic...

  6. Viscous sublayer code Supplementary material to the paper `Sand ripples and dunes', Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 45

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Viscous sublayer code Supplementary material to the paper `Sand ripples and dunes', Annu. Rev and Dunes Charru, Andreotti, and Claudin #12;2 Linearised equations For small enough amplitudes, we can

  7. Consistency of field-theoretical and kinetic calculations of viscous transport coefficients for a relativistic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel S. Denicol; Xu-Guang Huang; Tomoi Koide; Dirk H. Rischke

    2010-03-03

    The transport coefficients of causal relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics are calculated both in a field-theoretical and a kinetic approach. We find that the results from the traditional kinetic calculation by Israel and Stewart are modified. The new expressions for the viscous transport coefficients agree with the results obtained in the field-theoretical approach when the contributions from pair creation and annihilation are neglected.

  8. Properties of accretion shock waves in viscous flows with cooling effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santabrata Das; Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2007-06-20

    We study the properties of the shock waves for a viscous accretion flow having low angular momentum in presence of synchrotron cooling. We present all possible accretion solutions in terms of flow parameters. We identify the region of the parameter space for steady and oscillating shocks and show the effect of various energy dissipation processes on it. We discuss the role of the shock waves while explaining the observations from black hole candidates.

  9. APS Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    next up previous Next: Main Parameters APS Storage Ring Parameters M. Borland, G. Decker, L. Emery, W. Guo, K. Harkay, V. Sajaev, C.-Y. Yao Advanced Photon Source September 8, 2010...

  10. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  11. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  12. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  13. Influence of heterogeneity on second-kind self-similar solutions for viscous gravity currents

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Zhong; Christov, Ivan  C.; Stone, Howard  A.

    2014-04-16

    We report experimental, theoretical and numerical results on the effects of horizontal heterogeneities on the propagation of viscous gravity currents. We use two geometries to highlight these effects: (a) a horizontal channel (or crack) whose gap thickness varies as a power-law function of the streamwise coordinate; (b) a heterogeneous porous medium whose permeability and porosity have power-law variations. We demonstrate that two types of self-similar behaviours emerge as a result of horizontal heterogeneity: (a) a first-kind self-similar solution is found using dimensional analysis (scaling) for viscous gravity currents that propagate away from the origin (a point of zero permeability); (b)more »a second-kind self-similar solution is found using a phase-plane analysis for viscous gravity currents that propagate toward the origin. These theoretical predictions, obtained using the ideas of self-similar intermediate asymptotics, are compared with experimental results and numerical solutions of the governing partial differential equation developed under the lubrication approximation. All three results are found to be in good agreement.« less

  14. THE MIGRATION OF GAP-OPENING PLANETS IS NOT LOCKED TO VISCOUS DISK EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Farris, Brian D.; Haiman, Zoltan; D'Orazio, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Most standard descriptions of Type II migration state that massive, gap-opening planets must migrate at the viscous drift rate. This is based on the idea that the disk is separated into an inner and outer region and gas is considered unable to cross the gap. In fact, gas easily crosses the gap on horseshoe orbits, nullifying this necessary premise which would set the migration rate. In this work, it is demonstrated using highly accurate numerical calculations that the actual migration rate is dependent on disk and planet parameters, and can be significantly larger or smaller than the viscous drift rate. In the limiting case of a disk much more massive than the secondary, the migration rate saturates to a constant that is sensitive to disk parameters and is not necessarily of the order of the viscous rate. In the opposite limit of a low-mass disk, the migration rate decreases linearly with disk mass. Steady-state solutions in the low disk mass limit show no pile-up outside the secondary's orbit, and no corresponding drainage of the inner disk.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â��bottom-upâ� costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA�® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

  16. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  17. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, J. T. (Palo Alto, CA); Larsen, R. S. (Menlo Park, CA); Shapiro, S. L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  18. Marketing Cool Storage Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    1987-01-01

    -09-74 Proceedings from the Ninth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September 16-18, 1987 Utility Cool Storage Inducement Progra~ ,.,.. ?? ,.. ,., Utilities With Inducement~ CA -- Southern California Edison San Diego Gas &Electric..., electric utilities have been faced with risin~ construction costs, more strin~ent re~ulations, and increasin~ environmental constraints re~ardin~ development of new generatin~ facilities. As the viability of cool storage has been substantiated. bv...

  19. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan R&D Manager Office of Technology and Innovations Phone: 847 768 0812

    2012-03-14

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  20. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program deŢnes a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  1. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program defines a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  2. Savannah River Hydrogen Storage Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  3. Cryogenic, compressed, and liquid hydrogen fuel storage in vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Allan B

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen is the viable energy carrier of future energy and transportation systems due to its clean emissions, light weight, and abundance. Its extremely low volumetric density, however, presents significant challenges to ...

  4. Technology available for license: Charging of liquid energy storage media

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexico IndependentMatterTechnologyLaboratoryL.

  5. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »Tankless Water HeaterAutomotive Applications |Automotive

  6. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  7. Farm Fuel Safety Accidents in the handling, use and storage of gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, LP-gas and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    112 Farm Fuel Safety Accidents in the handling, use and storage of gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel and by keeping fuel storage facilities in top condition. Flammable Liquids and Gases Gasoline, diesel fuel, LP, deterioration or damage. Never store fuel in food or drink containers. When transferring farm fuels, bond

  8. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  9. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  10. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  11. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  12. Energy storage connection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  13. Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystalline Polymers James J. Feng Department theories and mole- cular theories separately. In addition, a theory for liquid crystalline materials has, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada INTRODUCTION Liquid crystallinity refers to an intermediate state

  14. Storage battery systems analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    Storage Battery Systems Analysis supports the battery Exploratory Technology Development and Testing Project with technical and economic analysis of battery systems in various end-use applications. Computer modeling and simulation techniques are used in the analyses. Analysis objectives are achieved through both in-house efforts and outside contracts. In-house studies during FY82 included a study of the relationship between storage battery system reliability and cost, through cost-of-investment and cost-of-service interruption inputs; revision and update of the SOLSTOR computer code in standard FORTRAN 77 form; parametric studies of residential stand-alone photovoltaic systems using the SOLSTOR code; simulation of wind turbine collector/storage battery systems for the community of Kalaupapa, Molokai, Hawaii.

  15. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE INTRODUCTION Even thoughHPLC - 1 High Performance Liquid Chromatography HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;HPLC - 2 High Performance Liquid Chromatography

  16. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  17. Neptunium storage at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderman, C.J.; Shiraga, S.S.; Schwartz, R.A.; Smith, R.J.; Wootan, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    A decision must be made regarding whether the United State`s stockpile of neptunium should be discarded into the waste stream or kept for the production of Pu-238. Although the cost of long term storage is not inconsequential, to dispose of the material means the closing of our option to maintain control over our Pu-238 stockpile. Within the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility at Hanford there exists a remotely operated facility that can be converted for neptunium storage. This paper describes the facility and the anticipated handling requirements.

  18. Carbon Storage Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from thecarbon captureCarbon Storage AtlasStorage

  19. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!TransportStorage RingStorage Ring

  20. Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewable EnergyStaff andState andStorage Storage

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  2. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper, Colorado1991). Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solarR. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling, Pacific

  3. Carbon Nanotube Films for Energy Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozinda, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Silicon Nanotubes and their Application to Energy Storage,&as an energy storage application of the amorphous-siliconof silicon nanowires hinders the energy storage capability [

  4. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

  5. Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Lynn Margaret

    2012-01-01

    based Materials for Energy Storage A dissertation submittedbased Materials for Energy storage by Lynn Margaret Ricewind are intermittent. Energy storage systems, then, that

  6. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  7. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onNM, USA. [37] Electricity Storage Association, Morgan Hill,dimensionless d. electricity storage loss factor for the EV

  8. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onthe final report for the Electricity Storage Viability andof utility electricity purchase, on-site generation, storage

  9. Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities DOE's hydrogen storage research and development (R&D) activities are aimed...

  10. MASS STORAGE SYSTEMS AND LARGE RESEARCH LIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Symposium on Mass Storage Systems, Denver, CO, April15-17, 1980 MASS STORAGE SYSTEMS AND LARGE RESEARCHSymposium on Mass Storage Systems, Denver, Colorado, April

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    D. Todd, (1973). Heat storage Systems in the L - Temperaturements for Energy Storage Systems, Los Alamos Scientificdirector for Physi- cal Storage Systems. Under Jim are three

  12. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    the prob- lem of seasonal storage of thermal energy (Matheyto study seasonal storage of thermal energy: winter storagewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program managed

  13. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01

    for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured Electrodesof the batteries and their energy storage efficiency. viifor Nanostructure-Based Energy Storage and Generation Tech-

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  15. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

  16. Pest Management For Grain Storage and Fumigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Pest Management For Grain Storage and Fumigation Seed Treatment -Pest Control- Grain Storage & Seed MANAGEMENT FOR GRAIN STORAGE AND FUMIGATION Introduction .................................................................................................................................................................. 12 Resistance Management Issues

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground...

  18. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage AfzalGeneration with Heat Recovery and Storage Manuscript Numberhere in order to focus on heat recovery and storage) utility

  19. Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow; Jill Buckley

    2006-04-01

    About one-half of U.S. oil reserves are held in carbonate formations. The remaining oil in carbonate reservoirs is regarded as the major domestic target for improved oil recovery. Carbonate reservoirs are often fractured and have great complexity even at the core scale. Formation evaluation and prediction is often subject to great uncertainty. This study addresses quantification of crude oil/brine/rock interactions and the impact of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement from pore to field scale. Wettability-alteration characteristics of crude oils were measured at calcite and dolomite surfaces and related to the properties of the crude oils through asphaltene content, acid and base numbers, and refractive index. Oil recovery was investigated for a selection of limestones and dolomites that cover over three orders of magnitude in permeability and a factor of four variation in porosity. Wettability control was achieved by adsorption from crude oils obtained from producing carbonate reservoirs. The induced wettability states were compared with those measured for reservoir cores. The prepared cores were used to investigate oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement. The results of imbibition tests were used in wettability characterization and to develop mass transfer functions for application in reservoir simulation of fractured carbonates. Studies of viscous displacement in carbonates focused on the unexpected but repeatedly observed sensitivity of oil recovery to injection rate. The main variables were pore structure, mobility ratio, and wettability. The potential for improved oil recovery from rate-sensitive carbonate reservoirs by increased injection pressure, increased injectivity, decreased well spacing or reduction of interfacial tension was evaluated.

  20. Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

  1. NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

  2. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA; Linehan, John C [Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  3. A viscous-convective instability in laminar Keplerian thin discs. II. Anelastic approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakura, N

    2015-01-01

    Using the anelastic approximation of linearised hydrodynamic equations, we investigate the development of axially symmetric small perturbations in thin Keplerian discs. The sixth-order dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved for different values of relevant physical parameters (viscosity, heat conductivity, disc semi-thickness and vertical structure). The analysis reveals the appearance of two overstable modes which split out from the classical Rayleigh inertial modes in a wide range of the parameters in both ionized and neutral gases. These modes have a viscous-convective nature and can serve as a seed for turbulence in astrophysical discs even in the absence of magnetic fields.

  4. The flow and heat transfer in a viscous fluid over an unsteady stretching surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ene, Remus-Daniel; Marinca, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the flow and heat transfer in a viscous fluid by a horizontal sheet. The stretching rate and temperature of the sheet vary with time. The governing equations for momentum and thermal energy are reduced to ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. These equations are solved approximately by means of the Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) which provides us with a convenient way to control the convergence of approximation solutions and adjust convergence rigorous when necessary. Some examples are given and the results obtained reveal that the proposed method is effective and easy to use.

  5. Global Solutions of Viscous Transonic Flows in Kerr Geometry I: Weak Viscosity Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1996-11-04

    We present fully general relativistic equations governing viscous transonic flows in vertical equilibrium in Kerr geometry. We find the complete set of global solutions (both for Optically thick and optically thin flows) in the weak viscosity limit. We show that for a large region of parameter space, centrifugal pressure supported standing shocks can form in accretion and winds very close to the black hole horizon, both for co-rotating and contra-rotating flows. We compute the nature of the shear tensor for complete transonic solutions and discuss the consequences of its reversal properties.

  6. Storage and Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madey, Gregory R.

    ;Cheaper to Collect RFIDs Sensor Nets The WWW, Screen Scraping, Google Searches Life in CyberSpace - Log Files, Digital Traces, MetaData Faster Computers ==> More Data to Study #12;Data Driven Discovery Organizations, Cyberinfrastructure #12;Research Opportunities & Challenges Sensors, Sensor Networks Storage

  7. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  8. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  9. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  10. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  11. Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The current status in terms of weight, volume, and cost of various hydrogen storage technologies is shown below. These values are estimates from storage system developers and the R&D community...

  12. Silo Storage Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage option’s primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argon’s design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, “Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study” (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

  13. SHEAR CELL RUPTURE OF NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-18

    For two-phase Newtonian (purely viscous) fluids, the free energy above yields the Cahn-Hilliard ...... Efficient phase-field simulation of quantum dot formation in a ...

  14. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  15. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  16. Evaluating managerial adjustment to farm firm growth: an aplication to investments in sealed storage systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greathouse, Gregory John

    1976-01-01

    sources of managerial adjustment to investment in sealed storage systemst 2)to empirically measure the timing and magnitude of these adjustment factors~ 3)to evaluate the implications of these measures of firm growth and resulting liquidity position... with the sealed storage system included~ 1) labo~ savings, 2)reduced field losses, 3)milk production 'ncrease in about one-half of the cases, 4)increase in multiple fillings through time, 5)machinery changes, 6)different forage crops, 7)different forage...

  17. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  18. Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Bonner, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Notardonato, W. U.; Tomsik, T. M.; Conyers, H. J.

    2014-01-29

    Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth, from Earth, or in space are envisioned for automobiles, aircraft, rockets, and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage, transfer, and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage, an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125,000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank, with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation, and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening, complete modularity, pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification, and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach, problem solving, and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

  19. The Power of Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    The Power of Energy Storage How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas;1Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law The Power of Energy Storage: How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Executive Summary: Expanding Energy Storage in California Sunshine and wind, even

  20. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEO­ON­DEMAND Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive Video­On­Demand Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical­9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract On­demand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  1. Electrical Energy Storage: Stan Whittingham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    1 p. 1 Electrical Energy Storage: Stan Whittingham Report of DOE workshop, April 2007 A Cleaner and Energy Independent America through Chemistry Chemical Storage: Batteries, today and tomorrow http needed in Energy Storage Lithium Economy not Hydrogen Economy #12;9 p. 9 Batteries are key to an economy

  2. Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy storage technologies and what the future may hold for multi-scale storage applications Presented by: Dave Lucero, Director Alternative Energy · Industry initiatives · Technology · Energy Storage Market · EaglePicher initiatives · Summary #12

  3. On a three-layer Hele-Shaw model of enhanced oil recovery with a linear viscous profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    We present a non-standard eigenvalue problem that arises in the linear stability of a three-layer Hele-Shaw model of enhanced oil recovery. A nonlinear transformation is introduced which allows reformulation of the non-standard eigenvalue problem as a boundary value problem for Kummer's equation when the viscous profile of the middle layer is linear. Using the existing body of works on Kummer's equation, we construct an exact solution of the eigenvalue problem and provide the dispersion relation implicitly through the existence criterion for the non-trivial solution. We also discuss the convergence of the series solution. It is shown that this solution reduces to the physically relevant solutions in two asymptotic limits: (i) when the linear viscous profile approaches a constant viscous profile; or (ii) when the length of the middle layer approaches zero.

  4. Viscous throughflow modeling of axial compressor bladerows using a tangential blade force hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallimore, S.J.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the modeling of axial compressor blade rows in an axisymmetric viscous throughflow method. The basic method, which has been reported previously, includes the effects of spanwise mixing, using a turbulent diffusion model, and endwall shear within the throughflow calculation. The blades are modeled using a combination of existing two-dimensional blade performance predictions for loss and deviation away from the annulus walls and a novel approach using tangential blade forces in the endwall regions. Relatively simple assumptions about the behavior of the tangential static pressure force imposed by the blades allow the secondary deviations produced by tip clearance flows and the boundary layer flows at fixed blade ends to be calculated in the axisymmetric model. Additional losses are assigned in these regions based on the calculated deviations. The resulting method gives realistic radial distributions of loss and deviation across the whole span at both design and off-design operating conditions, providing a quick method of estimating the magnitudes of these effects in the preliminary design process. Results from the method are compared to measured data in low and high-speed compressors and multistage three-dimensional viscous CFD predictions.

  5. THE GENERAL RELATIVISTIC EQUATIONS OF RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS IN THE VISCOUS LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-12-20

    We present an analysis of the general relativistic Boltzmann equation for radiation, appropriate to the case where particles and photons interact through Thomson scattering, and derive the radiation energy-momentum tensor in the diffusion limit with viscous terms included. Contrary to relativistic generalizations of the viscous stress tensor that appear in the literature, we find that the stress tensor should contain a correction to the comoving energy density proportional to the divergence of the four-velocity, as well as a finite bulk viscosity. These modifications are consistent with the framework of radiation hydrodynamics in the limit of large optical depth, and do not depend on thermodynamic arguments such as the assignment of a temperature to the zeroth-order photon distribution. We perform a perturbation analysis on our equations and demonstrate that as long as the wave numbers do not probe scales smaller than the mean free path of the radiation, the viscosity contributes only decaying, i.e., stable, corrections to the dispersion relations. The astrophysical applications of our equations, including jets launched from super-Eddington tidal disruption events and those from collapsars, are discussed and will be considered further in future papers.

  6. Solutions of Two Dimensional Viscous Accretion and Winds In Kerr Black Hole Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Chakrabarti

    1996-11-04

    We extend our previous studies of shock waves and shock-free solutions in thin accretion and winds in pseudo-Newtonian geometry to the case when the flow is ``two-dimensional'' and around a ``Kerr black hole''. We present equations for fully general relativistic viscous transonic flows and classify the parameter space according to whether or not shocks form in an inviscid flow. We discuss the behaviors of shear, angular momentum distribution, heating and cooling in viscous flows. We obtain a very significant result: we find that in weak viscosity limit the presence of the standing shock waves is more generic in the sense that flows away from the equatorial plane can produce shock waves in a wider range of parameter space. Similar conclusion also holds when the angular momentum of the black hole is increased. Generally, our conclusions regarding the shape of the shock waves are found to agree with results of the existing numerical simulations of the two dimensional accretion in Schwarzschild geometry. In a strong viscosity limit, the shocks may be located farther out or disappear completely as in the pseudo-Newtonian geometry.

  7. Hydrogen storage for vehicular applications: Technology status and key development areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.L.; Handrock, J.L.

    1994-04-01

    The state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage technology is reviewed, including gaseous, liquid, hydride, surface adsorbed media, glass microsphere, chemical reaction, and liquid chemical technologies. The review of each technology includes a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, likelihood of success, and key research and development activities. A preferred technological path for the development of effective near-term hydrogen storage includes both cur-rent DOT qualified and advanced compressed storage for down-sized highly efficient but moderate range vehicles, and liquid storage for fleet vehicle applications. Adsorbate media are also suitable for fleet applications but not for intermittent uses. Volume-optimized transition metal hydride beds are also viable for short range applications. Long-term development of coated nanoparticulate or metal matrix high conductivity magnesium alloy, is recommended. In addition, a room temperature adsorbate medium should be developed to avoid cryogenic storage requirements. Chemical storage and oxidative schemes present serious obstacles which must be addressed for these technologies to have a future role.

  8. Project Profile: Carbon Dioxide Shuttling Thermochemical Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: Carbon Dioxide Shuttling Thermochemical Storage Using Strontium Carbonate Project Profile: Carbon Dioxide Shuttling Thermochemical Storage Using Strontium...

  9. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) The Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

  10. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

  11. Blast Load Response of Steel Sandwich Panels with Liquid Encasement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Karr; Marc Perlin; Benjamin Langhorst; Henry Chu

    2009-10-01

    We describe an experimental investigation of the response of hybrid blast panels for protection from explosive and impact forces. The fundamental notion is to dissipate, absorb, and redirect energy through plastic collapse, viscous dissipation, and inter-particle forces of liquid placed in sub-structural compartments. The panels are designed to absorb energy from an impact or air blast by elastic-plastic collapse of the panel substructure that includes fluid-filled cavities. The fluid contributes to blast effects mitigation by providing increased initial mass and resistance, by dissipation of energy through viscosity and fluid flow, and by redirecting the momentum that is imparted to the system from the impact and blast impulse pressures. Failure and deformation mechanisms of the panels are described.

  12. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few cm in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  13. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  14. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Salt diapirism with simultaneous brittle faulting and viscous flow ALEXEI N. B. POLIAKOV1-2,YURIYU. PODLADCHIKOV3, ETHAN CH. DAWSON4 &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    Salt diapirism with simultaneous brittle faulting and viscous flow ALEXEI N. B. POLIAKOV1-2,YURIYU for the fxst time how sedimentaryrocks above a salt diapir can deform in either a brittle or a viscous way depending on the stress state and strain rates. Most existing models for salt tectonics incorporate only one

  16. FALLING OF A VISCOUS JET ONTO A MOVING SURFACE A. HLOD, A.C.T. AARTS, A.A.F. VAN DE VEN, AND M.A. PELETIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    FALLING OF A VISCOUS JET ONTO A MOVING SURFACE A. HLOD, A.C.T. AARTS, A.A.F. VAN DE VEN, AND M.A. PELETIER Abstract. We analyze the stationary flow of a jet of Newtonian fluid that is drawn by gravity onto observations. Key words. Viscous jet, moving surface, free boundary. AMS subject classifications. 76D25, 76D03

  17. Dehydrogenation of liquid fuel in microchannel catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toseland, Bernard Allen (Allentown, PA); Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Puri, Pushpinder Singh (Emmaus, PA)

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is an improved process for the storage and delivery of hydrogen by the reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of an organic compound wherein the organic compound is initially in its hydrogenated state. The improvement in the route to generating hydrogen is in the dehydrogenation step and recovery of the dehydrogenated organic compound resides in the following steps: introducing a hydrogenated organic compound to a microchannel reactor incorporating a dehydrogenation catalyst; effecting dehydrogenation of said hydrogenated organic compound under conditions whereby said hydrogenated organic compound is present as a liquid phase; generating a reaction product comprised of a liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound and gaseous hydrogen; separating the liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound from gaseous hydrogen; and, recovering the hydrogen and liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound.

  18. Dehydrogenation of liquid fuel in microchannel catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toseland, Bernard Allen (Coopersburg, PA); Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Puri, Pushpinder Singh (Emmaus, PA)

    2010-08-03

    The present invention is an improved process for the storage and delivery of hydrogen by the reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of an organic compound wherein the organic compound is initially in its hydrogenated state. The improvement in the route to generating hydrogen is in the dehydrogenation step and recovery of the dehydrogenated organic compound resides in the following steps: introducing a hydrogenated organic compound to a microchannel reactor incorporating a dehydrogenation catalyst; effecting dehydrogenation of said hydrogenated organic compound under conditions whereby said hydrogenated organic compound is present as a liquid phase; generating a reaction product comprised of a liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound and gaseous hydrogen; separating the liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound from gaseous hydrogen; and, recovering the hydrogen and liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound.

  19. Maui energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

    2012-12-01

    This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

  20. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  1. Liquid Propane Injection Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquid propane injection technology meets manufacturing/assembly guidelines, maintenance/repair strategy, and regulations, with same functionality, horsepower, and torque as gasoline counterpart.

  2. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  3. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  4. Modeling, system identification, and control for slosh-free motion of an open container of liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddema, J.; Baty, R.; Dykhuizen, R.; Dohrmann, C.; Parker, G.; Robinett, R.; Romero, V.; Schmitt, D.

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses work performed under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) with Corning, Inc., to analyze and test various techniques for controlling the motion of a high speed robotic arm carrying an open container of viscous liquid, in this case, molten glass. A computer model was generated to estimate the modes of oscillation of the liquid based on the shape of the container and the viscosity of the liquid. This fluid model was experimentally verified and tuned based on experimental data from a capacitive sensor on the side of the container. A model of the robot dynamics was also developed and verified through experimental tests on a Fanuc S-800 robot arm. These two models were used to estimate the overall modes of oscillation of an open container of liquid being carried by a robot arm. Using the estimated modes, inverse dynamic control techniques were used to determine a motion profile which would eliminate waves on the liquid`s surface. Experimental tests showed that residual surface waves in an open container of water at the end of motion were reduced by over 95% and that in-motion surface waves were reduced by over 75%.

  5. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  6. Radiation augmentation energy storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christe, K.O.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a method of converting radiation energy into chemical energy to produce a high-performance propellant. It comprises: photolytically converting oxygen to ozone; storing and stabilizing the ozone in liquid oxygen to form an ozone/liquid oxygen solution; and combusting the ozone/liquid oxygen solution with hydrogen.

  7. Enhanced Oil Recovery of Viscous Oil by Injection of Water-in-Oil Emulsion Made with Used Engine Oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xuebing

    2012-08-20

    Solids-stabilized water-in-oil emulsions have been suggested as a drive fluid to recover viscous oil through a piston-like displacement pattern. While crude heavy oil was initially suggested as the base oil, an alternative oil ? used engine oil...

  8. THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: THE MOVING CONTACT LINE WITH A `POROUS MEDIA' CUT OFF OF VAN DER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugh, Mary

    THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: THE MOVING CONTACT LINE WITH A `POROUS MEDIA ) in one space dimension. The equation without the second order term is derived from a `lubrication where f(h) = hn , n > 0. The fourth order term comes from a `lubrication approximation' and models

  9. THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: THE MOVING CONTACT LINE WITH A `POROUS MEDIA' CUT OFF OF VAN DER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugh, Mary

    THE LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION FOR THIN VISCOUS FILMS: THE MOVING CONTACT LINE WITH A `POROUS MEDIA ) in one space dimension. The equation without the second order term is derived from a `lubrication the case where f(h) = h n , n > 0. The fourth order term comes from a `lubrication approximation

  10. On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic RenderingGill University, Montr´eal, Canada ABSTRACT We describe the use of eddy current brakes as fast turn-on, tunable, linear dampers for haptic rendering using a prototype haptic device outfitted with eddy current brakes

  11. ACM Reference Format Bergou, M., Audoly, B., Vouga, E., Wardetzky, M., Grinspun, E. 2010. Discrete Viscous Threads.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audoly, Basile

    ACM Reference Format Bergou, M., Audoly, B., Vouga, E., Wardetzky, M., Grinspun, E. 2010. Discrete Viscous Threads. ACM Trans. Graph. 29, 4, Article 116 (July 2010), 10 pages. DOI = 10.1145/1778765.1778853 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1778765.1778853. Copyright Notice Permission to make digital or hard copies

  12. Reorganization Energy of Electron Transfer in Viscous Solvents above the Glass Transition Pradip K. Ghorai and Dmitry V. Matyushov*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    Reorganization Energy of Electron Transfer in Viscous Solvents above the Glass Transition Pradip KVed: September 15, 2005; In Final Form: NoVember 6, 2005 We present a molecular-dynamics study of the solvent arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to Debye relaxation of the solvent

  13. An enhanced pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracturing accounting for viscous height growth, non-local elasticity, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    An enhanced pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracturing accounting for viscous height growth, non to the predictions calculated using a recently developed fully planar hydraulic fracturing simulator. Ó 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Hydraulic fracturing (HF) is a process in which

  14. Air Entrainment by Contact Lines of a Solid Plate Plunged into a Viscous Fluid Antonin Marchand,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Entrainment by Contact Lines of a Solid Plate Plunged into a Viscous Fluid Antonin Marchand,1´te´roge`nes, UMR 7636 ESPCI -CNRS, Universite´ Paris-Diderot, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005, Paris 2 Physics of Fluids)], typically 10 microns thick. The substrate is sufficiently clean and the vibrations sufficiently low to avoid

  15. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  16. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  17. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  18. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  19. Thermodynamic descriptions of Polytropic gas and its viscous type as the dark energy candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moradpour, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, at first, we focus on a FRW universe in which the dark energy candidate satisfies the Polytropic equation of state and study thermodynamics of dark energy. Bearing the thermal fluctuation theorem in mind, we establish a relation between the thermal fluctuation of system and mutual interaction between the dark energy and dark matter. Generalization to a viscous Polytropic gas is also investigated. We point to a condition for decaying dark energy candidate into the dark matter needed for alleviating coincidence problem. The effects of dark energy candidates and their interactions with other parts of cosmos on the horizon entropy as well as the second law of thermodynamics are also addressed. Our study signals us to two correction terms besides the Bekenstein entropy which carry the information of the dark energy candidate, its interaction with other parts of cosmos and its viscosity.

  20. Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Development and Modeling for the ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Barbier, Charlotte N [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Edgemon, Timothy D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Hechler, Michael P [ORNL; Kersevan, R. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Dremel, M. [General Atomics, San Diego; Pearce, R.J.H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Boissin, Jean Claude [Consultant

    2011-01-01

    The ITER vacuum system requires a roughing pump system that can pump the exhaust gas from the torus cryopumps to the tritium exhaust processing plant. The gas will have a high tritium content and therefore conventional vacuum pumps are not suitable. A pump called a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed for the roughing system to pump from ~500 Pa to 10 Pa at flow rates of 200 Pa-m3/ s. A unique feature of this pump is that is allows any helium in the gas to flow through the pump where it is sent to the detritiation system before exhausting to atmosphere. A small scale prototype of the CVC is being tested for heat transfer characteristics and compared to modeling results to ensure reliable operation of the full scale CVC. Keywords- ITER; vacuum; fuel cycle

  1. Dynamics of an asymmetric bilayer lipid membrane in a viscous solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bingham, R J; Olmsted, P D

    2015-01-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are an essential component of many biological systems, forming a functional barrier between the cell and the surrounding environment. When the membrane relaxes from a structural perturbation, the dynamics of the relaxation depends on the bilayer structure. We present a model of a BLM in a viscous solvent, including an explicit description of a 'thick' membrane, where the fluctuations in the thickness of a monolayer leaflet are coupled to changes in the lipid density within that monolayer. We find dispersion relations describing three intuitive forms of bilayer motion, including a mode describing motion of the intermonolayer surface not noted previously in the literature. Two intrinsic length scales emerge that help characterise the dynamics; the well known Saffman-Delbruck length and another, $\\ell_r$, resulting from the intermonolayer friction. The framework also allows for asymmetry in the BLM parameters between the monolayer leaflets, which is found to couple dynamic modes of...

  2. Viscous boundary layers of radiation-dominated, relativistic jets. I. The two-stream model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Using the relativistic equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit, we analyze the boundary layers that develop between radiation-dominated jets and their environments. In this paper we present the solution for the self-similar, 2-D, plane-parallel two-stream problem, wherein the jet and the ambient medium are considered to be separate, interacting fluids, and we compare our results to those of previous authors. (In a companion paper we investigate an alternative scenario, known as the free-streaming jet model.) Consistent with past findings, we show that the boundary layer that develops between the jet and its surroundings creates a region of low-density material. These models may be applicable to sources such as super-Eddington tidal disruption events and long gamma-ray bursts.

  3. Finite volume approach for the instationary Cosserat rod model describing the spinning of viscous jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Arne; Nicole Marheineke; Andreas Meister; Raimund Wegener

    2012-07-03

    The spinning of slender viscous jets can be described asymptotically by one-dimensional models that consist of systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Whereas the well-established string models possess only solutions for certain choices of parameters and set-ups, the more sophisticated rod model that can be considered as $\\epsilon$-regularized string is generally applicable. But containing the slenderness ratio $\\epsilon$ explicitely in the equations complicates the numerical treatment. In this paper we present the first instationary simulations of a rod in a rotational spinning process for arbitrary parameter ranges with free and fixed jet end, for which the hitherto investigations longed. So we close an existing gap in literature. The numerics is based on a finite volume approach with mixed central, up- and down-winded differences, the time integration is performed by stiff accurate Radau methods.

  4. Chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks - the effects of viscous accretion, turbulent mixing and disk winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzeller, Dominikus; Walsh, Catherine; Millar, Tom J

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks considering radial viscous accretion, vertical turbulent mixing and vertical disk winds. We study the effects on the disk chemical structure when different models for the formation of molecular hydrogen on dust grains are adopted. Our gas-phase chemistry is extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry (Rate06) to which we have added detailed gas-grain interactions. We use our chemical model results to generate synthetic near- and mid-infrared LTE line emission spectra and compare these with recent Spitzer observations. Our results show that if H2 formation on warm grains is taken into consideration, the H2O and OH abundances in the disk surface increase significantly. We find the radial accretion flow strongly influences the molecular abundances, with those in the cold midplane layers particularly affected. On the other hand, we show that diffusive turbulent mixing affects the disk chemistry in the warm molecular layers, influencing the line ...

  5. Viscous-Fluid-Spring Damper Retrofit of a Steel Moment Frame Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Saif; Van Benschoten, Paul; Al Satari, Mohamed; Lin, Silian

    2008-07-08

    The subject building is a peculiar pre-Northridge steel moment resisting frame building. Upon investigating the existing lateral resisting system, numerous significant deficiencies were identified; inherent lack of redundancy, poor geometry and inadequate stiffness of the lateral resisting system. All of which resulted in an extremely soft 5-story structure with a primary torsional mode of vibration at T{sub 1} = 5.46 s. Significant structural modifications were deemed necessary to meet the 'life-safety' performance objective as outlined in rehabilitation standards such as ASCE 41. Both increased stiffness and damping were required to adequately retrofit the building. Furthermore, adjacent building separation as well as deformation compatibility issues needed to be addressed and resolved. A three-dimensional computer model of the building was created using ETABS mathematically simulating the building's dynamic characteristics in its current condition. Multiple seismic retrofit systems were investigated such as Buckling Restrained Braced Frames (BRBF's). However, based on the performance effectiveness and constructability of the retrofit schemes studied, the Viscous-Fluid-Spring Damper (VFSD) system was proposed as the 'optimum' solution for the building. The VFSD, was chosen because it combines the relatively compact size and minimally invasive constructability with the required properties (an elastomeric spring in parallel with a nonlinear velocity dependent viscous damper). A site-specific response spectrum was developed for the Design Basis Earthquake (DBE, 475 year return period) event, and three pairs of representative earthquake horizontal ground motion time-histories were scaled to match this DBE. The proposed scheme reduced the building maximum inter-story drift ratio from 5.4% to about 1%. Similarly, the maximum roof displacement was reduced by about 70% (23'' to 7'')

  6. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  7. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  9. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  10. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  11. Safe Home Food Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22

    leftovers? The charts in this publication give storage times for many leftover foods. Planning and us- ing leftovers carefully can save money and time. To prevent food-borne illness, it is important to prepare and handle foods properly: a78 Wash your hands.... Cooked fish or shellfish 2-3 days 3 months Canned fish or shellfish (unopened) 12 months (opened) 1 day Surimi seafood 2 weeks 9 months Fruits Fresh Do not wash fruit before storing?mois- Apples 1 month ture encourages spoilage?but wash Apricots, avocados...

  12. Entanglement Storage Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Caneva; T. Calarco; S. Montangero

    2012-09-27

    We introduce a protocol based on optimal control to drive many body quantum systems into long-lived entangled states, protected from decoherence by big energy gaps, without requiring any apriori knowledge of the system. With this approach it is possible to implement scalable entanglement-storage units. We test the protocol in the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, a prototype many-body quantum system that describes different experimental setups, and in the ordered Ising chain, a model representing a possible implementation of a quantum bus.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  14. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2StefanLightsource504,103FormulaStorage

  15. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters Storage Ring Parameters

  16. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters Storage Ring

  17. Storage Trends and Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters Storage

  18. Storage by Scientific Discipline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters StorageHeat & Cool »

  19. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!TransportStorage Ring Parameters

  20. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!TransportStorage Ring

  1. National Energy Storage Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment ofProgram | DepartmentEnergy6 3Energy Storage Strategy

  2. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  3. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  4. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth; Long, Darrell; Honeyman, Peter; Grider, Gary; Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Roth, Philip; Felix, Evan; Ward, Lee

    2013-07-01

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability.The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools.The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  5. Holographic Storage of Biphoton Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han-Ning Dai; Han Zhang; Sheng-Jun Yang; Tian-Ming Zhao; Jun Rui; You-Jin Deng; Li Li; Nai-Le Liu; Shuai Chen; Xiao-Hui Bao; Xian-Min Jin; Bo Zhao; Jian-Wei Pan

    2012-04-06

    Coherent and reversible storage of multi-photon entanglement with a multimode quantum memory is essential for scalable all-optical quantum information processing. Although single photon has been successfully stored in different quantum systems, storage of multi-photon entanglement remains challenging because of the critical requirement for coherent control of photonic entanglement source, multimode quantum memory, and quantum interface between them. Here we demonstrate a coherent and reversible storage of biphoton Bell-type entanglement with a holographic multimode atomic-ensemble-based quantum memory. The retrieved biphoton entanglement violates Bell's inequality for 1 microsecond storage time and a memory-process fidelity of 98% is demonstrated by quantum state tomography.

  6. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  7. Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015, the ITB Group’s 16th annual technical conference, was held from March 4–5, 2015, in Novi, Michigan.

  8. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. D. Staiger

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  9. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  10. Nano- and Microscale Architectures for Energy Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Host for Emerging Energy Storage Systems Introduction Li-ionStorage Systems …………………………………………………………………………………………………………85Architectures for Energy Storage Systems A dissertation

  11. ASME-ATI-UIT 2015 Conference on Thermal Energy Systems: Production, Storage, Utilization and the Environment 17 20 May, 2015, Napoli, Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    for application to Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is presented. The CAES stores energy (e.g. from wind also for materials and durability reasons. A liquid piston approach can be used for the CAES in terms of power consumption [3]. A more important advantage of the liquid piston to CAES

  12. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

  13. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY Barriers Addressed #12;3 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center National

  14. Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (May 2014)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (May 2014) Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (May 2014) The Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (TSP) Battery Energy Storage...

  15. Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers DOE: Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage...

  16. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    rates between the gas and the storage unit are specified forcontrol valves. two gas-distribution storage mani- folds andmanifold Main gas compressor Storage manifold Storage flow-

  17. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  18. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  19. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  20. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  1. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  2. Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Jun Li, Baochun--Distributed storage systems store redundant data to tolerate failures of storage nodes and lost data should be repaired when storage nodes fail. A class of MDS codes, called minimum- storage regenerating (MSR) codes

  3. March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure Chapter 12 #12;March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 2 Objectives Describe the physical structure of secondary and tertiary storage of mass-storage devices Discuss operating-system services provided for mass storage, including RAID

  4. Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brigo, Damiano

    Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures GARP Seminar, London, Nov://www.capco.com/capco-insights -- Joint work with Claudio Nordio Prof. D. Brigo (Imperial College and Capco) Risk Management under Management under Liquidity Risk GARP Seminar London 2 / 60 #12;Introduction Liquidity in Risk Measurement

  5. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  6. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  7. Fire protection guide for solid waste metal drum storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, H.M.

    1996-09-16

    This guide provides a method to assess potential fire development in drum storage facilities. The mechanism of fire propagation/spread through stored drum arrays is a complex process. It involves flame heat transfer, transient conduction,convection, and radiation between drums (stored in an array configuration). There are several phenomena which may occur when drums are exposed to fire. The most dramatic is violent lid failure which results in total lid removal. When a drum loses its lid due to fire exposure, some or all of the contents may be ejected from the drum, and both the ejected combustible material and the combustible contents remaining within the container will burn. The scope of this guide is limited to storage arrays of steel drums containing combustible (primarily Class A) and noncombustible contents. Class B combustibles may be included in small amounts as free liquid within the solid waste contents.Storage arrays, which are anticipated in this guide, include single or multi-tier palletized (steel or wood pallets) drums,high rack storage of drums, and stacked arrays of drums where plywood sheets are used between tiers. The purpose of this guide is to describe a simple methodology that estimates the consequences of a fire in drum storage arrays. The extent of fire development and the resulting heat release rates can be estimated. Release fractions applicable to this type of storage are not addressed, and the transport of contaminants away from the source is not addressed. However, such assessments require the amount of combustible material consumed and the surface area of this burning material. The methods included in this guide do provide this information.

  8. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  9. Hopper File Storage and I/O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File Storage and IO File Storage and IO Disk Quota Change Request Form Hopper File Systems Hopper has 5 user file systems which provide different degrees of storage, performance...

  10. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on MicrogridEPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission andLong- vs. Short-Term Energy Storage Technologies Analysis, A

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Resources Res. 14: 273-280. THERMAL STORAGE OF COLD WATER INR.C. HARE, 1972. Thermal Storage for Eco-Energy Utilities,W.J. MASICA, 1977. "Thermal Storage for Electric Utilities,"

  12. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    R. C. 1 1972 1 Thermal storage for eco=energy utilities: GE-and Harris, w. B. 0 1978 0 Thermal storage of cold water induration EXPERIMENTS Thermal storage radius (m) thickness

  13. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01

    energy generation and battery storage via the use ofenergy generation and battery storage via the use of nanos-and storage (e.g lithium-ion rechargeable battery)

  14. Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters June 15, 2012 - 6:00pm Addthis Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over...

  15. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    20) E. B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in waterE.B. , 1976. "Seasonal Storage of Thermal Energy in Water ina truly worthwhile goal. Seasonal Storage of Thermal Energy

  16. Functional Carbon Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    Temperature Dense Phase Hydrogen Storage Materials withinJugroot, Review of hydrogen storage techniques for on boardFigure 1.2 Plot of hydrogen storage materials as a function

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    aquifers for heat storage, solar captors for heat productionZakhidov, R. A. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-thermal energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems,

  18. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    associat~ ed with solar thermal storage. Now this system canand R.A. Zakhidov, "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Heat as Related to the Storage of Solar Energy. Sharing the

  19. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  20. Liquid scintillator sampling calorimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudgeon, R. Greg

    1994-01-01

    This research was supported by the Department of Energy to investigate a new sampling calorimeter technology for the high intensity regions of the Superconducting Supercollider. The technology involved using liquid scintillator filled glass tubes...

  1. Fractons and Luttinger liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington da Cruz

    2000-10-05

    We consider the concept of fractons as particles or quasiparticles which obey a specific fractal statistics in connection with a one-dimensional Luttinger liquid theory. We obtain a dual statistics parameter ${\\tilde{\

  2. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  3. Novel coiled tubing application controls large LPG storage well fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebhardt, F.; Eby, D.; Barnett, D.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional well control techniques for normal oil and gas wells are widely known and have been presented on numerous occasions. However, LPG storage (or cavern) wells rarely blow out and/or catch on fire. As a result, little information has been presented on the topic of well control for these types of wells. This article chronicles a case history of a high-volume liquid propane storage well fire. Because conventional wellhead removal methods could not be applied in this case, the capping/kill plan called for use of coiled tubing in a novel manner to cut the tubing downhole and install an inflatable packer to shut off propane flow. The plan was successfully executed, saving the operator millions of dollars in LPC product loss and cost of control.

  4. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  5. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael A.; Page, Richard A.

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to established and qualified standards. Working with industry, academia, and the U.S. government, SwRI set out to develop an accepted set of evaluation standards and analytical methodologies. Critical measurements of hydrogen sorption properties in the Laboratory have been based on three analytical capabilities: 1) a high-pressure Sievert-type volumetric analyzer, modified to improve low-temperature isothermal analyses of physisorption materials and permit in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the sample’s gas space; 2) a static, high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer employing an advanced magnetic suspension electro-balance, glove-box containment, and capillary interface for in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the sample’s gas space; and 3) a Laser-induced Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (LTDMS) system for high thermal-resolution desorption and mechanistic analyses. The Laboratory has played an important role in down-selecting materials and systems that have emerged from the MCoEs.

  6. Universal mechanism for air entrainment during liquid impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrix, Maurice H W; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    When a mm-sized liquid drop approaches a deep liquid pool, both the interface of the drop and the pool deform before the drop touches the pool. The build up of air pressure prior to coalescence is responsible for this deformation. Due to this deformation, air can be entrained at the bottom of the drop during the impact. We quantify the amount of entrained air numerically, using the Boundary Integral Method (BIM) for potential flow for the drop and the pool, coupled to viscous lubrication theory for the air film that has to be squeezed out during impact. We compare our results to various experimental data and find excellent agreement for the amount of air that is entrapped during impact onto a pool. Next, the impact of a rigid sphere onto a pool is numerically investigated and the air that is entrapped in this case also matches with available experimental data. In both cases of drop and sphere impact onto a pool the numerical air bubble volume V_b is found to be in agreement with the theoretical scaling V_b/V_...

  7. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  8. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  9. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Storage - Challenges and Opportunities Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company...

  10. Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012,...

  11. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer Review Presentations - Session 11...

  12. Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy and Energy Storage Systems TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

  13. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS)...

  14. Analytic Challenges to Valuing Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Ookie; O'Malley, Mark; Cheung, Kerry; Larochelle, Philippe; Scheer, Rich

    2011-10-25

    Electric grid energy storage value. System-level asset focus for mechanical and electrochemical energy storage. Analysis questions for power system planning, operations, and customer-side solutions.

  15. National Hydrogen Storage Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Hydrogen Storage Project National Hydrogen Storage Project In July 2003, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a "Grand Challenge" to the global scientific community for...

  16. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a...

  17. Overview of Gridscale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Washington, DC. flowcells2012johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems...

  18. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    A New Concept in Electric Generation and Energy Storage,"A New Concept in Electric Generation and Energy Storage,"of Solar Energy for Electric Power Generation," Proceedings

  19. DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report: Revision 2 DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee Report: Revision 2 Energy storage plays a vital role in all forms of business and affects the...

  20. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Superconducting Magnetic Bearing - Mike Strasik, Boeing.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 1 morning presentations Energy Storage...

  1. EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Storage

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry....

  2. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen...

  3. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Storage - Sanjoy Banerjee, CUNY.pdf PDF icon ESS 2010 Update Conference - Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid-Scale Energy Storage - Venkat Srinivasan,...

  4. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

  5. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  6. Importance of glassy fragility for energy applications of ionic liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sippel; P. Lunkenheimer; S. Krohns; E. Thoms; A. Loidl

    2015-02-24

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are salts that are liquid close to room temperature. Their possible applications are numerous, e.g., as solvents for green chemistry in various electrochemical devices, and even for such "exotic" purposes as spinning-liquid mirrors for lunar telescopes. Here we concentrate on their use for new advancements in energy-storage and -conversion devices: Batteries, supercapacitors or fuel cells using ILs as electrolytes could be important building blocks for the sustainable energy supply of tomorrow. Interestingly, ILs show glassy freezing and the universal, but until now only poorly understood dynamic properties of glassy matter, dominate many of their physical properties. We show that the conductivity of ILs, an essential figure of merit for any electrochemical application, depends in a systematic way not only on their glass temperature but also on the so-called fragility, characterizing the non-canonical super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of their ionic mobility.

  7. Experimental study of alumina-water and zirconia-water nanofluids convective heat transfer and viscous pressure loss in Laminar regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rea, Ulzie L

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate experimentally the convective heat transfer and viscous pressure loss characteristics of alumina-water and zirconia-water nanofluids. Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of ...

  8. Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular fuel storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aceves, Salvador; Berry, Gene; Weisberg, Andrew H.

    2004-03-23

    A lightweight, cryogenic-compatible pressure vessel for flexibly storing cryogenic liquid fuels or compressed gas fuels at cryogenic or ambient temperatures. The pressure vessel has an inner pressure container enclosing a fuel storage volume, an outer container surrounding the inner pressure container to form an evacuated space therebetween, and a thermal insulator surrounding the inner pressure container in the evacuated space to inhibit heat transfer. Additionally, vacuum loss from fuel permeation is substantially inhibited in the evacuated space by, for example, lining the container liner with a layer of fuel-impermeable material, capturing the permeated fuel in the evacuated space, or purging the permeated fuel from the evacuated space.

  9. Spherical Top-Hat Collapse of Viscous Modified Chaplygin Gas in Einstein's Gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ujjal Debnath; Mubasher Jamil

    2015-01-03

    In this work, we focus on the collapse of a spherically symmetric perturbation, with a classical top-hat profile, to study the nonlinear evolution of only viscous modified Chaplygin gas (VMCG) perturbations in Einstein's gravity as well as in loop quantum Cosmology (LQC). In the perturbed region, we have investigated the natures of equation of state parameter, square speed of sound and another perturbed quantities. The results have been analyzed by numerical and graphical investigations.

  10. Chapter 6 x Viscous Flow in Ducts 467 (c) 132000, 0.0170, hence the reduction in f is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    to the likely suspect, gasoline. Ans. 6.54* A swimming pool W by Y by h deep is to be emptied by gravity through) 0.0314 smoothf Ans. § · ¨ ¸© ą Re 46% 6.51 The viscous sublayer (Fig. 6.10) is normally less than 1 s § · |¨ ¸© ą The sublayer thickness is defined by y | 5.0 Uyu*/P. Thus sublayer 5 5(0.0311) y 0.0154 ft u* (2.44)(4.13) Ans

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

  12. Dark matter at viscous-gravitational Schwarz scales: theory and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson

    1999-04-21

    The Jeans criterion for the minimum self-gravitational condensation scale is extended to include the possibility of condensation on non-acoustic density nuclei at Schwarz scales, where structure formation begins in the plasma epoch at proto-supercluster masses about 10,000 years after the Big Bang, decreasing to galaxy masses at 300,000 years. Then the plasma universe became relatively inviscid gas and condensed to 10^23-26 kg "primordial fog particle" (PFP) masses. Baryonic dark matter by this theory should be mostly non-aggregated PFPs that persist in galactic halos. Schild (1996) suggests from quasar Q0957+561 microlensing that "rogue planets" are "likely to be the missing mass" of the lens galaxy. Non-baryonic dark matter composed of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) should condense slowly at large viscous Schwarz scales to form galaxy supercluster halos, and massive galaxy cluster halos as observed by Tyson and Fischer (1995) for the rich galaxy cluster Abel 1689.

  13. Dark matter at viscous-gravitational Schwarz scales theory and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    The Jeans criterion for the minimum self-gravitational condensation scale is extended to include the possibility of condensation on non-acoustic density nuclei at Schwarz scales, where structure formation begins in the plasma epoch at proto-supercluster masses about 10,000 years after the Big Bang, decreasing to galaxy masses at 300,000 years. Then the plasma universe became relatively inviscid gas and condensed to 10^23-26 kg "primordial fog particle" (PFP) masses. Baryonic dark matter by this theory should be mostly non-aggregated PFPs that persist in galactic halos. Schild (1996) suggests from quasar Q0957+561 microlensing that "rogue planets" are "likely to be the missing mass" of the lens galaxy. Non-baryonic dark matter composed of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) should condense slowly at large viscous Schwarz scales to form galaxy supercluster halos, and massive galaxy cluster halos as observed by Tyson and Fischer (1995) for the rich galaxy cluster Abel 1689.

  14. Probing bulk viscous matter-dominated models with Gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Montiel; N. Bretón

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we extend the range of consistency of a constant bulk viscosity model to redshifts up to $z\\sim 8.1$. In this model the dark sector of the cosmic substratum is a viscous fluid with pressure $p= -\\zeta \\theta$, where $\\theta$ is the fluid-expansion scalar and $\\zeta$ is the coefficient of bulk viscosity. Using the sample of 59 high-redshift GRBs reported by Wei (2010), we calibrate GRBs at low redshifts with the Union 2 sample of SNe Ia, avoiding then the circularity problem. Testing the constant bulk viscosity model with GRBs we found the best fit for the viscosity parameter $\\tilde{\\zeta}$ in the range $0<\\tilde{\\zeta}<3$, being so consistent with previous probes; we also determined the deceleration parameter $q_0$ and the redshift of transition to accelerated expansion. Besides we present an updated analysis of the model with CMB5-year data and CMB7-year data, as well as with the baryon acoustic peak BAO. From the statistics with CMB it turns out that the model does not describe in a feasible way the far far epoch of recombination of the universe, but is in very good concordance for epochs as far as $z\\sim 8.1$ till present.

  15. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

  16. Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2 - water displacement in a homogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing resident brine from the pore space by supercritical CO2 (scCO2). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio (logM < 0). The unstable mechanisms that affect scCO2 - water displacement under reservoir conditions (i.e., 41 °C, 9 MPa) were investigated in a homogeneous micromodel. A wide range of injection rates (logCa = -7.61~-4.73) was studied in two sets of experiments: discontinuous-rate injection, where the micromodel was first cleaned and saturated with water before each injection rate was imposed, and continuous-rate injection, where the rate was increased after quasi-steady conditions were reached for a certain rate. For the discontinuous-rate experiments, capillary fingering and viscous fingering are the dominant mechanisms for low (logCa <= -6.61) and high injection rates (logCa >= -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91~-5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO2 saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (1988).1 Capillary fingering was the only mechanism that dominates all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, and resulted in monotonic increase in scCO2 saturation.

  17. The October 1985 Long Outburst of U Geminorum: Revealing the Viscous Time Scale in Long Orbital Period Dwarf Novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John K. Cannizzo; Neil Gehrels; Janet A. Mattei

    2002-07-11

    We examine the AAVSO light curve of U Geminorum from 1908 to 2002, with particular focus on the October 1985 outburst. This outburst was longer than any other seen in U Gem by about a factor of 2, and appears to be unique among all dwarf nova outbursts seen in systems with orbital periods longer than 3 hr in that one can measure the decay time scale during the initial slow decay. This rate is ~26+-6 d/mag. Using estimates of the rate of accretion during outburst taken from Froning et al., one can show that ~1e24 g of gas was accreted onto the white dwarf during the outburst. When coupled with the viscous time inferred from the (short orbital period) SU UMa stars, the U Gem viscous time scale lends support to the standard model in which the decays in dwarf novae can either be viscous or thermal, with the ratio between them being roughly h/r where h is the vertical pressure scale height in the disk.

  18. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T; Andersson, Anna M

    2014-10-07

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries.

  19. 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim (1 of 8) 1500271wileyonlinelibrary.com Ionic Liquid Redox Catholyte for High Energy Efficiency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    .com Ionic Liquid Redox Catholyte for High Energy Efficiency, Low-Cost Energy Storage Leigang Xue, Telpriore. Although their cell cycled well, the quite high (91%)[3] energy efficiency of the normal ZEBRA battery redox catholyte by combining it with a liquid sodium anode to achieve >96% overall energy efficiency

  20. An interferometric study of spreading liquid films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavehpour, Hossein Pirouz

    2003-01-01

    Moving contact line problems involving polymeric materials and other complex fluids are encountered in many applications such as coating flows, gravity-driven drainage, and spin-coating operations. Viscous, capillary, ...

  1. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  2. Production, Storage, and FC Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Production, Storage, and FC Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  3. Efficient storage of versioned matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seering, Adam B

    2011-01-01

    Versioned-matrix storage is increasingly important in scientific applications. Various computer-based scientific research, from astronomy observations to weather predictions to mechanical finite-element analyses, results ...

  4. Device-transparent personal storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

    2010-01-01

    Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

  5. A Successful Cool Storage Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation....

  6. Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is a compilation of information exchanged at a forum on March 14, 2003 in Washington, DC. The forum was assembled for innovative and non-conventional brainstorming on this issue of hydrogen storage technologies.

  7. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  8. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  9. Experimental Investigation on the Operation Performance of a Liquid Desiccant Air-conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wu, Z.; Gu, W.; Zhang, G.

    2006-01-01

    that are energy- saving and environment-friendly. A liquid desiccant air conditioning system is among them, as it has a tremendous ability for power storage and low requirements for heat resources. Heat with low temperatures, such as excess heat, waste heat...

  10. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  11. Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  12. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap, November 2005

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen storage technology for transportation applications.

  13. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  14. 1 Files and Databases mass storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Files and Databases mass storage hash functions 2 Dictionaries logical key values nested Jan Verschelde, 28 January 2015 Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) mass storage and dictionaries L-7 28 January 2015 1 / 32 #12;mass storage dictionaries in Python 1 Files and Databases mass storage

  15. Addressing the Grand Challenges in Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun

    2013-02-25

    The editorial summarizes the contents of the special issue for energy storage in Advanced Functional Materials.

  16. Optimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qun

    of limited storage, communication capacity, and battery power is ameliorated. Placing storage nodesOptimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks Bo Sheng, Member, IEEE, Qun Li, Member, IEEE, and Weizhen Mao Abstract--Data storage has become an important issue in sensor networks as a large amount

  17. Hydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  18. Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.

    2011-10-01

    This presentation describes how you economically manage integration costs of storage and variable generation.

  19. New York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jonathan Silver and Matt Rogers on a major breakthrough for New York state's energy storage capacity.

  20. AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Mike

    on the market sectors of electricity transmission, gas transmission, storage and distribution and process

  1. Electroville: Grid-Scale Batteries: High Amperage Energy Storage Device—Energy for the Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by MIT professor Donald Sadoway, the Electroville project team is creating a community-scale electricity storage device using new materials and a battery design inspired by the aluminum production process known as smelting. A conventional battery includes a liquid electrolyte and a solid separator between its 2 solid electrodes. MIT’s battery contains liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt electrolyte. Because metals and salt don’t mix, these 3 liquids of different densities naturally separate into layers, eliminating the need for a solid separator. This efficient design significantly reduces packaging materials, which reduces cost and allows more space for storing energy than conventional batteries offer. MIT’s battery also uses cheap, earth-abundant, domestically available materials and is more scalable. By using all liquids, the design can also easily be resized according to the changing needs of local communities.

  2. Effect of Viscosity on the Microformability of Bulk Amorphous Alloy in Supercooled Liquid Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Ming; Zhang Shihong; Wang Ruixue

    2010-06-15

    Previously published results have shown that viscosity greatly influences on the deformation behavior of the bulk amorphous alloy in supercooled liquid region during microforming process. And viscosity is proved to be a component of the evaluation index which indicating microformability. Based on the fluid flow theory and assumptions, bulk amorphous alloy can be regarded as the viscous materials with a certain viscosity. It is helpful to understand how the viscosity plays an important role in viscous materials with various viscosities by numerical simulation on the process. Analysis is carried out by linear state equation in FEM with other three materials, water, lubricant oil and polymer melt, whose viscosities are different obviously. The depths of the materials flow into the U-shaped groove during the microimprinting process are compared in this paper. The result shows that the deformation is quite different when surface tension effect is not considered in the case. With the lowest viscosity, water can reach the bottom of micro groove in a very short time. Lubricant oil and polymer melt slower than it. Moreover bulk amorphous alloys in supercooled liquid state just flow into the groove slightly. Among the alloys of different systems including Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based alloy, Pd-based alloy ranks largest in the depth. Mg-based alloy is the second. And Zr-based alloy is the third. Further more the rank order of the viscosities of the alloys is Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based. It agrees well with the results of calculation. Therefore viscosity plays an important role in the microforming of the bulk amorphous alloy in the supercooled liquid state.

  3. Investigations in cool thermal storage: storage process optimization and glycol sensible storage enhancement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Michaela Marie

    1993-01-01

    of 10'F, the irreversibility developed from the heat transfer between the tank water and the refrigerant increases with lower freezing temperatures. The second part of this study presents a simplified optimization method for a pure water, ice storage...

  4. Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher and Yongdae Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yongdae

    Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher and Yongdae are witnessing a revival of Storage Service Providers in the form of new vendors as well as traditional players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many compa- nies are hesitating to outsource their storage

  5. Remote I/O Optimization and Evaluation for Tertiary Storage Systems through Storage Resource Broker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Wei-keng

    Remote I/O Optimization and Evaluation for Tertiary Storage Systems through Storage Resource Broker storage systems emerge as a popular place to hold them. SRB, a uniform interface to various storage systems including tertiary storage systems such as HPSS, UniTree etc., becomes an important and convenient

  6. SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Qing "Ken"

    1 SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems under Faulty), for evaluating the performance of block-level storage systems in the presence of faults as well as under normal operations. SPEK can work on both Direct Attached Storage (DAS) and block level networked storage systems

  7. SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xubin "Ben"

    SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems Ming Zhang storage systems at block level. It can be used for both DAS (Direct Attached Storage) and block level networked storage systems. Each SPEK tool consists of a controller, several workers, and one or more probers

  8. Routing, Storage Management and Caching, and Security of Peer-to-Peer Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yingwu "Jason"

    Routing, Storage Management and Caching, and Security of Peer-to-Peer Storage Systems Yingwu Zhu such as Napster, Gnutella and Freenet, has inspired a whole new breed of P2P storage systems, which aims-tolerant, and highly-available storage without centralized servers. Many P2P storage systems have been proposed

  9. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    SCMAG-798 Comments on Liquid Hydrogen Absorbers for MICEshown in Figure 1. Three liquid hydrogen absorbers are shownthe RF Cavities, the Liquid Hydrogen Absorbers, the Central

  10. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen is most commonly transported and delivered as a liquid when high-volume transport is needed in the absence of pipelines....

  11. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T. [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear System Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P. [U.S. ITER Project Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias [ITER Organization, 13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Boissin, J.-C. [Consultant, Grenoble (France)

    2014-01-29

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  12. Evaluation of Static Mixer Flow Enhancements for Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Prototype for ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL] [ORNL; Ha, Tam T [ORNL] [ORNL; Morrow, Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL] [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL] [ORNL; Hechler, Michael P [ORNL] [ORNL; Pearce, R.J.H. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France] [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Dremel, M. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France] [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Boissin, Jean Claude [Consultant] [Consultant

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (50 to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype

  13. Temporal Entropy Generation in the Viscous Layers of Laterally-converging Duct Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald M. McEligot; Robert S. Brodkey; Helmut Eckelmann

    2008-12-01

    Since insight into entropy generation is a key to increasing efficiency and thereby reducing fuel consumption and/or waste and -- for wall-bounded flows -- most entropy is generated in the viscous layer, we examine the transient behavior of its dominant contributor there for a non-canonical flow. New measurements in oil flow are presented for the effects of favorable streamwise mean pressure gradients on temporal entropy generation rates and, in the process, on key Reynolds-stress-producing events such as sweep front passage and on the deceleration/outflow phase of the overall bursting process. Two extremes have been considered: (1) a high pressure gradient, nearing "laminarization," and (2), for comparison, a low pressure gradient corresponding to many earlier experiments. In both cases, the peak temporal entropy generation rate occurs shortly after passage of the ejection/sweep interface. Whether sweep and ejection rates appear to decrease or increase with the pressure gradient depends on the feature examined and the manner of sampling. When compared using wall coordinates for velocities, distances and time, the trends and magnitudes of the transient behaviors are mostly the same. The main effects of the higher pressure gradient are (1) changes in the time lag between detections -- representing modification of the shape of the sweep front and the sweep angle with the wall, (2) modification of the magnitude of an instantaneous Reynolds shear stress with wall distance and (3) enlarging the sweeps and ejections. Results new for both low and high pressure gradients are the temporal behaviors of the dominant contribution to entropy generation; it is found to be much more sensitive to distance from the wall than to streamwise pressure gradient.

  14. liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving Christopher D. Carroll ccarroll to the optimal consumption/saving problem under uncertainty have long known that there are quantitatively important in- teractions between liquidity constraints and precautionary saving behavior. This paper

  15. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

    2008-03-18

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  16. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

    2012-04-03

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  17. Cloud Liquid Water Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    of heat to vaporize drops. Power is supplied to coil to maintain a constant temperature. P ­ Total Power #12;Wet Power Term Energy is transferred to heat droplets to to the boiling point and vaporize;Liquid Water Content Formula Combine the Wet and Dry Power Terms PC Ts-TaPv x Mldv[Lvcw Tv-Ta] · M

  18. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freibert, Franz J.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Schwartz, Daniel S.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Migliori, Albert

    2012-08-02

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  19. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  20. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.