Sample records for viscosity navy special

  1. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  2. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This video tells the story of the Navy's development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  3. Navy Reserve Co. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Navy's involvement in the Vietnam War, especially its role in the region's inland waterways, has long been an overshadowed aspect of the conflict. Most histories ignore or minimize the Navy's contribution, especially its river...

  4. Navy Geothermal Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Domestic geothermal resources with the potential for decreasing fossil fuel use and energy cost exist at a significant number of Navy facilities. The Geothermal Plan is part of the Navy Energy R and D Program that will evaluate Navy sites and provide a technical, economic, and environmental base for subsequent resource use. One purpose of the program will be to provide for the transition of R and D funded exploratory efforts into the resource development phase. Individual Navy geothermal site projects are described as well as the organizational structure and Navy decision network. 2 figs.

  5. Navy Technology Validation (Techval)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Navy's energy efficiency activities and is given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Spring 2008 meeting in Destin, Florida.

  6. Navy Technology Evaluation Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Navy Technology Evaluation update at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  7. Navy Bean Soup Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Navy Bean Soup Ingredients: 1 pound dried beans, navy 10 cups water 3/4 cup celery, diced 3/4 cup carrots, diced 1/2 cup onion, chopped 1 ounce ham Pepper to taste Directions 1. Wash and sort beans. Put beans in large sauce pan and cover with water. Soak overnight. 2. After soaking, drain water and add 10

  8. A STRATEGY FOR NAVY LEADERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A STRATEGY FOR DEVELOPING NAVY LEADERS Revised Draft 6 September 2012 Navy Leader Development for the 21st Century #12;|1 A STRATEGY FOR DEVELOPING NAVY LEADERS "There is one element in the profession strategic asset and are key to preserving our heritage as the world's greatest Navy. There is no priority

  9. Bravo Araby Navy Base Holtville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesquite Loveland Imperial Highline Descanso Calexico Sand Hill Navy Base Holtville Glencliff Foothills

  10. Passive retrofits for Navy housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbert, R.; Miles, C.; Jones, R.; Peck, C.; Anderson, J.; Jacobson, V.; Dale, A.M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to assess and initiate passive solar energy retrofits to US Navy family housing is described. The current data base for Navy housing (ECOP), and its enhancement for passive solar purposes options proposed for Navy housing are explained. The analysis goals and methods to evaluate the retrofits are discussed. An educational package to explain the retrofits is described.

  11. Janice C. Haith Director, Department of Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janice C. Haith Director, Department of Navy Deputy Chief Information Officer (Navy) (DDCIO (N)) Ms Haith became Director, Deputy Department of Navy Chief Information Officer (Navy) (formerly. In this position, she is responsible for all Chief Information Officer (CIO) matters related to the US Navy

  12. Department of the Navy Bioeconomy Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Department of the Navy Bioeconomy Activity Chris Tindal, Director for Operational Energy, U.S. Department of Navy

  13. Navy Leadership Disturbed by "Spice" Usage Rise Navy leaders are expressing alarm at recent statistics that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navy Leadership Disturbed by "Spice" Usage Rise Navy leaders are expressing alarm at recent, mimicking the chemical compounds found in the drug. These products are banned for Navy personnel (NAVADMIN) 108/10 in March 2010, which reemphasized the Navy's drug policy, the U.S. Navy has been

  14. Timely PTS Applications Critical to Staying Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timely PTS Applications Critical to Staying Navy Navy Personnel Command (NPC) is reminding commands and Sailors that submitting Perform to Serve (PTS) applications is the key to being able to stay Navy/10 explains how PTS is used to shape the Navy, and includes all business rules concerning. Commands must

  15. Satellite Navigation in Vietnam & The NAVIS Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Satellite Navigation in Vietnam & The NAVIS Centre TA HAI TUNG (PhD) NAVIS CentreKme predefined incidents occurring; or each 30 s #12;"The mission of Navis is to boost, in South-East Asia." hcp://navis.hust.edu.vn #12;(Source: Mul,-GNSS Asia) #12;Milestones

  16. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Benefits Bulletin 2010-2 DON Civilian Human Resources Web Site: Benefits Information The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Civilian Human Resources) launched a new Web site at http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr that provides Department of the Navy

  17. Navy fuel cell demonstration project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

  18. Invited Talk US Navy Seaweb Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    Invited Talk US Navy Seaweb Development Joe Rice Naval Postgraduate School Physics Department Monterey, CA 93943 USA Joe.Rice@navy.mil Abstract This talk traces the development of Seaweb through

  19. Navy RFP Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navy RFP Frequently Asked Questions and Answers 1. The press release states that the cost of the project must be at or below the Department of Navy's (DON) current cost of power in...

  20. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Benefits Line 888-320-2917 M - F, 7:30 a.m. ­ 7:30 p.m. ET TTY: 866-359-5277 Email: navybenefits@navy.mil http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Benefits Line 888-320-2917 M - F, 7:30 a.m. ­ 7:30 p.m. ET

  1. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Date: 26 June 2012 From: DON Benefits Officer To of the Navy systems are now ready to accept employee's Roth TSP transactions (regular and catch-up). The TSP available at http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits/resources/Documents/Benefits%20Bulletin%2020 12

  2. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 1 UNIVERSITY CIR MONTEREY, CA 93943-5000 IN REPLY FOR ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT OF NAVY FULLY-FUNDED GRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT CIVILIAN INSTITUTIONS guidance for the U.S. Navy's fully funded graduate education programs at Civilian Institutions (CIVINS

  3. 32 | iit magazine IIT Navy V-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    rewind 32 | iit magazine IIT Navy V-12 During the first half of the 1940s, at the request for members of the military were so numerous that by June 1943, the U.S. Army and Navy were using 70 percent the Navy contacted him to learn how many men could be accommodated at IIT and how quickly the preparations

  4. Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center Date: 28 November 2011 From: DON Benefits Officer and Flexible Spending Account. The Department of the Navy Benefit Civilian Human Resources Web site at http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits/Pages/BenefitsOpenSeason.aspx is an excellent source of Open Season

  5. Evaluation of technology transferring: The experiences of the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1989 the Office of the Chief of Naval Research and the American Defense Preparedness Association conducted the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. The objective of the Transfair was to expose the US Navy`s years of solid experience across a broad span of technology to organizations outside of the Navy. It was an opportunity for private industry to capitalize on the Navy developed technology and this opening for industry was the primary focus of the Transfair. The event provided a unique forum to meet leading Navy scientific and engineering innovators face-to-face. Information was available concerning licensing of naval technology that was for sale to the private sector. Further, discussions covered opportunities for new cooperative research and development agreements with Navy laboratories and R&D activities. These agreements were authorized under the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986. The Transfair program was conducted in such a manner as to allow each Navy inventor, either scientist or engineer, to present a system, piece of hardware, or licensable concept in a formal paper presentation. Then, the Navy inventors were available in two, two-hour periods in which individual discussions were conducted, with attendees pursuing specific venues of cooperative agreements as desired. This report provides specifics concerning the technologies that were made available for transfer to the private sector during the Transfair. The Transfair concept sought to add special emphasis to the opening that the 1988 Technology Transfer Act brought to the marketplace. The experience was a step in the education of the possibilities for cooperation between the government and the private sector to share technology. Of additional significance is the economic enhancement for business expansion with the application of the technology to markets beyond defense.

  6. A Report on Policies and Practices of the U.S. Navy for Naming the Vessels of the Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Report on Policies and Practices of the U.S. Navy for Naming the Vessels of the Navy Prepared by: Department of the Navy 1000 Navy Pentagon Rm. 4E720 Washington, DC the Vessels of the Navy 1 Purpose Background Orthodox Traditionalists versus Pragmatic

  7. Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A project started last year at a U.S. Navy base in Meridian, Miss., that will save thousands in taxpayer dollars has been successfully completed.

  8. ARMY, MARINE CORPS, NAVY, AIR FORCE MULTISERVICE TACTICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ARMY, MARINE CORPS, NAVY, AIR FORCE MULTISERVICE TACTICS, TECHNIQUES, AND PROCEDURES Development and Integration T. L. DAVISON THOMAS J. LOFTUS Captain, US Navy Major General, USAF, MC, CFS Acting Assistant Surgeon General Navy Warfare Development Command Health Care Operations Office

  9. U.S. Navy Social Media Registration Checklist December 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 U.S. Navy Social Media Registration Checklist December 2013 Thank you for your interest in registering with the Navy's social media directory. Before you contact the Navy's Emerging Media Team at 703- 614-9154 or usnsocialmedia

  10. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting system: Phase 3, Report. [Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Davis, R.M.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world oil scenarios were analyzed using the NMFFS. The linear programming models of the NMFFS have great value in the analysis of petroleum resource allocation and refining. The results of the general market analysis indicated that all disruptions resulted in reduced crude oil supply, higher prices, and reduced demand in the world. In a major Persian Gulf disruption, US refining capability appeared adequate to satisfy normal US military fuel requirements, including those supplied by foreign refiners. However, this would be at the expense of civilian fuels production. Mobilization fuel requirements during a major disruption that curtailed most Persian Gulf and Venezuelan crude exports resulted in significant competition in the production of civil versus military jet fuels, particularly in Texas Gulf Coast and West Coast refineries. In all disruption scenarios studied, the Middle East emerged as a potentially important refiner of both civil and military jet fuels. With SPR drawdown and the IEA agreements in effect, the impacts of the disruptions on the production of refined products were significantly reduced, particularly in the United States, compared to the impacts without these programs. The IEA agreement caused a redistribution of the regional demand levels among IEA countries in favor of the major oil consuming countries like the United States, Canada, and some of the European countries. The results of the RYM analysis of refinery regions focused on the availability and quality of JP-5 production in key Navy supply regions. Several findings potentially important to the Navy are listed.

  11. USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry to Advance Biofuels for Military and Commercial Transportation USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry...

  12. Russian Navy Fresh Fuel MPC and A Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forehand, Harry M.; O'Shell, Parker; Opanassiouk, Yuri R.; Rexroth, Paul E.; Shmelev, Vladimir; Sukhoruchkin, Vladimir K.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Russian Navy Fuels Program is to incorporate nuclear fuel that is in the custody of the Russian Navy into a materials protection, control and accounting program. In addition to applying MPC and A upgrades to existing facilities, a program is underway to train site personnel in MPC and A activities. The goal is to assure that the upgraded facilities are managed, operated and maintained in an effective, sustainable manner. Training includes both the conceptual and necessary operational aspects of the systems and equipment. The project began with a Needs Assessment to identify priorities and objectives of required training. This led to the creation of a series of classes developed by Kurchatov Institute. One course was developed to allow attendees to get a general understanding of goals and objectives of nuclear MPC and A systems in the context of the Russian Navy. A follow-on course provided the detailed skills necessary for the performance of specialized duties. Parallel sessions with hands-on exercises provided the specific training needed for different personnel requirements. The courses were presented at KI facilities in Moscow. This paper reviews the work to date and future plans for this program.

  13. navy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97,1996 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M

  14. Lyndon Johnson and the navy 1937-1948

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haussman, Harley Russell

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : History LYNDON JOHNSON AND THE NAVY 1937-1948 A Thesis by HARLEY RUSSELL HAUSSMAN Approved as to style and content by: Ro rt A. Ca vert (Chairman of Committee) R. J. Adams (Member) Larry D. Hill (Member) H. E. Benton (Member) enry C. Det off... Johnson began his political career when he defeated nine other candidates in the special election for the Tenth District of Texas. Obviously his political aspirations preceded his victory. Perhaps he inherited them from his father, Samuel E. Johnson...

  15. The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology A Look Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology ­ A Look Ahead Robert Kavetsky Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street, Arlington, VA., USA Robert_Kavetsky@onr.navy.mil ABSTRACT The Navy to building the "Navy After Next". The Office of Naval Research provided a leadership role in exploring those

  16. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 1000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON. D.C. 20350·1000 SECNAVINST 1524.2B DASN (MPP) October 27, 2005 SECNAV INSTRUCTION 1524.2B From: Secretary of the Navy Subj, Section 7041-7047, establishes the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and empowers the Secretary of the Navy

  17. Acoustic Mine Detection UsingAcoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy' CASS/GRAB Modelthe Navy' CASS/GRAB Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Acoustic Mine Detection UsingAcoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy' CASS/GRAB Modelthe Navy' CASS hunting component of the U.S. Navy's Mine Hunting and Countermeasure ships. #12;Detection Sonar and MOODS. Global GDEM has a 30'30' resolution U.S. Navy's Operationally important areas contain resolutions

  18. Navy Technology Validation (Techval) Monitoring Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Navy Technology Validation (Techval) Monitoring Results and is given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

  19. Viscosity at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Kerstin Paech

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of physical phenomena can lead to viscous effects. In this talk we review several sources of shear and bulk viscosity with an emphasis on the bulk viscosity associated with chiral restoration. We show that in the limit of a second order phase transition, the viscosity peaks in a singularity at the critical point.

  20. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System report: Navy fuel production in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Davis, R.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Refinery Yield Model of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System has been used to study the feasibility and quality of Navy JP-5 jet fuel and F-76 marine diesel fuel for two scenarios in the year 2000. Both scenarios account for environmental regulations for fuels produced in the US and assume that Eastern Europe, the USSR, and the People's Republic of China have free market economies. One scenario is based on business-as-usual market conditions for the year 2000. The second scenario is similar to first except that USSR crude oil production is 24 percent lower. During lower oil production in the USSR., there are no adverse effects on Navy fuel availability, but JP-5 is generally a poorer quality fuel relative to business-as-usual in the year 2000. In comparison with 1990, there are two potential problems areas for future Navy fuel quality. The first problem is increased aromaticity of domestically produced Navy fuels. Higher percentages of aromatics could have adverse effects on storage, handling, and combustion characteristics of both JP-5 and F-76. The second, and related, problem is that highly aromatic light cycle oils are blended into F-76 at percentages which promote fuel instability. It is recommended that the Navy continue to monitor the projected trend toward increased aromaticity in JP-5 and F-76 and high percentages of light cycle oils in F-76. These potential problems should be important considerations in research and development for future Navy engines.

  1. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System report: Navy fuel production in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Davis, R.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Refinery Yield Model of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System has been used to study the feasibility and quality of Navy JP-5 jet fuel and F-76 marine diesel fuel for two scenarios in the year 2000. Both scenarios account for environmental regulations for fuels produced in the US and assume that Eastern Europe, the USSR, and the People`s Republic of China have free market economies. One scenario is based on business-as-usual market conditions for the year 2000. The second scenario is similar to first except that USSR crude oil production is 24 percent lower. During lower oil production in the USSR., there are no adverse effects on Navy fuel availability, but JP-5 is generally a poorer quality fuel relative to business-as-usual in the year 2000. In comparison with 1990, there are two potential problems areas for future Navy fuel quality. The first problem is increased aromaticity of domestically produced Navy fuels. Higher percentages of aromatics could have adverse effects on storage, handling, and combustion characteristics of both JP-5 and F-76. The second, and related, problem is that highly aromatic light cycle oils are blended into F-76 at percentages which promote fuel instability. It is recommended that the Navy continue to monitor the projected trend toward increased aromaticity in JP-5 and F-76 and high percentages of light cycle oils in F-76. These potential problems should be important considerations in research and development for future Navy engines.

  2. The Department of the Navy's Research Development and Acquisition Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Department of the Navy's Research Development and Acquisition Community Efforts to Achieve the Navy's Energy Goals Enabling Energy Security Strategic Directions Dr. John V. Amy, Jr. ASN (RDA) CHSENG

  3. AZIENDA (denominazione e indirizzo): Grandi Navi Veloci Spa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    AZIENDA (denominazione e indirizzo): Grandi Navi Veloci Spa Via Fieschi 17 16121 Genova SEDE DEL. Segue inoltre aspetti legati alle navi correlati con le telecomunicazioni e con le attività di cablaggio

  4. UNIT TYPE MILITARY PROVIDES IIT PROVIDES (Navy/Marines)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    UNIT TYPE MILITARY PROVIDES IIT PROVIDES Naval (Navy/Marines) 4 year­Type 1 Full tuition and fees. Room and board* for all 4 years. Navy (Must be currently enlisted personnel) STA-21 Seaman to Admiral

  5. Navy Breaks World Record With Futuristic Free-Electron Laser...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    foxnews.comscitech20110218navy-breaks-world-record-futuristic-laser-getting-real Submitted: Sunday, February 20, 2011...

  6. Project Title: Navy-Civilian Relations Bachelor of Arts Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Project Title: Navy-Civilian Relations Bachelor of Arts Internship Company/Organization: The Royal New Zealand Navy Intern Position Title: Researcher Organisation Supervisor: Lance Kenyon, Warrant February, 11:00 am Project Description: The Royal New Zealand Navy identifies itself as protecting New

  7. Thomas W. Hicks Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Hicks Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy Deputy Chief Management Officer Tom Hicks was appointed as Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy / Deputy Chief Management Officer in August 2013. In this capacity, he oversees all Department of the Navy business operations, process, and efficiency initiatives

  8. John L. Forrest, Jr. Patent Counsel of the Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name John L. Forrest, Jr. Patent Counsel of the Navy Deputy Counsel, Office of Naval Research Office of Naval Research John L. Forrest, Jr., the Patent Counsel of the Navy, is the chief Intellectual. Additional responsibilities include managing the Navy trademark program, the DON patent licensing program

  9. Third party and shared savings contracting in the Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boothe, T.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Every year the Navy spends close to $4 billion for energy. Nearly $1 billion of the $4 billion is spent for energy for Naval bases. The Navy has many programs to reduce shore facilities energy costs, and is starting to use third party and shared savings contracting. Navy experience with these programs is briefly summarized, and examples are given. The Navy's position is that they and the private sector must work together to establish contracting relationships that will continue to reduce Navy costs while providing profitable business opportunities.

  10. Viscosity in modified gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shown that, on the basis of a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found for quantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions may incorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition in the cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided.

  11. Site Name : NAVIDAD Author : D. Carrizo E. Contreras C. Arriagada Site Code : NAVI date : year 08 month 03 day 07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    NAVI 1/6 Site Name : NAVIDAD Author : D. Carrizo ­ E. Contreras ­ C. Arriagada Site Code : NAVI: Alcalde Horacio Maldonado Keys: Margarita Cepeda #12;NAVI 2/6 Receiver: Trimble NetRS S/N: 4723133161 cable. #12;NAVI 3/6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION #12;NAVI 4/6 ACCESS SKETCH MAP #12;NAVI 5/6 #12;NAVI 6/6 SITE

  12. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Patrick Ian (Plano, TX)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  13. Viscosity and Riemann solutions On the Influence of Viscosity on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canic, Suncica

    Viscosity and Riemann solutions On the Influence of Viscosity on Riemann Solutions SunŸcica Ÿ Cani and uniqueness of Riemann solutions are affected by the precise form of viscosity which is used to select shock on viscosity and distinguish between Lax shock waves with and without a profile. These bifurcations

  14. California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Cellana, Inc.'s Kona Demonstration Facility is working...

  15. United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration...

  16. Departments of Energy, Navy, and Agriculture Invest $210 million...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In 2014, the U.S. Departments of Energy, Navy, and Agriculture announced that Emerald Biofuels, Fulcrum Energy, and Red Rock Biofuels have been awarded contracts to construct...

  17. Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview of Recovery Act (ARRA...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act (ARRA) funds received from the Navy, Army and Marines. ARRA funds plus our budget are supporting work ranging from the acquisition and interpretation of geophysical and...

  18. Presentation to the EAC - Philadelphia Navy Yard - Will Agate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    expansion * Incremental build out-PECO 13 KV line extensions Demand Reduction Programs * Demand-response with Navy and large commercial customers * On-site peak generation *...

  19. The Board is a discretionary Federal advisory committee and shall provide independent advice to the Secretary of Defense through the Secretary of the Navy and other Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Secretary of Defense through the Secretary of the Navy and other Navy Component Heads as determined by the Secretary of the Navy on matters relating to the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College, facilities, and other matters of interest. The Board shall report to the Secretary of the Navy, through

  20. ARPA-E 2011 Keynote: Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus addresses the 2nd annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit on the Navy's fuel consumption and successful implementation of biofuels.

  1. Navy 1 Geothermal Area | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural0-2002Valley, Arizona,Navy 1

  2. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  3. Early dissipation and viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bozek

    2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider dissipative phenomena due to the relaxation of an initial anisotropic local pressure in the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both for the Bjorken boost-invariant case and for the azimuthally symmetric radial expansion with boost-invariance. The resulting increase of the entropy can be counterbalanced by a suitable retuning of the initial temperature. An increase of the transverse collective flow is observed. The influence of the shear viscosity on the longitudinal expansion is also studied. Viscosity reduces the cooling rate from the longitudinal work and counteracts the pressure gradients that accelerate the longitudinal flow.

  4. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFfiCE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFfiCE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 2000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON, DC: Chief of Naval Operations Subj , NAVY PASSENGER TRAVEL Ref: (al 000 Di rective 5154.29 of 9 Marc h 1993 on the management , execution, and funding of passenger travel for Navy personne l . This i n struction

  5. The fireship and its role in the Royal Navy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coggeshall, James Lowell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contemporary records which discuss fireships including logs and journals of those who served in the Royal Navy, line drawings, ship models, and other written sources. This thesis will discuss both the specific elements and a general history of modem fireships...

  6. Philadelphia Navy Yard: UESC Project with Philadelphia Gas Works

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—provides information on the Philadelphia Navy Yard's utility energy services contract (UESC) project with Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW).

  7. Energy Department Joins Agriculture and Navy in the Fight for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE, USDA, and Navy are working with private industry to produce advanced drop-in biofuels that can be used by the Department of Defense and the private transportation sector....

  8. U.S. Navy - Moanalua Terrace, Hawaii | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in four phases. The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) 1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction projects was an incentive for the Navy to...

  9. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 4 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Hadder, G.R.; Leiby, P.N.; Lee, R.; Davis, R.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Navy's Maritime Strategy is designed to maintain military readiness and the ability to operate in all major theaters of the world. Mobility fuels required for sea, air, and land operations are vital components of the Navy's peacetime and wartime strategies. The purpose of the Navy's Mobility Fuels Technology Program is to understand fuel supply and fuel property impacts on Navy equipment performance and fleet readiness and operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has assisted the Department of Navy in developing and testing a methodology for forecasting mobility fuel availability, quality, and relative price, as well as evaluating options to increase fuel supplies during world oil supply disruptions. Publicly available models developed by the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy were selected as the foundation of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System (NMFFS). The NMFFS was enhanced as ORNL reviewed data on world oil reserves, production and prices, trends in crude oil and refined product quality, and changes in refinery process technology. The system was used to analyze the availability, quality, and relative price of military fuels that could be produced in several domestic and foreign refining regions under Business-As-Usual (BAU) and two hypothetical world crude oil disruption scenarios in the year 1995. 25 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. U. S. Navy shipboard-generated plastic-waste pilot-recycling program. Research and development report, Apr 90-Jan 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, L.B.; Huntley, J.Y.; Burgiel, J.J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From April 1990 through January 1991, the feasibility of recycling Navy shipboard-generated plastic wastes was explored. Normally, plastic wastes are source separated aboard Navy ships and retained for shoreside disposal in accordance with new fleet requirements implementing MARPOL Annex V that prohibits the discharge of plastics at sea. Over 23,000 pounds of shipboard plastic wastes from USS Lexington (AVT 16) and ships from the Norfolk Naval Base were recycled into park benches, picnic tables and carstops that have been distributed back to the Navy bases for use. Navy shipboard plastics must undergo sorting prior to recycling because Navy plastic waste contains large quantities of composite plastic items (e.g., plastic/paper) that are not easily recyclable. Recycling food-contaminated plastics is not practical due to sanitation problems encountered during handling. However, certain items have good resale value if separated by resin type and color (e.g., sonobuoy casings, hard plastic containers, packaging films). Education, feedback, and command support for shipboard recycling programs are required to ensure maximum participation and to minimize contamination with non-plastic items. Specially marked plastics only containers increase convenience and effectiveness of the recycling program.

  11. Viscosity near phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Probably the most enticing observation in theoretical physics during the last decade was the discovery of the great amount of consequences obtained from the AdS/CFT conjecture put forward by Maldacena. In this work we review how this correspondence can be used to address hydrodynamic properties such as the viscosity of some strongly interacting systems. We also employ the Boltzmann equation for those systems closer to low-energy QCD, and argue that this kind of transport coefficients can be related to phase transitions, in particular the QGP/hadronic phase transition studied in heavy ion collisions.

  12. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Xu

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I report my recent study on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Effects of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied.

  13. Detection of Suspended Sediment Effect on Sidescan Sonar Imagery Using the Navy's CASS-GRAB Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Detection of Suspended Sediment Effect on Sidescan Sonar Imagery Using the Navy's CASS-GRAB Model P of suspended sediment layer can aid the Navy in the detection of mines using the sonar imagery. This study

  14. Fighting engineers : the U.S. Navy and mechanical engineering, 1840-1905

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Brendan Patrick, 1968-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fighting Engineers examines social conflict as the cause of the formation of professional mechanical engineering in the nineteenth century U.S. Navy. In the middle of that century, the Navy began to utilize steam engines ...

  15. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ME2132 - DDO MPS213 MPS213 A Non A Non - - Thermal Plasma Application for the Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy Royal Navy 29 August 2002 29 August 2002 DEER DEER Lt...

  16. Flexibility in early stage design of US Navy ships : an analysis of options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Jonathan (Jonathan Edward)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores design options for naval vessels and provides a framework for analyzing their benefit to the Navy. Future demands on Navy warships, such as new or changing missions and capabilities, are unknowns at ...

  17. TECO BGA Completes Milestone Project for U.S. Navy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossi, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECO BGA completes milestone project for U.S. Navy Matthew Ossi TECO BGA TECO BGA and its affiliate Peoples Gas System teamed with the United States Navy to develop and implement an innovative energy conservation project for the military... and aging steam plant serving the base - began with a contract signing in September 1999. After breaking ground in February 2000, the first new steam plant was on line by August. The existing central steam plant was taken off line the end of that same...

  18. Lyndon Johnson and the navy 1937-1948 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haussman, Harley Russell

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LYNDON JOHNSON AND THE NAVY 1937-1948 A Thesis by HARLEY RUSSELL HAUSSMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1983 Major Subject...: History LYNDON JOHNSON AND THE NAVY 1937-1948 A Thesis by HARLEY RUSSELL HAUSSMAN Approved as to style and content by: Ro rt A. Ca vert (Chairman of Committee) R. J. Adams (Member) Larry D. Hill (Member) H. E. Benton (Member) enry C. Det off...

  19. Idaho, Navy, DOE agree on shipments to, from INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompkins, B.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes aspects of a legal agreement between the U.S. Navy, the state of Idaho, and the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) regarding shipments of radioactive wastes. The agreement will allow for the shipment of 244 spent fuel shipments from the Fort St Vrain facility in Colorado, if a repository or interim storage facility outside Idaho is open and accepting spent fuel from INEL. The number of shipments to the INEL will be limited to 1133, instead of the 1940 originally planned. The Navy will be allowed 575 total shipments through the year 2035.

  20. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 6 report: Impacts of a military disruption on Navy fuel availability and quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Davis, R.M.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Refinery Yield Model of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System has been used to study the impacts of a severe military disruption on the production of Navy JP-5 jet fuel and F-76 marine diesel fuel in the year 1995. The global petroleum supply reduction due to the disruption was about 40 percent of the business-as-usual supply. Regional production cost increases for JP-5 were between $3 and $11 per gallon during the disruption. For F-76, the production cost increases were between $3 and $5 per gallon. The disruption caused substantial degradations for certain fuel quality properties of F-76 produced in the Pacific basin and in southern Europe. During both business-as-usual and disruption, the most prevalent Navy fuel quality problem was F-76 instability due to high levels of light cycle oils. 37 refs., 1 fig., 21 tabs.

  1. 08 September 2014 Judge Navi Pillay to speak on advancing human rights in SA and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    08 September 2014 Judge Navi Pillay to speak on advancing human rights in SA and the world Annual Navanethem (Navi) Pillay ahead of delivering the 15th Annual Steve Biko Memorial Lecture at the University the caste-based system. About Judge Navi Pillay Judge Pillay has had an illustrious career. She became

  2. February 2012 Did you know that the Navy Memorial in Washington D.C. is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2012 004/12 Did you know that the Navy Memorial in Washington D.C. is is honoring all://navymemorial.org/yotc/Home/tabid/224/Default.aspx Challenge to all: in the Navy Log. This is your free opportunity to be entered and activities occurring across our Navy to support YOTC through this Facebook page: http

  3. Premio Perini Navi S.p.A. IL COMITATO LEONARDO ITALIAN QUALIT COMMITTE HA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    1 Premio Perini Navi S.p.A. IL COMITATO LEONARDO ­ ITALIAN QUALITÀ COMMITTE ­ HA DELIBERATO DI DELEGATO DI PERINI NAVI SPA. - ANNO 2011 - "Progetto di un natante ad uso tender per un'imbarcazione a vela dalla direzione della Perini Navi S.p.A. FINALITÀ: Premiare i due migliori progetti relativi ad un

  4. Decreased Funding Reduces Orders Timeline Citing the impact of reduced funding, Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decreased Funding Reduces Orders Timeline Citing the impact of reduced funding, Navy announced Feb that allows for continuous normal operations while a final budget is approved. Navy Personnel Command the orders are released. Navy has utilized this prioritization strategy in previous PCS funding

  5. DCPP Contact Information Assistant for Administration, Office of the Under Secretary of the Navy (AAUSN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DCPP Contact Information Assistant for Administration, Office of the Under Secretary of the Navy (AAUSN) RM 5B546, Pentagon Phone: 703-693-0888 Washington DC 20350-1000 DSN: 223 http://www.donhq.navy-3211 Washington DC 20372-5300 http://www.med.navy.mil/pages/default.aspx Chief of Naval Personnel (OPNAV Staff

  6. Navy aquatic hazardous waste sites: the problem and possible solutions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, R.K.; Wild, W.J.; Richter, K.E.; Lapota, D.; Stang, P.M.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on 367 hazardous waste disposal sites at 58 Navy Marine Corps activities, located in the coastal zone, were reviewed to characterize the contaminants, disposal methods, and potentially impacted environments present at navy aquatic hazardous waste sites. This report identifies Navy aquatic hazardous waste site problems, assesses technology requirements, and describes remedial pilot projects being initiated at impacted aquatic sites.

  7. Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard General of the Air Force/Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard O-10 General of the Air Force/Army (Reserved Corps Navy & Coast Guard WarrantOfficers No Warrant Officer Rank Warrant Officer 1 Chief Warrant Officer Warrant Officer 5 Air Force Army Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard E-9 Chief Master Sergeant of the Air

  8. The Navy released NAVADMIN 406/10, Dec. 17, announcing the creation of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Navy released NAVADMIN 406/10, Dec. 17, announcing the creation of the Information Systems are eligible to request conversion. Information System Technicians (IT) with Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC as an ITS. Applicants are encouraged to speak with a Navy Career Counselor about the conversion process

  9. Dr. John Zangardi, Ph.D. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Command, Control, Communications,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-11 Dr. John Zangardi, Ph.D. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Information Operations and Space Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development & Acquisition) John Zangardi was appointed as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy

  10. Office of the Secretary of the Navy Small and Disadvantaged Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of the Secretary of the Navy Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization 720 Kennon Street SE Room 207 Washington DC 20374-5015 Phone: 202/685-6485 Fax: 202/685-6865 http://www.hq.navy.mil/sadbu What it takes to successfully market your product to the Department of the Navy TEN STEPS TO SUCCESS

  11. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, Thomas H. (Princeton, NJ); Ono, Masayuki (Princeton Junction, NJ)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  12. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. LeStrange

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality.

  13. Cooperative MPC&A Enhancements at Russian Navy Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, N N; O'Shell, P; Hendrickson, S; Sukhoruchkin, V; Antipov, S; Melkhov, E; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N; Yurasov, N

    2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. MPC&A cooperation with the Russian Federation (RF) Navy is based on a Joint Statement signed in 1996 to protect Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fresh fuel used for nuclear propulsion. The Russian Federation Navy is the largest owner in Russia of highly enriched uranium, both in the form of fresh nuclear fuel, and in the form of slightly irradiated fuel with a long cooling time after irradiation. As a result of this agreement, projects began at the Northern Fleet Fresh Fuel Storage Facility (Site 49) and Refueling Ship PM-63. Initial projects provided upgrades for RF Navy HEU fresh fuel storage facilities, beginning with a land-based facility near Murmansk and later adding other land-based and ship-based fresh fuel storage facilities. Additional protocols (December 1997, January 1999, and March 2000) significantly expanded cooperation to include all HEU fuel under RF Navy control. To date, it is estimated that tens of metric tons of HEU have been secured - enough to construct hundreds of nuclear devices. It was determined that the cooperation would be coordinated by the Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute. This paper describes the history of the Program development, its stages, current status, scale of the work and prospects.

  14. Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW) MONTH HE1 HE2 HE3 HE4 HE5 HE6 HE7 HE8 HE9 HE10 HE11 HE12 HE13 HE14 HE15 HE16 HE17 HE18 HE19 HE20 HE21 HE22 HE23 HE24...

  15. Mary E. Lacey Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    working for the Naval Ordnance Laboratory in underwater shock testing and evaluation, advanced weapons systems, firefighting technology and nuclear weapons safety. #12;She earned a bachelor's of science degreeMary E. Lacey Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, Test & Evaluation

  16. Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

  17. Russian Navy fresh fuel MPC and A training and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forehand, H.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rexroth, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dove, A. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Shmelev, V.; Sukhoruchkin, V.; Roumiantsev, A. [Kurchatov Inst. Russian Research Center (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regulations and Training Projects are part of the US-Russian Federation Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) cooperative program to protect Russian Navy Fuels. This paper describes the general status of the projects, progress achieved to date, and long-term plans for further work in producing regulatory documents and training to support this ewffort. The regulatory development will result in a document set that will include general requirements and rules for the Russian Navy MPC&A as well as specific instructions for operation and maintenance of each facility. The goals of the training program are to instill in managers a culture of sustainable commitment to MPC&A through the understanding of its principles and philosophies. In addition, the training program will help ensure that upgrades are effectively utilized and maintained by training operators and maintenance personnel in MPC&A principles as well in as the detailed operations of the systems.

  18. Navy mobility fuels forecasting system. Phase II, report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Vineyard, T.A.; Das, S.; Lee, R.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of the Navy (DON) requires an improved capability to forecast mobility fuel availability and quality. The changing patterns in fuel availability and quality are important in planning the Navy's fuel use strategy and the Mobility Fuels Technology Program. Until recently, there has been a long-term decline in the quality of crude oil entering world markets and a shift in refinery capacities domestically and worldwide. Three publicly available models developed by the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy were selected as the basis of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System (NMFFS). The system was used to analyze the availability and quality of jet fuel (JP-5) and diesel fuel (F-76) that could be produced in several domestic and foreign refinery regions under business-as-usual and four hypothetical world crude oil disruption scenarios in 1990. The results from the study indicate that jet fuel availability could be reduced in some refinery regions under the disruptions studied. Various strategies were investigated for increasing JP-5 production during the disruptions. In general, the availability of JP-5 was more limited than F-76 under the disruption cases studied; however, in all cases one or more strategies were identified to increase refinery output of JP-5 in all study regions. Based on the four hypothetical disruption scenarios studied, the analysis suggested tat JP-5 production could be increased by relaxing the smoke point, freezing point, flash point, and by increasing the refiners' gate price for the jet fuel in the study regions. A more complete analysis of navy mobility fuel trends, as well as several changes in the models to make them easier to use in fuel planning and forecastig studies, are planned as part of the third phase of this program.

  19. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.M.; Hadder, G.R.; Singh, S.P.N.; Whittle, C.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of the Navy (DON) requires an improved capability to forecast mobility fuel availability and quality. The changing patterns in fuel availability and quality are important in planning the Navy's Mobility Fuels R and D Program. These changes come about primarily because of the decline in the quality of crude oil entering world markets as well as the shifts in refinery capabilities domestically and worldwide. The DON requested ORNL's assistance in assembling and testing a methodology for forecasting mobility fuel trends. ORNL reviewed and analyzed domestic and world oil reserve estimates, production and price trends, and recent refinery trends. Three publicly available models developed by the Department of Energy were selected as the basis of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System. The system was used to analyze the availability and quality of jet fuel (JP-5) that could be produced on the West Coast of the United States under an illustrative business-as-usual and a world oil disruption scenario in 1990. Various strategies were investigated for replacing the lost JP-5 production. This exercise, which was strictly a test case for the forecasting system, suggested that full recovery of lost fuel production could be achieved by relaxing the smoke point specifications or by increasing the refiners' gate price for the jet fuel. A more complete analysis of military mobility fuel trends is currently under way.

  20. Charm contribution to bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine; Kiyoumars A. Sohrabi

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the range of temperatures reached in future heavy ion collision experiments, hadronic pair annihilations and creations of charm quarks may take place within the lifetime of the plasma. As a result, charm quarks may increase the bulk viscosity affecting the early stages of hydrodynamic expansion. Assuming thermalization, we estimate the charm contribution to bulk viscosity within the same effective kinetic theory framework in which the light parton contribution has been computed previously. The time scale at which this physics becomes relevant is related to the width of the transport peak associated with the trace anomaly correlator, and is found to be 600 MeV.

  1. Shear Viscosity of Quark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Alberico; S. Chiacchiera; H. Hansen; A. Molinari; M. Nardi

    2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the shear viscosity of a system of quarks and its ratio to the entropy density above the critical temperature for deconfinement. Both quantities are derived and computed for different modeling of the quark self-energy, also allowing for a temperature dependence of the effective mass and width. The behaviour of the viscosity and the entropy density is argued in terms of the strength of the coupling and of the main characteristics of the quark self-energy. A comparison with existing results is also discussed.

  2. Viscosity and dissipation - early stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bozek

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A very early start up time of the hydrodynamic evolution is needed in order to reproduce observations from relativistic heavy-ion collisions experiments. At such early times the systems is still not locally equilibrated. Another source of deviations from local equilibrium is the viscosity of the fluid. We study these effects at very early times to obtain a dynamical prescription for the transition from an early 2-dimensional expansion to a nearly equilibrated 3-dimensional expansion at latter stages. The role of viscosity at latter stages of the evolution is also illustrated.

  3. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Wiranata; M. Prakash

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature arise from particles which are neither extremely nonrelativistic nor extremely relativistic. Numerical results for a model binary mixture are reported.

  4. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 5 report: Impacts of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel production on Navy fuel availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Domingo, N.; Davis, R.M.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legislation for ultra low sulfur (ULS) diesel fuel, with a greatly reduced allowable sulfur content and a new limit on aromatics content, is expected to be in place by 1995. The ULS diesel fuel has been specified to satisfy national standards for particulate emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. The economic and engineering models of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System have been used to study the impacts of ULS diesel fuel production on other refined petroleum products, with emphasis on the quality of Navy mobility fuels. The study predicts that to produce ULS diesel fuel, Gulf and West Coast refiners will have to invest about $4.4 billion in new processing capacity. Refiners will shift aromatics from No. 2 diesel fuel to jet fuel and to No. 2 fuel oil. Therefore, particulate emissions could be transferred from the nation's highways to the airways and to communities which use No. 2 fuel oil for residential and commercial heating. The study also predicts that there will be an increase in the aromatics content of domestically produced Navy JP-5 jet fuel and F-76 marine diesel fuel. The gum-forming tendencies of F-76 an F-77 burner fuel oil will increase in most cases. The freezing point of JP-5 will improve. There will be minor changes in the cost of JP-5, but sizable reductions in the cost of F-76 and F-77. 20 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

  5. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  6. Bulk viscosity and deflationary universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; R. Portugal; I. Waga

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the conditions that make possible the description of entropy generation in the new inflationary model by means of a nearequilibrium process. We show that there are situations in which the bulk viscosity cannot describe particle production during the coherent field oscillations phase.

  7. Viscosity of black liquor project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrall, G.A.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discussion of magnetic resonance in this report is confined to nuclides with a spin quantum number of 1/2. Included is a basic discussion of magnetic resonance; magnetic resonance relaxation and viscosity; and rhometers and viscometers. Many other effects are ignored for the sake of clarity.

  8. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessment was completed with an objective of demonstrating the applicability of wave power for use at US Navy bases worldwide. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 1 Device Nameplate...

  9. Shear viscosity of the quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaharu Iwasaki; Hiromasa Ohnishi; Takahiko Fukutome

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss shear viscosity of the quark matter by using Kubo formula. The shear viscosity is calculated in the framework of the quasi-particle RPA for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We obtain a formula that the shear viscosity is expressed by the quadratic form of the quark spectral function in the chiral symmetric phase. The magnitude of the shear viscosity is discussed assuming the Breit-Wigner type for the spectral function.

  10. Optimization Online - AN ASYMPTOTIC VISCOSITY SELECTION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boushra Abbas

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 29, 2015 ... AN ASYMPTOTIC VISCOSITY SELECTION RESULT FOR THE REGULARIZED NEWTON DYNAMIC. Boushra Abbas(abbas.boushra ***at*** ...

  11. Viscosity Measurement G.E. Leblanc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    30 Viscosity Measurement G.E. Leblanc McMaster University R.A. Secco The University of Western Ontario 30.1 Shear Viscosity ............................................................. 30-l Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluids l Dimensions and Units of Viscosity l Viscometer Types l Capillary M. Kostic

  12. Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

  13. VISCOSITY IN ACCRETION DISKS PAUL J. WIITA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiita, Paul J.

    VISCOSITY IN ACCRETION DISKS PAUL J. WIITA Department of Physics & Astronomy, Georgia State University Atlanta, Georgia, USA Abstract. Various proposals and prescriptions for the viscosity in accretion a solution to this difficult problem. 1. Introduction The nature of the viscosity within accretion disks

  14. Nuclear Navy Turns 50 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /76 Los Alamos NationalNuclearNavy

  15. Navy Catching Waves in Hawaii | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural0-2002Valley, Arizona,Navy

  16. Navy's Section 2922a Legislation Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of EnergyofPROTECTINGofNavy's Section 2922a Legislation

  17. Effective Viscosity of Confined Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Sivebaek; V. N. Samoilov; B. N. J. Persson

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity \\mu eff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log(effective viscosity) = C - n log (shear rate), where n varies from 1 (solidlike friction) at very low temperatures to 0 (Newtonian liquid) at very high temperatures, following an inverse sigmoidal curve. Only the shortest chain molecules melt, whereas the longer ones only show a softening in the studied temperature interval 0 < T < 900 K. The results are important for the frictional properties of very thin (nanometer) films and to estimate their thermal durability.

  18. Hall viscosity from gauge/gravity duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omid Saremi; Dam Thanh Son

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In (2+1)-dimensional systems with broken parity, there exists yet another transport coefficient, appearing at the same order as the shear viscosity in the hydrodynamic derivative expansion. In condensed matter physics, it is referred to as "Hall viscosity". We consider a simple holographic realization of a (2+1)-dimensional isotropic fluid with broken spatial parity. Using techniques of fluid/gravity correspondence, we uncover that the holographic fluid possesses a nonzero Hall viscosity, whose value only depends on the near-horizon region of the background. We also write down a Kubo's formula for the Hall viscosity. We confirm our results by directly computing the Hall viscosity using the formula.

  19. Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Navy's involvement in the Vietnam War, especially its role in the region's inland waterways, has long been an overshadowed aspect of the conflict. Most histories ignore or minimize the Navy's contribution, especially its river...

  20. "The Fourth Dimension of Naval Tactics": The U.S. Navy and Public Relations, 1919-1939 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadle, Ryan David

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1917, the United States Navy only utilized public relations techniques during times of war or to attract recruits into naval service. Following World I, the Navy confronted several daunting problems, including the ...

  1. User data package for implementation of electrolytic recovery technology in Navy electroplating shops. Final report, March 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, K.; Koff, J.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY94 the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) completed tests on three electrolytic recovery systems used for the recovery of metals and destruction of cyanide from electroplating wastewaters. Field testing and evaluation was conducted at NSY Norfolk, NAWC Indianapolis, and NADEP Cherry Pt. for five metal recovery applications: silver cyanide, copper cyanide, acid copper, electroless nickel, and tin-lead fluoborate. Advanced design features for metal recovery, including enhanced fluidized circulation, specialized oxidizing anodes, and high porous surface area cathodes were evaluated to optimize performance. NFESC demonstrated that electrolytic recovery systems can be adapted for effective use in the Navy plating operations where production is often sporadic as contrasted to industrial plating processes. The electrolytic recovery units removed metal ions from the rinsewater to below 1 ppm for each application. Electrowinning, as an alternative technology, can reduce industrial waste treatment costs and hazardous sludge generated from conventional treatment This User Data Package (UDP) covers the design, operational and maintenance requirements for these electrolytic systems. This UDP will be applicable to small Navy plating shops where closed-loop waste recycling and point source minimization is necessary for environmental compliance and cost competitiveness.

  2. United States navy fleet problems and the development of carrier aviation, 1929-1933 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadle, Ryan David

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Navy first took official notice of aviation in 1910, but its development of carrier aviation lagged behind Great Britain??s until the 1920s. The first American aircraft carrier, the Langley, commissioned in 1919, provided the Navy with a...

  3. Cylindrical Equidis LAMONT (LDEO) WOODS HOLE O.I. NOAA U.HAWAII SOEST US NAVY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOLE O.I. NOAA U.HAWAII SOEST US NAVY SCRIPPS INST.OC U RHODE ISLAND RUSSIA US COAST GUARD GERMANY US NOAA 330 415326 415326 0 0 0 0 1932257 U.HAWAII SOEST 1 5873 5319 3992 5387 0 0 69927 US NAVY 3 3486

  4. JSHSENSURING A FUTURE FOR SCIENCE The Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, sponsored by the US Army/Navy/Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    Army/Navy/Air Force and Loyola University Chicago is introducing an e-mentoring program for students

  5. Dual-fuel engine conversions evaluated by U.S. Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In seeking ways to reduce emissions from two-stroke locomotive type engines, the Navy has evaluated dual-fuel conversions operating on a compression ignition cycle, using up to 94% natural gas and 6% diesel pilot fuel. The Navy has conducted an evaluation and test program under the direction of Dr. Normnn L. Helgeson, at the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center in Port Hueneme, California. Of the Navy`s many diesel engines, those installed in its MUSE (mobile utility support equipment) units for temporary electrical power were the first Navy off-road engines to be affected by emissions regulations. Most of the units are powered by the EMD 645 engine, and when burning diesel fuel do not meet the emission requirements in many areas of the country. This paper discusses the changes and results of the conversion and shakedown tests.

  6. Treatment technologies for hazardous ashes generated from possible incineration of navy waste. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy recognizes that thermal treatment of Navy hazardous wastes (HW) should, under the terms of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, be avoided. Combustion waste disposal may nonetheless become unavoidable in certain cases, even after all possible process enhancements that avoid HW production are implemented. Even then, some toxic constituents that may be present in the waste will not be destroyed by incineration and will persist in the ash residue produced by incineration. Such incinerator ashes will have to be disposed of in HW landfills. The Navy is thus evaluating methods of treatment of such ash to remove or immobilize the toxic constituents that persist following incineration in order to render the waste treatment residue nonhazardous. Appropriate technology identified in this work can be applied to ash produced by HW combuster operated by the Navy, if any, or be required for ash produced by commercial generators handling Navy HWs.

  7. A First-Order Stochastic Prognostic System for the Diagnosis of Helicopter Rotor Systems for the US Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luger, George

    Navy Chayan Chakrabarti, Roshan Rammohan, and George F. Luger {cc | roshan | luger} @cs a diagnostic system for the US Navy to use in the analysis of the "running health" of helicopter rotor systems the data sets of actual helicopter rotor failures supplied by the US Navy. We discuss both critical

  8. Communication POC: Linda Dent-Mitchell 202-685-6181 Linda.dent-mitchell@navy.mil October 16, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCHR NEWS Communication POC: Linda Dent-Mitchell 202-685-6181 Linda.dent-mitchell@navy.mil October careers with the Department of the Navy (DON). "Civilian careers provide opportunities to tackle;OCHR NEWS Communication POC: Linda Dent-Mitchell 202-685-6181 Linda.dent-mitchell@navy.mil October 16

  9. Bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Noronha-Hostler; J. Noronha; F. Grassi

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between shear and bulk viscosities on the flow harmonics, $v_n$'s, at RHIC is investigated using the newly developed relativistic 2+1 hydrodynamical code v-USPhydro that includes bulk and shear viscosity effects both in the hydrodynamic evolution and also at freeze-out. While shear viscosity is known to attenuate the flow harmonics, we find that the inclusion of bulk viscosity decreases the shear viscosity-induced suppression of the flow harmonics bringing them closer to their values in ideal hydrodynamical calculations. Depending on the value of the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\zeta/s$, in the quark-gluon plasma, the bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics may require a re-evaluation of the previous estimates of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, of the quark-gluon plasma previously extracted by comparing hydrodynamic calculations to heavy ion data.

  10. Viscosity of a nucleonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of nucleonic matter is studied both classically and in a quantum mechanical description. The collisions between particles are modeled as hard sphere scattering as a baseline for comparison and as scattering from an attractive square well potential. Properties associated with the unitary limit are developed which are shown to be approximately realized for a system of neutrons. The issue of near perfect fluid behavior of neutron matter is remarked on. Using some results from hard sphere molecular dynamics studies near perfect fluid behavior is discussed further.

  11. Holographic Viscosity of Fundamental Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Mateos; Robert C. Myers; Rowan M. Thomson

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(N_c) gauge theory with a small number of flavours N_f viscosity to entropy ratio in these theories saturates the conjectured universal bound eta/s >= 1/4\\pi. The contribution of the fundamental matter eta_fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta_fund ~ lambda N_c N_f T^3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential.

  12. Effective viscosity of microswimmer suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salima Rafai; Levan Jibuti; Philippe Peyla

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile micro-algae (\\textit{Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii}) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells and suspensions show shear thinning behaviour. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  13. Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

  14. RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of...

  15. AN ASYMPTOTIC VISCOSITY SELECTION RESULT FOR THE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 29, 2015 ... viscosity selection properties for the regularized Newton dynamic governed by ?. Let us first recall some basic facts about this dynamical ...

  16. Bulk viscosity in kaon condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debarati Chatterjee; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of $K^-$ condensed matter on bulk viscosity and r-mode instability in neutron stars. The bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic process $n \\rightleftharpoons p + K^-$ is studied here. In this connection, equations of state are constructed within the framework of relativistic field theoretical models where nucleon-nucleon and kaon-nucleon interactions are mediated by the exchange of scalar and vector mesons. We find that the bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic weak process in the condensate is suppressed by several orders of magnitude. Consequently, kaon bulk viscosity may not damp the r-mode instability in neutron stars.

  17. Hyperon bulk viscosity in strong magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Sinha; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the bulk viscosity of neutron star matter including $\\Lambda$ hyperons in the presence of quantizing magnetic fields. Relaxation time and bulk viscosity due to both the non-leptonic weak process involving $\\Lambda$ hyperons and direct Urca processes are calculated here. In the presence of a strong magnetic field of $10^{17}$ G, the hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient is reduced whereas bulk viscosity coefficients due to direct Urca processes are enhanced compared with their field free cases when many Landau levels are populated by protons, electrons and muons.

  18. Development of an energy-use estimation methodology for the revised Navy Manual MO-303

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Wood, A.G.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Navy commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to revise and/or update the Navy Utilities Targets Manual, NAVFAC MO-303 (U.S. Navy 1972b). The purpose of the project was to produce a current, applicable, and easy-to-use version of the manual for use by energy and facility engineers and staff at all Navy Public Works Centers (PWCs), Public Works Departments (PWDs), Engineering Field Divisions (EFDs), and other related organizations. The revision of the MO-303 manual involved developing a methodology for estimating energy consumption in buildings and ships. This methodology can account for, and equitably allocate, energy consumption within Navy installations. The analyses used to develop this methodology included developing end-use intensities (EUIs) from a vast collection of Navy base metering and billing data. A statistical analysis of the metering data, weather data, and building energy-use characteristics was used to develop appropriate EUI values for use at all Navy bases. A complete Navy base energy reconciliation process was also created for use in allocating all known energy consumption. Initial attempts to use total Navy base consumption values did not produce usable results. A parallel effort using individual building consumption data provided an estimating method that incorporated weather effects. This method produced a set of building EUI values and weather adjustments for use in estimating building energy use. A method of reconciling total site energy consumption was developed based on a {open_quotes}zero-sum{close_quotes} principle. This method provides a way to account for all energy use and apportion part or all of it to buildings and other energy uses when actual consumption is not known. The entire text of the manual was also revised to present a more easily read understood and usable document.

  19. Dual-Fuel Combustion Turbine Provides Reliable Power to U.S. Navy Submarine Base New London in Groton, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In keeping with a long-standing tradition of running Base utilities as a business, the U.S. Navy Submarine Base New London installed a dual-fuel combustion turbine with a heat recovery boiler. The 5-megawatt (MW) gas- and oil-fired combustion turbine sits within the Lower Base area, just off the shores of the Thames River. The U.S. Navy owns, operates, and maintains the combined heat and power (CHP) plant, which provides power to the Navy?s nuclear submarines when they are in port and to the Navy?s training facilities at the Submarine Base. Heat recovered from the turbine is used to produce steam for use in Base housing, medical facilities, and laundries. In FY00, the Navy estimates that it will save over $500,000 per year as a result of the combined heat and power unit.

  20. Navy precision optical interferometer measurements of 10 stellar oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas; Schmitt, Henrique R. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Benson, James A.; Zavala, R. T. [U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, AZ 86001 (United States); Van Belle, Gerard T., E-mail: ellyn.baines@nrl.navy.mil [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer, we measured the angular diameters of 10 stars that have previously measured solar-like oscillations. Our sample covered a range of evolutionary stages but focused on evolved subgiant and giant stars. We combined our angular diameters with Hipparcos parallaxes to determine the stars' physical radii, and used photometry from the literature to calculate their bolometric fluxes, luminosities, and effective temperatures. We then used our results to test the scaling relations used by asteroseismology groups to calculate radii and found good agreement between the radii measured here and the radii predicted by stellar oscillation studies. The precision of the relations is not as well constrained for giant stars as it is for less evolved stars.

  1. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 5 report: Jet fuel conversion by Pacific fuel suppliers and impacts on Navy fuel availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Domingo, N.; Davis, R.M.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NATO members have made the commitment to convert land-based jet aircraft from naphtha-type JP-4 jet fuel to kerosene-type JP-8. JP-8 has safety advantages because of its relatively low volatility. With the NATO conversion underway, the US military has conducted market surveys to determine the effects of jet fuel conversion in the Pacific basin. This report describes the application of the economic and engineering models of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System to predict the effects of jet fuel conversion in the Pacific basin. The primary objective of the study was to estimate the impacts of conversion on the cost and quality of Navy jet and marine fuels. The study predicts that the average cost increase for producing JP-8 instead of JP-4 is 5 cents per gallon. The associated cost increases for Navy fuels are 0.4 cents per gallon for JP-5 jet fuel; 0.2 cents per gallon for F-76 marine diesel fuel; and 0.4 cents per gallon for F-77 burner fuel oil. Conversion has little effect on the quality of Navy fuels. With or without conversion, the study predicts that Navy fuels produced in the US West Coast could have increased tendencies to form gums and other particulates, with potentially adverse impacts on storage stability. 22 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Shear viscosity of pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiji Nakano

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using chiral perturbation theory we investigate the QCD shear viscosity ($\\eta $) to entropy density ($s$) ratio below the deconfinement temperature ($\\sim 170$ MeV) with zero baryon number density. It is found that $\\eta /s$ of QCD is monotonically decreasing in temperature ($T$) and reaches 0.6 with estimated $\\sim 50%$ uncertainty at T=120 MeV. A naive extrapolation of the leading order result shows that $\\eta /s$ reaches the $1/4\\pi $ minimum bound proposed by Kovtun, Son, and Starinets using string theory methods at $T\\sim 210$ MeV. This suggests a phase transition or cross over might occur at $T\\lesssim 210$ MeV in order for the bound to remain valid. Also, it is natural for $\\eta /s$ to stay close to the minimum bound around the phase transition temperature as was recently found in heavy ion collisions.

  3. The politics of innovative military doctrine : the U.S. Navy and fleet ballistic missiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote, Owen R., 1960-

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Polaris and Trident II SLBM weapon systems were developed by the U.S. Navy during periods of major strategic nuclear modernization, when national leaders were concerned about the vulnerability of U.S. Air Force land ...

  4. An integrated electric plant control architecture for future navy surface combatants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Stephen Ebert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emphasis by the U.S. Navy on the survivability of its warships' electric plants has prompted the investigation into unconventional control and protection systems. Working from a baseline electric plant configuration, the traditional independent...

  5. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002deerhughes3.pdf...

  6. Evaluation of non-intrusive monitoring for condition based maintenance applications on US Navy propulsion plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene, William C. (William Calvin)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis explores the use of the Non-intrusive Load Monitor (NILM) in Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) applications on US Navy ships as part of the Office of Naval Research Electric Ship Integration (ESI) Initiative. ...

  7. Cost prediction via quantitative analysis of complexity in U.S. Navy shipbuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Aaron T. (Aaron Travis)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the sophistication and technology of ships increases, U.S. Navy shipbuilding must be an effective and cost-efficient acquirer of technology-dense one-of-a-kind ships all while meeting significant cost and schedule ...

  8. Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawks, Matthew Arthur

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval ...

  9. H.M.S. Pallas: historical reconstruction of an 18th-century Royal Navy frigate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Peter Erik

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1998 joint survey undertaken by the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and Portuguese authorities located and identified the sunken remains of the Royal Navy frigate HMS Pallas (1757-1783) off of the Azorean island of ...

  10. Jack N. Summe Director, Navy Insider Threat to Cyber Security (ITCS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack N. Summe Director, Navy Insider Threat to Cyber Security (ITCS) Mr. Jack Summe currently Psychological Operations Group (Airborne) from 2003-2005. A native of Warsaw, Indiana, he holds a bachelor

  11. U.S. Navy - San Clemente Island, California | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    San Clemente Island, California U.S. Navy - San Clemente Island, California Photo of Wind Turbine on San Clemente Island, California San Clemente Island is one of the Channel...

  12. 46.1 Shear Viscosity An important mechanical property of fluids is viscosity. Physical systems and applications as diverse as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    46-1 46.1 Shear Viscosity An important mechanical property of fluids is viscosity. Physical systems involve fluid flow and are controlled to some degree by fluid viscosity. Viscosity is the tendency, viscosity is related to molecular dif- fusion and depends on the interactions between molecules or

  13. VISCOSITY AND RELAXATION APPROXIMATIONS FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS OF CONSERVATION LAWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    VISCOSITY AND RELAXATION APPROXIMATIONS FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS OF CONSERVATION LAWS Athanasios E. Tzavaras Abstract. These lecture notes deal with the approximation of conservation laws via viscosity or relaxation. The following topics are covered: The general structure of viscosity and relaxation

  14. VISCOSITY AND RELAXATION APPROXIMATIONS FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS OF CONSERVATION LAWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    VISCOSITY AND RELAXATION APPROXIMATIONS FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS deal with the approximation of conservation * *laws via viscosity or relaxation. The following topics are covered: The general structure of viscosity and relaxation approximations is discu

  15. Shear viscosity in neutron star cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity $\\eta = \\eta_{e\\mu}+\\eta_{n}$ in a neutron star core composed of nucleons, electrons and muons ($\\eta_{e\\mu}$ being the electron-muon viscosity, mediated by collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles, and $\\eta_{n}$ the neutron viscosity, mediated by neutron-neutron and neutron-proton collisions). Deriving $\\eta_{e\\mu}$, we take into account the Landau damping in collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles via the exchange of transverse plasmons. It lowers $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and leads to the non-standard temperature behavior $\\eta_{e\\mu}\\propto T^{-5/3}$. The viscosity $\\eta_{n}$ is calculated taking into account that in-medium effects modify nucleon effective masses in dense matter. Both viscosities, $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and $\\eta_{n}$, can be important, and both are calculated including the effects of proton superfluidity. They are presented in the form valid for any equation of state of nucleon dense matter. We analyze the density and temperature dependence of $\\eta$ for different equations of state in neutron star cores, and compare $\\eta$ with the bulk viscosity in the core and with the shear viscosity in the crust.

  16. A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles A new method for measuring the viscosity of nanoparticles Released: March 31, 2013 First direct determination of the...

  17. The Bulk Viscosity of a Pion Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egang Lu; Guy D. Moore

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of pion mass, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity zeta ~ (F_0^8/m_\\pi^5) exp(2m_\\pi/T), where F_0 = 93 MeV is the pion decay constant.

  18. Shear Viscosity from Effective Couplings of Gravitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Gen Cai; Zhang-Yu Nie; Ya-Wen Sun

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity of field theories with gravity duals using Kubo-formula by calculating the Green function of dual transverse gravitons and confirm that the value of the shear viscosity is fully determined by the effective coupling of transverse gravitons on the horizon. We calculate the effective coupling of transverse gravitons for Einstein and Gauss-Bonnet gravities coupled with matter fields, respectively. Then we apply the resulting formula to the case of AdS Gauss-Bonnet gravity with $F^4$ term corrections of Maxwell field and discuss the effect of $F^4$ terms on the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density.

  19. Bulk viscosity of N=2* plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel; Chris Pagnutti

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study the bulk viscosity of strongly coupled, mass deformed SU(N_c) N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, also known as N=2^* gauge theory. For a wide range of masses we confirm the bulk viscosity bound proposed in arXiv:0708.3459. For a certain choice of masses, the theory undergoes a phase transition with divergent specific heat c_V ~ |1-T_c/T|^(-1/2). We show that, although bulk viscosity rapidly grows as T -> T_c, it remains finite in the vicinity of the critical point.

  20. Bulk viscosity effects on elliptic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. S. Denicol; T. Kodama; T. Koide; Ph. Mota

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of bulk viscosity on the elliptic flow $v_{2}$ are studied using realistic equation of state and realistic transport coefficients. We find that thebulk viscosity acts in a non trivial manner on $v_{2}$. At low $p_{T}$, the reduction of $v_{2}$ is even more effective compared to the case of shear viscosity, whereas at high $p_{T}$, an enhancement of $v_{2}$ compared to the ideal case is observed. We argue that this is caused by the competition of the critical behavior of the equation of state and the transport coefficients.

  1. Shear viscosity of $?$-stable nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Benhar; Arianna Carbone

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscosity plays a critical role in determining the stability of rotating neutron stars. We report the results of a calculation of the shear viscosity of $\\beta$~-~stable matter, carried out using an effective interaction based on a state-of-the-art nucleon-nucleon potential and the formalism of correlated basis functions. Within our approach the equation of state, determining the proton fraction, and the nucleon-nucleon scattering probability are consistently obtained from the same dynamical model. The results show that, while the neutron contribution to the viscosity is always dominant, above nuclear saturation density the electron contribution becomes appreciable.

  2. Diesel fuel to dc power: Navy & Marine Corps Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomfield, D.P. [Analytic Power Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year Analytic Power has tested fuel cell stacks and diesel fuel processors for US Navy and Marine Corps applications. The units are 10 kW demonstration power plants. The USN power plant was built to demonstrate the feasibility of diesel fueled PEM fuel cell power plants for 250 kW and 2.5 MW shipboard power systems. We designed and tested a ten cell, 1 kW USMC substack and fuel processor. The complete 10 kW prototype power plant, which has application to both power and hydrogen generation, is now under construction. The USN and USMC fuel cell stacks have been tested on both actual and simulated reformate. Analytic Power has accumulated operating experience with autothermal reforming based fuel processors operating on sulfur bearing diesel fuel, jet fuel, propane and natural gas. We have also completed the design and fabrication of an advanced regenerative ATR for the USMC. One of the significant problems with small fuel processors is heat loss which limits its ability to operate with the high steam to carbon ratios required for coke free high efficiency operation. The new USMC unit specifically addresses these heat transfer issues. The advances in the mill programs have been incorporated into Analytic Power`s commercial units which are now under test.

  3. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiczer, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Cernosek, Richard W. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Gebert, Charles T. (Albuquerque, NM); Casaus, Leonard (Bernalillo, NM); Mitchell, Mary A. (Tijeras, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  4. Factors affecting viscosity changes in corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGill, Kendra Louise

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heating rate, holding temperature and CMC. Differences were found to exist between meals from different crop years which were not attributable to particle size. When tested at 13, 15 and 17% solids, new meal consistently developed viscosity earliest...

  5. Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbour, J.R.

    2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

  6. Viscosity and jet quenching from holographic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-hong Gao; Wei-shui Xu; Ding-fang Zeng

    2007-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the backreaction of the fundamental flavor degrees of freedom on the AdS$_5$-Schwarz background, and calculate their contributions to the shear viscosity and jet-quenching parameter of the thermal quark-gluon plasma.

  7. Viscosity at RHIC: Theory and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic behavior and the associated discussions of viscosity at RHIC has inspired a r enaissance in modeling viscous hydrodynamics. An explanation of Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics is presented here, with an emphasis on the tangible benefits compared to Navier Stokes.

  8. Randall-Sundrum model with $?viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Lepe; Francisco Peña; Joel Saavedra

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of the inclusion of bulk brane viscosity on brane world (BW) cosmology in the framework of the Eckart's theory, we focus in the Randall-Sundrum model with negative tension on the brane.

  9. Tsunamis, Viscosity and the HBT Puzzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The equation of state and bulk and shear viscosities are shown to be able to affect the transverse dynamics of a central heavy ion collision. The net entropy, along with the femtoscopic radii are shown to be affected at the 10-20% level by both shear and bulk viscosity. The degree to which these effects help build a tsunami-like pulse is also discussed.

  10. Viscosity anomaly in core-softened liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. D. Fomin; V. N. Ryzhov

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present article presents a molecular dynamics study of several anomalies of core-softened systems. It is well known that many core-softened liquids demonstrate diffusion anomaly. Usual intuition relates the diffusion coefficient to shear viscosity via Stockes-Einstein relation. However, it can break down at low temperature. In this respect it is important to see if viscosity also demonstrates anomalous behavior.

  11. Shear viscosity of hadronic gas mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Itakura; O. Morimatsu; H. Otomo

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of baryon chemical potential \\mu on the shear viscosity coefficient \\eta and the viscosity to entropy density ratio \\eta/s of a pion-nucleon gas mixture. We find that \\eta is an increasing function of T and \\mu, while the ratio \\eta/s turns to a decreasing function in a wide region of T-\\mu plane. In the kinematical region we studied, the smallest value of \\eta/s is about 0.3.

  12. Shear viscosity of degenerate electron matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the partial electron shear viscosity $\\eta_{ee}$ limited by electron-electron collisions in a strongly degenerate electron gas taking into account the Landau damping of transverse plasmons. The Landau damping strongly suppresses $\\eta_{ee}$ in the domain of ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and modifies its %asymptotic temperature behavior. The efficiency of the electron shear viscosity in the cores of white dwarfs and envelopes of neutron stars is analyzed.

  13. High-Temperature Viscosity Of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; See, Clem A.; Lam, Oanh P.; Minister, Kevin B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscosity was measured for six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Viscosity data were obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900°C and 1550°C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. Arrhenius coefficients were calculated for individual glasses and linear models were applied to relate them to the mass fractions of 11 major components (SiO2, CaO, Na2O, Al2O3, B2O3, BaO, SrO, K2O, MgO, PbO, and ZrO2) and 12 minor components (Fe2O3, ZnO, Li2O, TiO2, CeO2, F, Sb2O3, Cr2O3, As2O3, MnO2, SO3, and Co3O4). The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100°C to 1550°C and viscosity range from 10 to 400 Pa?s.

  14. High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

  15. Entropy viscosity Jean-Luc Guermond, B. Popov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    Entropy viscosity Jean-Luc Guermond, B. Popov Department of Mathematics Texas A&M University-Luc Guermond, B. Popov Residual/Entropy viscosity #12;Acknowledgments Collaborator: Richard Pasquetti, Univ/Entropy viscosity #12;Outline 1 TRANSPORT EQUATION Jean-Luc Guermond, B. Popov Residual/Entropy viscosity #12

  16. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS TO DEGENERATE COMPLEX MONGE-AMP`ERE EQUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS TO DEGENERATE COMPLEX MONGE-AMP`ERE EQUATIONS PHILIPPE EYSSIDIEUX, VINCENT an alternative approach based on the concept of viscosity solutions and compare systematically viscosity concepts PDE approach to second-order degenerate elliptic equations is the method of viscosity solutions

  17. Summertime Influence of SST on Surface Wind Stress off the U.S. West Coast from the U.S. Navy COAMPS Model*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Summertime Influence of SST on Surface Wind Stress off the U.S. West Coast from the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division, Monterey, CA 93943- 5502. E-mail: haack@nrlmry.navy

  18. An emissions database for U. S. Navy and Air Force aircraft engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, H,B.; Platt, M. (Northern Research and Engineering Corp., Woburn, MA (USA)); Klarman, A.F. (Naval Air Propulsion Test Center, Trenton, NJ (USA). Propulsion Technology and Project Engineering Dept.); Smith, M.D. (Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall AFB, FL (USA))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the U. S., the pollutant emissions at Navy and Air Force airbases are not regulated by civil law. However, there is a desire to be a good neighbor to the local population. On the other hand, military engine test facilities are designated as ground emission sources which are subject to civil air quality regulations. Both situations contribute to a Navy and Air Force requirement for the generation of air quality scenarios, which in turn requires ready access to engine emissions data. The Navy, with Air Force cooperation, has sponsored a program to develop an engine emissions database system tailored to their requirements, for use on a microcomputer. The resulting database is described by the authors. It contains all of the available emissions data, as well as background information on each engine model and the conditions for each test.

  19. Hall viscosity to entropy ratio in higher derivative theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibakar Roychowdhury

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper based on the basic principles of gauge/gravity duality we compute the hall viscosity to entropy ratio in the presence of various higher derivative corrections to the dual gravitational description embedded in an asymptotically $ AdS_{4} $ space time. As the first step of our analysis, considering the back reaction we impose higher derivative corrections to the abelian gauge sector of the theory where we notice that the ratio indeed gets corrected at the leading order in the coupling. Considering the probe limit as a special case we compute this leading order correction over the fixed background of the charged black brane solution. Finally we consider higher derivative ($ R^{2} $) correction to the gravity sector of the theory where we notice that the above ratio might get corrected at the sixth derivative level.

  20. The Analysis and Conservation of Two 18-pounder Carronades from the U.S. Navy Schooner Shark 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajdek, Brennan P.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .S. Navy schooner built at the Washington Navy Yard in 1821. During its 25-year career, Shark spent 18 years operating in the Atlantic Ocean suppressing piracy in the West Indies and the slave trade off the western coast of Africa. The schooner was also...

  1. Lowering kraft black liquor viscosity of ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, M.K.; Violette, D.A.; Woerner, D.L.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High viscosity is a major factor limiting the percentage total dissolved solids (%TDS) to which kraft black liquor (KBL), a spent pulping liquor, can be concentrated before it is burned to recover its fuel value and its inorganic chemicals. The effect on black liquor viscosity of removing high molecular weight lignin by ultrafiltration of 16% and 24% TDS liquors was studied. Viscosities of ultrafiltration permeates were reduced relative to feed black liquors. When a permeate was concentrated to higher %TDS levels, its viscosity decreased yet further relative to feed samples evaporated to similar solids levels. Retentate viscosity was very high relative to both feed and permeate. Ultrafiltration was carried out at 75/degrees/C using polysulfone membranes in a plate-and-frame or hollow fiber system. Flux rates varied greatly depending upon the specific liquor used. Flux was enhanced by increased temperature and increased linear velocity. The membrane molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) typically used was 50,000; increasing 100,000 or 200,000 did not enhance flux.

  2. Electric Demand Reduction for the U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the profitability of operating a Navy ship's generators (in San Diego) during high electricity price periods rather than the ships hooking up to the Base electrical system for power. Profitability is predicated on the trade-off between the operating and maintenance cost incurred by the Navy for operating the ship generators and the net profit associated with the sale of the electric power on the spot market. In addition, PNNL assessed the use of the ship's generators as a means to achieve predicted load curtailments, which can then be marketed to the California Independent System Operator.

  3. Navy Veteran Back to Work on the Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverview | Department of1-93 July 1993 Change NoticeNationalNavyNavy

  4. Predicting viscosities of aqueous salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscosity plays an important role in quantifying heat and mass transfer rates as depicted in theoretical and semi-empirical correlations. In practical problems where extreme temperatures and solute concentrations are encountered, viscosity data is usually unavailable. At these conditions, no dependable correlation appears to exist in the literature. This paper uses the hole type model to predict the viscosity of aqueous electrolytes containing single and mixed salts up to the molten salt regime. This model needs two parameters which can be evaluated from sparse data. For LiBr/water and (Li, K, na) NO[sub 3]/water mixtures, it is shown that the agreement between predicted and experimental values is very good over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The deviation between these two values was found to be less than 9%.

  5. Predicting viscosities of aqueous salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscosity plays an important role in quantifying heat and mass transfer rates as depicted in theoretical and semi-empirical correlations. In practical problems where extreme temperatures and solute concentrations are encountered, viscosity data is usually unavailable. At these conditions, no dependable correlation appears to exist in the literature. This paper uses the hole type model to predict the viscosity of aqueous electrolytes containing single and mixed salts up to the molten salt regime. This model needs two parameters which can be evaluated from sparse data. For LiBr/water and (Li, K, na) NO{sub 3}/water mixtures, it is shown that the agreement between predicted and experimental values is very good over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The deviation between these two values was found to be less than 9%.

  6. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  7. Energy-momentum tensor correlators and viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective flow has been observed in heavy ion collisions, with a large anisotropic component, and ideal hydrodynamic calculations had significant successful in describing the distribution of produced particles at the RHIC experiments. In order to account for this near ideal fluid behavior, the shear and bulk viscosity of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) must be computed from first principles in a regime where the QGP is not weakly coupled. In this talk I describe recent progress in computing energy-momentum tensor correlators on the lattice from which the viscosities can be extracted via Kubo formulas. I also show how to cumulate information from several channels, including at non-vanishing spatial momentum, in order to best constrain the viscosities. These methods should soon yield predictions at the higher temperatures that will be explored at the LHC experiments.

  8. Bulk viscosity in heavy ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Roy; A. K. Chaudhuri

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a temperature dependent bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\zeta/s$) along with a constant shear viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\eta/s$) on the space time evolution of the fluid produced in high energy heavy ion collisions have been studied in a relativistic viscous hydrodynamics model. The boost invariant Israel-Stewart theory of causal relativistic viscous hydrodynamics is used to simulate the evolution of the fluid in 2 spatial and 1 temporal dimension. The dissipative correction to the freezeout distribution for bulk viscosity is calculated using Grad's fourteen moment method. From our simulation we show that the method is applicable only for $\\zeta/s<0.004$.

  9. Shear Viscosity of a Hot Pion Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Lang; Norbert Kaiser; Wolfram Weise

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The shear viscosity of an interacting pion gas is studied using the Kubo formalism as a microscopic description of thermal systems close to global equilibrium. We implement the skeleton expansion in order to approximate the retarded correlator of the viscous part of the energy-momentum tensor. After exploring this in $g\\phi^4$ theory we show how the skeleton expansion can be consistently applied to pions in chiral perturbation theory. The shear viscosity $\\eta$ is determined by the spectral width, or equivalently, the mean free path of pions in the heat bath. We derive a new analytical result for the mean free path which is well-conditioned for numerical evaluation and discuss the temperature and pion-mass dependence of the mean free path and the shear viscosity. The ratio $\\eta/s$ of the interacting pion gas exceeds the lower bound $1/4\\pi$ from AdS/CFT correspondence.

  10. Seventh International Symposium on Technology and Mine Problem, NPS, Monterey, California, USA, 2-4 May, 2006 1 Abstract -The Navy's Impact Burial Model (IMPACT35)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    -4 May, 2006 1 1 Abstract - The Navy's Impact Burial Model (IMPACT35) predicts the cylindrical mine.S. Navy from "blue" water, anti-Soviet focus, towards a concentration on the regional littoral threats of the world. With the increasing number of regional and asymmetric threats, the Navy must operate effectively

  11. Journal of Counter-Ordnance Technology (Fifth International Symposium on Technology and Mine Problem) 1 Acoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Problem) 1 Acoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy's CASS/GRAB Model Peter C. Chu, Carlos Cintron, Steven D the Navy's Comprehensive Acoustic Simulation System/Gaussian Ray Bundle (CASS/GRAB) model. Sound speed needs in that region. Index Terms--Acoustic mine hunting, Navy's comprehensive acoustic simulation

  12. 555 Dyer Road, Ingersoll Hall, Monterey, CA 93950 (831) 656-3487 www.defensereform.org Best practices in the Navy's energy programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    practices in the Navy's energy programs Strategic communication factors operating in the tactical forces Abstract The Department of the Navy is the second largest consumer of petroleum within the Department of Defense and has been tasked by Navy leadership to reduce energy costs in the tactical forces. Energy

  13. The United States Navy and Marine Corps rely far too much on petroleum, a dependency that degrades the strategic position of our country and the tactical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The United States Navy and Marine Corps rely far too much on petroleum, a dependency that degrades the nation towards a clean energy economy, the Department of the Navy established the following five ambitious energy goals that will move the Navy and Marine Corps away from a reliance on petroleum

  14. Viscosity of a nanoconfined liquid during compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Shah H. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25120 (Pakistan); Kramkowski, Edward L.; Ochs, Peter J.; Wilson, David M.; Hoffmann, Peter M., E-mail: hoffmann@wayne.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscous behavior of liquids under nanoconfinement is not well understood. Using a small-amplitude atomic force microscope, we found bulk-like viscosity in a nanoconfined, weakly interacting liquid. A further decrease in viscosity was observed at confinement sizes of a just few molecular layers. Overlaid over the continuum viscous behavior, we measured non-continuum stiffness and damping oscillations. The average stiffness of the confined liquid was found to scale linearly with the size of the confining tip, while the damping scales with the radius of curvature of the tip end.

  15. Shear Viscosity of a Unitary Fermi Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Wlaz?owski; Piotr Magierski; Joaquín E. Drut

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first ab initio determination of the shear viscosity eta of the Unitary Fermi Gas, based on finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo calculations and the Kubo linear-response formalism. We determine the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s. The minimum of eta/s appears to be located above the critical temperature for the superfluid-to-normal phase transition with the most probable value being eta/s approx 0.2 hbar/kB, which almost saturates the Kovtun-Son-Starinets universal value hbar/(4 pi kB).

  16. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iorio; G. Lambiase

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, that cannot be explained by the conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  17. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.

    1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame. 7 figs.

  18. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J. (Bellaire, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  19. Analysis of volatile contaminants in US Navy fleet soda lime. Technical report, August 1992-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Ruby, R.; Gummin, D.D.; Porter, W.R.; Caldwell, J.M.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination was suspected of U.S. Navy Fleet soda lime (High Performance Sodasorb(R)) when an ammonia-like odor was reported during its use in August 1992. This material contained indicator dye and was used for carbon dioxide absorption during diving. This incident had a major impact on the U.S Navy diving program when the Navy temporarily banned use of Sodasorb(R) and authorized Sofnolime(R) as an interim replacement. The Naval Medical Research Institute was immediately assigned to investigate. Testing involved sampling from the headspace (gas space) inside closed buckets and from an apparatus simulating conditions during operational diving. Volatile organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry; ammonia and amines were measured by infrared spectroscopy. Significant amounts of ammonia (up to 30 ppm), ethyl and diethyl amines (up to several ppm), and various aliphatic hydrocarbons (up to 60 ppm) were detected during testing of both Sodasorb(R) and Sofnolime(R). Contaminants were slowly removed by gas flow and did not return. The source(s) of the ammonia and amines are unknown, although they may result from the breakdown of the indicator dye. Hydrocarbon contamination appeared to result from the materials of which the bucket is constructed. Based on these findings, the U.S. Navy is expected to phase in non-indicating soda lime that will be required to meet defined contaminant limits.

  20. The identity and construction of Wreck Baker: a War of 1812 era Royal Navy frigate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Daniel Robert

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    HMS St. Lawrence. Three of these four ships now rest at the bottom of Lake Ontario. Two of the wrecks have been identified as St. Lawrence and Prince Regent, the largest ships built by the Royal Navy at Kingston. The size and construction...

  1. EA-1876: Pennsylvania State Energy Program’s Conergy Navy Yard Solar Project, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conergy Projects, Inc. (Conergy) proposes to construct and operate a 1.251 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) facility at the former Navy Yard site in south Philadelphia in Pennsylvania’s Philadelphia County to provide up to 1,596 MW hours of electricity per year, feeding directly into the distribution grid.

  2. Updated: August 15, 2012 U.S. Navy Education Training Management Subspecialty (ETMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Updated: August 15, 2012 1 U.S. Navy Education Training Management Subspecialty (ETMS measurement. Offered online. #12;Updated: August 15, 2012 2 HIAD 8422. Higher Education Finance. (3. Introduction to Educational Leadership. (3). Theory and practice of educational leadership; scope, task, areas

  3. DON eBUSOPSOFFINST 4650.1A DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DON eBUSOPSOFFINST 4650.1A DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY eBUSINESS OPERATIONS OFFICE 5450 CARLISLE PIKE PO DON eBUSINESS OPERATIONS OFFICE INSTRUCTION 4650.1A Subj: POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Apr 03 (l) OSD Memo of 10 Jun 03 (m) Civilian Human Resources Manual Sub-Chapter 762 (n) IG Memo of 25

  4. T H E SECRETARY O F THE NAVY WASHINGTON, D . C . 20350-1000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Civilian Personnel Management Service (CPMS) Civilian Human Capital Accountability System (CHCAS.1. 3. Background a. The quality and effectiveness of civilian Human Capital Management (HCM) programs, 2009 SECNAV INSTRUCTION 12273.1A From: Secretary of the Navy Subj: CIVILIAN HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

  5. Bulk viscosity in a cold CFL superfluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Manuel; Felipe Llanes-Estrada

    2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute one of the bulk viscosity coefficients of cold CFL quark matter in the temperature regime where the contribution of mesons, quarks and gluons to transport phenomena is Boltzmann suppressed. In that regime dissipation occurs due to collisions of superfluid phonons, the Goldstone modes associated to the spontaneous breaking of baryon symmetry. We first review the hydrodynamics of relativistic superfluids, and remind that there are at least three bulk viscosity coefficients in these systems. We then compute the bulk viscosity coefficient associated to the normal fluid component of the superfluid. In our analysis we use Son's effective field theory for the superfluid phonon, amended to include scale breaking effects proportional to the square of the strange quark mass m_s. We compute the bulk viscosity at leading order in the scale breaking parameter, and find that it is dominated by collinear splitting and joining processes. The resulting transport coefficient is zeta=0.011 m_s^4/T, growing at low temperature T until the phonon fluid description stops making sense. Our results are relevant to study the rotational properties of a compact star formed by CFL quark matter.

  6. Hydrodynamic Modeling and the QGP Shear Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huichao Song

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we will briefly review the recent progress on hydrodynamic modeling and the extraction of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) specific shear viscosity with an emphasis on results obtained from the hybrid model VISHNU that couples viscous hydrodynamics for the macroscopic expansion of the QGP to the hadron cascade model for the microscopic evolution of the late hadronic stage.

  7. Viscosity to entropy ratio at extremality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayan K. Chakrabarti; Sachin Jain; Sudipta Mukherji

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming gauge theory realization at the boundary, we show that the viscosity to entropy ratio is 1/(4 pi) where the bulk is represented by a large class of extremal black holes in anti-de Sitter space. In particular, this class includes multiple R-charged black holes in various dimensions.

  8. Computation of Shear Viscosity: A Systems Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, John Ting-Yung

    Institute Troy, NY 12180. Emails: {hurstj,wenj}@rpi.edu Abstract-- Macroscopic material transport properties. Linearizing this map about an equilibrated trajectory results in a linear time varying system. By freezing]. In particular, macroscopic transport properties such as viscosity, diffusivity, conductivity, etc., may

  9. Synthesis and characterization of molecular rotors as viscosity sensors and beta amyloid binding agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutharsan, Jeyanthy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis and Evaluation as Viscosity Sensors IntroductionSynthesis and Evaluation as Viscosity Sensors14and evaluation of these compounds as viscosity sensors. The

  10. Viscosities of natural gases at high pressures and high temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, Anup

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of viscosities of naturally occurring petroleum gases provides the information needed to accurately work out reservoir-engineering problems. Existing models for viscosity prediction are limited by data, especially at high pressures...

  11. Relation between viscosity and stability for heavy oil emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Sherry Qianwen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation between viscosity and stability has been hics. found by investigating the effect of surfactant concentration on emulsion stability. Based on the Bingham plastic model for viscosity as a function of shear rate, two parameters were found...

  12. EFFECT OF GLASS COMPOSITION ON ACTIVATION ENERGY OF VISCOSITY...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3389-3399 (2008). 3. D. R. NEUVILLE, "Viscosity, structure and mixing in (Ca, Na) silicate melts," Chem. Geol., 229, 28 (2006). 4. P. HRMA, "High-temperature Viscosity of...

  13. Shear viscosity of CFT plasma at finite coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence for the universality of the shear viscosity of conformal gauge theory plasmas beyond infinite coupling. We comment of subtleties of computing the shear viscosity in effective models of gauge/gravity correspondence rather than in string theory.

  14. Shear Viscosity from the Effective Coupling of Gravitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Gen Cai; Zhang-Yu Nie; Ya-Wen Sun

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the progress in the holographic calculation of shear viscosity for strongly coupled field theories. We focus on the calculation of shear viscosity from the effective coupling of transverse gravitons and present some explicit examples.

  15. Shear viscosity and spectral function of the quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaharu Iwasaki; Hiromasa Ohnishi; Takahiko Fukutome

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the shear viscosity of the quark matter by using the Kubo-Mori formula. It is found that the shear viscosity is expressed in terms of the quark spectral function. If the spectral function is approximated by a modified Bright-Wigner type, the viscosity decreases as the width of the spectral function increases. We also discuss dependence of the shear viscosity on the temperature and the density.

  16. Simple concept predicts viscosity of heavy oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, V.R.; Miadonye, A.; Singh, B. (Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For in situ recovery, a correlation has been developed for predicting the viscosity of bitumen and heavy oil. The correlation requires only a single viscosity measurement. The derived viscosities show an overall average absolute deviation of 4.4% from experimental data for 18 sets of Alberta heavy oil and bitumen containing 175 measurements. The paper describes the equations, their accuracy in determining viscosity, and an example from the Alberta deposits.

  17. Development of US Navy Shipboard Systems for solid and liquid waste thermal treatment. Report for July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullet, B.K.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the U.S. Navy`s shipboard environmental challenges and a few of its research programs for meeting its needs for solid and liquid waste treatment. This objective is particularly important in environmentally sensitive areas, such as the Mediterranean Sea, where fleet deployment time is significant. Prohibitions on ocean dumping and anticipated requirements on effluent discharge quality have led the Navy to continue the research, development, and demonstration of shipboard systems to treat their unpreventable wastes. For solid, non-hazardous wastes, post-minimization efforts are geared toward long-term development of systems to thermally pyrolyze and oxidize the wastes into significantly reduced volume and weight.

  18. Cosmological model with viscosity media (dark fluid) described by an effective equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ren; Xin He Meng

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A generally parameterized equation of state (EOS) is investigated in the cosmological evolution with bulk viscosity media modelled as dark fluid, which can be regarded as a unification of dark energy and dark matter. Compared with the case of the perfect fluid, this EOS has possessed four additional parameters, which can be interpreted as the case of the non-perfect fluid with time-dependent viscosity or the model with variable cosmological constant. From this general EOS, a completely integrable dynamical equation to the scale factor is obtained with its solution explicitly given out. (i) In this parameterized model of cosmology, for a special choice of the parameters we can explain the late-time accelerating expansion universe in a new view. The early inflation, the median (relatively late time) deceleration, and the recently cosmic acceleration may be unified in a single equation. (ii) A generalized relation of the Hubble parameter scaling with the redshift is obtained for some cosmology interests. (iii) By using the SNe Ia data to fit the effective viscosity model we show that the case of matter described by $p=0$ plus with effective viscosity contributions can fit the observational gold data in an acceptable level

  19. VISCOSITY OF NEMATIC-CHIRAL MIXTURES AND THEIR ELECTROOPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    VISCOSITY OF NEMATIC-CHIRAL MIXTURES AND THEIR ELECTROOPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS Z. M. ELASHVILI, M. D of Georgian SSR, Tbilisi 380086, S. Euli str. 5, USSR Abstract. -- We have measured the viscosity in mixtures that the increase of the viscosity at low additive concentration (Cm

  20. Viscosity, hard sphere diameter and interionic potential for liquid lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-347 Viscosity, hard sphere diameter and interionic potential for liquid lead G. Chaussemy The Macedo-Litovitz equation for a hard sphere liquid provides a satisfactory model for the viscosity of lead and molecular dynamics. The activation energy for viscosity (0.07 eV) is similar to the height of the interionic

  1. Viscosity dependence of geminate recombination efficiency after bimolecular charge separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burshtein, Anatoly

    Viscosity dependence of geminate recombination efficiency after bimolecular charge separation A. A viscosity dependence. As a result the latter becomes nonmonotonous, provided the kinetic controlled ionization gives way to a diffusional one, creating the more remote ions the higher the solvent viscosity

  2. Viscosity of Quantum Hall Fluids J. E. Avron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viscosity of Quantum Hall Fluids J. E. Avron Department of Physics, Technion, 32000 Haifa, Israel R April 25, 1997 Abstract The viscosity of quantum fluids with an energy gap at zero temperature is non of the parameter space). For a quantum Hall fluid on two dimensional tori this viscosity is computed. In this case

  3. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES ZHENJIE REN Abstract, inspired by [3], we define the viscosity solution, by using the nonlinear expectation. The paper contains , that for any bounded viscosity subsolution u1 and Key words and phrases. Path dependent PDEs, Dirichlet problem

  4. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTONJACOBI EQUATIONS WITH DISCONTINUOUS COEFFICIENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON­JACOBI EQUATIONS WITH DISCONTINUOUS COEFFICIENTS GIUSEPPE MARIA of viscosity solution to the Cauchy problem, and that the front tracking algorithm yields an L contractive semigroup. We define a viscosity solution by treating the discontinuities in the coefficients analogously

  5. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS, AND ASYMPTOTICS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Diogo

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS, AND ASYMPTOTICS FOR HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS DIOGO:dgomes@math.ist.utl.pt Abstract. In this paper we apply the theory of viscosity solu- tions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations) that are characteristics of viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations, (2) H(P + Dxu, x) = H

  6. VISCOSITY OF CONCENTRATED SUSPENSIONS: INFLUENCE OF CLUSTER FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 VISCOSITY OF CONCENTRATED SUSPENSIONS: INFLUENCE OF CLUSTER FORMATION V.Starov1 , V.Zhdanov1 , M and these forces determine both structure and size of clusters. We assume that viscosity of concentrated suspension of viscosity on a concentration of dispersed particles taking into account cluster formation, is deduced. Under

  7. Viscosity and Relaxation Approximation for Hyperbolic Systems of Conservation Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    Viscosity and Relaxation Approximation for Hyperbolic Systems of Conservation Laws Athanasios E with the approximation of conservation laws via viscosity or relaxation. The following topics are covered: The general structure of viscosity and relaxation approximations is discussed, as suggested by the second law

  8. Bulk viscosity of gauge theory plasma at strong coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a lower bound on bulk viscosity of strongly coupled gauge theory plasmas. Using explicit example of the N=2^* gauge theory plasma we show that the bulk viscosity remains finite at a critical point with a divergent specific heat. We present an estimate for the bulk viscosity of QGP plasma at RHIC.

  9. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS, AND ASYMPTOTICS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS, AND ASYMPTOTICS FOR HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS DIOGO. In this paper we apply the theory of viscosity solu- tions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations to understand) with cer- tain minimizing properties) and viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations (2) H(P + Dxu, x

  10. Bulk viscosity and r-modes of neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debarati Chatterjee; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulk viscosity due to the non-leptonic process involving hyperons in $K^-$ condensed matter is discussed here. We find that the bulk viscosity is modified in a superconducting phase. Further, we demonstrate how the exotic bulk viscosity coefficient influences $r$-modes of neutron stars which might be sources of detectable gravitational waves.

  11. Viscosity, Black Holes, and Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Son; A. O. Starinets

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent progress in applying the AdS/CFT correspondence to finite-temperature field theory. In particular, we show how the hydrodynamic behavior of field theory is reflected in the low-momentum limit of correlation functions computed through a real-time AdS/CFT prescription, which we formulate. We also show how the hydrodynamic modes in field theory correspond to the low-lying quasinormal modes of the AdS black p-brane metric. We provide a proof of the universality of the viscosity/entropy ratio within a class of theories with gravity duals and formulate a viscosity bound conjecture. Possible implications for real systems are mentioned.

  12. Ternary liquid mixture viscosities and densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, I.C.; Rowley, R.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid mixture viscosities and densities have been measured at 298.15 K and ambient pressure for 20 ternary systems. Twelve ternary compositions, encompassing the entire composition range, have been chosen for each system in an effort to test a newly proposed predictive equation based on local compositions. Viscosities calculated by using the local composition model agreed with the experimental data within an average absolute deviation of 6.4%. No adjustable parameters were used and only binary interactions in the form of NRTL constants were input. The results of these studies indicate that the local composition model predictions are generally as good for multicomponent systems as they are for the corresponding binaries. 24 references, 3 tables.

  13. Shear viscosity, cavitation and hydrodynamics at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitesh R. Bhatt; Hiranmaya Mishra; V. Sreekanth

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study evolution of quark-gluon matter in the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within the frame work of relativistic second-order viscous hydrodynamics. In particular, by using the various prescriptions of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity to the entropy ratio, we show that the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic fluid become invalid due to the phenomenon of cavitation. For most of the initial conditions relevant for LHC, the cavitation sets in very early during the evolution of the hydrodynamics in time $\\lesssim 2 $fm/c. The cavitation in this case is entirely driven by the large values of shear viscosity. Moreover we also demonstrate that the conformal term used in equations of the relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic can influence the cavitation time.

  14. United States Navy Basic Plan Green-One: an analysis of the U.S. Navy's strategic war plan against Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Steven Jon

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the U. S. wanted stability in Mexico in order to keep foreign threats out of the hemisphere and away from the Panama Canal. Third, the U. S. wanted a secure southern border. Oil for its ships and a secure Panama Canal were vital to the U. S. Navy... to the U. S. effort to provide adequate defense of the Panama Canal. A month after the U. S. entered World War II Mexico declared war on the Axis powers as well. Furthermore, in January of 1942 a joint U. S. -Mexican Defense Commission was created...

  15. Bulk viscosity of QCD matter near the critical temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kharzeev; K. Tuchin

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Kubo's formula relates bulk viscosity to the retarded Green's function of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Using low energy theorems of QCD for the latter we derive the formula which relates the bulk viscosity to the energy density and pressure of hot matter. We then employ the available lattice QCD data to extract the bulk viscosity as a function of temperature. We find that close to the deconfinement temperature bulk viscosity becomes large, with viscosity-to-entropy ratio zeta/s about 1.

  16. Shear viscosity of a nonperturbative gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri Antonov

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear viscosity is evaluated within a model of the gluon plasma, which is based entirely on the stochastic nonperturbative fields. We consider two types of excitations of such fields, which are characterized by the thermal correlation lengths ~ 1/(g^2 T) and ~ 1/(g^4 T), where "g" is the finite-temperature Yang-Mills coupling. Excitations of the first type correspond to the genuine nonperturbative stochastic Yang-Mills fields, while excitations of the second type mimic the known result for the shear viscosity of the perturbative Yang-Mills plasma. We show that the excitations of the first type produce only an O(g^{10})-correction to this result. Furthermore, a possible interference between excitations of these two types yields a somewhat larger, O(g^7), correction to the leading perturbative Yang-Mills result. Our analysis is based on the Fourier transformed Euclidean Kubo formula, which represents an integral equation for the shear spectral density. This equation is solved by seeking the spectral density in the form of the Lorentzian Ans\\"atze, whose widths are defined by the two thermal correlation lengths and by their mean value, which corresponds to the said interference between the two types of excitations. Thus, within one and the same formalism, we reproduce the known result for the shear viscosity of the perturbative Yang-Mills plasma, and account for possible nonperturbative corrections to it.

  17. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Old Navy Dump Manchester Laboratory (USEPA/NOAA), Manchester, WA, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Old Navy Dump/Manchester Annex Superfund Site (Site) in Manchester, Washington. The selected remedy is the only response action planned for the Site.

  19. Managing a sea of information : shipboard command and control in the United States Navy, 1899-1945

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolters, Timothy Scott, 1965-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation traces the history of shipboard command and control systems in the United States Navy from 1899, when the service first conducted experiments with wireless telegraphy, through World War II, the conflict ...

  20. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  1. History and effectiveness of the enlistment bonus program for procuring nuclear-field personnel. Final report. [US Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quester; Jeffries

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enlistment bonuses are monetary incentives promised to potential recruits to induce them to sign contracts to join the Navy. The bonuses, paid upon successful completion of class A schools, have been awarded in military skill areas characterized by inadequate volunteer levels. This memorandum describes how the Navy has used enlistment bonuses. Additionally, it provides estimates of the efficacy of enlistment bonuses for procuring recruits for the nuclear field.

  2. Special Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview -Special Report 1501 MACY DRIVE

  3. Specialized Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special Report:4-01

  4. Establishment of the United States Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosclski, J.L.; Boyer, R. [Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Sloger, W. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, North Charleston, SC (United States). Southern Div.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed establishment of the US Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence (MWCE) in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas, involved the collocation of the Navy`s Mine Warfare and Mine Counter Measures assets in proximity to each other at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Ingleside and Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Texas. Collocation of these Navy forces would provide significant advantages in meeting mission and operational requirements. This action would improve the operational training and readiness of the forces. In addition to new construction or modifications at NAVSTA Ingleside, NAS Corpus Christi, and off-base; the establishment of offshore training and operating areas was required. When the project was first proposed in 1993, considerable concern was expressed by environmental interests, shrimpers, and state and federal resource agencies regarding the impact of the proposed training activities within Gulf waters. The Navy and Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., under contract to the Navy, conducted several technical studies and extensive coordination with concerned interests during the environmental impact statement process to identify and document the potential intensity, magnitude, and duration of impact from each proposed training activity.

  5. Energy Management System Lowers U.S. Navy Energy Costs Through PV System Interconnection (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the U.S. Navy's energy goals, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) spent two years collaborating on demonstrations that tested market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - an energy management system - was identified as a promising method for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

  6. Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces U.S. Navy Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Navy's overall energy strategy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - retrofitting rooftop air-conditioning units with an advanced rooftop control system - was identified as a promising source for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

  7. The Next Generation Air Particle Detectors for the United States Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hayes and Craig Marianno

    2007-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and testing of the United States Navy’s next generation air particle detector (NGAPD) is presently underway. The NGAPD is intended for use in nuclear applications for the United States Navy and is being designed to detect airborne Co-60 with a reduction in false alarms and improved ease of use. Features being developed include gamma compensation, low maintenance, commercial off-the-shelf electronics, and spectrum simulation for quality assurance and functional testing applications. By supplying a spectrum simulator, the radon stripping algorithm can be running when a simulated anthropogenic source spectrum (e.g., from Co-60 or transuranics) is superimposed on the radon progeny spectrum. This will allow alarm levels to be tested when the air flow is running and the radon stripping algorithm is providing the instrument response output. Modern units evaluate source spectra with the air flow off and the radon spectrum absent thereby not testing the true system performance which comes out of the radon stripping algorithm. Testing results of the preliminary prototype show promise along with computer simulations of source spectra. Primary testing results taken to date include gamma compensation, thermal insults, vibration and spectrum simulation.

  8. Overview of Navy marine ecological risk assessment projects in Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracey, G.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States); King, J.; Quinn, J. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States); Hahn, S. [Navy, Lester, PA (United States). Northern Div.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Navy has had a long and prominent role in shaping the shoreline of Narragansett Bay, R.I. During times of war, Navy bases in this area, as well as elsewhere, commonly used seaside landfill and/or conduits to the sea to dispose of wastes, including construction materials, solvents, spent fuels, and electrical components. Recognizing that the disposal areas may pose risks to the environment and human health, the Navy has been actively pursuing remediation options based on input from Ecological Risk Assessments (ERAs). In Narragansett Bay, four sites have been targeted for ecological risk assessments; one at the Naval Construction Battalion Center in western Narragansett Bay and three sites at the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC) in the Lower East Passage of Narragansett Bay. To streamline the process of ERA scoping, OA/QC and reporting procedures, a Master Plan was developed to encompass all general aspects of these projects, and were augmented by site-specific study plans for each ERA. This approach has dramatically reduced the time and cost which would have been required had each study been developed separately. This presentation will include an overview of each project, including conceptual approach, problem formulation, exposure and effects characterization and risk assessment summary.

  9. From Thermodynamics to the Bound on Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahar Hod

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the generalized second law of thermodynamics may shed much light on the mysterious Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) bound on the ratio of viscosity to entropy density. In particular, we obtain the lower bound $\\eta/s +O(\\eta^3/s^3)\\geq 1/4\\pi$. Furthermore, for conformal field theories we obtain a new fundamental bound on the value of the relaxation coefficient $\\tau_{\\pi}$ of causal hydrodynamics, which has been the focus of much recent attention: $(\\tau_{\\pi}T)^2\\geq {{(\\sqrt{3}-1)}/{2\\pi^2}}$.

  10. The viscosity bound in string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aninda Sinha; Robert C. Myers

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density $\\eta/s$ of any material in nature has been conjectured to have a lower bound of $1/4\\pi$, the famous KSS bound. We examine string theory models for evidence in favour of and against this conjecture. We show that in a broad class of models quantum corrections yield values of $\\eta/s$ just above the KSS bound. However, incorporating matter fields in the fundamental representation typically leads to violations of this bound. We also outline a program to extend AdS/CFT methods to RHIC phenomenology.

  11. Viscosity of many-component glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of composition on the viscosity of multicomponent glasses was expressed as a function of temperature and composition for three composition regions containing various subsets of Al2O3, B2O3, Bi2O3, CaO, Cr2O3, F, Fe2O3, K2O, Li2O, MgO, MnO, Na2O, NiO, P2O5, SiO2, UO2, and ZrO2. Limits of applicability of the composition models are discussed.

  12. EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 23 31.6 19.9 44.0 96.2 3.0 48.1 4.0 N00762 VISTA/MACKINAC//N94080 3 31.5 18.6 43;EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS

  13. Viscosity of an ideal relativistic quantum fluid: A perturbative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Torrieri

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a quantized ideal fluid will generally exhibit a small but non-zero viscosity due to the backreaction of quantum soundwaves on the background. We use an effective field theory expansion to estimate this viscosity to first order in perturbation theory. We discuss our results, and whether this estimate can be used to obtain a more model-independent estimate of the "quantum bound" on the viscosity of physical systems

  14. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  15. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and ?ow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and ?ow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the ?rst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the ?exibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex ?uids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  16. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrej El; Zhe Xu; Carsten Greiner; Azwinndini Muronga

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Grad's method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with $\\eta/s$ obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.3$(with $\\eta/s\\approx 0.18$) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.01$. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on $\\eta/s$, except when employing a small $\\alpha_s$. On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small $\\alpha_s$, the gluon system is far from kinetic and chemical equilibrium, which indicates the break down of second-order hydrodynamics because of the strong noneqilibrium evolution. In addition, for large $\\alpha_s$ ($0.3-0.6$), the Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics formally breaks down at large momentum $p_T\\gtrsim 3$ GeV but is still a reasonably good approximation.

  17. Shear Viscosity in a CFL Quark Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Manuel; Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the mean free path and shear viscosity in the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter at low temperature T, when the contributions of mesons, quarks and gluons to the transport coefficients are Boltzmann suppressed. CFL quark matter displays superfluid properties, and transport phenomena in such cold regime are dominated by phonon-phonon scattering. We study superfluid phonons within thermal field theory and compute the mean free path associated to their most relevant collision processes. Small-angle processes turn out to be more efficient in slowing transport phenomena in the CFL matter, while the mean free path relevant for the shear viscosity is less sensitive to collinear scattering due to the presence of zero modes in the Boltzmann equation. In analogy with superfluid He4, we find the same T power law for the superfluid phonon damping rate and mean free path. Our results are relevant for the study of rotational properties of compact stars, and correct wrong estimates existing in the literature.

  18. Computing the viscosity of the QGP on the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the recent progress made in calculating shear and bulk viscosity on the lattice, and discuss ways to improve the calculation.

  19. Torsional Response and Dissipationless Viscosity in Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor L. Hughes; Robert G. Leigh; Eduardo Fradkin

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the visco-elastic response of the electronic degrees of freedom in 2D and 3D topological insulators (TI). Our primary focus is on the 2D Chern insulator which exhibits a bulk dissipationless viscosity analogous to the quantum Hall viscosity predicted in integer and fractional quantum Hall states. We show that the dissipationless viscosity is the response of a TI to torsional deformations of the underlying lattice geometry. The visco-elastic response also indicates that crystal dislocations in Chern insulators will carry momentum density. We briefly discuss generalizations to 3D which imply that time-reversal invariant TI's will exhibit a quantum Hall viscosity on their surfaces.

  20. On Eling-Oz formula for the holographic bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Eling and Oz [1] proposed a simple formula for the bulk viscosity of holographic plasma. They argued that the formula is valid in the high temperature (near-conformal) regime, but is expected to break down at low temperatures. We point out that the formula is in perfect agreement with the previous computations of the bulk viscosity of the cascading plasma [2,3], as well as with the previous computations of the bulk viscosity of N=2^* plasma [4,5]. In the latter case it correctly reproduces the critical behaviour of the bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the critical point with the vanishing speed of sound.

  1. Jet momentum balance independent of shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Neufeld

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet momentum balance measurements, such as those recently performed by the CMS collaboration, provide an opportunity to quantify the energy transferred from a parton shower to the underlying medium in heavy-ion collisions. Specifically, I argue that the Cooper-Frye freezeout distribution associated with the energy and momentum deposited by the parton shower is controlled to a significant extent by the distribution of the underlying bulk matter and independent of the details of how deposited energy is redistributed in the medium, which is largely determined by transport coefficients such as shear viscosity. Thus by matching the distribution of momentum associated with the secondary jet in such measurements to the thermal distribution of the underlying medium, one can obtain a model independent estimate on the amount of parton shower energy deposited.

  2. On bulk viscosity and moduli decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine

    2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This pedagogically intended lecture, one of four under the header "Basics of thermal QCD", reviews an interesting relationship, originally pointed out by Bodeker, that exists between the bulk viscosity of Yang-Mills theory (of possible relevance to the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collision experiments) and the decay rate of scalar fields coupled very weakly to a heat bath (appearing in some particle physics inspired cosmological scenarios). This topic serves, furthermore, as a platform on which a number of generic thermal field theory concepts are illustrated. The other three lectures (on the QCD equation of state and the rates of elastic as well as inelastic processes experienced by heavy quarks) are recapitulated in brief encyclopedic form.

  3. Vanishing Viscosity Method for Transonic Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui-Qiang Chen; Marshall Slemrod; Dehua Wang

    2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A vanishing viscosity method is formulated for two-dimensional transonic steady irrotational compressible fluid flows with adiabatic constant $\\gamma\\in [1,3)$. This formulation allows a family of invariant regions in the phase plane for the corresponding viscous problem, which implies an upper bound uniformly away from cavitation for the viscous approximate velocity fields. Mathematical entropy pairs are constructed through the Loewner-Morawetz relation by entropy generators governed by a generalized Tricomi equation of mixed elliptic-hyperbolic type, and the corresponding entropy dissipation measures are analyzed so that the viscous approximate solutions satisfy the compensated compactness framework. Then the method of compensated compactness is applied to show that a sequence of solutions to the artificial viscous problem, staying uniformly away from stagnation, converges to an entropy solution of the inviscid transonic flow problem.

  4. Saturation of elliptic flow and shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of shear viscosity on elliptic flow is studied in causal dissipative hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Elliptic flow is reduced in viscous dynamics. Causal evolution of minimally viscous fluid ($\\eta/s$=0.08), can explain the PHENIX data on elliptic flow in 16-23% Au+Au collisions up to $p_T\\approx$3.6 GeV. In contrast, ideal hydrodynamics, can explain the same data only up to $p_T\\approx$1.5 GeV. $p_T$ spectra of identified particles are also better explained in minimally viscous fluid than in ideal dynamics. However, saturation of elliptic flow at large $p_T$ is not reproduced.

  5. Entropy & viscosity bound of strange stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibasish Laha; Taparati Gangopadhyay; Manjari Bagchi; Mira Dey; Jishnu Dey; Monika Sinha; Subharthi Ray

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At finite temperature (T) there is a link with general relativity and hydrodynamics that leads to a lower bound for the ratio of shear viscosity and entropy density (\\eta/s). We find that the bound is saturated in the simple model for quark matter that we use for strange stars at T = 80 MeV, at the surface of a strange star. At this T we have the possibility of cosmic separation of phases. We find that, although strongly correlated, the quark matter at the surface of strange stars constitute the most perfect interacting fluid permitted by nature. At the centre of the star, however, the density is higher and conditions are more like the results found for perturbative QCD.

  6. Confirming Fundamental Parameters of the Exoplanet Host Star epsilon Eridani Using the Navy Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baines, Ellyn K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star epsilon Eridani using the Navy Optical Interferometer. We determined its physical radius, effective temperature, and mass by combining our measurement with the star's parallax, photometry from the literature, and the Yonsei-Yale isochrones (Yi et al. 2001), respectively. We used the resulting stellar mass of 0.82 +/- 0.05 M_Sun plus the mass function from Benedict et al. (2006) to calculate the planet's mass, which is 1.53 +/- 0.22 M_Jupiter. Using our new effective temperature, we also estimated the extent of the habitable zone for the system.

  7. CONFIRMING FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI USING THE NAVY OPTICAL INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas, E-mail: ellyn.baines@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: tarmstr@crater.nrl.navy.mil [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {epsilon} Eridani using the Navy Optical Interferometer. We determined its physical radius, effective temperature, and mass by combining our measurement with the star's parallax, photometry from the literature, and the Yonsei-Yale isochrones, respectively. We used the resulting stellar mass of 0.82 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} plus the mass function from Benedict et al. to calculate the planet's mass, which is 1.53 {+-} 0.22 M{sub Jupiter}. Using our new effective temperature, we also estimated the extent of the habitable zone for the system.

  8. February 20, 2008: Navy shoots down NASA satellite | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY FactWindFault Current20, 2008: Navy

  9. U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 1 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarchC.DepartmentTexasof Energy 1 U.S. Navy

  10. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  11. 1 Visco-plastic rheology 1.1 Effective viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    1 Visco-plastic rheology 1.1 Effective viscosity Rheology specifies the relationship between viscosity eff, = 2eff , (2) which includes viscous and plastic components, 1 eff = 1 visc + 1 plast . (3) Also the strain rate tensor can be split into viscous and plastic part, = visc + plast , (4) where

  12. EddyViscosity Time Reversing Waves a Dissipative Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    where linear shallow water speed is given o o . The kinematic viscosity denoted parameter ratio been shown [6] nonlinear (inviscid) shallow water waves pres­ ence a random topography and alsoEddyViscosity Time Reversing Waves a Dissipative Environment Josselin Garnier Laboratoire

  13. Experimental investigations of the viscosity of nanofluids at low temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Experimental investigations of the viscosity of nanofluids at low temperatures Bahadir Aladag a nanofluids at low concentration and low temperatures are experimentally investigated. The viscosity data were stress ramp. CNT and Al2O3 water based nanofluids exhibited hysteresis behaviour when the stress

  14. Viscosity, entropy and the viscosity to entropy density ratio; how perfect is a nucleonic fluid?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of hadronic matter is studied using a classical evaluation of the scattering angle and a quantum mechanical discussion based on phase shifts from a potential. Semi classical limits of the quantum theory are presented. A hard sphere and an attractive square well potential step are each considered as well as the combined effects of both. The lowest classical value of the viscosity for an attractive potential is shown to be a hard sphere limit. The high wave number-short wavelength limits of the quantum result have scaling laws associated with it for both the viscosity and entropy. These scaling laws are similar to the Fraunhoher diffraction increase for the hard sphere geometric cross section. Specific examples for nuclear collisions are given. The importance of the nuclear tensor force and hard core is mentioned. The viscosity (eta), entropy density (s) and eta/s ratio are calculated for a gas of dilute neutrons in the unitary limit of large scattering length. Away from the unitary limit, the ratio of the interaction radius or the scattering length to the interparticle spacing introduces a variable y besides the fugacity z. The isothermal compressibility is shown to impose important constraints. The results for eta/s are compared to the AdS/CFT string theory minimum of (1/4Pi)hbar/kb to see how close a nucleonic gas is to being a perfect fluid. The eta/s ~1hbar/kb for a neutron gas in its unitary limit. The eta/s 3hbar/kb treating the nuclear scattering as billiard ball collisions. The minimum eta/s for a neutron gas occurs in regions of negative isothermal compressibility and high fugacity where higher virial terms are important. In a neutron-proton system higher virial terms are associated with a liquid-gas phase transition and critical opalescent phenomena.The type of flow-laminar,vortex, turbulent- is investigated.

  15. Viscosity Solutions In this lecture we take a glimpse of the viscosity solution theory for linear and nonlinear PDEs. From our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xinwei

    Oct. 1 0 Viscosity Solutions In this lecture we take a glimpse of the viscosity solution theory "viscosity solutions", and a quite complete regularity theory which paral- lels those we have seen has been a few example of the equations that can be dealt with using the idea of viscosity solutions. Example 1

  16. Study of shear-driven unsteady flows of a fluid with a pressure dependent viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Shriram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    withpressure dependent viscosity. The viscosity of many uids varies signicantly withpressure, a fact recognized by Stokes; and Barus, in fact, conducted experiments thatshowed that the variation of the viscosity with pressure was exponential. Given sucha...

  17. VISCOSITY OF AQUEOUS SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS FROM 0 - 150oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbek, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. , Fabuss, B.M. , "Viscosities of Binary Aqueous Solutionsof Pressure on the Viscosity of Aqueous NaCl Solutions inF.A. , Kestin, J. , "The Viscosity of NaCl and KCl Solutions

  18. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  19. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume I. Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). The first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 referenvces and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2. 18 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Controlled black liquor viscosity reduction through salting-in

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.E.; Khan, S.A.; Spontak, R.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black liquor viscosity increases exponentially with solids content and therefore causes processing problems for the paper industry by being a limiting factor in the Kraft pulp process. This study investigates a new approach for achieving viscosity reduction by salting-in black liquor through the addition of thiocyanate salts. These salts generally increase the solubility of the polymer constituents in black liquor, leading to a decrease in its viscosity. Several thiocyanate salts capable of reducing liquor viscosity by more than two orders of magnitude have been identified, with viscosity reduction greatest at high solids content. Salting-in of black liquor depends on the cation paired with the thiocyanate anion, as well as on solution pH and temperature. Comparative studies reveal the most effective viscosity-reducing agent of the series examined and that lignin plays an important role in the viscosity behavior of both unmodified and salted-in black liquor at high solids concentrations. These experimental findings are interpreted in terms of the underlying principles that describe salting-in and how it affects aqueous solution structure.

  1. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich57/%2A en4/%2A9/%2A7/%2A en

  2. Elongational viscosity of photo-oxidated LDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H., E-mail: victor.h.rolongarrido@tu-berlin.de, E-mail: manfred.wagner@tu-berlin.de; Wagner, Manfred H., E-mail: victor.h.rolongarrido@tu-berlin.de, E-mail: manfred.wagner@tu-berlin.de [Chair of Polymer Engineering and Polymer Physics, Berlin Institute of Technology-TU Berlin. Fasanenstr. 90. 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sheets of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were photo-oxidatively treated at room temperature, and subsequently characterized rheologically in the melt state by shear and uniaxial extensional experiments. For photo-oxidation, a xenon lamp was used to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Linear-viscoelastic characterization was performed in a temperature range of 130 to 220°C to obtain the master curve at 170°C, the reference temperature at which the elongational viscosities were measured. Linear viscoelasticity is increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by an increasing gel fraction as determined by a solvent extraction method. The elongational measurements reveal a strong enhancement of strain hardening until a saturation level is achieved. The elongational data are analyzed in the frame work of two constitutive equations, the rubber-like liquid and the molecular stress function models. Within the experimental window, timedeformation separability is confirmed for all samples, independent of the degree of photo-oxidation.

  3. Bulk viscosity, chemical equilibration and flow at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schaefer; Kevin Dusling

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of bulk viscosity on p_T spectra and elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We argue that direct effect of the bulk viscosity on the evolution of the velocity field is small, but corrections to the freezeout distributions can be significant. These effects are dominated by chemical non-equilibration in the hadronic phase. We show that a non-zero bulk viscosity in the range $\\zeta/s \\lsim 0.05$ improves the description of spectra and flow at RHIC.

  4. The Honda Point Disaster was the largest peacetime loss of U.S. Navy ships. On the evening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    1 The Honda Point Disaster was the largest peacetime loss of U.S. Navy ships. On the evening of September 8, 1923, seven destroyers, while traveling at 20 knots (37 km/h), ran aground at Honda Point not to slow down. · The dead reckoning was wrong, and the mistakes were fatal. #12;2 #12;3 Honda Point #12;

  5. Page 1 of 8 CBC 12830-19 (Rev 2/6/2012) Department of the Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information For Employees Applying For a Voluntary Early Retirement and/or Voluntary Separation Incentive Pay Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) before an employee can retire with the age and years of service Comprehensive information about the benefits and retirement is available on the Department of the Navy Civilian

  6. Residential Energy-Efficiency Equipment Shown to be a Good Investment for U.S. Navy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year project between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy's Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate energy efficiency technologies at bases in Hawaii and Guam resulted in the identification of several promising options for reducing energy use and costs, including whole-house energy efficiency retrofits.

  7. Reducing Idle Power Consumption in Office Spaces Saves U.S. Navy in Energy Costs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a two-year project to demonstrate energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has identified advanced plug load controls as a promising technology for reducing energy use and related costs in the U.S. Navy's Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) office spaces.

  8. Constraints on AGN accretion disc viscosity derived from continuum variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhaana L. C. Starling; Aneta Siemiginowska; Phil Uttley; Roberto Soria

    2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate a value of the viscosity parameter in AGN accretion discs for the PG quasar sample. We assume that optical variability on time-scales of months to years is caused by local instabilities in the inner accretion disc. Comparing the observed variability time-scales to the thermal time-scales of alpha-disc models we obtain constraints on the viscosity parameter for the sample. We find that, at a given L/L_Edd, the entire sample is consistent with a single value of the viscosity parameter, alpha. We obtain constraints of 0.01 < alpha < 0.03 for 0.01 < L/L_Edd < 1.0. This narrow range suggests that these AGN are all seen in a single state, with a correspondingly narrow spread of black hole masses or accretion rates. The value of alpha we derive is consistent with predictions by current simulation s in which MHD turbulence is the primary viscosity mechanism.

  9. Textured-surface quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiczer, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Cernosek, Richard W. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Gebert, Charles T. (Albuquerque, NM); Casaus, Leonard (Bernalillo, NM); Mitchell, Mary A. (Tijeras, NM)

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  10. Extensional viscosity measurements of polyethylene using a melt flow indexer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffatt, Scott Gordon

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Cogswell and Darby methods of defining extension rate and extensional viscosity are examined and compared. Six polyethylene resins (A through F) have been selected for this study. They have different densities, molecular weights (MN and molecular weight...

  11. Variational bounds for the shear viscosity of gelling melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claas H. Köhler; Henning Löwe; Peter Müller; Annette Zippelius

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study shear stress relaxation for a gelling melt of randomly crosslinked, interacting monomers. We derive a lower bound for the static shear viscosity $\\eta$, which implies that it diverges algebraically with a critical exponent $k\\ge 2\

  12. Bulk viscosity in nuclear and quark matter: A short review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Dong; Nan Su; Qun Wang

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The history and recent progresses in the study of bulk viscosity in nuclear and quark matter are reviewed. The constraints from baryon number conservation and electric neutrality in quark matter on particle densities and fluid velocity divergences are discussed.

  13. Method for controlling the viscosity of siloxane oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, A. Andrew (Lenoir City, TN); Shor, Joel T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of controlling the viscosity of siloxane oils in the presence of lead by adding a small amount of a dione such as p-benzoquinone or 2,3-butanedione.

  14. Hall viscosity and angular momentum in gapless holographic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hong

    We use the holographic approach to compare the Hall viscosity ?[subscript H] and the angular momentum density J in gapless systems in 2 + 1 dimensions at finite temperature. We start with a conformal fixed point and turn ...

  15. Quasiparticle theory of shear and bulk viscosities of hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, P.; Kapusta, J. I. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical framework for the calculation of shear and bulk viscosities of hadronic matter at finite temperature is presented. The framework is based on the quasiparticle picture. It allows for an arbitrary number of hadron species with pointlike interactions, and allows for both elastic and inelastic collisions. Detailed balance is ensured. The particles have temperature-dependent masses arising from mean-field or potential effects, which maintains self-consistency between the equation of state and the transport coefficients. As an example, we calculate the shear and bulk viscosity in the linear {sigma} model. The ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density shows a minimum in the vicinity of a rapid crossover transition, whereas the ratio of bulk viscosity to entropy density shows a maximum.

  16. Method for controlling the viscosity of siloxane oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, A.A.; Shor, J.T.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of controlling the viscosity of siloxane oils in the presence of lead by adding a small amount of a dione such as p-benzoquinone or 2,3-butanedione.

  17. Vanishing viscosity and the accumulation of vorticity on the boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Kelliher

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We say that the vanishing viscosity limit holds in the classical sense if the velocity for a solution to the Navier-Stokes equations converges in the energy norm uniformly in time to the velocity for a solution to the Euler equations. We prove, for a bounded domain in dimension 2 or higher, that the vanishing viscosity limit holds in the classical sense if and only if a vortex sheet forms on the boundary.

  18. Viscosity and boost invariance at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bozek

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the longitudinal hydrodynamic evolution of the fireball created in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. Nonzero shear viscosity reduces the colling rate of the system and hinders the acceleration of the longitudinal flow. As a consequence, the initial energy density needed to reproduce the experimental data at RHIC energies is significantly reduced. At LHC energies, we expect that shear viscosity helps to conserve a Bjorken plateau in the rapidity distributions during the expansion.

  19. Bulk viscosity and the conformal anomaly in the pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the bulk viscosity of the massive pion gas within Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory. We obtain a low temperature peak arising from explicit conformal breaking due to the pion mass and another peak near the critical temperature, dominated by the conformal anomaly through gluon condensate terms. The correlation between bulk viscosity and conformal breaking supports a recent QCD proposal. We discuss the role of resonances, heavier states and large-$N_c$ counting.

  20. Comment on "Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 091301 (2105)] the cause of the acceleration of the present Universe has been identified with the shear viscosity of an imperfect relativistic fluid even in the absence of any bulk viscous contribution. The gist of this comment is that the shear viscosity, if anything, can only lead to an accelerated expansion over sufficiently small scales well inside the Hubble radius.

  1. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer Imaging of Line Emission Regions of beta Lyrae Using Differential Phase Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, H R; Tycner, C; Armstrong, J T; Zavala, R T; Benson, J A; Gilbreath, G C; Hindsley, R B; Hutter, D J; Johnston, K J; Jorgensen, A M; Mozurkewich, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an experiment to image the interacting binary star beta Lyrae with data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), using a differential phase technique to correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the interferometer phases. We take advantage of the fact that the visual primary of beta Lyrae and the visibility calibrator we used are both nearly unresolved and nearly centrally symmetric, and consequently have interferometric phases near zero. We used this property to detect and correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the phases of beta Lyrae and to obtain differential phases in the channel containing the Halpha emission line. Combining the Halpha-channel phases with information about the line strength, we recovered complex visibilities and imaged the Halpha emission using standard radio interferometry methods. We find that the results from our differential phase technique are consistent with those obtained from a more-standard analysis ...

  2. Diameters of delta Cephei and eta Aquilae Measured with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Armstrong; Tyler E. Nordgren; M. E. Germain; Arsen R. Hajian; R. B. Hindsley; C. A. Hummel; D. Mozurkewich; R. N. Thessin

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the diameters of the Cepheid variables delta Cephei (18 nights) and eta Aquilae (11 nights) with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer. The primary results of these observations are the mean angular diameters of these Cepheids: 1.520 +/- 0.014 milliseconds of arc (mas) for delta Cep and 1.69 +/- 0.04 mas for eta Aql. We also report limb-darkened diameters for the check stars in this program: for beta Lac, theta(LD) = 1.909 +/- 0.011 mas, and for 12 Aql, theta(LD) = 2.418 +/- 0.010 mas. When combined with radius estimates from period-radius relations in the literature, the Cepheid angular diameters suggest distances slightly smaller than, but still consistent with, the Hipparcos distances. Pulsations are weakly detected at a level of about 1.5 sigma to 2 sigma for both Cepheids.

  3. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K. [Thermophysical Measurements Laboratory, Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  4. EXPT. 3101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 6/2/2003 ENTRY PEDIGREE, NAME NO. YIELD SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPT. 3101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 6/2/2003 ENTRY PEDIGREE, NAME NO. YIELD SEED DAYS.0 47.5 5.0 N00727 HURON/N94080//I92919 11 33.6 17.6 51 100.0 2.0 49.5 4.5 I02538 SCEPTER,GENTEC,NAVY 70.8 5.0 I01724 FRIGATE(NAVY) 69 32.8 17.8 49 99.4 2.0 50.6 4.0 N00762 VISTA/MACKINAC//N94080 17 32.6 16

  5. EXPT. 2101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 6/8/2002 ENTRY PEDIGREE, NAME NO. YIELD CWT SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPT. 2101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 6/8/2002 ENTRY PEDIGREE, NAME NO. YIELD CWT SEED.0 4.9 I01721 ROG 331(NAVY) 78 34.7 19.3 45.5 97.6 3.0 42.0 3.5 N00811 C-20//VISTA/MACKINAC 45 34.7 24.2 48.5 99.9 2.5 48.0 4.0 N00723 B96617/HURON 21 34.6 19.9 48.0 97.0 3.0 44.0 4.5 I02538 SCEPTER,GENTEC,NAVY

  6. EXPT. 4101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 6/2/2004 ENTRY PEDIGREE, NAME NO. YIELD SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPT. 4101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 6/2/2004 ENTRY PEDIGREE, NAME NO. YIELD SEED DAYS (GENTEC,NAVY) 49 20.4 24.0 44.0 93.0 2.0 46.6 4.1 N00762 VISTA/MACKINAC//N94080 11 20.2 17.5 47.0 94.0 1.0 46.4 4.6 I03351 COMET (ISB,NAVY) 46 19.8 26.7 44.0 90.0 1.5 46.0 4.6 I91112 SCHOONER (NOVARTIS) 47 19

  7. EXPERIMENT 8101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/03/08 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 8101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/03/08 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS(NAVY) 26 17.2 22.8 46.1 91.4 2.0 50.2 4.0 I06271 ND012103, AVALANCHE 25 17.2 22.8 45.0 92.5 1.5 51.8 5.0 N06701 N00838/N00809//N00729 6 17.0 21.3 45.9 92.5 1.0 48.3 4.1 I08903 LIGHTNING NAVY 24 16.7 20

  8. EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS.9 50.0 4.1 #12;EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100*6/CN49-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 3 25.8 17.9 42.7 88.8 2.0 50.0 3.9 N05305 N00838/B98304//N00792 44 25

  9. Environmental assessment for the granting of US Navy easements near Pearl Harbor and Waikele Gulch Oahu, Hawaii to Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luersen, P.; Wiley, M.; Hart, J.; Kanehiro, C.; Soloway, M.

    1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA: and Navy regulations (OPNAVINST 5090.1B)). The document addresses environmental impacts from the proposed granting of three easements to the Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO) for the use of Navy property near Waikele Gulch, Pearl City and the Waiau Power Plant. HECO`s proposed Waiau-CIP, Part 2, Project requires installation, operation, and maintenance of steel transmission line poles and associated equipment on three Navy parcels crossed by the 7.8 mile project. Health risks from exposure to the electric and magnetic fields of 138-kV transmission lines are discussed.

  10. EXPERIMENT 7101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 05/31/07 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 7101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 05/31/07 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED49-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 23 28.3 18.8 51.4 97.4 3.0 47.6 3.5 N01453 B98301/N97772 16 28.0 17.6 4900838/B98304//N00792 24 23.9 19.0 52.5 99.4 1.6 52.4 4.0 #12;EXPERIMENT 7101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST

  11. Viscosity of liquid He-4 and quantum of circulation: Why and how are they related?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. S. L'vov; L. Skrbek

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the apparently unrelated physical quantities -- kinematic viscosity of liquid He-4, $\

  12. The viscosity structure of the D00 layer of the Earth's mantle inferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The viscosity structure of the D00 layer of the Earth's mantle inferred from the analysis layer Core­mantle boundary Viscosity Maxwell body a b s t r a c t The viscosity structure of the D00-diurnal to 18.6 years tidal deformations combined with model viscosity­depth profiles corresponding to a range

  13. Viscosity of semi-dilute polymer solutions M. Adam and M. Delsanti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    549 Viscosity of semi-dilute polymer solutions M. Adam and M. Delsanti Laboratoire Léon viscosity measurements on semi-dilute solutions (c* c 10 %). The viscosity variation is independent to the solvent viscosity. With concentration, the following variations were observed : 2014 for PIB-toluene, ~r

  14. Special Clinical Staff Training Specialized Radiation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Special Clinical Staff Training Specialized Radiation Safety Training Courses for: Nurses these training courses by contacting the Radiation Safety Training Office at 496-2255. Radiation Safety for Clinical Center Employees A great introduction to radiation and radioactive material for new Clinical

  15. Special Nevada report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is submitted to Congress by the Secretary of the Air Force, the Secretary of the Navy, and the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to Section 6 of the Military Lands Withdrawal Act of 1986. It contains an analysis and evaluation of the effects on public health and safety resulting from DOD and Department of Energy (DOE) military and defense-related uses on withdrawn public lands in the State of Nevada and in airspace overlying the State. This report describes the cumulative impacts of those activities on public and private property in Nevada and on plants, fish and wildlife, cultural, historic, scientific, recreational, wilderness and other resources of the public lands of Nevada. An analysis and evaluation of possible measures to mitigate the cumulative effects of the withdrawal of lands and the use of airspace in Nevada for defense-related purposes was conducted, and those considered practical are listed.

  16. EIS-0259: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class and Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants, Hanford Site, Richland (adopted from Navy)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the alternate ways for disposing of decommissioned, defieled reactor compliments from U.S. Navy nuclear-powered cruisers, (Bainbridge, Truxtun, Long Beach, California Class and Virginia Class) and Los Angeles Class, and Ohio Class submarines.

  17. Fitting and re-fitting : adaptive re-use proposal for building 114 in the Charlestown Navy Yard as a bio-tech research facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Stephen D. (Stephen Dar), 1969-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    n the 1988 Master Plan of the Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 114 was originally planned as a boat repair and maintenance facility with offices. It appeared to be a logical proposal which would revive it to its previous ...

  18. * rjwatkin@nps.navy.mil; phone: 1-831-656-1146; fax:1-831-656-2313; http://www.aa.nps.navy.mil/~agrawal/srdc/ Optical Beam Jitter Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.aa.nps.navy.mil/~agrawal/srdc/ Optical Beam Jitter Control R. Joseph Watkins*, Hong-Jen Chen, Brij N. Agrawal, Young. S. Shin Department: Pointing, Laser Communication, Jitter Rejection, Fast Steering Mirrors ABSTRACT For several future imaging(s) in the range of 10~30 m diameter requires a few arc-seconds accuracy, 10~15 nano-radians jitter, and a fast

  19. Dark goo: Bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Sebastien Gagnon; Julien Lesgourgues

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an "effective" pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local equilibrium today for viscous effects to be important.

  20. Dark goo: Bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon, Jean-Sebastien

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an "effective" pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local eq...

  1. Viscosity and scale invariance in the unitary Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilman Enss; Rudolf Haussmann; Wilhelm Zwerger

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the shear viscosity of the unitary Fermi gas above the superfluid transition temperature, using a diagrammatic technique that starts from the exact Kubo formula. The formalism obeys a Ward identity associated with scale invariance which guarantees that the bulk viscosity vanishes identically. For the shear viscosity, vertex corrections and the associated Aslamazov-Larkin contributions are shown to be crucial to reproduce the full Boltzmann equation result in the high-temperature, low fugacity limit. The frequency dependent shear viscosity $\\eta(\\omega)$ exhibits a Drude-like transport peak and a power-law tail at large frequencies which is proportional to the Tan contact. The weight in the transport peak is given by the equilibrium pressure, in agreement with a sum rule due to Taylor and Randeria. Near the superfluid transition the peak width is of the order of $0.5 T_F$, thus invalidating a quasiparticle description. The ratio $\\eta/s$ between the static shear viscosity and the entropy density exhibits a minimum near the superfluid transition temperature whose value is larger than the string theory bound $\\hbar/(4\\pi k_B)$ by a factor of about seven.

  2. Bulk Viscosity and Cavitation in Boost-Invariant Hydrodynamic Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajagopal; Nilesh Tripuraneni

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve second order relativistic hydrodynamics equations for a boost-invariant 1+1-dimensional expanding fluid with an equation of state taken from lattice calculations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. We investigate the dependence of the energy density as a function of proper time on the values of the shear viscosity, the bulk viscosity, and second order coefficients, confirming that large changes in the values of the latter have negligible effects. Varying the shear viscosity between zero and a few times s/(4 pi), with s the entropy density, has significant effects, as expected based on other studies. Introducing a nonzero bulk viscosity also has significant effects. In fact, if the bulk viscosity peaks near the crossover temperature Tc to the degree indicated by recent lattice calculations in QCD without quarks, it can make the fluid cavitate -- falling apart into droplets. It is interesting to see a hydrodynamic calculation predicting its own breakdown, via cavitation, at the temperatures where hadronization is thought to occur in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions.

  3. A Brief Review of Viscosity Models for Slag in Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many researchers have defined the phenomenon of 'slagging' as the deposition of ash in the radiative section of a boiler, while 'fouling' refers to the deposition of ash in the convective-pass region. Among the important parameters affecting ash deposition that need to be studied are ash chemistry, its transport, deposit growth, and strength development; removability of the ash deposit; heat transfer mechanisms; and the mode of operation for boilers. The heat transfer at the walls of a combustor depends on many parameters including ash deposition. This depends on the processes or parameters controlling the impact efficiency and the sticking efficiency. For a slagging combustor or furnace, however, the temperatures are so high that much of the coal particles are melted and the molten layer, in turn, captures more particles as it flows. The main problems with ash deposition are reduced heat transfer in the boiler and corrosion of the tubes. Common ways of dealing with these issues are soot blowing and wall blowing on a routine basis; however, unexpected or uncontrolled depositions can also complicate the situation, and there are always locations inaccessible to the use of such techniques. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1300 C and 1500 C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa {center_dot} s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. In such cases the slag should be regarded as a non-Newtonian suspension, consisting of liquid silicate and crystals. A better understanding of the rheological properties of the slag, such as yield stress and shear-thinning, are critical in determining the optimum operating conditions. To develop an accurate heat transfer model in any type of coal combustion or gasification process, the heat transfer and to some extent the rheological properties of ash and slag, especially in high-temperature environments need to be understood and properly modeled. The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal (and biomass for co-firing cases) present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. In this report, we first provide a brief review of the various approaches taken by different researchers in formulating or obtaining a slag viscosity model. In general, these models are based on experiments. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied.

  4. Post-glacial rebound and asthenosphere viscosity in Iceland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmundsson, F. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Weichselian glaciation Iceland was covered with an ice cap which caused downward flexure of the Earth's surface. The post-glacial rebound in Iceland was very rapid, being completed in about 1,000 years. The length of this time interval constrains the maximum value of asthenosphere viscosity in Iceland to be 1 {times} 10{sup 19} Pa s or less. Further clarification of the ice retreat and uplift history may reveal lower viscosity. Current changes in the mass balance of Icelandic glaciers must lead to measurable elevation changes considering this low viscosity. Expected current elevation changes around the Vatnajoekull ice cap are of the order of 1 cm per year, due to mass balance change in this century.

  5. Bulk Viscosity Effects in Event-by-Event Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquelyn Noronha-Hostler; Gabriel S. Denicol; Jorge Noronha; Rone P. G. Andrade; Frederique Grassi

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk viscosity effects on the collective flow harmonics in heavy ion collisions are investigated, on an event by event basis, using a newly developed 2+1 Lagrangian hydrodynamic code named v-USPhydro which implements the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) algorithm for viscous hydrodynamics. A new formula for the bulk viscous corrections present in the distribution function at freeze-out is derived starting from the Boltzmann equation for multi-hadron species. Bulk viscosity is shown to enhance the collective flow Fourier coefficients from $v_2(p_T)$ to $v_5(p_T)$ when $% p_{T}\\sim 1-3$ GeV even when the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio, $% \\zeta/s$, is significantly smaller than $1/(4\\pi)$.

  6. Bulk Viscosity and Particle Creation in the Inflationary Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Eshaghi; Nematollah Riazi; Ahmad Kiasatpour

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study particle creation in the presence of bulk viscosity of cosmic fluid in the early universe within the framework of open thermodynamical systems. Since the first-order theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is non-causal and unstable, we try to solve the bulk viscosity equation of the cosmic fluid with particle creation through the full causal theory. By adopting an appropriate function for particle creation rate of "Creation of Cold Dark Matter" model, we obtain analytical solutions which do not suffer from the initial singularity and are in agreement with equivalent solutions of Lambda-CDM model. We constrain the free parameter of particle creation in our model based on recent Planck data. It is also found that the inflationary solution is driven by bulk viscosity with or without particle creation.

  7. Viscosity in cosmological simulations of clusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brüggen; M. Ruszkowski

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics of the intracluster medium, in particular the values for the thermal conductivity and the viscosity are largely unknown and subject to an ongoing debate. Here, we study the effect of viscosity on the thermal state of the intracluster medium using three-dimensional cosmological simulations of structure formation. It is shown that viscosity, provided it is not too far off from the unmagnetised Spitzer value, has a significant effect on cluster profiles. In particular, it aids in heating the cool cores of clusters. The central cooling time of the most massive clusters in our simulation is increased by more than an order of magnitude. In large clusters, viscous heating may help to establish an entropy floor and to prevent a cooling catastrophe.

  8. Bulk Viscosity, Decaying Dark Matter, and the Cosmic Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Wilson; Grant J. Mathews; George M. Fuller

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a cosmology in which cold dark-matter particles decay into relativistic particles. We argue that such decays could lead naturally to a bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid. For decay lifetimes comparable to the present hubble age, this bulk viscosity enters the cosmic energy equation as an effective negative pressure. We investigate whether this negative pressure is of sufficient magnitude to account fo the observed cosmic acceleration. We show that a single decaying species in a flat, dark-matter dominated cosmology without a cosmological constant cannot reproduce the observed magnitude-redshift relation from Type Ia supernovae. However, a delayed bulk viscosity, possibly due to a cascade of decaying particles may be able to account for a significant fraction of the apparent cosmic acceleration. Possible candidate nonrelativistic particles for this scenario include sterile neutrinos or gauge-mediated decaying supersymmetric particles.

  9. Bulk Viscosity and Particle Creation in the Inflationary Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eshaghi, Mehdi; Kiasatpour, Ahmad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study particle creation in the presence of bulk viscosity of cosmic fluid in the early universe within the framework of open thermodynamical systems. Since the first-order theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is non-causal and unstable, we try to solve the bulk viscosity equation of the cosmic fluid with particle creation through the full causal theory. By adopting an appropriate function for particle creation rate of "Creation of Cold Dark Matter" model, we obtain analytical solutions which do not suffer from the initial singularity and are in agreement with equivalent solutions of Lambda-CDM model. We constrain the free parameter of particle creation in our model based on recent Planck data. It is also found that the inflationary solution is driven by bulk viscosity with or without particle creation.

  10. Shear Viscosity in the Post-quasistatic Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Peralta; L. Rosales; B. Rodrí guez-Mueller; W. Barreto

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the post-quasi--static approximation, an iterative method for the evolution of self-gravitating spheres of matter, to study the evolution of anisotropic non-adiabatic radiating and dissipative distributions in General Relativity. Dissipation is described by viscosity and free-streaming radiation, assuming an equation of state to model anisotropy induced by the shear viscosity. We match the interior solution, in non-comoving coordinates, with the Vaidya exterior solution. Two simple models are presented, based on the Schwarzschild and Tolman VI solutions, in the non--adiabatic and adiabatic limit. In both cases the eventual collapse or expansion of the distribution is mainly controlled by the anisotropy induced by the viscosity.

  11. Implications of a viscosity bound on black hole accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aninda Sinha; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the viscosity bound in gauge/gravity duality, we consider the ratio of shear viscosity (eta) to entropy density (s) in black hole accretion flows. We use both an ideal gas equation of state and the QCD equation of state obtained from lattice for the fluid accreting onto a Kerr black hole. The QCD equation of state is considered since the temperature of accreting matter is expected to approach 10^{12}K in certain hot flows. We find that in both the cases eta/s is small only for primordial black holes and several orders of magnitude larger than any known fluid for stellar and supermassive black holes. We show that a lower bound on the mass of primordial black holes leads to a lower bound on eta/s and vice versa. Finally we speculate that the Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter should decrease with increasing density and/or temperatures.

  12. The evolution of the shear viscosity away from unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Wlaz?owski; Wei Quan; Aurel Bulgac

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an it ab initio calculation of the shear viscosity as a function of interaction strength in a two-component unpolarized Fermi gas near unitary limit, within a finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) framework and using the Kubo linear-response formalism. The shear viscosity decreases as we tune the interaction strength 1/ak_F from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) side of the Feshbach resonance towards Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) limit and it acquires the smallest value for 1/ak_F approx 0.4.

  13. The evolution of the shear viscosity away from unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlaz?owski, Gabriel; Bulgac, Aurel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an it ab initio calculation of the shear viscosity as a function of interaction strength in a two-component unpolarized Fermi gas near unitary limit, within a finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) framework and using the Kubo linear-response formalism. The shear viscosity decreases as we tune the interaction strength 1/ak_F from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) side of the Feshbach resonance towards Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) limit and it acquires the smallest value for 1/ak_F approx 0.4.

  14. Bulk viscosity of strongly coupled plasmas with holographic duals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven S. Gubser; Silviu S. Pufu; Fabio D. Rocha

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We explain a method for computing the bulk viscosity of strongly coupled thermal plasmas dual to supergravity backgrounds supported by one scalar field. Whereas earlier investigations required the computation of the leading dissipative term in the dispersion relation for sound waves, our method requires only the leading frequency dependence of an appropriate Green's function in the low-frequency limit. With a scalar potential chosen to mimic the equation of state of QCD, we observe a slight violation of the lower bound on the ratio of the bulk and shear viscosities conjectured in arXiv:0708.3459.

  15. Bulk Viscosity of a Gas of Massless Pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiunn-Wei Chen; Juven Wang

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the hadronic phase, the dominant configuration of QCD with two flavors of massless quarks is a gas of massless pions. We calculate the bulk viscosity (zeta) using the Boltzmann equation with the kinetic theory generalized to incorporate the trace anomaly. We find that the dimensionless ratio zeta/s, s being the entropy density, is monotonic increasing below T=120 MeV, where chiral perturbation theory is applicable. This, combined with previous results, shows that zeta/s reaches its maximum near the phase transition temperature Tc, while eta/s, eta being the shear viscosity, reaches its minimum near Tc in QCD with massless quarks.

  16. Method for measuring liquid viscosity and ultrasonic viscometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Lawrence, William P. (Downers Grove, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic viscometer and method for measuring fluid viscosity are provided. Ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves are generated and coupled to the fluid. Reflections from the generated ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves are detected. Phase velocity of the fluid is determined responsive to the detected ultrasonic longitudinal waves reflections. Viscosity of the fluid is determined responsive to the detected ultrasonic shear waves reflections. Unique features of the ultrasonic viscometer include the use of a two-interface fluid and air transducer wedge to measure relative signal change and to enable self calibration and the use of a ratio of reflection coefficients for two different frequencies to compensate for environmental changes, such as temperature.

  17. Asymmetric Surface Brightness Distribution of Altair Observed with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohishi, N; Hutter, D J; Ohishi, Naoko; Nordgren, Tyler E.; Hutter, Donald J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An asymmetric surface brightness distribution of the rapidly rotating A7IV-V star, Altair, has been measured by the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI). The observations were recorded simultaneously using a triangle of three long baselines of 30m, 37m, and 64m, on 19 spectral channels, covering the wavelength range of 520nm to 850nm. The outstanding characteristics of these observations are (a) high resolution with the minimum fringe spacing of 1.7mas, easily resolving the 3-milliarcsecond (mas) stellar disk, and (b) the measurement of closure phase which is a sensitive indicator to the asymmetry of the brightness distribution of the source. Uniform disk diameters fit to the measured squared visibility amplitudes confirms the Altair's oblate shape due to its rapid rotation. The measured observables of Altair showed two features which are inconsistent with both the uniform-disk and limb-darkened disk models, while the measured observable of the comparison star, Vega, are consistent with the limb-darke...

  18. Demonstration of base catalyzed decomposition process, Navy Public Works Center, Guam, Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Brown, M.D.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.N.; Wilcox, W.A.; Gano, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kim, B.C.; Gavaskar, A.R. [Battelle Columbus Div., OH (United States)] [Battelle Columbus Div., OH (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Base Catalyzed Decomposition (BCD) is a chemical dehalogenation process designed for treating soils and other substrate contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), pesticides, dioxins, furans, and other hazardous organic substances. PCBs are heavy organic liquids once widely used in industry as lubricants, heat transfer oils, and transformer dielectric fluids. In 1976, production was banned when PCBs were recognized as carcinogenic substances. It was estimated that significant quantities (one billion tons) of U.S. soils, including areas on U.S. military bases outside the country, were contaminated by PCB leaks and spills, and cleanup activities began. The BCD technology was developed in response to these activities. This report details the evolution of the process, from inception to deployment in Guam, and describes the process and system components provided to the Navy to meet the remediation requirements. The report is divided into several sections to cover the range of development and demonstration activities. Section 2.0 gives an overview of the project history. Section 3.0 describes the process chemistry and remediation steps involved. Section 4.0 provides a detailed description of each component and specific development activities. Section 5.0 details the testing and deployment operations and provides the results of the individual demonstration campaigns. Section 6.0 gives an economic assessment of the process. Section 7.0 presents the conclusions and recommendations form this project. The appendices contain equipment and instrument lists, equipment drawings, and detailed run and analytical data.

  19. Gas Viscosity at High Pressure and High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Kegang

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas viscosity is one of the gas properties that is vital to petroleum engineering. Its role in the oil and gas production and transportation is indicated by its contribution in the resistance to the flow of a fluid both in porous media and pipes...

  20. Densities and viscosities of ternary ammonia/water fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Zaltash, A.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The densities, viscosities, and boiling points (at barometric pressure) of solutions formed by inorganic salts dissolved in an ammonia/water (NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O) solvent have been measured. These ternary solutions of ammonia/water/dissolved salt are being investigated to reduce rectification requirements and to expand the temperature range of ammonia/water in advanced absorption cycles. Densities and viscosities of these fluids were measured over the temperature range of 283.15 to 343.15 K (10.0 to 70.0{degrees}C). Observed densities and viscosities were expressed as empirical functions of temperature by means of the least-squares method. The dynamic viscosities of ternary fluids were found to be three to seven times greater than those of the binary system of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O, which implies that a substantial decrease in the film heat and mass transfer coefficient is possible. However, because this quantitative linkage is not well understood, direct measurements of heat and mass transfer rates in a minisorber are recommended and planned.

  1. An improved viscosity equation to characterize shear-thinning fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved viscosity equation is proposed for shear-thinning polymer solutions, using a kinetic approach to model the rate of formation and loss of interactive bonding during shear flow. The bonds are caused by temporary polymer entanglements in polymer solutions, and by coordination bonding in metal ion cross-linked gels. The equation characterizes the viscosity of shear-thinning fluids over a wide range of shear rates, from the zero shear region through to infinite shear viscosity. The equation has been used to characterize fluid data from a wide range of fluids. Recent work indicates that a range of polymer solutions, polymer-based drilling fluids and frac-gels do not have a measurable yield stress, and that the equations which use extrapolated values of yield stress can be significantly in error. The new equation is compared with the Carreau and Cross equations, using the correlation procedure of Churchill and Usagi. It gives a significantly better fit to the data (by up to 50%) over a wide range of shear rates. The improved equation can be used for evaluating the fluid viscosity during the flow of polymeric fluids, in a range of oilfield applications including drilling, completion, stimulation and improved recovery (IOR) processes.

  2. Shear viscosity of the $\\Phi^4$ theory from classical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homor, M M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear viscosity of the classical $\\Phi^4$ theory is measured using classical microcanonical simulation. To calculate the Kubo formula, we measure the energy-momentum tensor correlation function, and apply the Green-Kubo relation. Being a classical theory, the results depend on the cutoff which should be chosen in the range of the temperature. Comparison with experimentally accessible systems is also performed.

  3. Shear viscosity of boost invariant plasma at finite coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss string theory alpha' corrections in the dual description of the expanding boost invariant N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma at strong coupling. We compute finite 't Hooft coupling corrections to the shear viscosity and find that it disagrees with the equilibrium correlation function computations. We comment on the possible source of the discrepancy.

  4. Shear Viscosity to Entropy within a Parton Cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El; C. Greiner; Z. Xu

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The shear viscosity is calculated by means of the perturbative kinetic partonic cascade BAMPS with CGC initial conditons for various saturation momentum scale Q_s. eta/s ~ 0.15 stays approximately constant when going from RHIC to LHC.

  5. Shear viscosity of the $?^4$ theory from classical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Homor; A. Jakovac

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear viscosity of the classical $\\Phi^4$ theory is measured using classical microcanonical simulation. To calculate the Kubo formula, we measure the energy-momentum tensor correlation function, and apply the Green-Kubo relation. Being a classical theory, the results depend on the cutoff which should be chosen in the range of the temperature. Comparison with experimentally accessible systems is also performed.

  6. Viscosity from elliptic flow: the path to precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich W. Heinz; J. Scott Moreland; Huichao Song

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we show that systematic studies of the impact parameter dependence of the eccentricity scaled elliptic flow can distinguish between different models for the calculation of the initial source eccentricity. This removes the largest present uncertainty in the extraction of the specific viscosity of the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from precise elliptic flow measurements.

  7. Author's personal copy Viscosity of magmatic liquids: A model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kelly

    for viscosity can also predict other transport properties including glass transition temperatures (Tg) and melt are effusive or explosive (Dingwell, 1996; Papale, 1999; Sparks, 2004). Other volatile components (CO2, Cl, Br assumes a common, high-T limit (A) for silicate melt viscosityand returns a value for this limit of -4

  8. Viscosity of magmatic liquids: A model Daniele Giordano a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kelly

    also predict other transport properties including glass transition temperatures (Tg) and melt fragility are effusive or explosive (Dingwell, 1996; Papale, 1999; Sparks, 2004). Other volatile components (CO2, Cl, Br-dependence of viscosity is accounted for by the VFTequation [log =A+B/(T(K)-C)]. The optimization assumes a common, high

  9. A Tensor Artificial Viscosity using a Mimetic Finite Difference Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashkov, Mikhail

    internal energy and v in the velocity vector. If the hydrodynamics code is intended to solve problems in a hydrodynamics code are the conservation equa­ tions. For a Lagrangian code the equations of conservation of mass to derive forms of the mo­ mentum and energy equations for a nonorthogonal grid with the viscosity tensor

  10. Intermolecular potential parameters and combining rules determined from viscosity data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastien, Lucas A.J.; Price, Phillip N.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Law of Corresponding States has been demonstrated for a number of pure substances and binary mixtures, and provides evidence that the transport properties viscosity and diffusion can be determined from a molecular shape function, often taken to be a Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, that requires two scaling parameters: a well depth {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and a collision diameter {sigma}{sub ij}, both of which depend on the interacting species i and j. We obtain estimates for {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and {sigma}{sub ij} of interacting species by finding the values that provide the best fit to viscosity data for binary mixtures, and compare these to calculated parameters using several 'combining rules' that have been suggested for determining parameter values for binary collisions from parameter values that describe collisions of like molecules. Different combining rules give different values for {sigma}{sub ij} and {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and for some mixtures the differences between these values and the best-fit parameter values are rather large. There is a curve in ({var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij}) space such that parameter values on the curve generate a calculated viscosity in good agreement with measurements for a pure gas or a binary mixture. The various combining rules produce couples of parameters {var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij} that lie close to the curve and therefore generate predicted mixture viscosities in satisfactory agreement with experiment. Although the combining rules were found to underpredict the viscosity in most of the cases, Kong's rule was found to work better than the others, but none of the combining rules consistently yields parameter values near the best-fit values, suggesting that improved rules could be developed.

  11. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawler, Katherine

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may be the cause of the viscosity reduction. The flow behavior of alumina particles in water and BECy is markedly different. Aqueous alumina suspensions are shear thinning at all alumina loadings and capable of 50 vol% loading before losing fluidity whereas BECy/alumina suspensions show Newtonian behavior up to 5 vol%, and above 5 vol% show shear thinning at all shear rates. Highly loaded suspensions (i.e. 20vol% alumina) exhibit shear thinning at low and moderate shear rates and shear thickening at higher shear rates. The maximum particle loading for a fluid suspension, in this case, appears to be about 20 vol%. The difference in the viscosity of these suspensions must be related to the solvent-particle interactions for each system. The reason is not exactly known, but there are some notable differences between BECy and water. Water molecules are {approx}0.28 nm in length and highly hydrogen bonded with a low viscosity (1 mPa's) whereas in the cyanate ester (BECy) system, the solvent molecule is about 1.2 nm, in the largest dimension, with surfaces of varied charge distribution throughout the molecule. The viscosity of the monomer is also reasonably low for organic polymer precursor, about 7 mPa's. Nanoparticles in water tend to agglomerate and form flocs which are broken with the shear force applied during viscosity measurement. The particle-particle interaction is very important in this system. In BECy, the particles appear to be well dispersed and not as interactive. The solvent-particle interaction appears to be most important. It is not known exactly how the alumina particles interact with the monomer, but NMR suggests hydrogen bonding. These hydrogen bonds between the particle and monomer could very well affect the viscosity. A conclusion that can be reached in this work is that the presence of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alumina particles is significant and seems to affect the interactions between other particles and the solvent. Thus, the hydrogen bonding between particles, particle/additive and/or particle/solvent dictates the behavior of nanos

  12. Determination of fluid viscosities from biconical annular geometries: Experimental and modeling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rondon, Nolys Javier

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of viscosity of flow streams is essential for the design and operation of production facilities, drilling operations and reservoir engineering calculations. The determination of the viscosity of a reservoir fluid at downhole conditions...

  13. Drop Formation and Breakup of Low Viscosity Elastic Fluids: Effects of Molecular Weight and Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tirtaatmadja, Viyada

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of drop formation and pinch-off have been investigated for a series of low viscosity elastic fluids possessing similar shear viscosities, but differing substantially in elastic properties. On initial approach ...

  14. Asymmetric Surface Brightness Distribution of Altair Observed with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Ohishi; Tyler E. Nordgren; Donald J. Hutter

    2004-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An asymmetric surface brightness distribution of the rapidly rotating A7IV-V star, Altair, has been measured by the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI). The observations were recorded simultaneously using a triangle of three long baselines of 30m, 37m, and 64m, on 19 spectral channels, covering the wavelength range of 520nm to 850nm. The outstanding characteristics of these observations are (a) high resolution with the minimum fringe spacing of 1.7mas, easily resolving the 3-milliarcsecond (mas) stellar disk, and (b) the measurement of closure phase which is a sensitive indicator to the asymmetry of the brightness distribution of the source. Uniform disk diameters fit to the measured squared visibility amplitudes confirms the Altair's oblate shape due to its rapid rotation. The measured observables of Altair showed two features which are inconsistent with both the uniform-disk and limb-darkened disk models, while the measured observable of the comparison star, Vega, are consistent with the limb-darkened disk model. The first feature is that measured squared visibility amplitudes at the first minimum do not reach 0.0 but rather remain at about 0.02, indicating the existence of a small bright region on the stellar disk. The other is that the measured closure phases show non-zero/180 degrees at all spectral channels, which requires an asymmetric surface brightness distribution. We fitted the measured observables to a model with a bright spot on a limb-darkened disk and found the observations are well reproduced by a bright spot, which has relative intensity of 4.7%, on a 3.38 mas limb-darkened stellar disk. Rapid rotation of Altair indicates that this bright region is a pole, which is brighter than other part of the star owing to gravity darkening.

  15. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer Imaging of Line Emission Regions of beta Lyrae Using Differential Phase Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. R. Schmitt; T. A. Pauls; C. Tycner; J. T. Armstrong; R. T. Zavala; J. A. Benson; G. C. Gilbreath; R. B. Hindsley; D. J. Hutter; K. J. Johnston; A. M. Jorgensen; D. Mozurkewich

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an experiment to image the interacting binary star beta Lyrae with data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), using a differential phase technique to correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the interferometer phases. We take advantage of the fact that the visual primary of beta Lyrae and the visibility calibrator we used are both nearly unresolved and nearly centrally symmetric, and consequently have interferometric phases near zero. We used this property to detect and correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the phases of beta Lyrae and to obtain differential phases in the channel containing the Halpha emission line. Combining the Halpha-channel phases with information about the line strength, we recovered complex visibilities and imaged the Halpha emission using standard radio interferometry methods. We find that the results from our differential phase technique are consistent with those obtained from a more-standard analysis using squared visibilities (V^2's). Our images show the position of the Halpha emitting regions relative to the continuum photocenter as a function of orbital phase and indicate that the major axis of the orbit is oriented along p.a.=248.8+/-1.7 deg. The orbit is smaller than previously predicted, a discrepancy that can be alleviated if we assume that the system is at a larger distance from us, or that the contribution of the stellar continuum to the Halpha channel is larger than estimated. Finally, we also detected a differential phase signal in the channels containing HeI emission lines at 587.6 and 706.5nm, with orbital behavior different from that of the Halpha, indicating that it originates from a different part of this interacting system.

  16. Advanced cogeneration and absorption chillers potential for service to Navy bases. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J.W.; Butcher, T.A.; Leigh, R.W.; McDonald, R.J.; Pierce, B.L.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US military uses millions of Btu`s of thermal energy to heat, cool and deliver process thermal energy to buildings on military bases, much of which is transmitted through a pipeline system incorporating thousands of miles of pipe. Much of this pipeline system is in disrepair and is nearing the end of its useful life, and the boilers which supply it are old and often inefficient. In 1993, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) proposed to SERDP a three-year effort to develop advanced systems of coupled diesel cogenerators and absorption chillers which would be particularly useful in providing a continuation of the services now provided by increasingly antiquated district systems. In mid-February, 1995, BNL learned that all subsequent funding for our program had been canceled. BNL staff continued to develop the Program Plan and to adhere to the requirements of the Execution Plan, but began to look for ways in which the work could be made relevant to Navy and DoD energy needs even without the extensive development plan formerly envisioned. The entire program was therefore re-oriented to look for ways in which small scale cogeneration and absorption chilling technologies, available through procurement rather than development, could provide some solutions to the problem of deteriorated district heating systems. The result is, we believe, a striking new approach to the provision of building services on military bases: in many cases, serious study should be made of the possibility that the old district heating system should be removed or abandoned, and small-scale cogenerators and absorption chillers should be installed in each building. In the remainder of this Summary, we develop the rationale behind this concept and summarize our findings concerning the conditions under which this course of action would be advisable and the economic benefits which will accrue if it is followed. The details are developed in the succeeding sections of the report.

  17. Major sources to waivers - lessons learned and $ saved at two U.S. Navy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klitsch, M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, West Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division (NSWCCD) manages 17 US Navy research and development (R and D) facilities across the country. These include two facilities in Maryland -- one in Annapolis and the other in West Bethesda which is better known as Carderock. NO{sub x} is the only air emission which exceeds a threshold limit at both properties. The potential to emit NO{sub x} is 72 tpy for Annapolis and 51 tpy for Carderock. The facilities are in different counties but each county has a trigger limit for NO{sub x} of 25 tpy making both facilities major sources. In preparation for the Title V permit applications to the state of Maryland, Carderock budgeted $150,000 in fiscal year 1996 to have a contractor conduct air emission inventories and prepare the Title V permits for both Carderock and Annapolis. However, the Carderock Air Program Manager did not pursue a contractor to perform the work but personally conducted the air emission inventory for both Annapolis and Carderock. Noticing a large difference between the potential-to-emit and the actual emissions of NO{sub x}, the Air Program Manager began negotiations with the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) to waive the requirement for the Title V permit application. MDE responded in December 1996 that if the facility`s actual emissions would not exceed 50% of any of the threshold limits during any 12 month period, then a letter of understanding stating such should be submitted to MDE. This letter of understanding would be recognized by the US EPA and MDE and would act as a waiver to the Title V permit applicability up to July 31, 1998. Carderock and Annapolis meet this requirement and letters of understanding were drafted and sent to MDE in January 1997.

  18. An Adaptive Artificial Viscosity Method for the Saint-Venant System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurganov, Alexander

    An Adaptive Artificial Viscosity Method for the Saint-Venant System Yunlong Chen, Alexander in applying the adaptive artificial viscosity method proposed in [13] to the Saint-Venant system of shallow enforc- ing the nonlinear stability by adding an artificial viscosity to the PDE system in the regions

  19. THE CALCULATION OF QUALITY FACTOR OF FILM BULK ACOUSTIC RESONATORS WITH THE CONSIDERATION OF VISCOSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    elastic constants which are proportional to vibration frequency. The actual value of the viscosity factor is given as an equivalent parameter. Such a procedure is useful in understanding the effect of viscosity factor, viscosity, electrical circuit parameters, layered structures, piezoelectric, film, FBAR 1

  20. Molecular rotors: synthesis and evaluation as viscosity sensors Jeyanthy Sutharsan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    Molecular rotors: synthesis and evaluation as viscosity sensors Jeyanthy Sutharsan a , Darcy-mechanical viscosity sensors. These compounds, referred to as molecular rotors, belong to a class of fluorescent probes present the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of these compounds as viscosity sensors

  1. Bulk viscosity of superfluid hyperon stars Mikhail E. Gusakov and Elena M. Kantor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulk viscosity of superfluid hyperon stars Mikhail E. Gusakov and Elena M. Kantor Ioffe Physical; published 14 October 2008) We calculate the bulk viscosity due to nonequilibrium weak processes bulk viscosity coefficients, with only three of them being independent. In addition, we correct

  2. Viscosity and longest relaxation time of semi-dilute polymer solutions. I. Good solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1185 Viscosity and longest relaxation time of semi-dilute polymer solutions. I. Good solvent M expliqués par un modèle de reptation classique. Abstract. 2014 The zero shear viscosity and longest concentration (4 c/c* 70), we find that : 2014 both the relative viscosity ~r and the longest relaxation time TR

  3. On viscosity solutions of certain Hamilton-Jacobi equations: Regularity results and generalized Sard's Theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On viscosity solutions of certain Hamilton-Jacobi equations: Regularity results and generalized prove that any viscosity solution of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation on the manifold M). Moreover, we prove that, under additional assumptions and in low dimension, any viscosity solution

  4. The viscosity of Earth's lower mantle inferred from sinking speed of subducted lithosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cizkova, Hana

    The viscosity of Earth's lower mantle inferred from sinking speed of subducted lithosphere Hana 2012 Available online 20 February 2012 Keywords: Lower mantle viscosity Slab sinking velocity a b s t r a c t The viscosity of the mantle is indispensable for predicting Earth's mechanical behavior

  5. VISCOSITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA WITHIN DOREMUS APPROACH Michael I. Ojovan, William E. Lee, Russell J. Hand*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    VISCOSITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA WITHIN DOREMUS APPROACH Michael I. Ojovan, William E. Lee, Russell J flow is the two-exponential formula of the viscosity AT exp(B/RT)(1+C exp(D/RT)). Derived formula of viscosity has the Arrhenius-type behaviour in both high and low temperature limits and has a form similar

  6. Shear viscosity and shear thinning in two-dimensional Yukawa , J. Goree2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    Shear viscosity and shear thinning in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids Z. Donk´o1 , J. Goree2 , P using two different nonequi- librium molecular dynamics simulation methods. Shear viscosity values.e., the viscosity diminishes with increasing shear rate. It is expected that two-dimensional dusty plasmas

  7. Viscosity of Bacterial Suspensions: Hydrodynamic Interactions and Self-Induced Noise Shawn D. Ryan,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlyand, Leonid

    Viscosity of Bacterial Suspensions: Hydrodynamic Interactions and Self-Induced Noise Shawn D. Ryan, 2011) The viscosity of a suspension of swimming bacteria is investigated analytically and numerically fluid, result in a dramatic reduction of the effective viscosity. In agreement with experiments

  8. Viscosity and elastic constants of amorphous Si and Ge Ann Witwow@ and Frans Spaepen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spaepen, Frans A.

    Viscosity and elastic constants of amorphous Si and Ge Ann Witwow@ and Frans Spaepen Division expansion. Viscous flow was measured by stress relaxation and was found to be Newtonian. The viscosity of the viscosity of sputter-deposited samples as a function of stress (to establish the Newtonian charac- ter

  9. Viscosity-Dependent Protein Dynamics Ilya J. Finkelstein, Aaron M. Massari, and M. D. Fayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Viscosity-Dependent Protein Dynamics Ilya J. Finkelstein, Aaron M. Massari, and M. D. Fayer viscosity at room temperature in four heme proteins: hemoglobin, myoglobin, a myoglobin mutant replaced by an alanine (M61A). Fructose is added to increase the viscosity of the aqueous protein solutions

  10. Process for stabilizing the viscosity characteristics of coal derived materials and the stabilized materials obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bronfenbrenner, James C. (Allentown, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Allentown, PA); Tewari, Krishna (Allentown, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for stabilizing the viscosity of coal derived materials such as an SRC product by adding up to 5.0% by weight of a light volatile phenolic viscosity repressor. The viscosity will remain stabilized for a period of time of up to 4 months.

  11. Viscosity and solute dependence of F-actin translocation by rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Tom

    Viscosity and solute dependence of F-actin translocation by rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin P, Ying Chen, Kristi L. Kulin, and Thomas L. Daniel. Viscosity and solute dependence of F the hypothesis that solvent viscosity affects transloca- tion of rhodamine phalloidin-labeled F-actin by rabbit

  12. A low viscosity wedge in subduction zones Magali I. Billen *, Michael Gurnis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billen, Magali I.

    A low viscosity wedge in subduction zones Magali I. Billen *, Michael Gurnis Seismological mantle wedge), which could decrease the viscosity of the mantle locally by several orders of magnitude. Using numerical models we demonstrate that a low viscosity wedge has a dramatic influence on the force

  13. A Viscosity Approach to Total Variation Flows of Non-Divergence Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hitoshi

    A Viscosity Approach to Total Variation Flows of Non-Divergence Type Norbert Poz´ar Graduate School, we will introduce a notion of viscosity solutions for a class of singular nonlinear parabolic viscosity theory does not apply is the unboundedness of the operator on the right-hand side of (5) at u = 0

  14. Viscosity of magmas containing highly deformable bubbles M. Mangaa,*, M. Loewenbergb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Viscosity of magmas containing highly deformable bubbles M. Mangaa,*, M. Loewenbergb a Department The shear viscosity of a suspension of deformable bubbles dispersed within a Newtonian ¯uid is calculated. For small Ca, bubbles remain nearly spherical, and for suf®ciently large strains the viscosity of suspension

  15. A review of "The Navy and Government in Early Modern France 1572-1661." by Alan James 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward M. Furgol

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hostilities with England in the mid-1650s led not to war, but to an alliance in 1657. Perhaps one could argue that English naval assistance removed the grounds for expansion of the French navy. James astutely observes that the physical and personal distance... infor- mation about the sources of warships in the Atlantic fleet, and the quality of those in the Mediterranean squadron. The index is serviceable. The exclusion of maps and images is unfortunate. Including charts that showed the con- flicting lines...

  16. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan (Mississippi State, MS); Shah, Vimal (Houston, TX); Costley, R. Daniel (Mississippi State, MS); Singh, Jagdish P. (Mississippi State, MS)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  17. Accretion disc viscosity: a limit on the anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Chris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of warped discs can give insight into the nature of angular momentum transport in accretion discs. Only a few objects are known to show strong periodicity on long timescales, but when such periodicity is present it is often attributed to precession of the accretion disc. The X-ray binary Hercules X-1/HZ Herculis (Her X-1) is one of the best examples of such periodicity and has been linked to disc precession since it was first observed. By using the current best-fitting models to Her X-1, which invoke precession driven by radiation warping, I place a constraint on the effective viscosities that act in a warped disc. These effective viscosities almost certainly arise due to turbulence induced by the magneto-rotational instability. The constraints derived here are in agreement with analytical and numerical investigations into the nature of magneto-hydrodynamic disc turbulence, but at odds with some recent global simulations.

  18. An estimate of QGP viscosity from STAR data on $?$ mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative hydrodynamics, with a lattice based equation of state, where the confinement-deconfinement transition is a cross-over at $T_{co}$=196 MeV, we have analysed the STAR data on $\\phi$ meson production in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. From a simultaneous fit to $\\phi$ mesons multiplicity, mean $p_T$ and integrated $v_2$, we obtain a phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity, $\\eta/s =0.15 \\pm 0.05 \\pm 0.03$, the first error is due to the experimental uncertainty in STAR measurements, the second reflects the uncertainties in initial and final conditions of the fluid. A host of STAR data, e.g. $\\phi$ multiplicity, integrated $v_2$, mean $p_T$, $p_T$ spectra ($p_T <$3 GeV), in central Au+Au collisions, are consistent with the estimate of viscosity.

  19. Magnetic component of gluon plasma and its viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. N. Chernodub; H. Verschelde; V. I. Zakharov

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the role of the magnetic degrees of freedom of the gluon plasma in its viscosity. The main assumption is that motions of the magnetic component and of the rest of the plasma can be considered as independent. The magnetic component in the deconfined phase is described by a three-dimensional (Euclidean) field theory. The parameters of the theory can be estimated phenomenologically, from the lattice data. It is not ruled out that the magnetic component is superfluid.

  20. Shear viscosity and chemical equilibration of the QGP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Plumari; Armando Puglisi; Maria Colonna; Francesco Scardina; Vincenzo Greco

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated, in the frame work of the transport approach, different aspects of the QGP created in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The shear viscosity $\\eta$ has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo relation at the cascade level. We have compared the numerical results for $\\eta$ obtained from the Green-Kubo correlator with the analytical formula in both the Relaxation Time Approximation (RTA) and the Chapman-Enskog approximation (CE). From this comparison we show that in the range of temperature explored in a Heavy Ion collision the RTA underestimates the viscosity by about a factor of 2, while a good agreement is found between the CE approximation and Gree-Kubo relation already at first order of approximation. The agreement with the CE approximation supplies an analytical formula that allows to develop kinetic transport theory at fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$. We show some results for the build up of anisotropic flows $v_{2}$ in a transport approach at fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$. We study the impact of a T-dependent $\\eta/s(T)$ on the generation of the elliptic flows at both RHIC and LHC. We show that the transport approach provides, in a unified way, a tool able to naturally describe the $v_{2}(p_{T})$ in a wide range of $p_{T}$, including also the description of the rise and fall and saturation of the $v_{2}(p_{T})$ observed at LHC. Finally, we have studied the evolution of the quark-gluon composition employing a Boltzmann-Vlasov transport approach that include: the mean fields dynamics, associated to the quasi-particle model, and the elastic and inelastic collisions for massive quarks and gluons. Following the chemical evolution from an initial gluon dominated plasma we predict a quark dominance close to $T_{C}$ paving the way to an hadronization via quark coalescence.

  1. Centrality dependence of elliptic flow and QGP viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Israel-Stewart's theory of second order hydrodynamics, we have analysed the recent PHENIX data on charged particles elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions. PHENIX data demand more viscous fluid in peripheral collisions than in central collisions. Over a broad range of collision centrality (0-10%- 50-60%), viscosity to entropy ratio ($\\eta/s$) varies between 0-0.17.

  2. Effective viscosity of active suspensions: Three-dimensional numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levan Jibuti; Walter Zimmermann; Salima Rafaï; Philippe Peyla

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional model is proposed for Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii swimming with a breaststroke-like beating of its two flagella. The model reveals unusual angular orbits of the active swimmer under a linear shear flow. Namely, the swimmer sustains orientation transiently across the flow when flagella plane is perpendicular to the shear plane, and amplify the shear-induced rotation along the flow. Such behavior is a result of the interplay between shear-induced deformation and swimmer's periodic beating motion that exerts internal torques on the torque-free swimmer. This particular behavior has some significant consequences on the rheological properties of the suspension that tends to confirm previous experimental results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 098102 (2010)]. We calculated the intrinsic viscosity of the suspension with such isolated modeled microswimmers (dilute case) in shear flow using numerical simulations based on Rotne-Prager approximation. The results show an increased intrinsic viscosity for active swimmer suspensions in comparison to non-active ones in accordance with previous experimental measurements. A major enhancement of the active swimmer viscosity occurs due to the effectively extended shape of the deformable swimming cells. We also recover the experimentally observed shear thinning behavior.

  3. Viscosity and Diffusion: Crowding and Salt Effects in Protein Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Heinen; Fabio Zanini; Felix Roosen-Runge; Diana Fedunová; Fajun Zhang; Marcus Hennig; Tilo Seydel; Ralf Schweins; Michael Sztucki; Marián Antalík; Frank Schreiber; Gerhard Nägele

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a joint experimental-theoretical study of collective diffusion in, and static shear viscosity of solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins, focusing on the dependence on protein and salt concentration. Data obtained from dynamic light scattering and rheometric measurements are compared to theoretical calculations based on an analytically treatable spheroid model of BSA with isotropic screened Coulomb plus hard-sphere interactions. The only input to the dynamics calculations is the static structure factor obtained from a consistent theoretical fit to a concentration series of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data. This fit is based on an integral equation scheme that combines high accuracy with low computational cost. All experimentally probed dynamic and static properties are reproduced theoretically with an at least semi-quantitative accuracy. For lower protein concentration and low salinity, both theory and experiment show a maximum in the reduced viscosity, caused by the electrostatic repulsion of proteins. The validity range of a generalized Stokes-Einstein (GSE) relation connecting viscosity, collective diffusion coefficient, and osmotic compressibility, proposed by Kholodenko and Douglas [PRE 51, 1081 (1995)] is examined. Significant violation of the GSE relation is found, both in experimental data and in theoretical models, in semi-dilute systems at physiological salinity, and under low-salt conditions for arbitrary protein concentrations.

  4. Special Access Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order is for OFFICIAL USE ONLY and will not be distributed on the Directives' Portal. For distribution, please contact the Executive Secretary of the Special Access Program Oversight Committee at (202) 586-3345. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin Economy Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2009 An annual report by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department

  6. Special Undergraduate Informations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report: IG-0900 December 6,Special

  7. Navy Warfare Development Command (NWDC) is hosting a Pacific Rim Innovation Symposium on October 10-11, 2012, at the SPAWAR Center in San Diego, Ca., for junior leaders from E-5 to O-5. The event is scheduled to start at 12:00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navy Warfare Development Command (NWDC) is hosting a Pacific Rim Innovation Symposium on October 10 will be brought forward to senior Navy leadership. Agenda: 10 OCT (All Times Pacific Daylight Time) 1200 Welcome of Breakout Group Issues 1730 Adjourn for the Day 11 OCT 1200 Navy Innovation Resources, CAPT David Tyler, ACo

  8. Procedure for Koehler Digital Constant Temperature Viscosity Bath This unit is designed to perform kinematic viscosity tests using glass capillary viscometers, for this lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Standard D-446. Viscosity Bath: The viscosity bath should be filled 5 cm (2") from the top of the bath tank - ASTM D446 - ASTM D2170 - IP 71 - IP 319 - ISO 3140 - DIN 51550 - FTM 791-305 Over Temperature

  9. A Ratiometric Fluorescent Viscosity Sensor Mark A. Haidekker,*, Thomas P. Brady, Darcy Lichlyter, and Emmanuel A. Theodorakis*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    .g., blood, plasma, or lymphatic fluid viscosity changes in diabetes, hypertension, infarction, and aging).2

  10. Bulk viscosity in a plasma of confining gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Radoslaw Ryblewski; Nan Su; Konrad Tywoniuk

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamic properties of a plasma whose constituents are confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization. In a static formulation, this system reproduces qualitatively the pure-glue equation of state and thereby encodes crucial features of the phase transition. The dynamic description proposed in this work allows us to study non-equilibrium transport phenomena with the inclusion of confinement effects. In particular, we determine the non-equilibrium behaviour of the interaction measure (trace anomaly) and find the form of the bulk viscosity coefficient. The latter may be used in phenomenological applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rye,Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM), Yost,Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  12. Sweeping has no effect on renormalized turbulent viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendra K. Verma; Abhishek Kumar

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ renormalization group techniques (RG) to the Navier-Stokes equation in the presence of constant mean velocity field $\\mathbf U_0$, and show that the renormalized viscosity is independent of $\\mathbf U_0$. Thus we demonstrates that the renormalized parameter in Eulerian field theory is Galilean invariant, and it is unaffected by the "sweeping effect", contrary to the results of Kraichnan [Phys. Fluids {\\bf 7}, 1723 (1964)] on random Galilean invariance. Using direct numerical simulation, we show that the correlation functions for $\\mathbf U_0 =0$ and $\\mathbf U_0 \

  13. Viscosity in X-ray clusters: Braginskii over 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gruzinov

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that it is currently impossible to simulate X-ray clusters using correct equations, because even the MHD description is not applicable. But since fluid simulations actually reproduce observations quite well, one may try to improve the fluid codes by including molecular transport of heat and momentum. We calculate the effective molecular viscosity for the simplest model of magnetic field and obtain 1/5 of the Braginskii value, similar to 1/3 of Spitzer for the heat conduction. This is large enough to noticeably damp the X-ray cluster turbulence.

  14. Bulk viscosity in a plasma of confining gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Su, Nan; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamic properties of a plasma whose constituents are confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization. In a static formulation, this system reproduces qualitatively the pure-glue equation of state and thereby encodes crucial features of the phase transition. The dynamic description proposed in this work allows us to study non-equilibrium transport phenomena with the inclusion of confinement effects. In particular, we determine the non-equilibrium behaviour of the interaction measure (trace anomaly) and find the form of the bulk viscosity coefficient. The latter may be used in phenomenological applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Influence of Liquid Viscosity on Droplet Impingement on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, John T; Webb, Brent W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fluid dynamics video describes droplet impingement experiments performed on superhydrophobic surfaces. When droplets of pure water are impinged upon superhydrophobic surfaces, a region of thin coherent jets are observed for Weber numbers between 5 and 15. Also, peripheral splashing is observed for Weber numbers above about 200. When the viscosity of the droplet is increased by mixing glycerol with the water, the thin jets are not observed and peripheral splashing is delayed somewhat. In the Weber number range where pure water droplets are observed to splash peripherally, the water/glycerol droplets are observed to have two-pronged jets.

  16. "we have . . . kept the negroes' goodwill and sent them away": black sailors, white dominion in the new navy, 1893-1942 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles Hughes

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    major phase began in April 1919 with the cessation of domestic enlistments in the messman’s branch. The meant the effective exclusion of blacks, as the navy had previously limited them to this one area of service. Between World War I and 1933 thousands...

  17. SpecialBulletin BLUEPRINTBLUEPRINT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (along with those forenergy efficientappliances) have saved more than $56billion in electricity and natural gasSpecialBulletin BLUEPRINTBLUEPRINT EFFICIENCY,RENEWABLES&DEMANDANALYSISDIVISION C a l i f or n i costs since 1978. It is estimatedthe Standards will save an additional $23 billion by 2013. http

  18. of Colorado's Special Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Special Issue 2005 Aspen Forests #12;2005 Report the ecology and management of the state's aspen forests and provides an expanded insect and disease update in the management of Colorado's trademark aspen forests. Many of the state's aspen stands are reaching the end

  19. Absolute measurement of the viscosity of classical and quantum fluids by rotating-cylinder viscometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, R.J.; LaMar, M.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the use of rotating-cylinder viscometers to determine absolute shear viscosities of classical fluids and of helium II in the context of past and current knowledge of the stability and flow of these fluids between concentric cylinders. We identify a problem in measuring the absolute viscosity when the inner cylinder is rotating and the outer cylinder is at rest. We conclude by discussing the design of viscometers for absolute viscosity measurements in helium I and helium II.

  20. Shear Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio in Six Derivative Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabamita Banerjee; Suvankar Dutta

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in presence of four derivative (with coefficient $\\alpha'$) and six derivative (with coefficient $\\alpha'^2$) terms in bulk action. In general, there can be three possible four derivative terms and ten possible six derivative terms in the Lagrangian. Among them two four derivative and eight six derivative terms are ambiguous, i.e., these terms can be removed from the action by suitable field redefinitions. Rest are unambiguous. According to the AdS/CFT correspondence all the unambiguous coefficients (coefficients of unambiguous terms) can be fixed in terms of field theory parameters. Therefore, any measurable quantities of boundary theory, for example shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, when calculated holographically can be expressed in terms of unambiguous coefficients in the bulk theory (or equivalently in terms of boundary parameters). We calculate $\\eta/s$ for generic six derivative gravity and find that apparently it depends on few ambiguous coefficients at order $\\alpha'^2$. We calculate six derivative corrections to central charges $a$ and $c$ and express $\\eta/s$ in terms of these central charges and unambiguous coefficients in the bulk theory.

  1. Displacement of oil from reservoir rock using graded-viscosity water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Atigi, Yosef A

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reservoir conditions. The objective of this paper was to investigate, in the dis- placement processes the effect on oil recovery of 1) A graded- viscosity bank as compared to that of a constant-viscosity bank. The two banks used had the same mass...- cosity. He compared his results with a constant-viscosity slug, having the same mass of polymer and found increased oil recov- eries from the graded-viscosity slug, in the displacement process. His concentration of polymer, however, were too high...

  2. Bulk viscosity of strange matter and r-modes in neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debarati Chatterjee; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss bulk viscosity due to non-leptonic processes involving hyperons and Bose-Einstein condensate of negatively charged kaons in neutron stars. It is noted that the hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient is a few order of magnitude larger than that of the case with the condensate. Further it is found that the hyperon bulk viscosity is suppressed in a superconducting phase. The hyperon bulk viscosity efficiently damps the r-mode instability in neutron stars irrespective of whether a superconducting phase is present or not in neutron star interior.

  3. From US NAVY Mate to Division Leader for Operations - Requirements, Development and Career Paths of LANL/LANSCE Accelerator Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    There are opportunities for advancement within the team. Operators advance by: (1) Becoming fully qualified - following the LANSCE Accelerator Operator Training Manual, Operator trainees go through 5 levels of qualification, from Radiation Security System to Experimental Area Operator. Must obtain Knowledge and Performance checkouts by an OSS or AOSS, and an End-of-Card checkout by the team leader or RSS engineer (level I). Program was inspired by US NAVY qualification program for nuclear reactor operators. Time to complete: 2-2.5 years. (2) Fully qualified operators are eligible to apply for vacant (OSS)/AOSS positions; and (3) Alternatively, experienced operators can sign up for the voluntary Senior Operator Qualification Program. They must demonstrate in-depth knowledge of all areas of the accelerator complex. Time to complete is 2-3 years (Minimum 4 years from fully qualified). Eligible for promotion to level between qualified operator and AOSS.

  4. An Analysis of Stream Culvert Fish Passage on the Navy Railroad Line between Bremerton and Shelton, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; Miller, Martin C.; Southard, John A.

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy railroad service line runs between Shelton, Bremerton, and Silverdale, and is used by the Navy to transfer freight to its facilities. It is also used by commercial clients to ship service items and bulk cargo for municipalities along portions of the route. Culverts of various size and construction convey streams and stormwater runoff under the railroad line. These allow transfer of water and, in some cases allow for passage of juvenile and adult salmon into waters upstream of the culverts. As part of this project, 21 culverts along a 34-mile reach (Shelton to Bremerton) of this railroad were surveyed to evaluate their function and ability to allow salmon to utilize the streams. The culverts and attached watersheds were evaluated using criteria developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to assign a Priority Index (PI) to barriers present on each fish-bearing stream. The PI is a relative numeric rating indicator, assigned using consistent criteria related to the degree of potential habitat gained by removing barriers and improving the function of the watershed. Of the 21 culverts evaluated, five were found to be complete fish-passage barriers and six were found to be partial barriers, primarily to juvenile salmon. Three of these culverts had PI ratings above 10 and five others had ratings between 7 and 10. Corrective action can be taken based on any PI rating, but the WDFW normally assigns lower priority to projects with PI scores lower than 15. Several of the stream and culverts had previously been evaluated for structural integrity and function and have been scheduled for repair. A narrative indicating the condition of the culvert has been prepared as well as a table indicating the PI scores and a summary of recommendations for action for each culvert.

  5. QCD Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio in the Hadronic Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiunn-Wei Chen; Yen-Han Li; Yen-Fu Liu; Eiji Nakano

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear viscosity (eta) of QCD in the hadronic phase is computed by the coupled Boltzmann equations of pions and nucleons in low temperatures and low baryon number densities. The eta to entropy density ratio eta/s maps out the nuclear gas-liquid phase transition by forming a valley tracing the phase transition line in the temperature-chemical potential plane. When the phase transition turns into a crossover, the eta/s valley gradually disappears. We suspect the general feature for a first-order phase transition is that eta/s has a discontinuity in the bottom of the eta/s valley. The discontinuity coincides with the phase transition line and ends at the critical point. Beyond the critical point, a smooth eta/s valley is seen. However, the valley could disappear further away from the critical point. The eta/s measurements might provide an alternative to identify the critical points.

  6. Coalescence of Low-Viscosity Fluids in Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah C. Case

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical method is used to study the early stages of coalescence of two low-viscosity drops. A drop of aqueous NaCl solution is suspended in air above a second drop of the same solution which is grown until the drops touch. At that point a rapidly widening bridge forms between them. By measuring the resistance and capacitance of the system during this coalescence event, one can obtain information about the time dependence of the characteristic bridge radius and its characteristic height. At early times, a new asymptotic regime is observed that is inconsistent with previous theoretical predictions. The measurements at several drop radii and approach velocities are consistent with a model in which the two liquids coalesce with a slightly deformed interface.

  7. Cavitation from bulk viscosity in neutron stars and quark stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jes Madsen

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulk viscosity in quark matter is sufficiently high to reduce the effective pressure below the corresponding vapor pressure during density perturbations in neutron stars and strange stars. This leads to mechanical instability where the quark matter breaks apart into fragments comparable to cavitation scenarios discussed for ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Similar phenomena may take place in kaon-condensed stellar cores. Possible applications to compact star phenomenology include a new mechanism for damping oscillations and instabilities, triggering of phase transitions, changes in gravitational wave signatures of binary star inspiral, and astrophysical formation of strangelets. At a more fundamental level it points to the possible inadequacy of a hydrodynamical treatment of these processes in compact stars.

  8. A New Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Methanol Hong Wei Xiang,a...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    A New Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Methanol Hong Wei Xiang,a... Arno Laesecke for the viscosity of methanol is presented that is valid over the entire fluid region, including vapor, liquid coefficient is developed from experimental data and applied to methanol. The high-density contribution

  9. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Wittmer, Dale E. (Carbondale, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  10. Role of viscosity in the accurate prediction of source-terms for high molecular weight substances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Irfan Yusuf

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressure, and mixing effects. The viscosity prediction uses an improvement on current predictions by combining b-parameter and Modified Chung-Lee-starling (MCLS) viscosity predictions for the employed pseudo-mixtures. The source-term model used is SPILLS...

  11. Optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor Mark A. Haidekker and Walter J. Akers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    Optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor Mark A. Haidekker and Walter J. Akers Department to molecular rotors in solution. An optical fiber-based fluorescent vis- cosity sensor may be used in real, we sought to develop an optical fiber-based sensor that could re- port changes in fluid viscosity

  12. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; Wittmer, D.E.

    1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  13. Shear viscosity from R-charged AdS black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mas

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the shear viscosity in the supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory dual to the STU background. This is a thermal gauge theory with a chemical potential. The quotient of the shear viscosity over the entropy density exhibits no deviation from the well known result 1/4\\pi.

  14. ARRHENIUS MODEL FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE GLASS VISCOSITY WITH A CONSTANT PRE-EXPONENTIAL FACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified form of the Arrhenius equation, ln ? = A + B(x)/T, where ? is the viscosity, T the temperature, x the composition vector, and A and B the Arrhenius coefficients, was fitted to glass-viscosity data for the processing temperature range (the range at which the viscosity is within 1 to 103 Pa.s) while setting A = constant and treating B(x) as a linear function of mass fractions of major components. Fitting the Arrhenius equation to over 550 viscosity data of commercial glasses and approximately 1000 viscosity data of glasses for nuclear-waste glasses resulted in the A values of -11.35 and -11.48, respectively. The R2 value ranged from 0.92 to 0.99 for commercial glasses and was 0.98 for waste glasses. The Arrhenius models estimate viscosities for melts of commercial glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 within the temperature range of 1100 to 1550°C and viscosity range of 5 to 400 Pa.s and for waste glasses containing 32 to 60 mass% SiO2 within the temperature range of 850 to 1450°C and viscosity range of 0.4 to 250 Pa.s.

  15. Bending Creep Test to Measure the Viscosity of Porous Materials during Sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messing, Gary L.

    Bending Creep Test to Measure the Viscosity of Porous Materials during Sintering Sang-Ho Lee creep test is proposed for measuring the change in viscosity of a porous material during densification be measured. Experiments with porous Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 beams were used to illustrate the bending creep test

  16. Viscosity and reptation time in polystyrene-benzene semidilute solutions M. Adam and M. Delsanti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-523 Viscosity and reptation time in polystyrene-benzene semidilute solutions M. Adam and M viscosity ~ and reptation time TR in semidilute polystyrene-benzene solutions. We have obtained, our aim is to study the viscoelastic properties of polystyrene-benzene systems in a well defined

  17. Enhanced thermal conductivity and viscosity of copper nanoparticles in ethylene glycol nanofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enhanced thermal conductivity and viscosity of copper nanoparticles in ethylene glycol nanofluid J conductivity and viscosity of copper nanoparticles in ethylene glycol. The nanofluid was prepared calculations suggest that this nanofluid would not be beneficial as a coolant in heat exchangers without

  18. Experimental investigation of nanofluid shear and longitudinal viscosities Aaron J. Schmidt,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental investigation of nanofluid shear and longitudinal viscosities Aaron J. Schmidt,1,a. The measurements indicate that for the decane-based nanofluids the nanoparticles do not form clusters. In the case of PAO nanofluids, the measurements of longitudinal viscosity and the corresponding values

  19. Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity, reduction of slurry viscosity, and corrosion inhibition. INTRODUCTION Water often forms gas hydrates antiagglomeration (AA) in the natural gas hydrate literature. The main limitation to application has been the need

  20. Enrichment short courses and special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrichment short courses and special events specially developed for folks 50 and better. Look better way to spend your summer than expanding your knowledge and enriching your life with an Osher

  1. A correlation of United States tar sand bitumen viscosities with NMR spectroscopic parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netzel, D.A.; Turner, T.F.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed whereby the viscosity of a tar sand bitumen at any temperature can be calculated from nuclear magnetic resonance parameters. The method is semiempirical but is based upon some fundamental theoretical concepts for molecular mobility and intermolecular interactions. Using this method, the viscosities of three United States tar sand bitumens have been correlated to the weighted average spin-spin relaxation rates for the semiliquid, solidlike mobile, and solidlike rigid phases of the bitumens. The results indicate that bitumens with a high viscosity have a greater amount of solidlike rigid phase and lesser amounts of solidlike mobile and semiliquid phases than do the bitumens with low viscosity. It is also shown that the viscosity of a tar sand bitumen over a 100 degree temperature range can be determined from a single NMR experiment conducted near room temperature. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A correlation of United States tar sand bitumen viscosities with NMR spectroscopic parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netzel, D.A.; Turner, T.F. (Western Research Institute, Box 3395, Laramie, WY (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed whereby the viscosity of a tar sand bitumen at any temperature can be calculated from nuclear magnetic resonance parameters. The method is semi empirical but is based upon some fundamental theoretical concepts for molecular mobility and intermolecular interactions. Using this method, the viscosities of three United States tar sand bitumens have been correlated to the weighted average spin-spin, relaxation rates for the semiliquid, solidlike mobile, and solidlike rigid phases of the bitumens. The results indicate that bitumens with a high viscosity have a greater amount of solidlike rigid phase and lesser amounts of solidlike mobile and semiliquid phases than do the bitumens with low viscosity. It is also shown that the viscosity of a tar sand bitumen over a 100 degree temperature range can be determined from a single NMR experiment conducted near room temperature.

  3. Special Report: IG-0748

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview -Special Report 150133

  4. Special Report: IG-0777

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview -Special Report

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (Area B Navy Fire Test Facility), Atlantic County, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ, September 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for Area B, the Navy Fire Test Facility, at the FAA Technical Center, Atlantic City Internatioal Airport, New Jersey. The selected remedy for Area B includes: Installation of additional monitoring wells; Continued ground water and surface water monitoring; Installation and operation of air sparging wells, vapor extraction wells and monitoring probes; On-site vapor treatment (if necessary); and Five year reviews.

  6. Viscosity Dependence of the Rotational Reorientation of Rhodamine B in Mono-and Polyalcohols. Picosecond Transient Grating Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Viscosity Dependence of the Rotational Reorientation of Rhodamine B in Mono- and Polyalcohols-Stokes-Einstein (DSE) theorywas shown to extend to much higher viscosities than previously reported. Detailed of radius R and hydrodynamic volume V rotating in a fluid continuum of macroscopic viscosity q and relates

  7. Viscosity of an electro-rheological suspension with internal rotations. E. Lemaire, L.Lobry, N. Pannacci, F.Peters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Viscosity of an electro-rheological suspension with internal rotations. E. Lemaire, L.Lobry, N (Quincke rotation) which, in turn, leads to a drastic decrease of the apparent viscosity of the suspension. The purpose of the paper is to provide a relation between the apparent viscosity of the suspension and the E

  8. Viscosity and radial distribution function in PbxSe(1-x) melts for stoechiometric and peritectic compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-529 Viscosity and radial distribution function in PbxSe(1-x) melts for stoechiometric by lead atoms sur- rounded by Se atoms are considered. Kinematic viscosity data are compared a molecular structure in the liquid state rather than a chain-structure [1]. Viscosity is very sensitive

  9. Viscosity of the Aqueous Liquid/Vapor Interfacial Region: 2D Electrochemical Measurements with a Piperidine Nitroxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Marcin

    Viscosity of the Aqueous Liquid/Vapor Interfacial Region: 2D Electrochemical Measurements, and that it is coupled to the interfacial water via hydrogen bonding with H2O. In view of this postulate, the viscosity into the dynamic characteristics of aqueous interfaces. Thus, parameters such as the viscosity of water

  10. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers at moderate concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantin, Lipnikov [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.; Aronson, I [ANL; Berlyand, L [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there have been a number of experimental studies suggesting that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled bacteria can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  11. Direct multi-wavelength limb-darkening measurements of three late-type giants with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wittkowski; C. A. Hummel; K. J. Johnston; D. Mozurkewich; A. R. Hajian; N. M. White

    2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of the limb-darkened intensity profiles of the late-type giant stars HR5299, HR7635, and HR8621 obtained with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) at the Lowell Observatory. A triangle of baselines with lengths of 18.9 m, 22.2 m, and 37.5 m was used. We utilized squared visibility amplitudes beyond the first minimum, as well as triple amplitudes and phases in up to 10 spectral channels covering a wavelength range of ~650 nm to ~850 nm. We find that our data can best be described by featureless symmetric limb-darkened disk models while uniform disk and fully darkened disk models can be rejected. We derive high-precision angular limb-darkened diameters for the three stars of 7.44 mas +/- 0.11 mas, 6.18 mas +/- 0.07 mas, and 6.94 mas +/- 0.12 mas, respectively. Using the HIPPARCOS parallaxes, we determine linear limb-darkened radii of 114 R$_\\odot \\pm $13 R$_\\odot$, 56 R$_\\odot \\pm $4 R$_\\odot$, and 98 R$_\\odot \\pm $9 R$_\\odot$, respectively. We compare our data to a grid of Kurucz stellar model atmospheres, with them derive the effective temperatures and surface gravities without additional information, and find agreement with independent estimates derived from empirical calibrations and bolometric fluxes. This confirms the consistency of model predictions and direct observations of the limb-darkening effect.

  12. Theory comparison and numerical benchmarking on neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhirui; Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas; Kim, Kimin; Menard, Jonathan E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Liu, Yueqiang [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic comparison and numerical benchmarking have been successfully carried out among three different approaches of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory and the corresponding codes: IPEC-PENT is developed based on the combined NTV theory but without geometric simplifications [Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 065002 (2009)]; MARS-Q includes smoothly connected NTV formula [Shaing et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025022 (2010)] based on Shaing's analytic formulation in various collisionality regimes; MARS-K, originally computing the drift kinetic energy, is upgraded to compute the NTV torque based on the equivalence between drift kinetic energy and NTV torque [J.-K. Park, Phys. Plasma 18, 110702 (2011)]. The derivation and numerical results both indicate that the imaginary part of drift kinetic energy computed by MARS-K is equivalent to the NTV torque in IPEC-PENT. In the benchmark of precession resonance between MARS-Q and MARS-K/IPEC-PENT, the agreement and correlation between the connected NTV formula and the combined NTV theory in different collisionality regimes are shown for the first time. Additionally, both IPEC-PENT and MARS-K indicate the importance of the bounce harmonic resonance which can greatly enhance the NTV torque when E×B drift frequency reaches the bounce resonance condition.

  13. Finite viscous disks with time-independent viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipunova, Galina V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find the Green's functions for the accretion disk with the fixed outer radius and time-independent viscosity. With the Green's functions, a viscous evolution of the disk with any initial conditions can be described. Two types of the inner boundary conditions are considered: the zero stress tensor and the zero accretion rate. The variable mass inflow at the outer radius can also be included. The well-known exponential decline of the accretion rate is a part of the solution with the inner zero stress tensor. The solution with the zero central accretion rate is applicable to the disks around stars with the magnetosphere's boundary exceeding the corotation radius. Using the solution, the viscous evolution of disks in some binary systems can be studied. We apply the solution with zero inner stress tensor to outbursts of short-period X-ray transients during the time around the peak. It is found that for the Kramers' regime of opacity and the initial surface density proportional to the radius, the rise time to th...

  14. Bound for entropy and viscosity ratio for strange quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manjari Bagchi; Jishnu Dey; Mira Dey; Taparati Gangopadhyay; Sibasish Laha; Subharthi Ray; Monika Sinha

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy density ($\\eps$) and temperature (T) links general relativity and hydrodynamics leading to a lower bound for the ratio of shear viscosity ($\\eta$) and entropy density ($s$). We get the interesting result that the bound is saturated in the simple model for quark matter that we use for strange stars at the surface for $T \\sim 80 MeV$. At this $T$ we have the possibility of cosmic separation of phases. At the surface of the star where the pressure is zero - the density $\\eps$ has a fixed value for all stars of various masses with correspondingly varying central energy density $\\eps_c$. Inside the star where this density is higher, the ratio of $\\eta/s$ is larger and are like the known results found for perturbative QCD. This serves as a check of our calculation. The deconfined quarks at the surface of the strange star at $T = 80 MeV$ seem to constitute the most perfect interacting fluid permitted by nature.

  15. Ultrasonic attenuation and volume viscosity in liquid argon, nitrogen and helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, James Robert

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /cm . Measurements taken at densities from 2 1. 06 to 1. 42 g/cm result in values of 2. 3 to 0. 8 for the ratio of volume to shear viscosity. These values are compared with theoretical predictions of other investigators. It appears that the volume viscosity...ULTRASOM IC A'ITEN UAT IOM AMD VOLUME VISCOSITY IM LIQUID ARGON, "IITROGEV AMD MET IUM A Thesis by JAMES ROBFRT SI'%GER Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AgM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  16. The measurement of cross-linked fracture fluid viscosity using a pipe viscometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermaelen, John Douglas

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was designed to reproduce the shear rate vs. viscosity pr ofile for a linear (uncross-linked) fracture fluid. The fluid tested was a 40 lb/1000 gal hydroxypropyl guar polymer solution, which is a 0. 48$ HPG aqueous solution, The compar ison of the published.... Fig. 27 compar es cases 31, 32, and 33. -1 The gel cross-linked at 30 sec has the lowest appar ent viscosity. Case 31 does not follow the same trend as the other -1 cases. The gel cross-linked at 100 sec has a higher appar ent ? 1 viscosity than...

  17. Page 1 of 3 CBC 12830-123 (Rev 2/6/2012) Department of the Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Special Retirement Provisions The special retirement provisions for Law Enforcement Officers, allows early Retirement Provisions For Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) Law Enforcement Officers Purpose retirement based on the determination that these positions should be composed of young men and women

  18. Experimental Investigation on High-pressure, High-temperature Viscosity of Gas Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davani, Ehsan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the performance of high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) natural gas reservoirs requires the understanding of gas behavior at such conditions. In particular, gas viscosity is an important fluid property that directly affects fluid flow...

  19. Improvement of nutritive value of guar meal through reduction of viscosity by enzyme supplementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason Thomas

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guar meal is a high protein by-product of guar gum production that contains a residual gum, galactomannan polysaccharide. The gum increases intestinal viscosity while decreasing nutrient absorption. Four experiments examined effects of two guar...

  20. Role of viscosity in the accurate prediction of source-terms for high molecular weight substances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Irfan Yusuf

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study shows that using better material property predictions results in better source-term modeling for high molecular weight substances. Viscosity, density, and enthalpy are used as a function of process variables, namely, temperature...

  1. The effective approach for predicting viscosity of saturated and undersaturated reservoir oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulchanyavivat, Sawin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting reservoir oil viscosity with numerical correlation equations using field-measured variables is widely used in the petroleum industry. Most published correlation equations, however, have never profoundly realized the genuine relationship...

  2. Varying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A viscosity of one or more zones of the hydrocarbon layer is assessed. The heating rates in the zones are varied based on the assessed viscosities. The heating rate in a first zone of the formation is greater than the heating rate in a second zone of the formation if the viscosity in the first zone is greater than the viscosity in the second zone. Fluids are produced from the formation through the production wells.

  3. Effects of lubricant viscosity and surface texturing on ring-pack performance in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takata, Rosalind (Rosalind Kazuko), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The piston ring-pack contributes approximately 25% of the mechanical losses in an internal combustion engine. Both lubricant viscosity and surface texturing were investigated in an effort to reduce this ring-pack friction ...

  4. The effective approach for predicting viscosity of saturated and undersaturated reservoir oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulchanyavivat, Sawin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting reservoir oil viscosity with numerical correlation equations using field-measured variables is widely used in the petroleum industry. Most published correlation equations, however, have never profoundly realized the genuine relationship...

  5. Deformation and breakup of high-viscosity droplets with symmetric microfluidic cross flows Thomas Cubaud*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    flows due to the effect of nearby boundaries. In particular, the translation of lubricated drops having are generated at the first focusing section by injecting a sili- cone oil liquid L1 , having a viscosity 1

  6. The nucleon thermal width due to pion-baryon loops and its contribution in Shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the real-time thermal field theory, the standard expression of shear viscosity for the nucleonic constituents is derived from the two point function of nucleonic viscous stress tensors at finite temperature and density. The finite thermal width or Landau damping is traditionally included in the nucleon propagators. This thermal width is calculated from the in-medium self-energy of nucleon for different possible pion-baryon loops. The dynamical part of nucleon-pion-baryon interactions are taken care by the effective Lagrangian densities of standard hadronic model. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of nucleonic component decreases with the temperature and increases with the nucleon chemical potential. However, adding the contribution of pionic component, total viscosity to entropy density ratio also reduces with the nucleon chemical potential when the mixing effect between pion and nucleon components in the mixed gas is considered. Within the hadronic domain, viscosity to entropy density ratio of ...

  7. QGP viscosity at RHIC and the LHC - a 2012 status report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huichao Song

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we briefly review the recent progress related to extracting the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) specific shear viscosity from the flow data measured at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  8. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  9. Influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in a porous medium is investigated through a linear stability analysis (LSA) as well as direct numerical simulations (DNS). The linear stability method implemented in this paper is based on an initial value approach, which helps to capture the onset of instability more accurately than the quasi-steady state analysis. In the absence of displacement, we show that viscosity contrast delays the onset of instability in buoyantly unstable miscible fluids. Further, it is observed that suitably choosing the viscosity contrast and injection velocity a gravitationally unstable miscible interface can be stabilized completely. Through LSA we draw a phase diagram, which shows three distinct stability regions in a parameter space spanned by the displacement velocity and the viscosity contrast. DNS are performed corresponding to parameters from each regime and the results obtained are in accordance with the linear stability results. Moreover, the conv...

  10. Analysis of techniques for predicting viscosity of heavy oil and tar sand bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khataniar, S.; Patil, S.L.; Kamath, V.A. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal recovery methods are generally employed for recovering heavy oil and tar sand bitumen. These methods rely on reduction of oil viscosity by application of heat as one of the primary mechanisms of oil recovery. Therefore, design and performance prediction of the thermal recovery methods require adequate prediction of oil viscosity as a function of temperature. In this paper, several commonly used temperature-viscosity correlations are analyzed to evaluate their ability to correctly predict heavy oil and bitumen viscosity as a function of temperature. The analysis showed that Ali and Standing`s correlations gave satisfactory results in most cases when properly applied. Guidelines are provided for their application. None of the correlations, however, performed satisfactorily with very heavy oils at low temperatures.

  11. Medium effects and the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas away from the conformal limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus Bluhm; Thomas Schaefer

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the shear viscosity of a dilute Fermi gas as a function of the scattering length in the vicinity of the unitarity limit. The calculation is based on kinetic theory, which provides a systematic approach to transport properties in the limit in which the fugacity $z=n\\lambda^3/2$ is small. Here, $n$ is the density of the gas and $\\lambda$ is the thermal wave length of the fermions. At leading order in the fugacity expansion the shear viscosity is independent of density, and the minimum shear viscosity is achieved at unitarity. At the next order medium effects modify the scattering amplitude as well as the quasi-particle energy and velocity. We show that these effects shift the minimum of the shear viscosity to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) side of the resonance, in agreement with the result of recent experiments.

  12. Special set linear algebra and special set fuzzy linear algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; K. Ilanthenral

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors in this book introduce the notion of special set linear algebra and special set fuzzy Linear algebra, which is an extension of the notion set linear algebra and set fuzzy linear algebra. These concepts are best suited in the application of multi expert models and cryptology. This book has five chapters. In chapter one the basic concepts about set linear algebra is given in order to make this book a self contained one. The notion of special set linear algebra and their fuzzy analogue is introduced in chapter two. In chapter three the notion of special set semigroup linear algebra is introduced. The concept of special set n-vector spaces, n greater than or equal to three is defined and their fuzzy analogue is their fuzzy analogue is given in chapter four. The probable applications are also mentioned. The final chapter suggests 66 problems.

  13. Computer simulation of effective viscosity of fluid-proppant mixture used in hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Linkov, Aleksandr M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results of numerical experiments performed to evaluate the effective viscosity of a fluid-proppant mixture, used in hydraulic fracturing. The results, obtained by two complimenting methods (the particle dynamics and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics), coincide to the accuracy of standard deviation. They provide an analytical equation for the dependence of effective viscosity on the proppant concentration, needed for numerical simulation of the hydraulic fracture propagation.

  14. Viscosity of plant oils as a function of temperature, fatty acid chain length, and unsaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neo, Tong Heng

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering VISCOSITY OF PLANT OILS AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE, FATTY ACID CHAIN LENGTH, AND UNSATURATION A Thesis by TONG HENG NEO Approved as to style and content by...: Vincent E. Sweat (Chairman of Committee) Ron L. Richter (Member) R. Engler (Member) Edward A. Hiler (Head of the Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Viscosity of Plant Oils as a Function of Temperature, Fatty Acid Chain Length, and Unsaturation...

  15. Shear viscosity from Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a dilaton coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Ronggen [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China); Nie Zhangyu; Sun Yawen [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, YuQuan Road 19A, Beijing 100049 (China); Ohta, Nobuyoshi [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity of field theories with gravity duals of Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a nontrivial dilaton using anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory. We find that the dilaton field has a nontrivial contribution to the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density, and, after imposing a causal constraint for the boundary field theory, the new lower bound 4/25{pi}, obtained from pure Gauss-Bonnet gravity, may have a small violation.

  16. Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections The Josiah T. Newcomb Collection Finding Aid begun 1985, Richard Gannon Completed 2011, Jean L. Green, Head of Special Collections and Elizabeth A Science in 1937 at Colorado State College of Education and the Bachelor of Science in Library Science

  17. Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections The George E. Green Letter Collection, 1900-1916 Finding Aid created 2010 Macarry Pobanz, Student Assistant, Special Collections #12;The George E. Green Letter Collection Biographical note George E. Green was a prominent politician and businessman

  18. Holographic Spontaneous Parity Breaking and Emergent Hall Viscosity and Angular Momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam Thanh Son; Chaolun Wu

    2014-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spontaneous parity breaking and generating of Hall viscosity and angular momentum in holographic p+ip model, which can describe strongly-coupled chiral superfluid states in many quantum systems. The dual gravity theory, an SU(2) gauge field minimally coupled to Einstein gravity, is parity-invariant but allows a black hole solution with vector hair corresponding to a parity-broken superfluid state. We show that this state possesses a non-vanishing parity-odd transport coefficient -- Hall viscosity -- and an angular momentum density. We first develop an analytic method to solve this model near the critical regime and to take back-reactions into account. Then we solve the equation for the tensor mode fluctuations and obtain the expression for Hall viscosity via Kubo formula. We also show that a non-vanishing angular momentum density can be obtained through the vector mode fluctuations and the corresponding boundary action. We give analytic results of both Hall viscosity and angular momentum density near the critical regime in terms of physical parameters. The near-critical behavior of Hall viscosity is different from that obtained from a gravitational Chern-Simons model. We find that the magnitude of Hall viscosity to angular momentum density ratio is numerically consistent with being equal to 1/2 at large SU(2) coupling corresponding to the probe limit, in agreement with previous results obtained for various quantum fluid systems and from effective theory approaches. In addition, we find the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio remains above the universal bound.

  19. Viscosity of neutron star matter and $r$-modes in rotating pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. E. Kolomeitsev; D. N. Voskresensky

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study viscosity of the neutron star matter and $r$-mode instability in rotating neutron stars. Contributions to the shear and bulk viscosities from various processes are calculated with account of in-medium modifications of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A softening of the pion mode and a possibility of the pion condensation are included. The nucleon pairing is incorporated. In the shear viscosity we include the lepton contribution calculated with account of the Landau damping in the photon exchange, the nucleon contribution described by the medium-modified one pion exchange, and other terms, such as the novel phonon contribution in the 1S$_0$ superfluid neutron phase, and the neutrino term in the neutrino opacity region. The nucleon shear viscosity depends on the density rather moderately and proves to be much less than the lepton term. Among the terms contributing to the bulk viscosity, the term from the medium modified Urca reactions possesses strongest density dependence because of the pion softening. Contributions to the bulk viscosity arising from other reactions induced by charged weak currents are included. The radiative bulk viscosity induced by charged and neutral weak currents in the region of the neutrino transparency of the star is also calculated with account for in-medium effects. The computed frequency boundary of the $r$-mode stability for the stars with the mass $\\ge 1.8 M_{\\odot}$ proves to be above the frequencies of all rotating young pulsars. To explain the stability of rapid rotation of old pulsars in X-ray binaries we propose a novel efficient mechanism associated with appearance of condensates of low-lying modes of bosonic excitations with finite momentum and/or with an enhancement of the inhomogeneous pion/kaon condensates in some parts of the star, if the angular velocity exceeds a critical value.

  20. Super Special Codes using Super Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; K. Ilanthenral

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The new classes of super special codes are constructed in this book using the specially constructed super special vector spaces. These codes mainly use the super matrices. These codes can be realized as a special type of concatenated codes. This book has four chapters. In chapter one basic properties of codes and super matrices are given. A new type of super special vector space is constructed in chapter two of this book. Three new classes of super special codes namely, super special row code, super special column code and super special codes are introduced in chapter three. Applications of these codes are given in the final chapter.

  1. Special Issue on Human Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijholt, Anton

    The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

  2. Texas Stream Team Special Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Stream Team Special Projects · TMDL and Watershed Protection Plan Projects · Steering ­ Transparency tube ­ E. coli · Web site resources · Materials ­ Maps, Watershed Models Orange County Adams training sessions · Quality control · NPS education sessions · Volunteers of the month · Orange county

  3. Shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma in a kinetic theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95125 Catania, Italy and Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 63, I-95125 Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main results of heavy ions collision (HIC) at relativistic energy experiments is the very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, close to the conjectured lower bound ?/s=1/4? for systems in the infinite coupling limit. Transport coefficients like shear viscosity are responsible of non-equilibrium properties of a system: Green-Kubo relations give us an exact expression to compute these coefficients. We compute shear viscosity numerically using Green-Kubo relation in the framework of Kinetic Theory solving the relativistic transport Boltzmann equation in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. We investigate a system of particles interacting via anisotropic and energy dependent cross-section in the range of temperature of interest for HIC. Green-Kubo results are in agreement with Chapman-Enskog approximation while Relaxation Time approximation can underestimates the viscosity of a factor 2. The correct analytic formula for shear viscosity can be used to develop a transport theory with a fixed ?/s and have a comparison with physical observables like elliptic flow.

  4. The Viscosity Bound Conjecture and Hydrodynamics of M2-Brane Theory at Finite Chemical Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omid Saremi

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Kovtun, Son and Starinets have conjectured that the viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ is always bounded from below by a universal multiple of $\\hbar$ i.e., $\\hbar/(4\\pi k_{B})$ for all forms of matter. Mysteriously, the proposed viscosity bound appears to be saturated in all computations done whenever a supergravity dual is available. We consider the near horizon limit of a stack of M2-branes in the grand canonical ensemble at finite R-charge densities, corresponding to non-zero angular momentum in the bulk. The corresponding four-dimensional R-charged black hole in Anti-de Sitter space provides a holographic dual in which various transport coefficients can be calculated. We find that the shear viscosity increases as soon as a background R-charge density is turned on. We numerically compute the few first corrections to the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ and surprisingly discover that up to fourth order all corrections originating from a non-zero chemical potential vanish, leaving the bound saturated. This is a sharp signal in favor of the saturation of the viscosity bound for event horizons even in the presence of some finite background field strength. We discuss implications of this observation for the conjectured bound.

  5. Bulk viscosity, particle spectra and flow in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Dusling; Thomas Schaefer

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of bulk viscosity on pT spectra and elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions. For this purpose we compute the dissipative correction df to the single particle distribution functions in leading-log QCD, and in several simplified models. We consider, in particular, the relaxation time approximation and a kinetic model for the hadron resonance gas. We implement these distribution functions in a hydrodynamic simulation of Au + Au collisions at RHIC. We find significant corrections due to bulk viscosity in hadron pT spectra and the differential elliptic flow parameter v2(pT). These corrections are dominated by viscous corrections to the distribution function. We find that the relation between df and the bulk viscosity is different in the quark gluon plasma and hadronic phases. Reliable bounds on the bulk viscosity require accurate calculations of df in a hadronic resonance gas. Based on v2 spectra at RHIC we conservatively estimate zeta/s viscosity on the pT integrated v2 are small.

  6. Black liquor viscosity reduction through salt additives: A novel environmentally benign processing alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.E.; Khan, S.A.; Spontak, R.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processing black liquor at high solids would reduce SO{sub x} emissions, facilitate the use of non-chlorine bleaching techniques and enhance the energy efficiency of the pulping process. However, black liquor exhibits and exponential increase in viscosity as its solids content rises, thus hindering its processability in the composition range of interest (>70% solids). In this study, we present a new approach for controlling viscosity at high solids content by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} black liquor through addition of thiocyanate salts. These salts increases the solubility of the polymer constituents in black liquor leading to a decrease in its viscosity. Several salts capable of viscosity reduction by as much as two orders of magnitude have been identified. The effects of cation size, solution pH and temperature on viscosity reduction is presented and interpreted in terms of the underlying principles of {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} and how it affects aqueous solution structure.

  7. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Wednesday, 22 April 2015 13:19 Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray...

  8. Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendra K. Verma

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [{\\it Verma et al.}, 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron's thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of {\\it Braginskii}. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity.

  9. Viscosity scaling of fingering instability in finite slices with Korteweg stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pramanik, Satyajit

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform linear stability analyses (LSA) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to investigate the influence of the dynamic viscosity on viscous fingering (VF) instability in miscible slices. Selecting the characteristic scales appropriately the importance of the magnitude of the dynamic viscosity of individual fluids on VF in miscible slice has been shown in the context of the transient interfacial tension. Further, we have confirmed this result for immiscible fluids and manifest the similarities between VF in immiscible and miscible slices with transient interfacial tension. In a more general setting, the findings of this letter will be very useful for multiphase viscous flow, in which the momentum balance equation contains an additional stress term free from the dynamic viscosity.

  10. Shear viscosity of the gluon plasma in the stochastic-vacuum approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri Antonov

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear viscosity of the gluon plasma in SU(3) YM theory is calculated nonperturbatively, within the stochastic vacuum model. The result for the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density, proportional to the squared chromo-magnetic gluon condensate and the fifth power of the correlation length of the chromo-magnetic vacuum, falls off with the increase of temperature. At temperatures larger than the deconfinement critical temperature by a factor of 2, this fall-off is determined by the sixth power of the temperature-dependent strong-coupling constant and yields an asymptotic approach to the conjectured lower bound of 1/(4\\pi), achievable in {\\cal N}=4 SYM theory. As a by-product of the calculation, we find a particular form of the two-point correlation function of gluonic field strengths, which is the only one consistent with the Lorentzian shape of the shear-viscosity spectral function.

  11. Viscosity of gauge theory plasma with a chemical potential from AdS/CFT correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengo Maeda; Makoto Natsuume; Takashi Okamura

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the strong coupling limit of the shear viscosity for the N=4 super-Yang-Mill theory with a chemical potential. We use the five-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom-anti-deSitter black hole, so the chemical potential is the one for the R-charges U(1)_R^3. We compute the quasinormal frequencies of the gravitational and electromagnetic vector perturbations in the background numerically. This enables one to explicitly locate the diffusion pole for the shear viscosity. The ratio of the shear viscosity eta to the entropy density s is eta/s=1/(4pi) within numerical errors, which is the same result as the one without chemical potential.

  12. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I; Lapenta, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  13. Equation of State and Viscosities from a Gravity Dual of the Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yaresko; B. Kampfer

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing new precision data of the equation of state of the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory (gluon plasma) the dilaton potential of the gravity dual is adjusted in the temperature range $(1 - 10) T_c$ in a bottom-up approach. The ratio of bulk viscosity to shear viscosity follows then as $\\zeta/\\eta \\approx \\pi \\Delta v_s^2$ for $\\Delta v_s^2 maximum value of 0.95 at $\\Delta v_s^2 \\approx 0.32$, where $\\Delta v_s^2$ is the non-conformality measure, while the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density is known as $(4 \\pi)^{-1}$ for the considered set-up with Hilbert action on the gravity side.

  14. Special Science Call Projects Announced | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Science Call Projects Announced Special Science Call Projects Announced Released: April 22, 2015 23 high-impact research proposals accepted EMSL Scientist Zihua Zhu...

  15. Independent Oversight Special Review, Headquarters - August 2008...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oversight Special Review, Headquarters - August 2008 August 2008 Review of Construction Safety and Health Programs This special review of construction safety was performed...

  16. Nonlinear bulk viscosity and the stability of accelerated expansion in FRW spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Acquaviva; A. Beesham

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of dark energy solutions, we consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with a non-interacting mixture of dust and a viscous fluid, whose bulk viscosity is governed by the nonlinear model proposed in [15]. Through a phase space analysis of the equivalent dynamical system, existence and stability of critical solutions are established and the respective scale factors are computed. The results point towards the possibility of describing the current accelerated expansion of the Universe by means of the abovementioned nonlinear model for viscosity.

  17. Isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Xu

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an improved isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction, we have studied the qualitative effect of isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass on the specific shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. It is seen that for $m_n^\\star>m_p^\\star$, the relaxation time of neutrons is smaller and the neutron flux between flow layers is weaker, leading to a smaller specific shear viscosity of neutron-rich matter compared to the case for $m_n^\\starviscosity near nuclear liquid-gas phase transition.

  18. Shear Viscosity of Hot QED at Finite Density from Kubo Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Liu; Defu Hou; Jiarong Li

    2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of finite temperature field theory this paper discusses the shear viscosity of hot QED plasma through Kubo formula at one-loop skeleton diagram level with a finite chemical potential. The effective widths(damping rates) are introduced to regulate the pinch singularities. The finite chemical potential, which enhances the contributions to the shear viscosity from the electrons while suppresses those from the photons, finally gives a positive contribution compared to the pure temperature environment. The result agrees with that from the kinetics theory qualitatively.

  19. Bulk viscosity-driven freeze-out in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Torrieri; Igor Mishustin; Boris Tomášik

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an review the HBT puzzle, and argue that its resolution requires the introduction of new physics close to the phase transition scale. We argue that a candidate for this new physics is bulk viscosity, recently postulated to peak, and even diverge, close to the phase transition temperature. We show that such a viscosity peak can force the system created in heavy ion collisions to become unstable, and filament into fragments whose size is weakly dependent on the global size of the system, thereby triggering freeze-out.

  20. Lyapunov Stabilizability of Controlled Diffusions via a Superoptimality Principle for Viscosity Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cesaroni, Annalisa [Dipartimento di Matematica P. e A., Universita di Padova, via Belzoni 7, 35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: acesar@math.unipd.it

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove optimality principles for semicontinuous bounded viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations. In particular, we provide a representation formula for viscosity supersolutions as value functions of suitable obstacle control problems. This result is applied to extend the Lyapunov direct method for stability to controlled Ito stochastic differential equations. We define the appropriate concept of the Lyapunov function to study stochastic open loop stabilizability in probability and local and global asymptotic stabilizability (or asymptotic controllability). Finally, we illustrate the theory with some examples.

  1. Micro-Specialization: Dynamic Code Specialization of Database Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    performance. Much of the work to date on optimizing DBMS performance has emphasized ensuring efficient data to a particular kind of invariant. We realize these techniques, in concert termed micro-specialization, via a DBMS-independent run-time environment and apply them to a high- performance open-source DBMS, PostgreSQL. We show

  2. Effect of pulping conditions and black liquor composition on Newtonian viscosity of high solids kraft black liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaman, A.A.; Fricke, A.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of black liquor composition and solids concentrations on the Newtonian viscosity of slash pine black liquors over wide ranges of temperature (up to 140 C) and solids concentrations (between 50% and 83% solids) has been studied. It was found that the zero shear rate viscosity of high solids black liquors depends strongly on the cooking conditions and/or black liquor composition. Not only is high solids viscosity affected by lignin molecular weight and lignin concentration in the liquor but other organic and inorganic constituents of black liquor also make a significant contribution to viscosity. The dependency of zero shear rate viscosity on solids concentrations, and temperature is defined. The Newtonian viscosities vary over a wide range depending on temperature, solids concentrations and solids composition. The results indicate that, at fixed levels of effective alkali and sulfidity, the zero shear rate viscosities can be described as a function of both lignin concentration and lignin molecular weight. The viscosity of black liquor is an increasing function of the organics-to-inorganics ratio and is a decreasing function of the concentration of sodium and chloride ions and pH of the liquor.

  3. Regularity criteria and uniform estimates for the Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jishan Fan; Fucai Li; Gen Nakamura

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we establish some regularity criteria for the 3D Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity. We also obtain some uniform estimates for the corresponding 2D case when the fluid viscosity coefficient is a positive constant.

  4. Einstein's Special Relativity: The Hyperbolic Geometric Viewpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham A. Ungar

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytic hyperbolic geometric viewpoint of Einstein's special theory of relativity is presented.

  5. Optical microstructure and viscosity enhancement for an epoxy resin matrix containing multiwall carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    dispersed in polycarbonate, where they reported a step change in viscosity for 2 wt % loading of MWCNTs in polycarbonate at low shear rates. The rheological behavior of MWCNTs in polypropylene, and their corresponding conductivity. Recently, Xu et al. 2005 again reported on the systematic development of viscoelasticity

  6. On the rate-independent limit of systems with dry friction and small viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mielke, Alexander

    On the rate-independent limit of systems with dry friction and small viscosity Messoud A. Efendiev of this work is to present a model which is able to account for viscous as well as for dry-friction effects slow time scale, in which viscous transitions are seen as instantaneous jumps. However, effects of dry

  7. The Propagation of Rayleigh Waves in Layered Piezoelectric Structures with Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    The Propagation of Rayleigh Waves in Layered Piezoelectric Structures with Viscosity Jinxiang Shen frequency and wave propagation. With the known major properties such as the quality factor, we can obtain, filters, and delay lines made by surface acoustic waves propagating along the surface of piezoelectric

  8. EFFECT OF CONTACT VISCOSITY AND ROUGHNESS ON INTERFACE STIFFNESS AND WAVE PROPAGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EFFECT OF CONTACT VISCOSITY AND ROUGHNESS ON INTERFACE STIFFNESS AND WAVE PROPAGATION Anil Misra1 and asperity properties compete in determining the stiffness behavior, and consequently, the wave propagation widely used to investigate plane wave propagation through contacts between two rough solids [see

  9. Effect of Water on Deposition, Aggregate Size, and Viscosity of Asphaltenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Effect of Water on Deposition, Aggregate Size, and Viscosity of Asphaltenes Seyma Aslan and Abbas. In this study, we investigate the aggregation and deposition of water and asphaltenes, the most polar fraction and provide the evidence for clear changes in asphaltene deposition. Differential interference contrast (DIC

  10. Glacial isostatic adjustment and Earth rotation: Refined constraints on the viscosity of the deepest mantle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, W.R.; Jiang, X. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explores the use of the present-day rate and direction of polar wander and the magnitude of the nontidal acceleration of the rate of planetary rotation of the earth to contrain the viscosity of the lower regions of the lower mantle.

  11. The nucleon thermal width due to pion-baryon loops and its contribution in Shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabyasachi Ghosh

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the real-time thermal field theory, the standard expression of shear viscosity for the nucleonic constituents is derived from the two point function of nucleonic viscous stress tensors at finite temperature and density. The finite thermal width or Landau damping is traditionally included in the nucleon propagators. This thermal width is calculated from the in-medium self-energy of nucleon for different possible pion-baryon loops. The dynamical part of nucleon-pion-baryon interactions are taken care by the effective Lagrangian densities of standard hadronic model. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of nucleonic component decreases with the temperature and increases with the nucleon chemical potential. However, adding the contribution of pionic component, total viscosity to entropy density ratio also reduces with the nucleon chemical potential when the mixing effect between pion and nucleon components in the mixed gas is considered. Within the hadronic domain, viscosity to entropy density ratio of the nuclear matter is gradually reducing as temperature and nucleon chemical potential are growing up and therefore the nuclear matter is approaching toward the (nearly) perfect fluid nature.

  12. Mantle dynamics in super-Earths: Post-perovskite rheology and self-regulation of viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    Mantle dynamics in super-Earths: Post-perovskite rheology and self-regulation of viscosity P, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received a self-regulation of deep mantle temperature. The deep mantle is not adiabatic; instead feedback between

  13. Hole Growth as a Microrheological Probe to Measure the Viscosity of Polymers Confined to Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Hole Growth as a Microrheological Probe to Measure the Viscosity of Polymers Confined to Thin Films thin freely-standing films revealed that hole formation and growth occurs only at temperatures: 3011­3021, 2006 Keywords: glass transition; nanoscale confinement; rheology; thin films; viscoelastic

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Determination of Heavy Oil Viscosity Under Reservoir Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Barrufet, Maria

    2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research was to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes.

  15. Micromechanical transient sensor for measuring viscosity and density of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Oden, Patrick I. (Plano, TX); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN); Finot, Eric Laurent (Torcy, FR)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring the viscosity and/or specific density of a fluid utilizes a microcantilever vibrated in the analyte fluid. The source of vibration is switched on and off and the transient behavior or decay in amplitude of the vibration is monitored. The method is particularly useful for the measurement of process conditions in remote locations in real time.

  16. Bulk viscosity and the phase transition of the linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we deal with the critical behavior of the bulk viscosity in the linear sigma model (LSM) as an example of a system which can be treated by using different techniques. Starting from the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation we compute the bulk viscosity over entropy density of the LSM in the large-N limit. We search for a possible maximum of the bulk viscosity over entropy density at the critical temperature of the chiral phase transition. The information about this critical temperature, as well as the effective masses, is obtained from the effective potential. We find that the expected maximum (as a measure of the conformality loss) is absent in the large N in agreement with other models in the same limit. However, this maximum appears when, instead of the large-N limit, the Hartree approximation within the Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) formalism is used. Nevertheless, this last approach to the LSM does not give rise to the Goldstone theorem and also predicts a first order phase transition instead of the expected second order one. Therefore both, the large-N limit and the CJT-Hartree approximations, should be considered as complementary for the study of the critical behavior of the bulk viscosity in the LSM.

  17. Shear Viscosity from AdS Born-Infeld Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Gen Cai; Ya-Wen Sun

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity in the frame of AdS/CFT correspondence for the field theory with a gravity dual of Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity. We find that the ratio of $\\eta/s$ is still the conjectured universal value $1/4\\pi$ at least up to the first order of the Born-Infeld parameter $1/b^2$.

  18. Viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium mixtures in the warm-dense-matter regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lambert, F. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium (DT) in the warm, dense matter regime for densities from 5 to 20 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2 to 10 eV, using both finite-temperature Kohn-Sham density-functional theory molecular dynamics (QMD) and orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD). The OFMD simulations are in generally good agreement with the benchmark QMD results, and we conclude that the simpler OFMD method can be used with confidence in this regime. For low temperatures (3 eV and below), one-component plasma (OCP) model simulations for diffusion agree with the QMD and OFMD calculations, but deviate by 30% at 10 eV. In comparison with the QMD and OFMD results, the OCP viscosities are not as good as for diffusion, especially for 5 g/cm{sup 3} where the temperature dependence is significantly different. The QMD and OFMD reduced diffusion and viscosity coefficients are found to depend largely, though not completely, only on the Coulomb coupling parameter {Gamma}, with a minimum in the reduced viscosity at {Gamma}{approx_equal}25, approximately the same position found in the OCP simulations. The QMD and OFMD equations of state (pressure) are also compared with the hydrogen two-component plasma model.

  19. An experimental investigation into the dimension-sensitive viscosity of polymer containing lubricant oils in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, David

    lubricant oils in microchannels David Erickson a , Fuzhi Lu a , Dongqing Li a,*, Tony White b , Jason Gao b lubrication processes, lubricating oils containing polymer additives are subject to high shear rate through of channel height on the effective viscosity of oil lubricants with two different polymer additives (a radial

  20. Dynamics of Hemoglobin in Human Erythrocytes and in Solution: Influence of Viscosity Studied by Ultrafast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Dynamics of Hemoglobin in Human Erythrocytes and in Solution: Influence of Viscosity Studied by Ultrafast Vibrational Echo Experiments Brian L. McClain, Ilya J. Finkelstein, and M. D. Fayer* Contribution experiments are used to measure the vibrational dephasing of the CO stretching mode of hemoglobin-CO (Hb