National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vii tundra coral

  1. Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Bonfils-1.jpg Why it Matters: Simulations at NERSC are the first to investigate long-term climate...

  2. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dataset: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic...

  3. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems.more » Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.« less

  4. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems. Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.

  5. Suzlon Project VII | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project VII Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Suzlon Developer Suzlon Energy Purchaser QF on SPP Location Dumas TX...

  6. EA-212-D_Coral_Rescission.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Order authorizing Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (2.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC EA-213-A Coral Power,

  7. Learning About the Equal Employment Opportunity- Title VII- Complaint Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about what is unlawful under Title VII, the legislation behind it, the steps before filing a complaint (mediation), how an individual files an official Title VII complaint, the acceptance or...

  8. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  9. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack

  10. Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report: Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation...

  11. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in Arctic tundra soils

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David E.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Bargar, John; Janot, Noemie; Regier, Tom Z.

    2015-12-07

    Climate change is warming tundra ecosystems in the Arctic, resulting in the decomposition of previously-frozen soil organic matter (SOM) and release of carbon (C) to the atmosphere; however, the processes that control SOM decomposition and C emissions remain highly uncertain. In this study, we evaluate geochemical factors that influence anaerobic production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the active layers of four ice-wedge polygons. Surface and soil pore waters were collected during the annual thaw season over a two-year period in an area containing waterlogged, low-centered polygons and well-drained, high-centered polygons. We report spatial and seasonal patterns ofmore » dissolved gases in relation to the geochemical properties of Fe and organic C as determined using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Iron was present as Fe(II) in soil solution near the permafrost boundary but enriched as Fe(III) in the middle of the active layer, similar to dissolved aromatic-C and organic acids. Dissolved CH4 increased relative to dissolved CO2 with depth and varied with soil moisture in the middle of the active layer in patterns that were positively correlated with the proportion of dissolved Fe(III) in transitional and low-centered polygon soils but negatively correlated in the drier flat- and high-centered polygons. These results suggest that microbial-mediated Fe oxidation and reduction influence respiration/fermentation of SOM and production of substrates (e.g., low-molecular-weight organic acids) for methanogenesis. As a result, we infer that geochemical differences induced by water saturation dictate microbial products of SOM decomposition, and Fe geochemistry is an important factor regulating methanogenesis in anoxic tundra soils.« less

  12. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in Arctic tundra soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David E.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Bargar, John; Janot, Noemie; Regier, Tom Z.

    2015-12-07

    Climate change is warming tundra ecosystems in the Arctic, resulting in the decomposition of previously-frozen soil organic matter (SOM) and release of carbon (C) to the atmosphere; however, the processes that control SOM decomposition and C emissions remain highly uncertain. In this study, we evaluate geochemical factors that influence anaerobic production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the active layers of four ice-wedge polygons. Surface and soil pore waters were collected during the annual thaw season over a two-year period in an area containing waterlogged, low-centered polygons and well-drained, high-centered polygons. We report spatial and seasonal patterns of dissolved gases in relation to the geochemical properties of Fe and organic C as determined using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Iron was present as Fe(II) in soil solution near the permafrost boundary but enriched as Fe(III) in the middle of the active layer, similar to dissolved aromatic-C and organic acids. Dissolved CH4 increased relative to dissolved CO2 with depth and varied with soil moisture in the middle of the active layer in patterns that were positively correlated with the proportion of dissolved Fe(III) in transitional and low-centered polygon soils but negatively correlated in the drier flat- and high-centered polygons. These results suggest that microbial-mediated Fe oxidation and reduction influence respiration/fermentation of SOM and production of substrates (e.g., low-molecular-weight organic acids) for methanogenesis. As a result, we infer that geochemical differences induced by water saturation dictate microbial products of SOM decomposition, and Fe geochemistry is an important factor regulating methanogenesis in anoxic tundra soils.

  13. Black Coral Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coral Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Black Coral Capital Address: 55 Union Street, 3rd Floor Place: Boston, Massachusetts Zip: 02108 Region: Greater Boston Area Product:...

  14. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; et al

    2015-05-13

    The nitrate (NO3–) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO3– derived from atmospheric deposition versus that derived from microbial nitrification.

  15. EA-213 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Coral Power, LLC Order authorizing Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-213 Coral Power, LLC More Documents & Publications EA-232 OGE Energy...

  16. Equal Employment Opportunity -Title VII | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equal Employment Opportunity -Title VII Equal Employment Opportunity -Title VII The Department of Energy does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex (including sexual harassment), religion, national origin, age, disability (physical or mental), sexual orientation, reprisal, parental status, protected genetic information, or any other non-merit factor. We are committed to equal employment opportunity principles and practices in all of our management decisions and personnel practices.

  17. Equal Employment Opportunity -Title VII | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equal Employment Opportunity -Title VII Equal Employment Opportunity -Title VII The Department of Energy does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex (including sexual harassment), religion, national origin, age, disability (physical or mental), sexual orientation, reprisal, parental status, protected genetic information, or any other non-merit factor. We are committed to equal employment opportunity principles and practices in all of our management decisions and personnel practices.

  18. EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -D Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC Order rescinding the authorization of Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC More ...

  19. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Order authorizing Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (2.19 MB) More Documents & ...

  20. EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-A Coral Canada US Inc EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc Order authorizing Coral Canada US Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc (1.63 MB) More ...

  1. EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC to export electric energy to Canada. EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC (1.48 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC EA-253-A Coral Canada ...

  2. EA-293-A Coral Energy Management, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electric energy to Canada EA-293-A Coral Energy Management, LLC (465.78 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-253-A Coral Canada ...

  3. Resistance and resilience of tundra plant communities to disturbance by winter seismic vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, N.A.; Raynolds, M.K.; Jorgenson, J.C.; DuBois, K.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Effects of winter seismic exploration on arctic tundra were evaluated on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, four to five growing seasons after disturbance. Plant cover, active layer depths, and track depression were measured at plots representing major tundra plant communities and different levels of initial disturbance. Results are compared with the initial effects reported earlier. Little resilience was seen in any vegetation type, with no clearly decreasing trends in community dissimilarity. Active layer depths remained greater on plots in all nonriparian vegetation types, and most plots still had visible trails. Decreases in plant cover persisted on most plots, although a few species showed recovery or increases in cover above predisturbance level. Moist sedge-shrub tundra and dryas terraces had the largest community dissimilarities initially, showing the least resistance to high levels of winter vehicle disturbance. Community dissimilarity continued to increase for five seasons in moist sedge-shrub tundra, with species composition changing to higher sedge cover and lower shrub cover. The resilience amplitude may have been exceeded on four plots which had significant track depression.

  4. Simulation of subsurface thermal regimes of polygonal tundra at Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Richard T. Mills; Jitendra Kumar; Vladimir Romanovsky; Peter E. Thornton; Gautam Bisht; Colleen M. Iversen; Nathan Collier

    2016-01-27

    Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to atmosphere under warming climate. Ice--wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. The microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behaviour under current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites at Barrow, Alaska spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygon and representative of broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multi--phase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using high resolution LiDAR DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high resolution model mesh. Best available soil data from field observations and literature was utilized to represent the complex hetogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. This data collection provides the complete set of input files, forcing data sets and computational meshes for simulations using PFLOTRAN for four sites at Barrow Environmental Observatory. It also document the complete computational workflow for this modeling study to allow verification, reproducibility and follow up studies.

  5. AWEA O&M Recommended Practices Series Part VII: Wind Turbine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AWEA O&M Recommended Practices Series Part VII: Wind Turbine Gear Lubricant Flushing Procedures AWEA O&M Recommended Practices Series Part VII: Wind Turbine Gear Lubricant Flushing...

  6. Data Testing for ENDF/B-VII.1beta2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacFarlane, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Calculations have been performed for 390 critical assemblies from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments using the beta2 release of ENDF/B-VII.1. The results are compared to previous results for ENDF/B-VII. Cases that changed between the two versions are highlighted, and the results are discussed. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is working on a new release of the ENDF/B-VII library of evaluated nuclear data, and the 'beta2' set of files was recently made available by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). A set of about 850 input files for the MCNP Monte Carlo code to run critical assemblies from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments was available from our previous data testing work for ENDF/B-VII.0. We have now run 390 of those cases using data based on the beta2 files, and those results will be presented below. The ENDF files were downloaded from the NNDC to a Mac workstation. They were then processed using NJOY10 into ACE format files for use in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The processing was limited to materials needed for the data testing work at this point. The existing MCNP input decks were used. No checking was done to see if any of the benchmarks had been updated since the ENDF/B-VII testing was finished. Most runs used 50 million histories in order to get Monte Carlo statistical uncertainties down the 0.01% range.

  7. AmeriFlux US-ICt Imnavait Creek Watershed Tussock Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICt Imnavait Creek Watershed Tussock Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Tussock Tundra (Biocomplexity Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Biocomplexity Station was deployed in 2004, and it has been in operation during the melt seasons ever since.

  8. AmeriFlux US-ICs Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICs Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra (Fen Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Fen Station was deployed at the end of Summer 2007.

  9. AmeriFlux US-ICh Imnavait Creek Watershed Heath Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICh Imnavait Creek Watershed Heath Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Heath Tundra (Ridge Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Ridge Station was deployed at the end of Summer 2007.

  10. Pathways of anaerobic organic matter decomposition in tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Mann, Benjamin F.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-11-23

    Arctic tundra soils store a large quantity of organic carbon that is susceptible to decomposition and release to the atmosphere as methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) under a warming climate. Anaerobic processes that generate CH4 and CO2 remain unclear because previous studies have focused on aerobic decomposition pathways. To predict releases of CO2 and CH4 from tundra soils, it is necessary to identify pathways of soil organic matter decomposition under the anoxic conditions that are prevalent in Arctic ecosystems. Here molecular and spectroscopic techniques were used to monitor biological degradation of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) during anoxic incubation ofmore » tundra soils from a region of continuous permafrost in northern Alaska. Organic and mineral soils from the tundra active layer were incubated at –2, +4, or +8°C for up to 60 days to mimic the short-term thaw season. Results suggest that, under anoxic conditions, fermentation converted complex organic molecules into simple organic acids that were used in concomitant Fe-reduction and acetoclastic methanogenesis reactions. Nonaromatic compounds increased over time as WEOC increased. Organic acid metabolites initially accumulated in soils but were mostly depleted by day 60 because organic acids were consumed to produce Fe(II), CO2, and CH4. We conclude that fermentation of nonprotected organic matter facilitates methanogenesis and Fe reduction reactions, and that the proportion of organic acids consumed by methanogenesis increases relative to Fe reduction with increasing temperature. As a result, the decomposition pathways observed in this study are important to consider in numerical modeling of greenhouse gas production in the Arctic.« less

  11. Pathways of anaerobic organic matter decomposition in tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Mann, Benjamin F.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-11-23

    Arctic tundra soils store a large quantity of organic carbon that is susceptible to decomposition and release to the atmosphere as methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) under a warming climate. Anaerobic processes that generate CH4 and CO2 remain unclear because previous studies have focused on aerobic decomposition pathways. To predict releases of CO2 and CH4 from tundra soils, it is necessary to identify pathways of soil organic matter decomposition under the anoxic conditions that are prevalent in Arctic ecosystems. Here molecular and spectroscopic techniques were used to monitor biological degradation of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) during anoxic incubation of tundra soils from a region of continuous permafrost in northern Alaska. Organic and mineral soils from the tundra active layer were incubated at –2, +4, or +8°C for up to 60 days to mimic the short-term thaw season. Results suggest that, under anoxic conditions, fermentation converted complex organic molecules into simple organic acids that were used in concomitant Fe-reduction and acetoclastic methanogenesis reactions. Nonaromatic compounds increased over time as WEOC increased. Organic acid metabolites initially accumulated in soils but were mostly depleted by day 60 because organic acids were consumed to produce Fe(II), CO2, and CH4. We conclude that fermentation of nonprotected organic matter facilitates methanogenesis and Fe reduction reactions, and that the proportion of organic acids consumed by methanogenesis increases relative to Fe reduction with increasing temperature. As a result, the decomposition pathways observed in this study are important to consider in numerical modeling of greenhouse gas production in the Arctic.

  12. CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS FOR ENDF/B-VII.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERMAN, M.; ROCHMAN, D.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2006-06-05

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on neutron cross section evaluations for ENDF/B-VII (April 2005-May 2006). The purpose of the contract was to ensure seamless integration of the LANL neutron cross section evaluations in the new ENDF/B-VII library. The following work was performed: (1) LANL evaluated data files submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B-VII were checked and, when necessary, formal formatting errors were corrected. As a consequence, ENDF checking codes, run on all LANL files, do not report any errors that would rise concern. (2) LANL dosimetry evaluations for {sup 191}Ir and {sup 193}Ir were completed to match ENDF requirements for the general purpose library suitable for transport calculations. A set of covariances for both isotopes is included in the ENDF files. (3) Library of fission products was assembled and successfully tested with ENDF checking codes, processed with NJOY-99.125 and simple MCNP calculations. (4) KALMAN code has been integrated with the EMPIRE system to allow estimation of covariances based on the combination of measurements and model calculations. Covariances were produced for 155,157-Gd and also for 6 remaining isotopes of Gd.

  13. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2013-05-29

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  14. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  15. EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    089 -- Coral Reef Protection EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection Establishes the Coral Reef Task Force EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection (114.01 KB) More Documents & Publications EO 13158: Marine Protected Areas (2000) EO 13031: Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership (1996) EO 12969: Federal Acquisition and Community Right-To-Know (1995)

  16. Dynamics of the recovery of damaged tundra vegetation: preliminary results of revegetation experiments of maritime tundra with Elymus mollis on Adak Island, Alaska. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundsen, C C; McCord, R A

    1982-08-01

    The vegetation of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska is maritime tundra (Amundsen, 1977). While maritime tundra is not characterized by the presence of permafrost, the soil temperatures remain low (5 to 7/sup 0/C) year-round (Williams, 1980). The low soil temperature, a high level of soil moisture, and a low level of incident solar radiation are thought to delay the development of the vegetation. Natural revegetation of natural or man made open areas is relatively slow. Disturbed areas from World War II military activity are not completely revegetated after almost 40 years. Because of the windy and wet climate of the region, exposed soil is unstable and subject to extensive freeze-thaw action and erosion. Insults to the vegetation, both marine and aeolian, are common. Successful reproduction by seed is uncommon among species of this flora. The primary means of reproduction appears to be by vegetative propagules which are usually fragments of the shoot and rhizome. While the transport of the fragments by wind and water aids in the dispersal of the propagules, the same action often removes these fragments from open areas. This later activity further delays the revegetation of open and disturbed areas. Elymus mollis Trin. is the most successful major native species found to date as it fragments due to wind and water action and transplants easily. Transplanting experiments with sprigs of Elymus mollis Trin. have been conducted on Adak Island, Alaska since 1977. Preliminary results indicate that Elymus mollis may be transplanted for revegetation with a survival rate of at least 90 percent. Experiments were set up in 1979 to determine appropriate planting density, sprig rhizome length, and best time of year for transplanting. Preliminary results for these experiments are reported here.

  17. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics Authors: Frank, Mark R. ; Scott, Henry P. ; Aarestad, Elizabeth ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. 1 ; UC) 2 ; NIU) 2 + ...

  18. 99Tc(VII) Retardation, Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in Naturally...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in Naturally Reduced Sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 99Tc(VII) Retardation, Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in ...

  19. Organic Carbon Transformation and Mercury Methylation in Tundra Soils from Barrow Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liang, L.; Wullschleger, Stan; Graham, David; Gu, B.; Yang, Ziming

    2016-04-20

    This dataset includes information on soil labile organic carbon transformation and mercury methylation for tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska. The soil cores were collected from high-centered polygon (trough) at BEO and were incubated under anaerobic laboratory conditions at both freezing and warming temperatures for up to 8 months. Soil organic carbon including reducing sugars, alcohols, and organic acids were analyzed, and CH4 and CO2 emissions were quantified. Net production of methylmercury and Fe(II)/Fe(total) ratio were also measured and provided in this dataset.

  20. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-08

    The nitrate (NO??) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO?? derived from at NO?? signal with ??N averaging 4.8 1.0 (standard error of the mean) and ??O averaging 70.2 1.7. In active layer pore waters, NO?? primarily occurred at concentrations suitable for isotopic analysis in the relatively dry and oxic centers of high-centered polygons. The average ??N and ??O of NO?? from high-centered polygons were 0.5 1.1 and 4.1 0.6, respectively. When compared to the ??N of reduced nitrogen (N) sources, and the ??O of soil pore waters, it was evident that NO?? in high-centered polygons was primarily from microbial nitrification. Permafrost NO?? had ??N ranging from approximately 6 to 10, similar to atmospheric and microbial NO??, and highly variable ??O ranging from approximately 2 to 38. Permafrost ice wedges contained a significant atmospheric component of NO??, while permafrost textural ice contained a greater proportion of microbially derived NO??. Large-scale permafrost thaw in this environment would release NO?? with a ??O signature intermediate to that of atmospheric and microbial NO?. Consequently, while atmospheric and microbial sources can be readily distinguished by the NO?? dual isotope technique in tundra environments, attribution of NO?? from thawing permafrost will not be straightforward. The NO?? isotopic signature, however, appears useful in identifying NO?? sources in extant permafrost ice.

  1. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2009-01-30

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  2. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2010-01-08

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  3. Coral Power LLC (Nevada) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Coral Power LLC Place: Nevada Phone Number: (916) 653-1097 Website: wwwcers.water.ca.govcoral.cfm Outage Hotline: (916) 653-1097 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  4. Coral Power LLC (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coral Power LLC Place: California Phone Number: (858)- 320-1500 Outage Hotline: (858)- 320-1500 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861...

  5. Modeling the spatio-temporal variability in subsurface thermal regimes across a low-relief polygonal tundra landscape: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Peter E. Thornton; Jitendra Kumar; Colleen M. Iversen; Richard T. Mills; Gautam Bisht; Nathan Collier; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2016-01-27

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic discussion paper under review and available at http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2016-29/. Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to atmosphere under warming climate. Ice--wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. The microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behaviour under current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites at Barrow, Alaska spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygon and representative of broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multi--phase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using high resolution LiDAR DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high resolution model mesh. Best available soil data from field observations and literature was utilized to represent the complex hetogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. This data collection provides the complete set of input files, forcing data sets and computational meshes for simulations using PFLOTRAN for four sites at Barrow Environmental Observatory. It also document the complete computational workflow for this modeling study to allow verification, reproducibility and follow up studies.

  6. EA-212 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Mexico. EA-212 Coral Power, LLC (16.9 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

  7. ICSBEP Criticality Benchmark Eigenvalues with ENDF/B-VII.1 Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III; MacFarlane, Robert

    2012-06-28

    We review MCNP eigenvalue calculations from a suite of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook evaluations with the recently distributed ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section library.

  8. Cesium-137 inventories in Alaskan Tundra, lake and marine sediments: An indicator of recent organic material transport?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Tundra sampling was accomplished in 1989--1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68{degree}37` N, 149{degree}17` W). Inventories of {sup 137}Cs (102--162 mBq/cm{sup 2}) are close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude. Accumulated inventories of {sup 137}Cs in tundra decrease by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70{degree}13` N, 148{degree}30` W). Atmospheric deposition of {sup 137}Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This suggests a recent loss of {sup 137}Cs and possibly associated organic matter from tundra over the northern portions of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. Sediments from Toolik Lake (68{degree}38` N, 149{degree}38` W) showed widely varying {sup 137}Cs inventories, from a low of 22 mBq/cm{sup 2} away from the lake inlet, to a high between 140 to >200 mBq/cm{sup 2} near the main stream inflow. This was indicative of recent accumulation of cesium and possibly organic material associated with it in arctic lakes, although additional sampling is needed.

  9. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; et al

    2015-06-08

    The nitrate (NO₃⁻) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO₃⁻ derived from at NO₃⁻ signal with δ¹⁵N averaging –4.8 ± 1.0‰ (standard error of the mean) and δ¹⁸O averaging 70.2 ±1.7‰. In active layer pore waters, NO₃⁻ primarily occurred at concentrations suitable for isotopic analysis in the relatively dry and oxic centers of high-centered polygons. The average δ¹⁵N and δ¹⁸O of NO₃⁻ from high-centered polygons were 0.5 ± 1.1‰ and –4.1 ± 0.6‰, respectively. When compared to the δ¹⁵N of reduced nitrogen (N) sources,more » and the δ¹⁸O of soil pore waters, it was evident that NO₃⁻ in high-centered polygons was primarily from microbial nitrification. Permafrost NO₃⁻ had δ¹⁵N ranging from approximately –6‰ to 10‰, similar to atmospheric and microbial NO₃⁻, and highly variable δ¹⁸O ranging from approximately –2‰ to 38‰. Permafrost ice wedges contained a significant atmospheric component of NO₃⁻, while permafrost textural ice contained a greater proportion of microbially derived NO₃⁻. Large-scale permafrost thaw in this environment would release NO₃⁻ with a δ¹⁸O signature intermediate to that of atmospheric and microbial NO₃. Consequently, while atmospheric and microbial sources can be readily distinguished by the NO₃⁻ dual isotope technique in tundra environments, attribution of NO₃⁻ from thawing permafrost will not be straightforward. The NO₃⁻ isotopic signature, however, appears useful in identifying NO₃⁻ sources in extant permafrost ice.« less

  10. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-08

    The nitrate (NO₃⁻) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO₃⁻ derived from at NO₃⁻ signal with δ¹⁵N averaging –4.8 ± 1.0‰ (standard error of the mean) and δ¹⁸O averaging 70.2 ±1.7‰. In active layer pore waters, NO₃⁻ primarily occurred at concentrations suitable for isotopic analysis in the relatively dry and oxic centers of high-centered polygons. The average δ¹⁵N and δ¹⁸O of NO₃⁻ from high-centered polygons were 0.5 ± 1.1‰ and –4.1 ± 0.6‰, respectively. When compared to the δ¹⁵N of reduced nitrogen (N) sources, and the δ¹⁸O of soil pore waters, it was evident that NO₃⁻ in high-centered polygons was primarily from microbial nitrification. Permafrost NO₃⁻ had δ¹⁵N ranging from approximately –6‰ to 10‰, similar to atmospheric and microbial NO₃⁻, and highly variable δ¹⁸O ranging from approximately –2‰ to 38‰. Permafrost ice wedges contained a significant atmospheric component of NO₃⁻, while permafrost textural ice contained a greater proportion of microbially derived NO₃⁻. Large-scale permafrost thaw in this environment would release NO₃⁻ with a δ¹⁸O signature intermediate to that of atmospheric and microbial NO₃. Consequently, while atmospheric and microbial sources can be readily distinguished by the NO₃⁻ dual isotope technique in tundra environments, attribution of NO₃⁻ from thawing permafrost will not be straightforward. The NO₃⁻ isotopic signature, however, appears useful in identifying NO₃⁻ sources in extant permafrost ice.

  11. Effect of shading by the table coral Acropora Hyacinthus on understory corals. [Acropora; Pocillopora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimson, J.

    1985-02-01

    Field surveys at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, show that coral density and diversity is much lower beneath Acropora table corals than in adjacent unshaded areas. Additionally, the understory community is predominantly composed of massive and encrusting species, while branching Acropora and Pocillopora predominate in unshaded areas. Results of experiments in which coral fragments were transferred to the shade of table Acropora and to adjacent unshaded areas show that shading slows the growth and leads to higher mortality of branching species, while massive and encrusting species are unaffected. Light measurements made beneath table Acropora show that illumination and irradiance values fall to levels at which most hermatypic corals do not occur. The fast-growing but fragile table Acropora are abundant in a wide variety of atoll habitats and grow rapidly to form a canopy approx. = 50 cm above the substrate. However, table Acropora also have high mortality rates, so that there is continuous production of unshaded areas. The growth and death of tables thus create local disturbances, and the resulting patchwork of recently shaded and unshaded areas may enhance coral diversity in areas of high coral cover.

  12. Technetium (VII) Co-precipitation with Framework Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harsh, James B.; Dickson, Johnbull Otah; Pierce, Eric M.; Bargar, John

    2015-07-13

    Technetium-99 (99Tc), a long-lived radionuclide, is one of the most widespread contaminants within the Hanford subsurface. At some depths, it is only extractable with strong acids, suggesting incorporation into a solid phase. We hypothesized that Tc may have coprecipitated with feldspathoid aluminosilicates under waste tanks that had leaked caustic solutions into the vadose zone. Our objectives were to determine if Tc could be incorporated into the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite and under what conditions coprecipitation could occur. Our hypothesis was that sodalite was more likely to incorporate and retain Tc. Our approach was to use known methods of feldspathoid formation in solutions resembling those in Hanford waste tanks contacting sediments in terms of major ion (Na, NO3, OH, Al(OH)4, and Si(OH)4 concentrations. In some cases, Al and Si were supplied from zeolite. We used perrhenate (ReO4) as a surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4) to avoid the radioactivity. The major findings of this study were 1) ReO4 could be incorporated into either sodalite or cancrinite but the concentration in the solid was < 1% of the competing ion Cl, NO3, or NO2. 2) The small amount of ReO4 incorporated was not exchangeable with NO3 or NO2. 3) In sodalite, NO3 was highly preferred over ReO4 but significant Re-sodalite was formed when the mole fraction in solution (Re/Re+N) exceeded 0.8. 4) A nonlinear relation between the unit cell parameter and amount of Re incorporated suggested that a separate Re-sodalite phase was formed rather than a solid solution. 5) We determined that sodalite preference for sodalite in the presence of different anions increased with the ionic size of the competing anion: Cl < CO3 < NO3 < SO4 < MnO4 < WO4 and significant incorporation did not occur unless the difference in anion radii was less than 12%. 6) Re(VII) was not significantly reduced to Re(IV) under the conditions of this experiment and Re appeared to be a good surrogate for Tc under oxidizing

  13. Composition, apparatus, and process, for sorption of gaseous compounds of group II-VII elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.; Luxon, Bruce A.

    1991-08-06

    Scavenger compositions are disclosed, which have utility for effecting the sorptive removal of hazardous gases containing Group II-VII elements of the Periodic Table, such as are widely encountered in the manufacture of semiconducting materials and semiconductor devices. Gas sorption processes including the contacting of Group II-VII gaseous compounds with such scavenger compositions are likewise disclosed, together with critical space velocity contacting conditions pertaining thereto. Further described are gas contacting apparatus, including mesh structures which may be deployed in gas contacting vessels containing such scavenger compositions, to prevent solids from being introduced to or discharged from the contacting vessel in the gas stream undergoing treatment. A reticulate heat transfer structure also is disclosed, for dampening localized exothermic reaction fronts when gas mixtures comprising Group II-VII constituents are contacted with the scavenger compositions in bulk sorption contacting vessels according to the invention.

  14. Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) The Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) is a joint procurement activity among three of the Department of Energy's National Laboratories launched in 2014 to build state-of-the-art high-performance computing technologies that are essential for supporting U.S. national nuclear security and are key tools used for

  15. Coral Gables, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coral Gables, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.72149, -80.2683838 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  16. Press Materials for Argonne CORAL announcement | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Livermore (CORAL) initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy announced a 200 million investment to deliver a next-generation supercomputer, known as Aurora, to the Argonne...

  17. EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC (18.43 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-212 Coral Power, LLC EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C

  18. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC | Department of Energy export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC:

  19. Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings May 18, 2011 - 4:32pm Addthis Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. |

  20. Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in Scleractinia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl,Jennifer; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Hexacorallia includes the Scleractinia, or stony corals, characterized by having an external calcareous skeleton made of aragonite, and the Corallimorpharia, or mushroom corals, that lack such a skeleton. Although each group has traditionally been considered monophyletic, some molecular phylogenetic analyses have challenged this, suggesting that skeletal features are evolutionarily plastic, and reviving notions that the scleractinian skeleton may be ephemeral and that the group itself may be polyphyletic. Nevertheless, the most comprehensive phylogenetic study of Hexacorallia supported scleractinian monophyly (REF), and so this remains controversial. In order to resolve this contentious issue, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of nine scleractinians and four corallimorpharians and performed phylogenetic analysis that also included three outgroups (an octocoral and two sea anemones). Our data provide the first strong evidence that Scleractinia is paraphyletic and that the Corallimorpharia is derived from within the group, from which we conclude that skeletal loss has occurred in the latter group secondarily. It is possible that a driving force in such skeletal loss could be the high levels of CO{sub 2} in the ocean during the mid-Cretaceous, which would have impacted aragonite solubility. We estimate from molecular divergence measures that the Corallimorpharia arose in the mid-Cretaceous, approximately 87 million years ago (Ma), supporting this view. These data also permit us to date the origin of Scleractinia to 265 Ma, narrowing the gap between the group's phylogenetic origin and its earliest fossil record.

  1. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-11-13

    Version 01 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  2. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-07-22

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  3. Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 8-1 Chapter VIII This chapter gives an overview of current and projected employment in and related to the energy sector and discusses programs to assist in meeting the demand for new workers going forward. The first section provides estimates of jobs

  4. MENDF71x. Multigroup Neutron Cross Section Data Tables Based upon ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Parsons, Donald Kent; Gardiner, Steven J.; Gray, Mark Girard; Lee, Mary Beth; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-12-17

    A new multi-group neutron cross section library has been released along with the release of NDI version 2.0.20. The library is named MENDF71x and is based upon the evaluations released in ENDF/B-VII.1 which was made publicly available in December 2011. ENDF/B-VII.1 consists of 423 evaluations of which ten are excited states evaluations and 413 are ground state evaluations. MENDF71x was created by processing the 423 evaluations into 618-group, downscatter only NDI data tables. The ENDF/B evaluation files were processed using NJOY version 99.393 with the exception of 35Cl and 233U. Those two isotopes had unique properties that required that we process the evaluation using NJOY version 2012. The MENDF71x library was only processed to room temperature, i.e., 293.6 K. In the future, we plan on producing a multi-temperature library based on ENDF/B-VII.1 and compatible with MENDF71x.

  5. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael; Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Herv; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-09-14

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

  6. Coral Terrace, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Coral Terrace is a census-designated place in Miami-Dade County, Florida.1 References ...

  7. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m{sup 2}) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO{sub 2} exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO{sub 2} exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses.

  8. POINT 2011: ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta2 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullen, D E

    2011-04-07

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and presented in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results. The latest ENDF/B-VII.1 beta2 data library was recently and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This release completely supersedes all preceding releases of ENDF/B. As distributed the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF-6 character format [R2], which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form the POINT 2011 library is approximately 16 gigabyte in size and is distributed on one compressed DVDs (see, below for the details of the contents of each DVD).

  9. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate

  10. VII Zw 403: H I STRUCTURE IN A BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Caroline E.; Ashley, Trisha; Hunter, Deidre A.; Nordgren, Tyler E.; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Lynds, Roger; O'Neil, Earl J.; McIntyre, Vince J.; Oestlin, Goeran; Westpfahl, David J.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2011-09-15

    We present optical (UBVJ), ultraviolet (FUV, NUV), and high-resolution atomic hydrogen (H I) observations of the nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD), VII Zw 403. We find that VII Zw 403 has a relatively high H I mass-to-light ratio for a BCD. The rotation velocity is nominally 10-15 km s{sup -1}, but rises to {approx}20 km s{sup -1} after correction for the {approx}8-10 km s{sup -1} random motions present in the gas. The velocity field is complex, including a variation in the position angle of the major axis going from the northeast to the southwest parts of the galaxy. Our high-resolution H I maps reveal structure in the central gas, including a large, low-density H I depression or hole between the southern and northern halves of the galaxy, coincident with an unresolved X-ray source. Although interactions have been proposed as the triggering mechanism for the vigorous star formation occurring in BCDs, VII Zw 403 does not seem to have been tidally triggered by an external interaction, as we have found no nearby possible perturbers. It also does not appear to fall in the set of galaxies that exhibit a strong central mass density concentration, as its optical scale length is large in comparison to similar systems. However, there are some features that are compatible with an accretion event: optical/H I axis misalignment, a change in position angle of the kinematic axis, and a complex velocity field.

  11. DOE Office of Science Releases Journal of Undergraduate Research Volume VII

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) DOE Office of Science Releases Journal of Undergraduate Research Volume VII News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.20.07 DOE Office of Science Releases Journal

  12. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  13. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

  14. InSAR Detection and Field Evidence for Thermokarst after a Tundra Wildfire, Using ALOS-PALSAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iwahana, Go; Uchida, Masao; Liu, Lin; Gong, Wenyu; Meyer, Franz; Guritz, Richard; Yamanokuchi, Tsutomu; Hinzman, Larry

    2016-03-08

    Thermokarst is the process of ground subsidence caused by either the thawing of ice-rich permafrost or the melting of massive ground ice. The consequences of permafrost degradation associated with thermokarst for surface ecology, landscape evolution, and hydrological processes have been of great scientific interest and social concern. Part of a tundra patch affected by wildfire in northern Alaska (27.5 km2) was investigated here, using remote sensing and in situ surveys to quantify and understand permafrost thaw dynamics after surface disturbances. A two-pass differential InSAR technique using L-band ALOS-PALSAR has been shown capable of capturing thermokarst subsidence triggered by a tundramore » fire at a spatial resolution of tens of meters, with supporting evidence from field data and optical satellite images. We have introduced a calibration procedure, comparing burned and unburned areas for InSAR subsidence signals, to remove the noise due to seasonal surface movement. In the first year after the fire, an average subsidence rate of 6.2 cm/year (vertical) was measured. Subsidence in the burned area continued over the following two years, with decreased rates. The mean rate of subsidence observed in our interferograms (from 24 July 2008 to 14 September 2010) was 3.3 cm/year, a value comparable to that estimated from field surveys at two plots on average (2.2 cm/year) for the six years after the fire. These results suggest that this InSAR-measured ground subsidence is caused by the development of thermokarst, a thawing process supported by surface change observations from high-resolution optical images and in situ ground level surveys.« less

  15. Effects of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics of tundra and riparian vegetation: A project in the R4D program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Models were proposed as research tools to test the basic understanding of the structure and function of arctic ecosystems, as a means for providing initial management assessments of potential response to energy-related development, and as a vehicle for extrapolation of research results to other arctic sites and landscapes. This final summary report reviews progress made on models at a variety of scales from nutrient uptake by individual roots to nutrient availability within arctic landscapes, and examines potentials and critical limitations of these models for providing insight on patch and landscape level function in tundra regions.

  16. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide

  17. POINT 2015: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    Version 00 For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 K and 2100 K, in steps of 300 K (the exception being 293.6 K, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 K is approximatelymore » 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 K. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  18. 2015 DOE Final UF Report. Effects of Warming the Deep Soil and Permafrost on Ecosystem Carbon Balance in Alaskan Tundra. A Coupled Measurement and Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuur, Edward

    2015-06-11

    The major research goal of this project was to understand and quantify the fate of carbon stored in permafrost ecosystems using a combination of field and laboratory experiments to measure isotope ratios and C fluxes in a tundra ecosystem exposed to experimental warming. Field measurements centered on the establishment of a two-factor experimental warming using a snow fence and open top chambers to increase winter and summer temperatures alone, and in combination, at a tundra field site at the Eight Mile Lake watershed near Healy, Alaska. The objective of this experimental warming was to significantly raise air and deep soil temperatures and increase the depth of thaw beyond that of previous warming experiments. Detecting the loss and fate of the old permafrost C pool remains a major challenge. Because soil C has been accumulating in these ecosystems over the past 10,000 years, there is a strong difference between the radiocarbon isotopic composition of C deep in the soil profile and permafrost compared to that near the soil surface. This large range of isotopic variability is unique to radiocarbon and provides a valuable and sensitive fingerprint for detecting the loss of old soil C as permafrost thaws.

  19. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  20. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 | Department of Energy export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice Vol 72 No 118 EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (51.25 KB)

  1. Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub. L. No. 113-76.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2014-04 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2014-01 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the...

  2. ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VI, JEFF-3.1, AND JENDL-3.3 RESULTS FOR UNREFLECTED PLUTONIUM SOLUTIONS AND MOX LATTICES (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSTELLER, RUSSELL D.

    2007-02-09

    Previous studies have indicated that ENDF/B-VII preliminary releases {beta}-2 and {beta}-3, predecessors to the recent initial release of ENDF/B-VII.0, produce significantly better overall agreement with criticality benchmarks than does ENDF/B-VI. However, one of those studies also suggests that improvements still may be needed for thermal plutonium cross sections. The current study substantiates that concern by examining criticality benchmarks for unreflected spheres of plutonium-nitrate solutions and for slightly and heavily borated mixed-oxide (MOX) lattices. Results are presented for the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries as well as ENDF/B-VII.0 and ENDF/B-VI. It is shown that ENDF/B-VII.0 tends to overpredict reactivity for thermal plutonium benchmarks over at least a portion of the thermal range. In addition, it is found that additional benchmark data are needed for the deep thermal range.

  3. CORAL Fact Sheet__FINAL AS ISSUED_UPDATED

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact S heet: Collaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) The C ollaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) i s a j oint p rocurement activity a mong t hree o f t he D epartment o f E nergy's N ational L aboratories launched i n 2 014 to b uild s tate---of---the---art h igh---performance c omputing t echnologies t hat a re e ssential f or supporting U.S. national nuclear security a nd a re k ey t ools u sed f or t echnology advancement a nd s cientific

  4. Investigation of inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 independent and cumulative fission product yields with proposed revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigni, Marco T; Francis, Matthew W; Gauld, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII. independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear scheme in the decay sub-library that is not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that are incompatible with the cumulative fission yields in the library, and also with experimental measurements. A comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to evaluate the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. An important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library in the case of stable and long-lived cumulative yields due to the inconsistency of ENDF/B-VII.1 fission p;roduct yield and decay data sub-libraries. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  5. Investigation of inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 independent and cumulative fission product yields with proposed revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigni, Marco T; Francis, Matthew W; Gauld, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII. independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear scheme in the decay sub-library that is not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that are incompatible with the cumulative fission yields in the library, and also with experimental measurements. A comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to evaluate the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. An important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library in the case of stable and long-lived cumulative yields due to the inconsistency of ENDF/B-VII.1 fission p;roduct yield and decay data sub-libraries. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  6. Temperature and vital effect controls on Bamboo coral (Isididae) isotopegeochemistry: A test of the "lines method"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, T M; Spero, H J; Guilderson, T P; LaVigne, M; Clague, D; Macalello, S; Jang, N

    2011-03-01

    Deep-sea bamboo corals hold promise as long-term climatic archives, yet little information exists linking bamboo coral geochemistry to measured environmental parameters. This study focuses on a suite of 10 bamboo corals collected from the Pacific and Atlantic basins (250-2136 m water depth) to investigate coral longevity, growth rates, and isotopic signatures. Calcite samples for stable isotopes and radiocarbon were collected from the base the corals, where the entire history of growth is recorded. In three of the coral specimens, samples were also taken from an upper branch for comparison. Radiocarbon and growth band width analyses indicate that the skeletal calcite precipitates from ambient dissolved inorganic carbon and that the corals live for 150-300 years, with extension rates of 9-128 {micro}m/yr. A linear relationship between coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C indicates that the isotopic composition is influenced by vital effects ({delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope of 0.17-0.47). As with scleractinian deep-sea corals, the intercept from a linear regression of {delta}{sup 18}O versus {delta}{sup 13}C is a function of temperature, such that a reliable paleotemperature proxy can be obtained, using the 'lines method.' Although the coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope is maintained throughout the coral base ontogeny, the branches and central cores of the bases exhibit {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C values that are shifted far from equilibrium. We find that a reliable intercept value can be derived from the {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C regression of multiple samples distributed throughout one specimen or from multiple samples within individual growth bands.

  7. MICROX-2 cross section library based on ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, J.; Ivanov, K.; Choi, H.

    2012-07-01

    New cross section libraries of a neutron transport code MICROX-2 have been generated for advanced reactor design and fuel cycle analyses. A total of 386 nuclides were processed, including 10 thermal scattering nuclides, which are available in ENDF/B-VII release 0 nuclear data. The NJOY system and MICROR code were used to process nuclear data and convert them into MICROX-2 format. The energy group structure of the new library was optimized for both the thermal and fast neutron spectrum reactors based on Contributon and Point-wise Cross Section Driven (CPXSD) method, resulting in a total of 1173 energy groups. A series of lattice cell level benchmark calculations have been performed against both experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for the effective/infinite multiplication factor and reaction rate ratios. The results of MICROX-2 calculation with the new library were consistent with those of 15 reference cases. The average errors of the infinite multiplication factor and reaction rate ratio were 0.31% {delta}k and 1.9%, respectively. The maximum error of reaction rate ratio was 8% for {sup 238}U-to-{sup 235}U fission of ZEBRA lattice against the reference calculation done by MCNP5. (authors)

  8. MT71x: Multi-Temperature Library Based on ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Parsons, Donald Kent; Gray, Mark Girard; Lee, Mary Beth; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-12-16

    The Nuclear Data Team has released a multitemperature transport library, MT71x, based upon ENDF/B-VII.1 with a few modifications as well as additional evaluations for a total of 427 isotope tables. The library was processed using NJOY2012.39 into 23 temperatures. MT71x consists of two sub-libraries; MT71xMG for multigroup energy representation data and MT71xCE for continuous energy representation data. These sub-libraries are suitable for deterministic transport and Monte Carlo transport applications, respectively. The SZAs used are the same for the two sub-libraries; that is, the same SZA can be used for both libraries. This makes comparisons between the two libraries and between deterministic and Monte Carlo codes straightforward. Both the multigroup energy and continuous energy libraries were verified and validated with our checking codes checkmg and checkace (multigroup and continuous energy, respectively) Then an expanded suite of tests was used for additional verification and, finally, verified using an extensive suite of critical benchmark models. We feel that this library is suitable for all calculations and is particularly useful for calculations sensitive to temperature effects.

  9. Substrates Control Multimerization and Activation of the Multi-Domain ATPase Motor of Type VII Secretion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, Oren S.; Dovala, Dustin; Li, Xueming; Connolly, Lynn; Bendebury, Anastasia; Finer-Moore, Janet; Holton, James; Cheng, Yifan; Stroud, Robert M.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2015-04-09

    We report that Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus secrete virulence factors via type VII protein secretion (T7S), a system that intriguingly requires all of its secretion substrates for activity. To gain insights into T7S function, we used structural approaches to guide studies of the putative translocase EccC, a unique enzyme with three ATPase domains, and its secretion substrate EsxB. The crystal structure of EccC revealed that the ATPase domains are joined by linker/pocket interactions that modulate its enzymatic activity. EsxB binds via its signal sequence to an empty pocket on the C-terminal ATPase domain, which is accompanied by an increasemore » in ATPase activity. Surprisingly, substrate binding does not activate EccC allosterically but, rather, by stimulating its multimerization. Thus, the EsxB substrate is also an integral T7S component, illuminating a mechanism that helps to explain interdependence of substrates, and suggests a model in which binding of substrates modulates their coordinate release from the bacterium.« less

  10. Substrates Control Multimerization and Activation of the Multi-Domain ATPase Motor of Type VII Secretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Oren S.; Dovala, Dustin; Li, Xueming; Connolly, Lynn; Bendebury, Anastasia; Finer-Moore, Janet; Holton, James; Cheng, Yifan; Stroud, Robert M.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2015-04-09

    We report that Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus secrete virulence factors via type VII protein secretion (T7S), a system that intriguingly requires all of its secretion substrates for activity. To gain insights into T7S function, we used structural approaches to guide studies of the putative translocase EccC, a unique enzyme with three ATPase domains, and its secretion substrate EsxB. The crystal structure of EccC revealed that the ATPase domains are joined by linker/pocket interactions that modulate its enzymatic activity. EsxB binds via its signal sequence to an empty pocket on the C-terminal ATPase domain, which is accompanied by an increase in ATPase activity. Surprisingly, substrate binding does not activate EccC allosterically but, rather, by stimulating its multimerization. Thus, the EsxB substrate is also an integral T7S component, illuminating a mechanism that helps to explain interdependence of substrates, and suggests a model in which binding of substrates modulates their coordinate release from the bacterium.

  11. A reduced order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for regional- and climate-scale land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-04-04

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometer scale (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a particular reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "Proper Orthogonal Decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally-resolvedmore » fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We applied this technique to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface-subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the four study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (< 0.1%) for two validation years not used in training the ROM. We also demonstrated that our approach: (1) efficiently corrects for coarse-resolution model bias and (2) can be used for polygonal tundra sites not included in the training dataset with relatively good accuracy (< 1.5% relative error), thereby allowing for the possibility of applying these ROMs across a much larger landscape. This method has the potential to efficiently increase the resolution of land models for coupled climate simulations, allowing LSMs to be used at spatial scales consistent with

  12. A reduced-order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-09-17

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from the molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometers (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "proper orthogonal decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally resolvedmore » fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We developed four different methods and applied them to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface–subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (< 0.1%) for 2 validation years not used in training the ROM. We also demonstrate that our approach: (1) efficiently corrects for coarse-resolution model bias and (2) can be used for polygonal tundra sites not included in the training data set with relatively good accuracy (< 1.7% relative error), thereby allowing for the possibility of applying these ROMs across a much larger landscape. By coupling the ROMs constructed at different scales together hierarchically, this method has the potential to efficiently increase the resolution of land models for coupled

  13. The effect of changes in sea surface temperature on linear growth of Porites coral in Ambon Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corvianawatie, Corry Putri, Mutiara R.; Cahyarini, Sri Y.

    2015-09-30

    Coral is one of the most important organisms in the coral reef ecosystem. There are several factors affecting coral growth, one of them is changes in sea surface temperature (SST). The purpose of this research is to understand the influence of SST variability on the annual linear growth of Porites coral taken from Ambon Bay. The annual coral linear growth was calculated and compared to the annual SST from the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 3b (ERSST v3b) model. Coral growth was calculated by using Coral X-radiograph Density System (CoralXDS) software. Coral sample X-radiographs were used as input data. Chronology was developed by calculating the coral’s annual growth bands. A pair of high and low density banding patterns observed in the coral’s X-radiograph represent one year of coral growth. The results of this study shows that Porites coral extents from 2001-2009 and had an average growth rate of 1.46 cm/year. Statistical analysis shows that the annual coral linear growth declined by 0.015 cm/year while the annual SST declined by 0.013°C/year. SST and the annual linear growth of Porites coral in the Ambon Bay is insignificantly correlated with r=0.304 (n=9, p>0.05). This indicates that annual SST variability does not significantly influence the linear growth of Porites coral from Ambon Bay. It is suggested that sedimentation load, salinity, pH or other environmental factors may affect annual linear coral growth.

  14. Radiocarbon-Based Ages and Growth Rates of Bamboo Corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Flood-Page, S; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L; Fallon, S J; McCulloch, M

    2004-12-12

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present {Delta}{sup 14}C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletal carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.

  15. A Temperature-Dependent, Linearly Interpolable, Tabulated Cross Section Library Based on released ENDF/B-VII.0.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-06-15

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.0 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.0 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures: 1, 10, 100 eV,more » 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. CCC-638/TART2005 is recommended for use with these data. Codes within TART can be used to display these data or to run calculations using these data.« less

  16. ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-03-03

    Version 00 For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 K and 2100 K, in steps of 300 K (the exception being 293.6 K, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 K is approximatelymore » 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 K. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. As distributed the original evaluated data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 K. For use in applications, this data has been processed using the 2012 version of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes PREPRO 2012 to produce temperature dependent, linearly interpolable in energy, tabulated cross sections, in the ENDF-6 format. The steps required and codes used to produce room temperature, linearly interpolable tabulated cross sections, in the ENDF-6 format, are described below; the name of each code in given in parenthesis; for details of each code see reference. Here are the steps, and PREPRO 2012 codes, used to process the data, in the order in which the codes were used. 1) Linearly interpolable, tabulated cross sections (LINEAR) 2) Including the resonance contribution (RECENT) 3) Doppler broaden all cross sections to temperature (SIGMA1) 4) Check data, define redundant cross sections by summation (FIXUP) 5) Update evaluation dictionary in MF/MT=1/451 (DICTIN) For the "cold" (0 K) data steps 1), 2) and 4), 5) were used (no Doppler broadening). For the data at other temperatures, after steps 1) and 2), the data was Doppler broadened to each temperature using step 3), and the results were then made consistent with the ENDF/B formats and conventions using steps 4) and 5), to

  17. Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74 and Related Conference Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-08 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74 and Related Conference Report.

  18. First-principles electronic structure and formation energies of group V and VII impurities in the ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Congxin; Jia, Yu; Zhang, Qiming

    2014-09-21

    Based on density functional theory, the electronic structures, formation energy, and transition level of the selected group V and VII impurities in ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are investigated by means of first-principles methods. Numerical results show that the group V and VII atoms-doped ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be energetically favorable under the Fe-rich condition. Group V atom substituting O atom can induce the acceptor impurity level, while the deep donor impurity states are formed inside the band gap when group VII atom substitute O atom in the ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Moreover, our results show that halogen atom F substituting O atom should be very easy in the ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, our results also show that for both group V and VII atom-doped ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the upper sides of valence band are modified obviously, while the conduction band edge does not change.

  19. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voolstra, Christian R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Matz, Mikhail V.; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M.; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Monica

    2011-01-31

    Background: Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. Methodology/Principal Findings: We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7percent of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineagespecific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Conclusion/Relevance: This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals? evolutionary response to global climate change.

  20. Effect of warming on the degradation and production of low-molecular-weight labile organic carbon in an Arctic tundra soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ziming; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Liang, Liyuan; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-01-16

    The fate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stored in the Arctic permafrost is a key concern as temperatures continue to rise in the northern hemisphere. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is affected by the composition of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are vulnerable to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be controlling SOC degradation upon permafrost thaw. Here, we examine the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC in an anoxic incubation experiment using soil samples from the active layer at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska, USA. Free-reducing sugars, alcohols, andmore » low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids were analyzed during incubation at either –2 or 8 °C for up to 240 days. Results show that simple sugar and alcohol SOC largely account for the initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products, acetate and formate, are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important role as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations are further supported in a glucose addition experiment, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production occurred concurrently with rapid production and consumption of labile organics such as acetate. However, addition of tannic acid, as a more complex organic substrate, showed little influence on the overall production of CO2 and CH4 and organic acids. Together our study shows that LMW labile organics in SOC control the initial rapid release of green-house gases upon warming. We thus present a conceptual framework for the labile SOC transformations and their relations to fermentation, iron reduction and methanogenesis, thereby providing the basis for improved model prediction of climate feedbacks in the Arctic.« less

  1. COMBINE7.0 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2008-09-01

    COMBINE7.0 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.0 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 finegroup cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko selfshielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those selfshielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.0 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a onedimensional, discrete

  2. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2009-08-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those self-shielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional, discrete

  3. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 4. Federal Regions V and VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    The following material is provided for each state in Federal Regions V and VII: state title page lists nonattainment areas for each pollutant, the number of monitors with valid readings for a particular averaging time for a pollutant, and the number of monitors that recorded a violation of the standard); revised State Implementation Plan (SIP) outline (covers sources of the problems, the proposed strategies for achieving attainment, and new state review procedures); maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; SAROAD (Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data) data; SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region V are Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Federal Region VII includes Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. (JGB)

  4. Sedimentologic succession of uplifted coral community, Urvina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgan, M.W.; Hollander, D.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1954, along the west-central coast of Isabela Island, an upward movement of magma suddenly raised Urvina Bay over 6 m and exposed several square kilometers of carbonate deposits covering a young aa lava flow (around 1000 years old). Results from 6 transect lines across the uplift, 30 cores, and 10 trenches describe the sedimentologic and ecologic transition from barren basalt to diverse carbonate sediments with small coral reefs. Along horizontal transects spanning from 0 to 7 m paleowater depth, there is a seaward progression from beaches, mangroves, and basalt to thick deposits (> 1.6 m) of carbonate sands and small coral reefs. Variation in water depth, degree of wave exposure, and irregularity of the aa lava topography provided many microhabitats where coral, calcareous algae, and mollusks settled and grew. Eight hermatypic coral species are found throughout the shelf, and three species (i.e., Pavona clavus, Pocillopora damicornis, and Porites lobata) produced five small, isolated, monospecific, coral-reef frameworks. The vertical section seen in cores and trenches shows that calcium carbonate increased upward, whereas volcanic sediments decreased; however, episodic layers occur with high concentrations of basaltic sands. In vertical samples from the central portion of the shelf, the coral population changed from small, isolated colonies of Psammocora (Plesioseris) superficalis near the basalt basement to large reef-forming colonies of Pocillopora damicornis farther upsection. Reefs of the Galapagos Islands are small and less diverse than most Pacific reefs. Nonetheless, understanding their temporal successional development should throw light on the origin and history of larger oceanic reefs in the Pacific.

  5. ENDF-6 Formats Manual Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, M.; Members of the Cross Sections Evaluation Working Group

    2009-06-01

    In December 2006, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) of the United States released the new ENDF/B-VII.0 library. This represented considerable achievement as it was the 1st major release since 1990 when ENDF/B-VI has been made publicly available. The two libraries have been released in the same format, ENDF-6, which has been originally developed for the ENDF/B-VI library. In the early stage of work on the VII-th generation of the library CSEWG made important decision to use the same formats. This decision was adopted even though it was argued that it would be timely to modernize the formats and several interesting ideas were proposed. After careful deliberation CSEWG concluded that actual implementation would require considerable resources needed to modify processing codes and to guarantee high quality of the files processed by these codes. In view of this the idea of format modernization has been postponed and ENDF-6 format was adopted for the new ENDF/B-VII library. In several other areas related to ENDF we made our best to move beyond established tradition and achieve maximum modernization. Thus, the 'Big Paper' on ENDF/B-VII.0 has been published, also in December 2006, as the Special Issue of Nuclear Data Sheets 107 (1996) 2931-3060. The new web retrieval and plotting system for ENDF-6 formatted data, Sigma, was developed by the NNDC and released in 2007. Extensive paper has been published on the advanced tool for nuclear reaction data evaluation, EMPIRE, in 2007. This effort was complemented with release of updated set of ENDF checking codes in 2009. As the final item on this list, major revision of ENDF-6 Formats Manual was made. This work started in 2006 and came to fruition in 2009 as documented in the present report.

  6. Intra-annual variability of the radiocarbon content of corals from the Galapagos Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.A. Geophysics Program AK-50, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA ); Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H. ); Grootes, P.M. Quatenary Isotope Lab. AK-60, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA ); Stuiver, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors report AMS [sup 14]C measurements on sub annual samples of coral from the Galapagos Islands that span the period, 1970-1973. Both the major 1972 El Nino/Southern Oscillation event and intra-annual changes in regional upwelling of [sup 14]C-depleted waters associated with alternation of surface-ocean current patterns are evident in the record. These data show that the corals preserve a detailed record of past intra-annual variations of the [sup 14]C content of surface ocean water.

  7. MCNP Super Lattice Method for VHTR ORIGEN2.2 Nuclear Library Improvement Based on ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Chang; J. R. Parry

    2010-10-01

    The advanced Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) achieves simplification of safety through reliance on innovative features and passive systems. One of the VHTRs innovative features is the reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under extreme accident conditions. The effect of the random fuel kernel distribution in the fuel prismatic block creates a double-heterogeneous lattice, which needs to be addressed through the use of the newly developed prismatic super Kernel-by-Kernel Fuel (KbKF) lattice model method. Based on the new ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross section evaluated data, the developed KbKF super lattice model was then used with MCNP to calculate the material isotopes neutron reaction rates, such as, (n,?); (n,n); (n,2n); (n,f); (n,p); (n,?). Then, the MCNP-calculated results are rearranged to generate a set of new libraries VHTRXS.lib, for the ORIGEN2.2 isotopes depletion and build-up analysis code. The libraries contain one group cross section data for the structural light elements, actinides, and fission products that can be applied in the VHTR related fuel burnup and material transmutation analysis codes. The efficiency and ease of use of the MCNP method to generate and update the ORIGEN2.2 one-group spectrum weighed cross section library for VHTR was demonstrated.

  8. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kimball, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Dunbar, R.

    2015-12-04

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzedmorein CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as ?47 values. We analyzed ?47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured ?47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between ?47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between ?47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct ?47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset between the corals

  9. Mineral accretion technology for coral reef restoration, shore protection, and adaptation to rising sea level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hilbertz, W.

    1997-12-31

    Electrolysis of seawater is used to precipitate limestone on top of underwater steel structures to create growing artificial reefs to enhance coral growth, restore coral reef habitat, provide shelter for fish, shellfish, and other marine organisms, generate white sand for beach replenishment, and protect shore lines from wave erosion. Films and slides will be shown of existing structures in Jamaica, Panama, and the Maldives, and projects being developed in these and other locations will be evaluated. The method is unique because it creates the only artificial reef structures that generate the natural limestone substrate from which corals and coral reefs are composed, speeding the settlement and growth of calcareous organisms, and attracting the full range of other reef organisms. The structures are self-repairing and grow stronger with age. Power sources utilized include batteries, battery chargers, photovoltaic panels, and windmills. The cost of seawalls and breakwaters produced by this method is less than one tenth that of conventional technology. Because the technology is readily scaled up to build breakwaters and artificial islands able to keep pace with rising sea level it is capable of playing an important role in protecting low lying coastal areas from the effects of global climate change.

  10. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  11. EECBG Success Story: Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The city of Cape Coral, Florida -- a town of located on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico -- is using funding from the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program to help reduce the city’s energy use by 40% over the next 15 years. Learn more.

  12. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  13. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2011-09-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B3 or B1 zero-dimensional approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constants may be output in any of several standard formats including INL format, ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional (1-D) discrete-ordinate transport code, is incorporated into COMBINE7.1. As an option, the 167 fine-group constants generated by zero-dimensional COMBINE portion in the program can be

  14. Recurrent nonsense mutations within the type VII collagen gene in patients with severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovnanian, A.; Hilal, L.; Goossens, M. ); Blanchet-Bardon, C.; Prost, Y. de ); Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The generalized mutilating form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (i.e., the Hallopeau-Siemens type; HS-RDEB) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extreme mucocutaneous fragility associated with absent or markedly altered anchoring fibrils (AF). Recently, the authors reported linkage between HS-RDEB and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), which encodes the major component of AF. In this study, they investigated 52 unrelated HS-RDEB patients and 2 patients with RDEB inversa for the presence, at CpG dinucleotides, of mutations changing CGA arginine codons to premature stop codons TGA within the COL7A1 gene. Eight exons containing 10 CGA codons located in the amino-terminal domain of the COL7A1 gene were studied. Mutation analysis was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified genomic fragments. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products with altered electrophoretic mobility led to the characterization of three premature stop codons, each in a single COL7A1 allele, in four patients. Two patients (one affected with HS-RDEB and the other with RDEB inversa) have the same C-to-T transition at arginine codon 109. Two other HS-RDEB patients have a C-to-T transition at arginine 1213 and 1216, respectively. These nonsense mutations predict the truncation of [approximately]56%-92% of the polypeptide, including the collagenous and the noncollagenous NC-2 domains. On the basis of linkage analysis, which showed no evidence for locus heterogeneity in RDEB, it is expected that these patients are compound heterozygotes and have additional mutations on the other COL7A1 allele, leading to impaired AF formation. These results indicate that stop mutations within the COL7A1 gene can underlie both HS-RDEB and RDEB inversa, thus providing further evidence for the implication of this gene in RDEB. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The O VII X-Ray Forest Toward Markarian 421: Consistency between XMM-Newton and Chandra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaastra, J.S.; Werner, N.; Herder, J.W.A.den; Paerels, F.B.S.; de Plaa, J.; Rasmussen, A.P.; de Vries, C.P.; /SRON, Utrecht

    2006-04-28

    Recently the first detections of highly ionized gas associated with two Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) filaments have been reported. The evidence is based on X-ray absorption lines due to O VII and other ions observed by Chandra towards the bright blazar Mrk 421. We investigate the robustness of this detection by a re-analysis of the original Chandra LETGS spectra, the analysis of a large set of XMM-Newton RGS spectra of Mrk 421, and additional Chandra observations. We address the reliability of individual spectral features belonging to the absorption components, and assess the significance of the detection of these components. We also use Monte Carlo simulations of spectra. We confirm the apparent strength of several features in the Chandra spectra, but demonstrate that they are statistically not significant. This decreased significance is due to the number of redshift trials that are made and that are not taken into account in the original discovery paper. Therefore these features must be attributed to statistical fluctuations. This is confirmed by the RGS spectra, which have a higher signal to noise ratio than the Chandra spectra, but do not show features at the same wavelengths. Finally, we show that the possible association with a Ly{alpha} absorption system also lacks sufficient statistical evidence. We conclude that there is insufficient observational proof for the existence of the two proposed WHIM filaments towards Mrk 421, the brightest X-ray blazar on the sky. Therefore, the highly ionized component of the WHIM still remains to be discovered.

  16. Reconstruction of deglacial sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific from selective analysis of a fossil coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, N.; Finch, A.A.; Tudhope, A.W.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.R.; Ellam, R.M.

    2010-07-13

    The Sr/Ca of coral skeletons demonstrates potential as an indicator of sea surface temperatures (SSTs). However, the glacial-interglacial SST ranges predicted from Sr/Ca of fossil corals are usually higher than from other marine proxies. We observed infilling of secondary aragonite, characterized by high Sr/Ca ratios, along intraskeletal pores of a fossil coral from Papua New Guinea that grew during the penultimate deglaciation (130 {+-} 2 ka). Selective microanalysis of unaltered areas of the fossil coral indicates that SSTs at {approx}130 ka were {le} 1 C cooler than at present in contrast with bulk measurements (combining infilled and unaltered areas) which indicate a difference of 6-7 C. The analysis of unaltered areas of fossil skeletons by microprobe techniques may offer a route to more accurate reconstruction of past SSTs.

  17. Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub. L. No. 113-76.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2014-04 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2014-01 have been revised to remove language from Section 502 that was not carried forward from previous appropriation acts. FAL 2014-01 was also revised to update the Corporate Felony Conviction and Federal Tax Liability Representations and Assurances and the Conference Spending term. As a result, AL 2014-04 (Rev 1) and FAL 2014-01 (Rev 1) provide implementing instructions and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub. L. No. 113-76.

  18. Blast induced subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests over coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Glenn, H.D.; Bryan, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere. Attempts to account for the differences quantitatively have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  20. VII-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Invited Talk, Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics V (NPA5), Eilat, Israel (April 2011). ... 5 th Biannual Conference on Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics, Eilat, Israel (April 2011). ...

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of coral-like Au/ZnO catalyst and photocatalytic degradation of Orange II dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.K.; Lee, G.J.; Davies, S.H.; Masten, S.J.; Amutha, R.; Wu, J.J.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? Coral-like Au/ZnO was successfully prepared using green synthetic method. ? Gold nanoparticles were deposited on the ZnO structure using NaBH{sub 4} and ?-D-glucose. ? Coral-like Au/ZnO exhibited superior photocatalytic activity to degrade Orange II. - Abstract: A porous coral-like zinc oxide (c-ZnO) photocatalyst was synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The coral-like structure was obtained by precipitating Zn{sub 4}(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 6}H{sub 2}O (ZnCH), which forms nanosheets that aggregate together to form microspheres with the coral-like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicate that after heating at 550 C the ZnCH microspheres can be converted to ZnO microspheres with a morphology similar to that of ZnCH microspheres. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows this conversion takes place at approximately 260 C. A simple electrostatic self-assembly method has been employed to uniformly disperse Au nanoparticles (1 wt.%) on the ZnO surface. In this procedure ?-D-glucose was used to stabilize the Au nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscope images indicate that the diameter of coral-like ZnO microspheres (c-ZnO) is about 8 ?m. X-ray diffraction reveals that the ZnO is highly crystalline with a wurtzite structure and the Au metallic particles have an average size of about 13 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies have confirmed the presence of ZnO and also showed that the Au is present in the metallic state. The photocatalytic degradation of Orange II dye, with either ultraviolet or visible light, is faster on Au/c-ZnO than on c-ZnO.

  2. Significance of cyclic Pennsylvanian-Permian coral/algal buildups Snaky Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, K.L. ); Isaacson, P.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Five cyclic algal, hydrozoan, and coral buildups occur within a thick sequence of Pennsylvanian-Permian (Virgilian through Wolfcampain) carbonates in south-central Idaho. The Juniper Gulch Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation, as described by Skipp and coworkers, is approximately 600 m thick and contains four depositional facies, including: (1) open circulation outer( ) platform, (2) hydrozoan and phylloid algal mound-dominated carbonate buildup, (3) backmound, restricted platform/lagoon, and (4) restricted inner platform facies. Several microlithofacies, including lime mud-rich bafflestone, diversely fossiliferous packstone and grainstone, bryozoan lime floatstone, and phylloid algal and hydrozoan (Palaeoaplysina) lime bindstone are described within the phylloid algal mounds. Successional faunal assemblage stages are recognized within the buildups. Colonial rugose corals comprise a stabilization stage. When the algal communities of the diversification stage reached wave base, because of their rapid upward growth, cross-bedded oolitic grainstone and occasional cross-bedded dolomite shoals developed. Supratidal to high intertidal platform sedimentation is represented by dolomitic Palaeoaplysina bindstone, algal mat bindstone, and vuggy dolomite. Five vertical sequences of buildup development, each terminate by intertidal, supratidal, or erosional events, are seen in the Juniper Gulch Member in the North Howe stratigraphic section of the southern Lost River Range. The carbonate platform was constructed within a depositional basin that includes an eroded highland to the west, and a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate inner platform with craton uplifts to the east.

  3. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VII. Employee occupational exposure and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This is the seventh in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VII is to describe record series pertaining to employee occupational exposure and health at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of occupational exposure monitoring and health practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to occupational exposure monitoring and health policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of the guide and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume 1. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, environmental and workplace monitoring, and waste management. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  4. NESC VII European project: demonstration of warm pre-stressing effect in biaxial loading conditions - Bending tests on 18MND5 cruciform specimens and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquemoud, C.; Yuritzinn, T.; Marie, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the NESC VII European project, a large experimental program has been dedicated to characterize the Warm Pre-Stressing (WPS) effect in different testing configurations. One of the CEA (France) contributions to this project is the realization of five point bending tests on large cruciform specimens considering different WPS loading cycles. The five cruciform specimens, sponsored by EDF (France) and IRSN (France), are made of 18MND5 steel. Two of them have been tested on a same LCF (Load-Cool-Fracture) loading cycle and two others on the same LCTF (Load-Cool-Transient-Fracture) loading cycle. The experimental results presented in this paper give a successful demonstration of the WPS effect in biaxial loading conditions either on a LCF or on a LCTF cycle. During the test interpretations, different models have then been tested and compared in order to evaluate their ability to predict the cleavage fracture in the case of different WPS loading cycles. They all provide very conservative predictions whatever loading cycle is concerned. (authors)

  5. CORAL: a stepping stone for establishing the Indian fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataraman, M.; Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2007-07-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) has been successfully demonstrated in the pilot plant, CORAL (COmpact Reprocessing facility for Advanced fuels in Lead shielded cell). Since commissioning in 2003, spent mixed carbide fuel from FBTR of different burnups and varying cooling period, have been reprocessed in this facility. Reprocessing of the spent fuel with a maximum burnup of 100 GWd/t has been successfully carried out so far. The feed backs from these campaigns with progressively increasing specific activities, have been useful in establishing a viable process flowsheet for reprocessing the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) spent fuel. Also, the design of various equipments and processes for the future plants, which are either under design for construction, namely, the Demonstration Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (DFRP) and the Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP) could be finalized. (authors)

  6. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  7. Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

    2008-04-23

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

  8. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2014-04 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2014-01 have been revised to remove language from Section 502 that was not carried forward from previous appropriation acts. FAL 2014-01was also revised to update the Corporate Felony Conviction and Federal Tax Liability Representations and Assurances and the Conference Spending term. As a result, AL 2014-04 (Rev 1) and FAL 2014-01 (Rev 1) provide implementing instructions and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub. L. No. 113-76.

  9. Microsoft Word - Tundra Activity2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    each category is: lichen, shrub, and caribou. 2. As an extension, find the Iupiat translation for at least ten words on your chart. 3. Over the next few days, go outside and...

  10. pVII.6.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. pVII.7.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. pVII.8.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. pVII.9.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. A new species of antipatharian coral (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Antipatharia: Schizopathidae) from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opresko, Dennis M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2010-09-01

    A new species of black coral, Aphanipathes colombiana (Cnidaria:Antipatharia) from the Caribbean coast of Colombia is described. The species forms small flabellate colonies with anisomorphic polypar spines. It is morphologically similar to the western Atlantic species A. thyoides (Pourtales) but its hypostomal polypar spines are not reduced in size. The new species also resembles the Indo-Pacific species A. reticulata van Pesch but it has smooth-surfaced polypar spines, whereas in A. reticulata these spines have small tubercles on their surface

  15. Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013-- Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74 and Related Conference Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 101(a)(4) of the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013, Pub. L No. 112-175, makes appropriations available through March 27, 2013 for continuing projects or activities that were conducted under Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74, under the same authority and conditions. Section 104 provides that no appropriation under the continuing resolution shall be used to initiate or resume any project or activity for which appropriations, funds, or other authority were not available during fiscal year 2012. Therefore, the Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-08 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01 providing implementing instructions and guidance for Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74 and Related Conference Report remains in effect until rescinded or superseded.

  16. Proxy Records of the Indonesian Low and the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from Stable Isotope Measurements of Indonesian Reef Corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Earth`s largest atmospheric convective center is the Indonesian Low. It generates the Australasian monsoon, drives the zonal tropospheric Walker Circulation, and is implicated in the genesis of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term variability of the Indonesian Low is poorly characterized, yet such information is crucial for evaluating whether changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are a possible manifestation of global warming. Stable oxygen isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 18}O) in shallow-water reef coral skeletons track topical convective activity over hundreds of years because the input of isotopically-depleted rainwater dilutes seawater {delta}{sup 18}O. Corals also impose a temperature-dependent fractionation on {delta}{sup 18}O, but where annual rainfall is high and sea surface temperature (SST) variability is low the freshwater flux effect dominates.

  17. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  18. Natural input of arsenic into a coral-reef ecosystem by hydrothermal fluids and its removal by Fe(III) oxyhydroxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichler, T.; Veizer, J.; Hall, G.E.M.

    1999-05-01

    The coral reef that circles Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea, is exposed to the discharge of a hot, mineralized hydrothermal fluid. The hydrothermal fluids have a pH of {approximately}6 and are slightly reducing and rich in As. Seven individual vents discharge an estimated 1500 g of As per day into an area of approximately 50 x 100 m that has an average depth of 6 m. Despite the amount of As released into the bay, corals, clams, and fish do not show a response to the elevated values. The authors analyzed hydrothermal precipitates for their chemical and mineralogical composition in order to determine As sinks. Two mechanisms efficiently control and buffer the As concentration: (1) dilution by seawater and (2) incorporation in and adsorption on Fe(III) oxyhydroxides that precipitate when the hydrothermal fluids mix with ambient seawater. Fe(III) oxyhydroxides contain up to 76,000 ppm As, by an order of magnitude the highest As values found in a natural marine environment. Following adsorption, As is successfully retained in the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide deposits because oxidizing conditions prevail and high As activity allows for the formation of discrete As minerals, such as claudetite, arsenic oxide, and scorodite.

  19. Fiscal year 1985 Department of Energy Authorization (support research and technical analysis). Volume VII-B. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 23, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Volume VII-B covers two appendices with material supporting the testimony given on research and technical analysis budgets. Appendix I continues questions and answers submitted for the record by Alvin W. Trivelpiece and material on research programs at various laboratories, research institutes, and universities. Appendix II contains eight background reports, a statement by the Association of American Universities, and the DOE budget request for research programs. The budget includes a program overview and budget breakdowns for the following programs: Basic Energy Sciences, Energy Research Analysis, University Research Support, University Research Instrumentation, Advisory and Oversight Program Direction, and Multiprogram General Purpose Facilities.

  20. VII-10 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Youngblood, Professor of Physics Akram M. Zhanov, Senior Scientist Research Staff Marina Barbui, Assist. Research Scientist Henry Clark, Accelerator Physicist (50%) Grigor...

  1. VII-10 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 - March 31, 2012 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Research Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of Physics Carl A. Gagliardi, Professor of Physics John C. Hardy, Professor of Physics Che Ming Ko, Professor of Physics Dan Melconian, Assist. Professor of Physics Saskia Mioduszewski, Assist. Prof. of Physics J. B. Natowitz, Professor of Chemistry, Bright Chair Ralf Rapp Associate Professor of Physics Shalom Shlomo,

  2. VII-14 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11-March 31, 2012 2011 April 21 Dr. Pibero Djawotho, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Gluon Polarization Measurements with STAR May 2 Professor G. Wolschin, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Heavy Ion at LHC Energies: Selected Predictions vs. First Data May 10 Professor J. Stone, Oxford University, United Kingdom and University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee Nuclear Matter and Giant Resonance Constraints on Models of Nucleon-Nucleon

  3. VII-7 Org Chart - 2002.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. pVII.1-5.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  5. pVII.10-13.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. Cours-VII/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    propagation downstream propagation Turbulence facilitates ignition of hydrocarbon lean mixtures Turbulence may suppress ignition of hydrocarbon rich mixtures Some hydrocarbon...

  7. VII-14 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seattle Giant Quantum Few-Body Systems May 26 Professor Igal Talmi, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel The Nclear Shell Model - Older Than 60 Years June 8 Dr. ...

  8. VII-7 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Bon asera, INF N, Catan ia, Italy 1 V. Kolomietz, INR, Kiev, Ukraine 2 B.H. Sa, CIAE, Beijing, China 3 Y.-M. Zheng, CIAE, Beijing, China 4 RESEARCH STAFF Robert B urch, Jr., Re ...

  9. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  10. Thriving Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soil and transpire it into the air, a process called evapotranspiration. That water vapor, in turn, acts as a greenhouse gas, trapping heat, raising temperatures, and...

  11. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ecosystems in the Arctic. Authors: Iversen, Colleen M 1 ; Sloan, Victoria L 1 ; Sullivan, Patrick F. 2 ; Euskirchen, Eugenie S 2 ; McGuire, A. David 2 ; Norby, Richard...

  12. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic. Authors: Sullivan, Paddy ; Sloan, Victoria ; Warren, Jeff ; McGuire, Dave ; Euskirchen, Eugenie ;...

  13. ARM - Coral Reef Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They accumulate layer upon layer on an annual basis and leave a record of their growth (and the climate) much like rings on trees or rings on fish scales. Scientists can drill into ...

  14. Department of Energy Authorization (supporting research and technical analysis) - fiscal year 1985. Volume VII-a. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 23, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Volume VII-A of the hearing record covers supporting material for the DOE research and development (R and D) budget. A panel of DOE witnesses, including Alvin Trivelpiece, Director of the Office of Energy Research, and panels of scientists from universities, laboratories, and industry described DOE-funded research programs for both basic and applied science. Trivelpiece gave an overview of 24 feature programs. One panel explained and defended the work at the Center for Advanced Materials at Sandia National Laboratories; while the chairman of the Energy Research Advisory Board and a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Major Facilities in Materials Sciences testified about the materials sciences R and D and facilities. An appendix with questions and answers submitted for the record by Trivelpiece follows the testimony of the seven principal witnesses.

  15. A large drop in atmospheric [sup 14]C/[sup 12]C and reduced melting in the younger dryas, documented with [sup 230]Th ages of corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.L.; Beck, J.W. ); Burr, G.S.; Donahue, D.J. ); Chappell, J.M.A. ); Bloom, A.L. ); Druffel, E.R.M. ); Taylor, F.W. )

    1993-05-14

    Paired carbon-14 ([sup 14]C) and thorium-230 ([sup 230]Th) ages were determined on fossil corals from the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The ages were used to calibrate part of the [sup 14]C time scale and to estimate rates of sea-level rise during the last deglaciation. An abrupt offset between the [sup 14]C and [sup 230]Th ages suggests that the atmospheric [sup 14]C/[sup 12]C ratio dropped by 15 percent during the latter part of and after the Younger Dryas (YD). This prominent drop coincides with greatly reduced rates of sea-level rise. Reduction of melting because of cooler conditions during the YD may have caused an increase in the rate of ocean ventilation, which caused the atmospheric [sup 14]C/[sup 12]C ratio to fall. The record of sea-level rise also shows that globally averaged rates of melting were relatively high at the beginning of the YD. Thus, these measurements satisfy one of the conditions required by the hypothesis that the diversion of meltwater from the Mississippi to the St. Lawrence River triggered the YD event. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of India of November 4, 2010 for Cooperation on a Joint Clean Energy Research and Development ...

  17. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Abuse Programs at DOE Sites 10 CFR 719 - Contractor Legal Management Requirements 10 CFR 835 - Occupational Radiation Protection 10 CFR 851 - Worker Safety and Health Program 10 ...

  18. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VII-11 DIRECTOR Yennello

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 DIRECTOR Yennello SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint Law

  19. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VII-12 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Group Leaders Administration Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark...

  20. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment K Diversity Plan Diversity Plan CY2014 is hereby incorporated as Attachment K of the contract

  1. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment J Performance Evaluation And Measurement Plan FY 2015 Performance Evaluation And Measurement Plan dated May 11, 2015, Rev 4, is ...

  2. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III SECTION J LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ......... 55 Attachment J Performance Evaluation And Measurement Plan ...

  3. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    P Five Year Strategic Plan NREL's Five-Year Plan (FY15-FY19), dated October 23, 2014, Rev 2, is hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment P

  4. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (i) Any restriction of DOE's use of the supplies or data procured under a subcontract. (j) The cancellation or termination of a subcontract or any part hereof which may result in ...

  5. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    N DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment N Supplemental Requirements To Laws, Regulations, And Doe Directives

  6. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment H Performance Guarantee Agreement Incorporated by Reference In Modification M004

  7. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment M Equal Opportunity Program Incorporated by Reference In Modification M004

  8. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program (ECP) Implementation Plan The Employee Concerns Program Plan, dated January 22, 2015, is hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment L

  9. Chapter VII Appendix D FEDERAL EMERGENCY AUTHORITIES AND POLICY...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gasoline Supply Reserve, and provides for the presidentially directed drawdown of the reserves through the Secretary of Energy. It also authorizes the Secretary of Energy to...

  10. Solar Technology Assessment Project. Volume VII. A review of OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, P.C.

    1981-04-01

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) principle is discussed along with general system and cycle types, specific OTEC designs, applications, and the ocean thermal resource. the historic development and present status of OTEC are reviewed. Power system components of the more technically advanced closed-cycle OTEC concept are discussed: heat exchangers, corrosion and biofouling countermeasures, working fluids, ammonia power systems, and on-platform seawater sytems. Several open-cycle features are also discussed. A critical review of the ocean engineering aspects of the OTEC power system is presented. Major subsystems such as platform, cold water pipe, mooring system, dynamic positioning system and power transmission cable system are assessed for their relationships with the ocean environment and with each other. Nine available studies of OTEC costs are reviewed, and tentative comparisons are made between OTEC and traditional fuel costs. OTEC products and markets are considered. Possible environmental and social effects of OTEC development are discussed. International and national laws regulating OTEC plants are reviewed, specifically, the United Nations Third Conference on the Law of the Sea and the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980. Coast Guard regulations, OSHA laws, and state and local government regulations are also considered as well as attitudes of the utilities. (LEW)

  11. Chapter VII Appendix D FEDERAL EMERGENCY AUTHORITIES AND POLICY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Presidential Policy Directive 21 (PPD-21)-Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience (Feb. 12, 2013): Establishes shared responsibility for strengthening critical ...

  12. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... CRD applicable in whole DOE O 456.1 CRD The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles Approved: 053111 CRD applicable in part DOE O 458.1 CRD Change 2 CRD Radiation ...

  13. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment R Organizational Conflict Of Interest Implementation Program Organizational Conflicts of Interest Management Plan and ...

  14. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Q DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment Q Organizational Conflict Of Interest Management Plan Organizational Conflicts of Interest Management Plan and Implementation ...

  15. Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 ... device producers, communications system products and services providers, and ...

  16. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Those countries follow: Algeria Armenia AzerbaiJan Belarus China (People's Republic of China ) Cuba - Terrorist Georgia India Iran - Terrorist Iraq Israel Kazakhstan North Korea ...

  17. PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGIONAL COLLABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FOR SYNERGY VII (2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.; Bolte, John; Guzy, Michael; Woodruff, Dana L.; Humes, Karen; Walden, Von; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Glenn, Nancy; Ames, Dan; Rope, Ronald; Martin, David; Sandgathe, Scott

    2008-04-01

    During this final year of the Pacific Northwest Regional Collaboratory we focused significantly on continuing the relationship between technical teams and government end-users. The main theme of the year was integration. This took the form of data integration via our web portal and integration of our technologies with the end users. The PNWRC's technical portfolio is based on EOS strategies, and focuses on 'applications of national priority: water management, invasive species, coastal management and ecological forecasting.' The products of our technical approaches have been well received by the community of focused end-users. The objective this year was to broaden that community and develop external support to continue and operationalize product development.

  18. SEGS VII Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References http:ewh.ieee.orgr6lasvegasIEEELASVEGASMAY2006.pdf Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Forest-tundra_LANL-28 Jan-2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Circumpolar pattern Why Why focus focus on on the the subarctic subarctic forest? forest? Models predict: * Rapid advance of trees and shrubs i p t l b l i in response to global...

  20. Coral Power LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE Activity Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  1. Coral Power LLC (Washington) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4410 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Industrial: 0.0221kWh...

  2. ARM - Lesson Plans: Rate of Coral Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  3. EA-253-A_Coral_Canada.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  4. EA-293-A_Coral_Rescission.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  5. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Graham, David E

    2015-01-01

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 C showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4. High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.

  6. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Graham, David E

    2015-01-01

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 Cmore » showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4. High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.« less

  7. Pathways and transformations of dissolved methane and dissolved inorganic carbon in Arctic tundra watersheds: Evidence from analysis of stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Throckmorton, Heather M.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Newman, Brent D.; Altmann, Garrett L.; Conrad, Mark S.; Muss, Jordan D.; Perkins, George B.; Smith, Lydia J.; Torn, Margaret S.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2015-11-08

    Arctic soils contain a large pool of terrestrial C and are of interest due to their potential for releasing significant carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Due to substantial landscape heterogeneity, predicting ecosystem-scale CH4 and CO2 production is challenging. This study assessed dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC = Σ (total) dissolved CO2) and CH4 in watershed drainages in Barrow, Alaska as critical convergent zones of regional geochemistry, substrates, and nutrients. In July and September of 2013, surface waters and saturated subsurface pore waters were collected from 17 drainages. Based on simultaneous DIC and CH4 cycling, we synthesized isotopic and geochemical methods to develop a subsurface CH4 and DIC balance by estimating mechanisms of CH4 and DIC production and transport pathways and oxidation of subsurface CH4. We observed a shift from acetoclastic (July) toward hydrogenotropic (September) methanogenesis at sites located toward the end of major freshwater drainages, adjacent to salty estuarine waters, suggesting an interesting landscape-scale effect on CH4 production mechanism. The majority of subsurface CH4 was transported upward by plant-mediated transport and ebullition, predominantly bypassing the potential for CH4 oxidation. Thus, surprisingly, CH4 oxidation only consumed approximately 2.51± 0.82% (July) and 0.79 ± 0.79% (September) of CH4 produced at the frost table, contributing to <0.1% of DIC production. DIC was primarily produced from respiration, with iron and organic matter serving as likely e- acceptors. Furthermore, this work highlights the importance of spatial and temporal variability of CH4 production at the watershed scale and suggests broad scale investigations are required to build better regional or pan-Arctic representations of CH4 and CO2 production.

  8. VII-13 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 - March 31, 2012 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Hyo-In Park 2011 High-Precision Measurements of the Superallowed 0 + → 0 + Beta Decays of 38 Ca and 46 V J. C. Hardy Post Doc., Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Mathew McCleskey 2011 14C(n,g)15C as a Test Case in the Evaluation of a New Method to Determine Spectroscopic Factors Using Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients R. E. Tribble Post Doc., Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory,

  9. VII-9 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE-4/1/99-3/31/00 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor First Position Present Position John M. Blackadar 1999 Systematics of K and L-X-ray Production by 6 to 15 MeV/u Heavy Ion Bombardment Ph.D. Watson Lecturer, Blinn Junior College, Bryan, TX Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, NM Tye Botting 1999 Probing Fission Time Scales and Dynamics via GDR Gamma Rays and Neutron Angular Distributions Ph.D. Schm itt Research Assistant, TAMU Nuclear Engineering SAME Bruce C.

  10. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume 4. Safety and health plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    The Safety and Health Plan recognizes the potential hazards associated with the Project and has been developed specifically to respond to these risks in a positive manner. Prevention, the primary objective of the Plan, starts with building safety controls into the process design and continues through engineering, construction, start-up, and operation of the Project facilities and equipment. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local health and safety laws, regulations, and codes throughout all Project phases is required and assured. The Plan requires that each major Project phase be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed to determine that those provisions required to assure the safety and health of all employees and the public, and to prevent property and equipment losses, have been provided. The Plan requires followup on those items or situations where corrective action needs were identified to assure that the action was taken and is effective. Emphasis is placed on loss prevention. Exhibit 1 provides a breakdown of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.'s (ASFI's) Loss Prevention Program. The Plan recognizes that the varied nature of the work is such as to require the services of skilled, trained, and responsible personnel who are aware of the hazards and know that the work can be done safely, if done correctly. Good operating practice is likewise safe operating practice. Training is provided to familiarize personnel with good operational practice, the general sequence of activities, reporting requirements, and above all, the concept that each step in the operating procedures must be successfully concluded before the following step can be safely initiated. The Plan provides for periodic review and evaluation of all safety and loss prevention activities at the plant and departmental levels.

  11. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  12. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume II. Environmental baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company, Inc. (AECI) have recently formed the Breckinridge Project and are currently conducting a process and economic feasibility study of a commercial scale facility to produce synthetic liquid fuels from coal. The coal conversion process to be used is the H-COAL process, which is in the pilot plant testing stage under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at the H-COAL Pilot Plant Project near Catlettsburg, Kentucky. The preliminary plans for the commercial plant are for a 18,140 metric ton/day (24,000 ton/day) nominal coal assumption capacity utilizing the abundant high sulfur Western Kentucky coals. The Western Kentucky area offers a source of the coal along with adequate water, power, labor, transportation and other factors critical to the successful siting of a plant. Various studies by federal and state governments, as well as private industry, have reached similar conclusions regarding the suitability of such plant sites in western Kentucky. Of the many individual sites evaluated, a site in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, approximately 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) west of the town of Stephensport, has been identified as the plant location. Actions have been taken to obtain options to insure that this site will be available when needed. This report contains an overview of the regional setting and results of the baseline environmental studies. These studies include collection of data on ambient air and water quality, sound, aquatic and terrestrial biology and geology. This report contains the following chapters; introduction, review of significant findings, ambient air quality monitoring, sound, aquatic ecology, vegetation, wildlife, geology, soils, surface water, and ground water.

  13. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VIVII transformations using dynamic-DAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction ...

  14. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    diffraction across water-ices VIVII transformations using dynamic-DAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VIVII ...

  15. Part VII: Section J: List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of India of November 4, 2010 for Cooperation on a Joint Clean Energy Research and Development...

  16. AWEA O&M Recommended Practices Series Part VII: Wind Turbine Gear Lubricant Flushing Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Operations and Maintenance Recommended Practice 101 was developed to provide guidance to the wind industry regarding proper methods of wind turbine gearbox flushing and oil conversion...

  17. Criticality Safety Validation of SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.0 Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J; Rearden, Bradley T

    2012-01-01

    ANSI/ANS-8.1-1998;2007, Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Material Outside Reactors, and ANSI/ANS-8.24-2007, Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations, require validation of a computer code and the associated data through benchmark evaluations based on physical experiments. The performance of the code and data are validated by comparing the calculated and the benchmark results. A SCALE procedure has been established to generate a Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID). This procedure provides a framework for preparing, peer reviewing, and controlling models and data sets derived from benchmark definitions so that the models and data can be used with confidence. The procedure ensures that the models and data were correctly generated using appropriate references with documented checks and reviews. Configuration management is implemented to prevent inadvertent modification of the models and data or inclusion of models that have not been subjected to the rigorous review process. VALID entries for criticality safety are based on critical experiments documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). The findings of a criticality safety validation of SCALE 6.1 utilizing the benchmark models vetted in the VALID library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are summarized here.

  18. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarete, F.; Figueredo, E.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Blum, R. D.; Conti, P. S.

    2011-09-15

    Spectrophotometric distances in the K band have been reported by different authors for a number of obscured Galactic H II regions. Almost 50% of them show large discrepancies compared to the classical method using radial velocities measured in the radio spectral region. In order to provide a crucial test of both methods, we selected a target that does not present particular difficulty for any method and which has been measured by as many techniques as possible. The W3 star-forming complex, located in the Perseus arm, offers a splendid opportunity for such a task. We used the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North telescope to classify candidate 'naked photosphere' OB stars based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Two of the targets are revealed to be mid-O-type main-sequence stars leading to a distance of d = 2.20 kpc. This is in excellent agreement with the spectrophotometric distance derived in the optical band (d = 2.18 pc) and with a measurement of the W3 trigonometric parallax (d = 1.95 kpc). Such results confirm that the spectrophotometric distances in the K band are reliable. The radio-derived kinematic distance, on the contrary, gives a distance twice as large (d = 4.2 kpc). This indicates that this region of the Perseus arm does not follow the Galactic rotation curve, and this may also be the case for other H II regions for which discrepancies have been found.

  19. Part VII: Section J: List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AzerbaiJan Belarus China (People's Republic of China ) Cuba - Terrorist Georgia India Iran - Terrorist Iraq Israel Kazakhstan North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) -...

  20. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment C

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment C Small Business Subcontracting Plan

  1. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment E

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment E Applicable Laws and Regulations (List A) Necessary and Sufficient Environmental, Safety and Health Standards CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS (CFR) 7 CFR 340-Biotechnology Permits 10 CFR 8.4 - Interpretation by the General Counsel: AEC Jurisdiction 10 CFR 707 Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites 10 CFR 719 - Contractor Legal Management Requirements 10 CFR 835 - Occupational Radiation Protection 10 CFR 851 - Worker Safety and Health

  2. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment F

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    F DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment F Operating and Administrative Requirements (List B) Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The operating and administrative requirements, including the Contractor Requirements Documents of DOE directives listed below are applicable in whole or in part in accordance with clauses H-18 Application of DOE Contractor Requirements Documents and 970.5204-2, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives (DEC 2000). The concurrence analysis documenting

  3. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment G

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    G DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment G Sensitive Foreign Nations Control In accordance with the Clause I.92, Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls, this Attachment sets forth the requirements the contractor shall comply with under this contract. (Reference DOE Order 142.3, or superseding directives.) Foreign National access to DOE sites, programs, information and technologies will be approved provided the access is needed to support the program objectives of DOE and/or objectives of

  4. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment I Subcontracts, Purchase Orders And Other Actions Requiring DOE Review And Approval And Other Agreements Between The Parties This Attachment, implementing the Article entitled Contractor Purchasing System, sets forth the requirements for DOE's approval under the prime contract for the operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Subcontracts not binding on DOE Subcontracts and purchase orders shall be made in the name of Alliance, shall

  5. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment J Performance Evaluation And Measurement Plan FY 2015 Performance Evaluation And Measurement Plan dated May 11, 2015, Rev 4, is hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment J

  6. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment K

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment K Diversity Plan Diversity Plan CY2014 is hereby incorporated as Attachment K of the contract

  7. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment L

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment L Employee Concerns Program (ECP) Implementation Plan The Employee Concerns Program Plan, dated January 22, 2015, is hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment L

  8. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment M

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment M Equal Opportunity Program Incorporated by Reference In Modification M004

  9. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment N

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    N DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment N Supplemental Requirements To Laws, Regulations, And Doe Directives

  10. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment O

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    O DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment O

  11. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment P

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    P DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment P Five Year Strategic Plan NREL's Five-Year Plan (FY15-FY19), dated October 23, 2014, Rev 2, is hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment P

  12. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment Q

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Q DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment Q Organizational Conflict Of Interest Management Plan Organizational Conflicts of Interest Management Plan and Implementation Program, Volumes I and II, dated October 6, 2014, are hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment Q

  13. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment R

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment R Organizational Conflict Of Interest Implementation Program Organizational Conflicts of Interest Management Plan and Implementation Program, Volumes I and II, dated October 6, 2014, are hereby incorporated into this contract by reference as Section J, Attachment R

  14. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment S

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    S DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment S Human Resources Compensation Plan

  15. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment T

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment T Human Resources Workforce Plan

  16. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachment U

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment U Treaties and International Agreements Intellectual property rights for subject inventions made under NREL's award under the JCERDC will be allocated as set forth in the Agreement between the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of India of November 4, 2010 for Cooperation on a Joint Clean Energy Research and Development Center (JCERDC), and its "Project Annex on Intellectual Property

  17. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Attachments H

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M1033 Attachment H Performance Guarantee Agreement Incorporated by Reference In Modification M004

  18. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments, Table of Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III SECTION J LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Document Title Page Attachment A Personnel (Appendix A) ......................................................................................... ..3 Attachment B Key Personnel ......................................................................................................... 26 Attachment C Small Business Subcontracting Plan ...................................................................... 27

  19. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume III. Cultural resource assessment socioeconomic background data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macfarlane, Heather; Janzen, Donald E.

    1980-11-26

    This report has been prepared in conjunction with an environmental baseline study for a commercial coal conversion facility being conducted by Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company (AECO). This report represents a cultural resource assessment for the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. This assessment presents data collected by Dames and Moore during a recent archaeological reconnaissance of the unsurveyed southeastern portion of the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. Also, results of two previous surveys on the northern and southwestern portion of the plant site for American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) and Kentucky Utilities are included. The Dames and Moore survey of the southeastern portion of the plant site identified one archaeological site, three standing structures and one historic cemetery. In addition 47 archaeological sites and six standing structures are known from two previous surveys of the remainder of the plant site (Cowan 1975 and Turnbow et al 1980). Eleven of the previously recorded archaeological sites were recommended for further assessment to evaluate their potential for inclusion within the Holt Bottoms Archaeological District currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. None of the archaeological sites or standing structures located within the plant site during the Dames and Moore survey were recommended for further assessment. A total of eight archaeological sites were located during the Dames and Moore survey of the two potential solid waste disposal areas. Of this total only two sites were recommended for further assessment. Also, one previously unknown historic cemetry was located in the southernmost potential waste disposal area.

  20. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  1. Part VII: Section J: List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12898 - Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations EO 13112 - Invasive Species 1999 EO 13186 - Responsibilities of Federal...

  2. Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

  3. DOE_OR_21548_411_R_0_V_II_1_OF_5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  4. DOE_OR_21548_411_R_0_V_II_2_OF_5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  5. DOE_OR_21548_411_R_0_V_II_3_OF_5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  6. DOE_OR_21548_411_R_0_V_II_4_OF_5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  7. DOE_OR_21548_411_R_0_V_II_5_OF_5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) - A pulsed laser system that measures reflected light ... wide tires) designed to travel across the tundra, preventing damage to the tundra. ...

  9. Coral Springs, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.271192, -80.2706044 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  10. EECBG Success Story: Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the next 15 years. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles The new energy efficient IT Data Center in Savannah, Georgia. | Courtesy of the City of Savannah, GA. EECBG Success Story: ...

  11. Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of /sup 239 +240/Pu and lesser amounts of /sup 241/Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of /sup 239 +240/Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables.

  12. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1992-04-01

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

  13. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations.

  14. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume I. Introduction and background. [Storage losses of 28 products and by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    The proposed plant site consists of 1594 acres along the Ohio River in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. An option to purchase the site has been secured on behalf of the Breckinridge Project by the Commonwealth of Kentucky Department of Energy. Figure 1 is an area map locating the site with respect to area cities and towns. The nearest communities to the site are the hamlet of Stephensport, Kentucky, about 3-1/2 miles northeast and Cloverport, Kentucky, which is 6 miles to the southwest. The nearest major cities are Owensboro, Kentucky, 45 road miles to the west and Louisville, Kentucky, 65 miles to the northeast. The Breckinridge facility will convert about 23,000 TPD of run-of-mine (ROM) coal into a nominal 50,000 BPD of hydrocarbon liquids including a significant quantity of transportation fuels. Major products refined for marketing include pipeline gas, propane, butane, 105 RONC gasoline reformate, middle distillate and heavy distillate. By-products include sulfur, anhydrous ammonia, and commercial-grade phenol. Care is being taken to minimize the impact of the facility operations on the environment. Water and wastewater treatment systems have been designed to achieve zero discharge. Waste solids will be disposed of in a carefully designed and well-monitored landfill operation. Also, special design features have been included to minimize air emissions.

  15. NEW PRECISION ORBITS OF BRIGHT DOUBLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES. VII. 47 ANDROMEDAE, 38 CASSIOPEIAE, AND HR 8467

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael H.; Tomkin, Jocelyn; Pourbaix, Dimitri E-mail: jt@alexis.as.utexas.edu

    2011-09-15

    Improved orbital elements for three double-lined spectroscopic binaries, 47 And, 38 Cas, and HR 8467, have been determined with extensive new radial velocities. For 38 Cas lines of the secondary have been detected for the first time. Given the orbital periods for these systems of 35.3682, 134.130, and 42.3813 days, respectively, it is not surprising that all three have either moderate or relatively high eccentricities. The orbital dimensions (a{sub 1}sin i and a{sub 2}sin i) and minimum masses (m{sub 1}sin{sup 3}i and m{sub 2}sin{sup 3}i) have accuracies of 0.5% or better. An astrometric orbit for 38 Cas, which was recomputed with Hipparcos astrometry and our new spectroscopic orbital elements, produces a very high orbital inclination of 88{sup 0} {+-} 5{sup 0}. We have found no evidence for eclipses in either 38 Cas or HR 8467. We estimate that both components of 38 Cas are slightly metal poor with [Fe/H] = -0.3. The two components of 47 And are Am main-sequence stars, while our spectral types for 38 Cas are F6 dwarf and G5 dwarf for its primary and secondary, respectively. For HR 8467 we determined spectral types of F6 subgiant and F6 dwarf for the components. The primary of HR 8467 is likely just beginning to traverse the Hertzsprung gap and is rotating more slowly than its pseudosynchronous velocity, while the main-sequence secondary is rotating pseudosynchronously. On the other hand, the binary components of 47 And and 38 Cas are rotating significantly faster than their pseudosynchronous velocities.

  16. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-10

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  17. TIMS U-series dating and stable isotopes of the last interglacial event in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, M.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Chen, J.H. ); Aharon, P. ); Zhu, Z.R.; Chappell, J. ); Bloom, A. )

    1993-06-01

    The extensive flight of uplifted reef terraces which occurs along the Vitiaz strait on the northern flank of the Huon Peninsula in PNG (Papua New Guinea) contains a particularly good record of sea level changes in the last 250 ky. The Huon terraces were the target of an international expedition which took place in July--August 1988. In particular, the authors searched for suitable samples for U-series dating in a reef complex designated as VII, which is correlated with the last interglacial episode and high sea level stand. This complex is composed of a barrier reef (VIIb), a lagoon, and a fringing reef (VIIa). Twelve corals from these terraces and two corals from the older reef complex VIII were selected for analysis. The petrography, oxygen and carbon isotope compositions, and magnesium and strontium concentrations were determined along with the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium and thorium. The simplest model for sea level height for terrace VII is a continuous rise between 134 and 118 ky. Alternatively, there may have been two periods of rapid sea level rise. In contrast, in the Bahamas, there is evidence that sea level remained rather constant over the time interval 132 to 120 ky. The absence of ages between 132 and 120 ky in PNG could be the result of changes in the local tectonic uplift rates during that time, or erosion that disrupted the continuous record. In any event, the authors find no basis for accepting a single brief time for the age of the last interglacial and applying this age as a precise chronometer for worldwide correlation, or as a test of climatic models. The older ages reported here precede the Milankovitch solar insolation peak at 128 ky, and the younger ages are [approximately]10 ky after this peak. If the present high-precision data are correct, then it will be necessary to reassess the validity of the Milankovitch theory of climatic changes. 76 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1980-05-01

    Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

  19. Tracking the Sun VII: An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the deployment of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has increased, so too has the desire to track the cost and price of these systems. This report helps fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed price of grid-connected PV systems in the United States from 1998 through 2013, with partial data for the first half of 2014. The analysis is based on project level data for more than 300,000 individual residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV systems installed across 33 states, representing 80% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2013. Researchers found that installed prices continued declining in 2013, falling year-over-year by $0.7/W, or 12-15% depending on system size range, and data for the first six months of 2014 indicate that installed prices have continued to fall. This recorded decline since 2008 is largely attributable to module price reductions.

  20. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VII. FBC Data-Base-Management System (FBC-DBMS) users manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base (FBCDB) is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. FBCDB is implemented on MIT's 370/168 computer, using the Model 204 Data Base Management System (DBMS) developed by Computer Corporation of America. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the data base from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results. More than 20 program segments are currently available in M204 User Language to simplify the user interface for the FBC design or research personnel. However, there are still many complex and advanced retrieving as well as applications programs to be written for this purpose. Although there are currently 71 entries, and about 2000 groups reposited in the system, this size of data is only an intermediate portion of our selection. The usefulness of the system at the present time is, therefore, limited. This version of FBCDB will be released on a limited scale to obtain review and comments. The document is intended as a reference guide to the use of FBCDB. It has been structured to introduce the user to the basics of FBCDB, summarize what the available segments in FBCDB can do, and give detailed information on the operation of FBCDB. This document represents a preliminary draft of a Users Manual. The draft will be updated when the data base system becomes fully implemented. Any suggestions as to how this manual may be improved will be appreciated.

  1. Instrumentation in astronomy VII; Proceedings of the SPIE Meeting, Vol. 1235, Pts. 1 2, Tucson, AZ, Feb. 13-17, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics discussed include IR detectors and instrumentation, detectors, other instrumentation, optical instrumentation, and space instrumentation. Papers are presented on the IR spectrometer/imager for the ESO VLT, the fiber-coupled high-resolution IR array spectrometer for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, the Balloon-Borne Infrared Telescope for FIR spectroscopy, and a simple transputer-based CCD camera controller. Attention is given to CCD guidance system for William Herschel Telescope, the New Technology Telescope control/acquisition system as a prototype for the VLT, a control system for spincasting 8-m borosilicate honeycomb mirrors, echelle spectrographs for 8-m class telescopes, and fiber spectroscopy at Palomar Observatory. Other papers are on the Kitt Peak National Observatory fiber actuator device, a two-star photoelectric photometer, an ultrahigh-resolution XUV spectroheliograph, an optical monitor for X-ray satellites, and large-format electrographic and array detectors for a space Schmidt imaging telescope.

  2. Stability of U(VI)- and Tc(VII) reducing microbial communities to environmental perturbation: a thermodynamic network model and intermediate-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinley, James P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Istok, Jack; Krumholz, Lee

    2006-06-01

    The project is a collaborative task with a larger project headed by Jack Istok at Oregon State University, which is conducted under the same title. The project was conceptualized as follows. A ''geochemical'' model of microbial communities was hypothesized, in which microbes were characterized as mineral species according to the chemical transformations they used for metabolic function. The iron-reducing bacteria, for example, would be represented by the iron reducing chemical reaction, including a specific electron donor, the fraction of the consumed donor used for biomass maintenance or growth, and a free energy for the reaction. The pseudomineral species would then be included in a standard geochemical model, and community succession could be calculated according to the thermodynamically favored microbially mediated reactions under progressive consumption of electron donors and receptors, and evolving geochemical conditions. The project includes relatively minor participation by the University of Oklahoma and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, with the major component at OSU. The PNNL project was funded to provide assistance to Dr. Istok in formulating the appropriate modeling approach and geochemical constraints on the modeling effort.

  3. The Carina project. VII. Toward the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the C {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fabrizio, M.; Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico Collurania, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Bono, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Nonino, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Dall'Ora, M. [INAFOsservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monte Porzio Catone, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Thvenin, F., E-mail: monelli@iac.es [Universit de Nice Sophia-antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ?12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} = (U B) (B I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I}. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =2.32 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =1.82 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  4. Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-10-30

    We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics software to determine air distribution from cross-ventilation and used the resulting interior wind speeds to calculate occupant comfort and allowable outside air temperatures for cross-ventilation.

  5. TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. VII. G9.62+0.20 AND THE EXPANDING 3 kpc ARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanna, A.; Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.; Moscadelli, L.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Zheng, X. W.; Xu, Y.

    2009-11-20

    We report a trigonometric parallax of 12 GHz methanol masers associated with the massive star-forming region G9.62+0.20, corresponding to a distance of 5.2{sup +0.6} {sub -0.6} kpc. With an LSR velocity of about 2 km s{sup -1}, the region's kinematic distances of 0.5 and 16 kpc differ greatly from the distance derived here. Our measurement of the peculiar motion of the star-forming region shows a very large deviation from a circular Galactic orbit: 41 km s{sup -1} radially outward from the Galactic center and 60 km s{sup -1} counter to Galactic rotation. The combination of its radial velocity and distance places G9.62+0.20 in the inner region of the Galaxy close to the expanding near 3 kpc arm, where the bulge/bar potential has strong gravitational influence. We also map the distribution of 12 GHz methanol masers, locate them with respect to a hypercompact H II region, and compare our data with the periodic flare phenomenon reported previously for this source.

  6. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... basalts, partly obscuring the underlying geology from seismic and increasing the cost of ... May 17, 2013 VII-11 Figure VII-6: Regional Seismic Time Section Across the Chaco ...

  7. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Appendices A through I Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................................ vii List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................................ xiii List of Tables

  8. Microsoft Word - Vol 2 Appendices TOC.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Appendices A through I Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................................ vii List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................................ xiii List of Tables

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 16, 2015 [Feature Stories and Releases] Getting an Inside View of Arctic Clouds Bookmark and Share Researchers investigate the polar atmosphere's unique properties Researchers are using unmanned aerial systems to study Arctic atmospheric processes, especially where the tundra and ocean meet. Researchers are using unmanned aerial systems to study Arctic atmospheric processes, especially where the tundra and ocean meet. On the north coast of Alaska, where the barren tundra meets the icy

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant...

  11. Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    "The Senate's vote today to clear the way for environmentally responsible oil and gas ... frozen tundra has the potential to yield billions of barrels of domestically produced oil. ...

  12. AmeriFlux US-Atq Atqasuk

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oechel, Walt [San Diego State University; Zona, Donatella [San Diego State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Atq Atqasuk. Site Description - This site is 100 km south of Barrow, Alaska, Variety of moist-wet coastal sedge tundra, and moist-tussock tundra surfaces in the more well-drained upland.

  13. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    PNNL, Florida HERO, and Energy Smart Home Plans helped Ravenwood Homes achieve a HERS 15 with PV or HERS 65 without PV on a home in Florida with SEER 16 AC, concrete block and rigid foam walls, high-performance windows, solar water heating, and 5.98 kW PV.

  14. Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For DOE questions concerning the policy flash or AL, please contact Jason Taylor at (202) 287-1560 or jason.taylor@hq.doe.gov or Richard Bonnell at (202) 287-1747 or richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov ...

  15. Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions. Volume II, Part I. Homogeneous Nuclear Chain Reactions. Chapter V. Neutron Chain Reactions. Chapter VI. Pile Equations. Chapter VII. Theory of Reflectors And The Method Of Groups

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1951-08-10

    The previous section of this book deals with the general problem of neutron diffusion. In this sequel we shall apply the results obtained already to the theory of slow neutron chain reacting systems.

  16. Planet hunters. VII. Discovery of a new low-mass, low-density planet (PH3 C) orbiting Kepler-289 with mass measurements of two additional planets (PH3 B and D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Margossian, Charles; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Holman, Matthew J.; Jek, Kian J.; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; and others

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R {sub P} = 2.68 ± 0.17 R {sub ⊕}) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R {sub P} = 2.15 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R {sub P} = 11.59 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (∼1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (∼1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M {sub *} = 1.08 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉}, R {sub *} = 1.00 ± 0.02 R {sub ☉}, and T {sub eff} = 5990 ± 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (∼5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 ± 6.8 M {sub ⊕}, 4.0 ± 0.9M {sub ⊕}, and M = 132 ± 17 M {sub ⊕}, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ρ = 1.2 ± 0.3 g cm{sup –3} for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1{sub −0.3}{sup +0.8}% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets.

  17. Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ... Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...(n,el) Cross-section Uncertainties for the ENDL99 and ENDFB-VII Evaluations Younes, W ; Pruet, J Uncertainties for the ENDL99 and ENDFB-VII evaluations of the sup 9Be (n, el) ...

  19. Acquisition Letter No. AL 2012-08

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, ...

  20. New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes the evaluation results for new Orion VII buses at NYCT with CNG propulsion and new hybrid propulsion.

  1. Microsoft Word - Vol 1 Chapters TOC.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 - Book 1 (Chapters 1 through 4) Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................................ vii List of Figures ......................................................................................................................................................... xxvii List of Tables

  2. Turmoil at the Top of the World

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turmoil at the Top of the World 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Turmoil at the Top of the World The Arctic tundra is being drained and dried by the warming climate. July 21, 2016 arctic tundra signature pattern of polygons The Arctic tundra has a signature pattern of polygons due to complex interactions between soil and water-interactions that are being disrupted by the warming climate. "It's exciting but also scary. I

  3. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TURMOIL AT THE TOP OF THE WORLD The Arctic's changing climate is literally turning the tundra upside down. The texture of the summer tundra is biz arre when seen from above. It looks like crocodile skin: a watery expanse of patterned brown and green. This signature landscape is the result of complex interactions between soil and water at high latitude. But those interactions are being disrupted by a rapidly changing climate, and the pattern of the tundra is gradually being inverted-what once was

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to be caused by enhanced surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat over the moist tundra, compared to those found over the ocean, as air moves inland from the coast. This...

  5. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice wedges are a particularly cool surface feature in the Arctic tundra. And new research suggests they are melting fast, which is bad news for the ecosystem at the top of the ...

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These mats, borrowed from the City of Barrow, provided a stable surface strong enough to support a loader and a crane while protecting the fragile, water-logged tundra. Approval ...

  7. C-N-P interactions control climate driven changes in regional patterns of C storage on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yueyang; Rocha, Adrian; Rastetter, Edward; Shaver, Gaius; Mishra, U.; Zhuang, Qianlai; Kwiatkowski, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    As climate warms, changes in the carbon (C) balance of arctic tundra will play an important role in the global C balance. The C balance of tundra is tightly coupled to the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles because soil organic matter is the principal source of plant-available nutrients and determines the spatial variation of vegetation biomass across the North Slope of Alaska. Warming will accelerate these nutrient cycles, which should stimulate plant growth.

  8. CX-005248: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida-City-Cape CoralCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 02/17/2011Location(s): Cape Coral, FloridaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon Application to export ...

  10. A framework for modeling the detailed optical response of thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Paris U., VI-VII ; Claver, Chuck ; NOAO, Tucson ; Doherty, Peter ; Harvard U., Phys. ... Part. Phys. ; Stubbs, Christopher ; Harvard U., Phys. Dept. less Publication Date: ...

  11. Clean Cities White Paper Template

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ...................................................................................................... v GLOSSARY ............................................................................................................................. vii 1 INTRODUCTION TO HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND SHALE GAS PRODUCTION ....................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Road and Well Pad Construction

  12. 7th international symposium on photosynthetic prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the abstracts of all the presentations made either in oral or poster form, at the VII International Symposium on Photosynthetic Prokaryotes.

  13. 7th international symposium on photosynthetic prokaryotes. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    This book contains the abstracts of all the presentations made either in oral or poster form, at the VII International Symposium on Photosynthetic Prokaryotes.

  14. CLASS DEVIATION FINDINGS AND DETERMINATION TO IMPLEMENT AN APPROPRIATI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROVISION RELATED TO INTERNAL CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENTS AND THE REPORTING OF FRAUD, WASTE, AND ABUSE Findings I. Section 743 of Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated...

  15. Contractor Human Resources Management Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-02-06

    The revision will reflect organizational changes to Chapter III; delete references and requirements in Chapter IV; and remove CRDs from Chapters III and VII.

  16. Low Carbon Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Low Carbon Research Institute Name: Low Carbon Research Institute Address: King Edward VII Avenue CF10 3NB Place: Cardiff,...

  17. Section M: Evaluations Factors for Award

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... it will result in accelerated commercialization and increased market penetration of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. (vii) The Government will evaluate ...

  18. Acquisition Letter No. AL 2015-02

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of Acquisition Letter is to communicate the revisions to Chapter VII, Risk Management and Insurance Programs of DOE Order 350.1...

  19. DOE-Idaho Operations Summary For November 2 to November 14, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At ARP-VII (Pit 10 West), North Wind Services continued construction activities by placing base beams and drilling the anchor bolt locations. Idaho National Laboratory Nov. 4: ...

  20. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accel. Sci. Tech. ; Dainton, John ; Liverpool U. ; Klein, Max ; Liverpool U. ; Eide, Anders ; Paris U., VI-VII less Publication Date: 2012-06-21 OSTI Identifier: 1043845 ...

  1. QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NG-1 Chapter VII Appendix B NATURAL GAS NG-2 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Appendix B: NATURAL GAS Highlights Increasing...

  2. QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LF-1 Chapter VII Appendix A LIQUID FUELS LF-2 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Appendix A: LIQUID FUELS Introduction The...

  3. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expedite Milestones C. Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets (C. Staley) D. Election of FY 2015 Board Officers (B. Price) VII. Responses to Recommendations & Comments (D. ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... by an arrangement of outer aluminum shells pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. ... of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics Frank, Mark R. ; Scott, Henry P. ; Aarestad, Elizabeth ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. ; UC) ; NIU) December 2015 , The ...

  6. vacate _ 70 FR 48943

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VII. Agency Contact FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cosette Ryan, U.S. Department of Education, Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need Program, 1990 K Street NW., room...

  7. Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data from the Evaluated Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The current version is ENDFB VII.0, released in 2006. Users can search ENDF via specialized interfaces, browse sub-libraries or download them as zipped files. ...

  8. Financial Assistance Letter No. FAL 2014-01

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub. L. No. 113-76.

  9. RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - From 51309 Ricardo Rodriguez Brian Roeder Praveen Shidling - From 3110 Rahul Tripathi - From 51409 Jun Xu VII-11 STUDENTS April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010 Graduate...

  10. RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Katarzyna Schmidt - From 4610 Praveen Shidling Taesoo Song - From 7110 Rahul Tripathi - To 3111 Jun Xu VII-10 STUDENTS April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011 Graduate Students...

  11. QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chapter VII Appendix B NATURAL GAS NG-2 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and ... time horizon under consideration for the Quadrennial Energy Review). Increasing Demand. ...

  12. QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chapter VII Appendix C ELECTRICITY EL-2 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and ... policy objectives, such as greenhouse gas reduction and state renewable energy goals. ...

  13. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VII System Description Chapter 1: System Overview Chapter 2: Laser Sources (final draft material) Chapter 3: Laser Amplifiers Chapter 4: Power Conditioning Chapter 5: ...

  14. DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Lifting points. v. Sling angles. vi. Boom and swing angles. vii. Methods of attachment. viii. Crane orientations. ix. Other factors affecting equipment capacity. 4. Operating ...

  15. DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Lifting points. v. Sling angles. vi. Boom and swing angles. vii. Methods of attachment. viii. Crane orientations. ix. Other factors affecting equipment capacity (e.g. load path ...

  16. Transmission

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Our application was deemed complete by DPS in August of 2010, and the parties to the Article VII proceeding have been engaged in confidential settlement negotiations since November ...

  17. James Madison University: Business Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... vii http:www.nytimes.com20101225scienceearth25fossil.html?pagewantedall&r0 viii http:... xiii http:www.ruralpovertyportal.orgcountrystatisticstagskenya xiv http:...

  18. Policy Flash 2013-1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Flash 2013-1 POLICY FLASH 2013-01 Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 -- Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated ...

  19. Policy Flash 2013-1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Appropriations Resolution, 2013 -- Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74 and...

  20. Expert Meeting: Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of IBACOS. Definitions BSC Building Science Corporation AHRI Air Conditioning Heating ... 34 vii List of Figures Figure 1. Computer modeling improvements allowing more ...

  1. Lesson Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9-12 Rate of Coral Growth http://education.arm.gov Rate of Coral Growth Approximate Time One hour Objective The objective of this activity is to investigate and understand the fact that the growth of coral depends on water depth and the effect of sea level changes on corals. Key Points to Understand * If the greenhouse effect occurs, its effects will be global, both on land and in the sea. * The information given in the following table shows the rate of growth (in millimeters per year) of coral

  2. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-12-15

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  3. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida | Department of Energy Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida PNNL, Florida HERO, and Energy Smart Home Plans helped Ravenwood Homes achieve a HERS 15 with PV or HERS 65 without PV on a home in Florida with SEER 16 AC, concrete block and rigid foam walls,

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-8046" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous...

  5. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida Building ...

  6. EERE Success Story-How the Weatherization Assistance Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the path towards making history: becoming the first female weatherization quality control inspectorauditor in ... Program Changed Jasmine's Life Cape Coral Youth Center ...

  7. Lee County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florida Bokeelia, Florida Bonita Springs, Florida Buckingham, Florida Burnt Store Marina, Florida Cape Coral, Florida Captiva, Florida Charleston Park, Florida Cypress Lake,...

  8. C O M P U T E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Systems to be delivered in the next 4-5 years Companion accelerator Node sharing memory with host Coral systems TB Delivered by IBMNvidia AMD APU systems ...

  9. Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    have been mandated to include this vitally important energy efficiency measure. ... Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida ...

  10. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... food and organism-associated environments (ant fungus garden, coral, fish and human gut). ... 303 SpoOA Gpr Color Codes Seawnter Fish slime Soil Mosquito Sputum Lake ...

  11. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, ...

  12. U.S. Department of Energy awards $200 million for next-generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CORAL) initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a 200 million investment to deliver a next-generation supercomputer, known as Aurora, to the Argonne...

  13. LLNL to deliver next-generation supercomputer | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    national labs (CORAL) to accelerate the development of high performance computing. ... to deploy systems of about 150 petaflops to advance science and ensure national security. ...

  14. Executive Order 13031-Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Executive Order 12969-Federal Acquisition and Community RightTo-Know EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL ...

  15. Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection ARPA-E Technical Support Memo Appendices Microsoft Word - ...

  16. Director's Perspective by George Miller | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Computational Advances in Applied Energy Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Edison Electric ...

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Awards $200 Million for Next- Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Under the joint Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Livermore (CORAL) ... at its Oak Ridge and Lawrence Livermore laboratories. "Few national investments ...

  18. Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequoia 4 WD SUV 5.7L V8 Auto Tier I I B in 5 141317 10913 NA 2016 FFV Toyota Tundra 2WD4WD Pickup 5.7L V8 Auto Tier I I B in 5 151318 11913 NA Model Y ear 2 016: A...

  19. AmeriFlux US-Ivo Ivotuk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ivo Ivotuk. Site Description - This site is 300 km south of Barrow and is located at the foothill of the Brooks Range and is classified as tussock sedge, dwarf-shrub, moss tundra.

  20. AmeriFlux US-Brw Barrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walt; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Brw Barrow. Site Description - The local landscape surrounding the Barrow site has a history absent of any disturbances. The terrain was not heavily glaciated during the last period of glaciation. The vegetation is mature in an unmanaged and undisturbed Arctic tundra.

  1. DOE-STD-1040-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Control of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF ON-SHIFT TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy FSC ... Guide to Good Practices for Control of On-Shift Training PageSection Change pg. vii ...

  2. NEMS International Energy Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EIA NEMS International Energy Module Model Documentation Report vii Mr. G. Daniel Butler U.S. Department of Energy EI-812 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Tel:...

  3. International Energy Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EIA NEMS International Energy Module Model Documentation Report vii Mr. G. Daniel Butler U.S. Department of Energy EI-812 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Tel:...

  4. Microsoft Word - 2014PHYSOR_Powers_ThoriumMSRs_final rev2.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Depletion calculations were performed using SCALE 6.1.1 with ENDFB-VII.0 nuclear data. ... US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy is evaluating and screening ...

  5. Financial Assistance Letter No. FAL 2015-03- Rev 2- 08/03

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Implementing Instructions and Guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub.L. No 113-235.

  6. G Subject: Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section Pub.L. No. 113-76 301(a) and Title V, Sections 501, 502, 503 Division E, Title ... of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title VII of the ...

  7. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ... Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title ...

  8. Democratic Republic of Congo-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for 2050. The country exported 500,000 tons of copper in 2010, as well as oil, still poverty reduction is one of the main efforts of the government.vii In its Poverty Reduction...

  9. EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    changes made as a result of negotiations with State of New York agencies and other stakeholders as part of the project review under Article VII of the New York Public Service Law. ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Frank, Mark R. (2) Prakapenka, Vitali B. (2) Scott, Henry P. (2) Save Results Save this ... Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics Frank, Mark R. ; Scott, Henry ...

  11. BPA-2011-01103-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meet 85 percent of regional electricity load growth over the next 20 years through energy efficiency. IV. Recovery Plan V. Reform-Based Actions VI. MeetingsEvents VII. Issues for...

  12. Financial Assistance Letter No. FAL 2015-03

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Implementing Instructions and Guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub.L. No 113-235. - - Rev 2 - 08/03

  13. Loan Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will work on the Federal loan and loan guarantee portfolios as approved and authorized by Energy Policy Act (EPA) Title VII Programs, and under Section 136...

  14. Safeguards Guidance for Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Administration NPT Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons vii NRC United ... IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). ...

  15. G Subject: Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Restrictions VII. Section 735 Any Payment for the Election for a Federal Office or ... for a cancellation payment to be made to the contractor if appropriations are not made. ...

  16. The University of Chicago,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... I. ARTICLE VII - Espionage or Sabotage The Subcontractor shall immediately submit a confidential report to the Contractor whenever for any cr".usc it has reason to believe that ...

  17. Secretary Chu Speaks at Washington Post Live | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... which has supported nearly 20,000 renewable energy projects,vii and loan programs to ... 12,000,000; Italy, 8,000,000; Austria, 5,000,000; England, 3,000,000; ...

  18. Acquisition Letter No. AL 2015-04- Rev. 2- 08/25/2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L. No.113-235

  19. Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, For DOE ...

  20. Application of the stellarator expansion for plasma-stability studies in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anania, G.; Johnson, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    A numerical code, which utilizes the stellarator expansion, is developed and tested. It is used to investigate the magnetohydrodynamic stability properties of several stellarator configurations, including Heliotron E, Wendelstein VII-A, a modular-coil device, and ATF-1.

  1. Gamma-Ray Emission Concurrent with the Nova in the Symbiotic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coun., Wash., D.C. KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Perugia U. KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Montpellier U. Stockholm U. Stockholm U., OKC DAPNIA, Saclay Paris U., VI-VII NASA, Goddard ...

  2. 2014 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Applications VII -- Methods and Theoretical Apsects, ... Di Vittorio, A.V. and N.L.Miller (2014), Reducing the impact ... analogues, SO2, OS2, and S3: Correlation ...

  3. 2012 Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review - Day 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations | Department of Energy 2 Presentations 2012 Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review included seven sessions over 2 days on June 12 - 13, 2012. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions VI and VII) are available below. Session VI: Yuri Makarov, Henry Huang, Jim McCalley Session VII: Carlos Martinez, Pete Sauer, Gil Tam 2012 Advanced Applications R&D Peer Review - Real-Time

  4. Final Technical report-4-30-13

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT DE-FG02-05ER64124 Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced

  5. ENDF-related Nuclear Data from the T-2 Group (T-2 Nuclear Information Service) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The T-2 Nuclear Information Service provides access to a variety of nuclear data, including ENDF/B cross sections, radioactive decay data, astrophysics data, photoatomic data, charged particle data, thermal neutron data, a Map to the Nuclides, and a Nuclear Data Viewer. The T-2 Group is a participating member of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program. ENDF/B-VII information presented here includes: • ENDF/B-VII Neutron Data • ENDF/BVII Thermal Scattering Data • ENDF/B-VII Proton Data • ENDF/B-VII Photonuclear Data Each of these sections of the website is an index to the contents of the specifically named ENDF/B-VII library of data. Links in each index provide access to more information about the individual materials, including raw and interpreted views of the ENDF file, and PDF plots of the cross sections and distributions. Also provided is a section of information and graphs related to the Energy Balance of ENDF/B-VII and table of neutron Kerma data. [Information taken from http://t2.lanl.gov/data/data.html

  6. Quaternary sedimentation and diagenesis in a high-latitude reef, Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, M.R.; Collins, L.B. (Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)); Wyrwoll, K.H.; Hatcher, B.G. (Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia))

    1990-05-01

    The Houtman Abrolhos reefs are located 80 km off the west coast of Australia between latitudes 28 and 29{degree} south. The islands are situated on three Pleistocene carbonate reef platforms which rise above the surrounding shelf. The modern coral reefs are close to the geographic limit for coral growth in the southern hemisphere and survive due to the presence of the Leeuwin current (a poleward-flowing warm stream). Two major shallow-water benthic communities coexist in the Abrolhos: a macroalgal-dominated community on the windward platform margins and a coral-dominated community on the leeward margins. These communities overlap-particularly in the platform lagoons, where competition between macroalgae and corals is intense. This interaction has been suggested as a major factor controlling the growth of cord reefs at high latitudes. The Holocene carbonate sediments lack nonskeletal components and are dominated by coral and coralline algal fragments with subordinate molluskan and echinoderm debris. The accumulations can be grouped into the following major facies: (1) coral framestone and coralline algal/serpulid boundstone, (2) submarine sand sheets, (3) subaerial coral storm ridges, (4-) peritidal to subtidal shingle and rubble veneers composed of dominantly coral debris, and (5) eolian dunes and beach sand. The Holocene sediment is a thin (< 2 m) veneer on the Pleistocene reef platform, which is emergent as small islands. The Pleistocene platform is composed of reef facies that can be directly related to the Holocene sediments. The platform is composed of framestone and boundstone facies (corals and coralline algal/serpulid facies), rudstones (submarine coral rubble facies), planar-bedded skeletal grainstones dipping 12-13{degree} (submarine sand sheet and peritidal shingle facies), and large 15-m-high eolianite dunes (eolian dune facies).

  7. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Lilly, Michael R.; Kane, Douglas L.; Miller, D. Dan; Galloway, Braden K.; Hilton, Kristie M.; White, Daniel M.

    2005-09-30

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  8. Comparing bacterial community composition of healthy and dark spot-affected Siderastrea siderea in Florida and the Caribbean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gray, Michael A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-10-07

    Coral disease is one of the major causes of reef degradation. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) was described in the early 1990's as brown or purple amorphous areas of tissue on a coral and has since become one of the most prevalent diseases reported on Caribbean reefs. It has been identified in a number of coral species, but there is debate as to whether it is in fact the same disease in different corals. Further, it is questioned whether these macroscopic signs are in fact diagnostic of an infectious disease at all. The most commonly affected species in the Caribbean ismore » the massive starlet coral Siderastrea siderea. We sampled this species in two locations, Dry Tortugas National Park and Virgin Islands National Park. Tissue biopsies were collected from both healthy colonies and those with dark spot lesions. Microbial-community DNA was extracted from coral samples (mucus, tissue, and skeleton), amplified using bacterial-specific primers, and applied to PhyloChip G3 microarrays to examine the bacterial diversity associated with this coral. Samples were also screened for the presence of a fungal ribotype that has recently been implicated as a causative agent of DSS in another coral species, but the amplifications were unsuccessful. S. siderea samples did not cluster consistently based on health state (i.e., normal versus dark spot). Various bacteria, including Cyanobacteria and Vibrios, were observed to have increased relative abundance in the discolored tissue, but the patterns were not consistent across all DSS samples. Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that DSS in S. siderea is linked to a bacterial pathogen or pathogens. This dataset provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the bacterial community associated with the scleractinian coral S. siderea.« less

  9. Comparing bacterial community composition of healthy and dark spot-affected Siderastrea siderea in Florida and the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gray, Michael A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-10-07

    Coral disease is one of the major causes of reef degradation. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) was described in the early 1990's as brown or purple amorphous areas of tissue on a coral and has since become one of the most prevalent diseases reported on Caribbean reefs. It has been identified in a number of coral species, but there is debate as to whether it is in fact the same disease in different corals. Further, it is questioned whether these macroscopic signs are in fact diagnostic of an infectious disease at all. The most commonly affected species in the Caribbean is the massive starlet coral Siderastrea siderea. We sampled this species in two locations, Dry Tortugas National Park and Virgin Islands National Park. Tissue biopsies were collected from both healthy colonies and those with dark spot lesions. Microbial-community DNA was extracted from coral samples (mucus, tissue, and skeleton), amplified using bacterial-specific primers, and applied to PhyloChip G3 microarrays to examine the bacterial diversity associated with this coral. Samples were also screened for the presence of a fungal ribotype that has recently been implicated as a causative agent of DSS in another coral species, but the amplifications were unsuccessful. S. siderea samples did not cluster consistently based on health state (i.e., normal versus dark spot). Various bacteria, including Cyanobacteria and Vibrios, were observed to have increased relative abundance in the discolored tissue, but the patterns were not consistent across all DSS samples. Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that DSS in S. siderea is linked to a bacterial pathogen or pathogens. This dataset provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the bacterial community associated with the scleractinian coral S. siderea.

  10. Water Levels, Barrow, Alaska, NGEE Areas A, B, C and D for 2012, 2013, 2014, Final Version, 20150324

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2015-06-08

    Ice wedge polygonal tundra water levels were measured at a total of 45 locations representing polygon centers and troughs during three summers. Early season water levels, which were still affected by ice and snow, are represented by manual measurements only. Continuous (less than hourly) measurements followed through early fall (around mid-Sep). The data set contains inundation depth (cm), absolute water level and local ground surface elevation (masl).

  11. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapid ice-wedge melting accelerates permafrost decline March 15, 2016 Widespread Artic phenomenon carries major hydrological, climate implications LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 15, 2016-A new study of permafrost has found that the ice wedges forming the prevalent honeycomb pattern across the tundra appear to be melting rapidly across the Arctic, changing the hydrology of the region and accelerating the release of greenhouse gases with major implications for global warming. While the gradual warming of

  12. Water Levels, Barrow, Alaska, NGEE Areas A, B, C and D for 2012, 2013, 2014, Final Version, 20150324

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    Ice wedge polygonal tundra water levels were measured at a total of 45 locations representing polygon centers and troughs during three summers. Early season water levels, which were still affected by ice and snow, are represented by manual measurements only. Continuous (less than hourly) measurements followed through early fall (around mid-Sep). The data set contains inundation depth (cm), absolute water level and local ground surface elevation (masl).

  13. Ground Water Levels for NGEE Areas A, B, C and D, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2015-06-08

    Ice wedge polygonal tundra water levels were measured at a total of 45 locations representing polygon centers and troughs during three summers. Early season water levels, which were still affected by ice and snow, are represented by manual measurements only. Continuous (less than hourly) measurements followed through early fall (around mid-Sep). The data set contains inundation depth (cm), absolute water level and local ground surface elevation (masl).

  14. O:ELECTRICEA-212.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Mexico as a power marketer. Coral does not own or control any electric generating or transmission facilities, nor does it have a

  15. O:ELECTRICEA-213.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. Coral, a limited liability company based in Delaware, does not own or control any electric generating

  16. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the information given in the following table, which lists the sea level for the last 250,000 years, as recorded by thoriumuranium dating of coral reefs off Papua New Guinea. ...

  17. EA-127 SPS Southwestern Public Service Company | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon EA-127-SPS Southwestern Public Service Company More Documents & Publications EA-48-M El Paso Electric Company Ea-48-L El Paso Electric Company EA-212 Coral Power, LLC

  18. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice Vol 72 No 118 PDF icon EA-212-C...

  19. Energy-related pollution of semi-tropical and tropical nearshore ecosystems. Annual report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A.; Marcus, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The major components of the nearshore marine ecosystems in the subtropics and tropics (seagrasses, mangroves, and corals) are examined and compound sublethal and lethal effects from extremes in some energy-related effects (temperature, salinity and light) are discussed.

  20. EECBG Success Story: Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Related Articles EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the...

  1. How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape ...

  2. EA-161-A Duke Energy Indiana, Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electric energy to Canada. EA-161-A Duke Energy Indiana, Inc (1.58 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-286-A Avista Energy Inc EA-286 Avista Energy Inc EA-253-A Coral Canada ...

  3. EA-66-B Citizens Utilities Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy to Canada EA-66-B Citizens Utilities Company (17.09 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-211 DTE Energy Trading, Inc EA-213 Coral Power, LLC EA-209 Cargill-Alliant, LLC

  4. G Subject: Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    G Subject: Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L. No.113-235 References: Consolidated and Further Continuing Division D, Title III, Sections Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub.L. No. 113-235 301(a), 304, 305, 307, and 310 and Title V, Section 501; Division E, Title VII, Sections 733, 735, 739, 743, 744, 745 and 747 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) effective? The statutory

  5. ENDF-related Nuclear Data from the T-2 Group (T-2 Nuclear Information Service) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Each of these sections of the website is an index to the contents of the specifically named ENDF/B-VII library of data. Links in each index provide access to more information about the individual materials, including raw and interpreted views of the ENDF file, and PDF plots of the cross sections and distributions. Also provided is a section of information and graphs related to the Energy Balance of ENDF/B-VII and table of neutron Kerma data. [Information taken from http://t2.lanl.gov/data/data.html

  6. Microsoft Word - FAL 2015-03 FY2015Approp REV 2 FINAL 8-3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L. No. 113-235. References: Consolidated and Further Continuing Division D, Title III, Sections Appropriations Act, 2015, 301(a), 307 and 310 and Title Pub.L. No. 113-235 V, Section 501; Division E, Title VII, Sections 724, 739, 743,744, 745 and 747 When is this Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) effective? The statutory provisions addressed in this FAL were effective as of the

  7. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading statements made by these authors which require a response by the IntCal working group. Furthermore, we would like to comment on the sample selection criteria, pretreatment methods, and statistical methods utilized by Fairbanks et al. in derivation of their own radiocarbon calibration.

  8. Amendment to Extend the Partnership Agreement between the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to advise you that subject amendment is issued pursuant to Section VII of the Partnership Agreement (PA) between the SBA and the DOE. The amendment extends the current PA until January 29,2010. All other terms and conditions of the PA remain unchanged.

  9. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Forrest B.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  10. Amendment to Extend the Partnership Agreement between the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to advise you that an amendment was issued pursuant to Section VII of the Partnership Agreement (PA) between the SBA and the DOE. The amendment extends the current PA until November 30,2009. All other terms and conditions of the PA remain unchanged.

  11. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE„4/1/00-3/31/01

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2005 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor First Position Present Position Wei Liu 2004 Charmonium absorption and charmed hadron production in hadronic reaction Che-Ming Ko Graduate Research Assistant Post Doc. at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University VII-11

  12. Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-01

    The order establishes departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using general schedule (GS) and federal wage system (FWS) standards and for developing and administering a sound position management and classification program within the Department. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 320.1. Canceled by DOE O 325.2 Chg 1 (Admin Chg), 9-1-15.

  13. Erratum: Measurement of the electron charge asymmetry in $$\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow W+X \\rightarrow e\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-30

    The recent paper on the charge asymmetry for electrons from W boson decay has an error in the Tables VII to XI that show the correlation coefficients of systematic uncertainties. Furthermore, the correlation matrix elements shown in the original publication were the square roots of the calculated values.

  14. EM-20 ISD Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of D&D and FE, EM-13 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Project Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................... vii 1. Introduction

  15. Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The current version is ENDF/B VII.0, released in 2006. Users can search ENDF via specialized interfaces, browse sub-libraries or download them as zipped files. Data plots can be generated through the Sigma interface. The ENDF web page also provides access to covariance data processing and plots. (Specialized Interface)

  16. 2004 Progress in Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2004 INTRODUCTION R.E. Tribble, Director SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION SECTION VI: PUBLICATIONS List of Papers Published SECTION VII: APPENDIX Talks Presented Research Personnel, Engineering Staff and Students Organizational Chart

  17. 2005 Progress in Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2005 INTRODUCTION R.E. Tribble, Director SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION SECTION VI: PUBLICATIONS List of Papers Published SECTION VII: APPENDIX Talks Presented Research Personnel, Engineering Staff and Students Organizational Chart Degrees Awarded

  18. Erratum: Measurement of the electron charge asymmetry in $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow W+X \\rightarrow e\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-30

    The recent paper [1] on the charge asymmetry for electrons from W boson decay has an error in the Tables VII to XI that show the correlation coefficients of systematic uncertainties. Furthermore, the correlation matrix elements shown in the original publication were the square roots of the calculated values.

  19. Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2003 INTRODUCTION R.E. Tribble, Director SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION SECTION VI: PUBLICATIONS List of Papers Published SECTION VII: APPENDIX Talks Presented Research Personnel, Engineering Staff and Students Organizational Chart Graduate Degree Students

  20. Erratum: Measurement of the electron charge asymmetry in $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow W+X \\rightarrow e\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-30

    The recent paper on the charge asymmetry for electrons from W boson decay has an error in the Tables VII to XI that show the correlation coefficients of systematic uncertainties. Furthermore, the correlation matrix elements shown in the original publication were the square roots of the calculated values.

  1. WIPP Sampling and Analysis Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-05-23

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to fulfill requirements of Module VII, Section VII.M.2 and Table VII.1, requirement 4 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED [New Mexico Environment Department], 1999a). This SAP describes the approach for investigation of the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. This SAP addresses the current Permit requirements for a RCRA Facility Investigation(RFI) investigation of SWMUs and AOCs. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the RFI specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI work plan and report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can beentered either before or after a RFI work plan. According to NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare a RFI work plan or SAP for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998).

  2. Secrets of the Soil: Promotion of the Nov. 7 Science at the Theater Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin

    2011-01-01

    There are billions of microbes in a handful of soil, some of which could hold the key to our climate and energy future. Find out how at Secrets of the Soil, our next Science at the Theater Nov. 7 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. At the event, four Berkeley Lab scientists will reveal how our scientists travel the globe -- to deserts, rainforests, and the Arctic tundra -- to explore the secret world of soil microbes -- and what they mean to you. More info: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  3. Secrets of the Soil: Promotion of the Nov. 7 Science at the Theater Event

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin

    2013-05-29

    There are billions of microbes in a handful of soil, some of which could hold the key to our climate and energy future. Find out how at Secrets of the Soil, our next Science at the Theater Nov. 7 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. At the event, four Berkeley Lab scientists will reveal how our scientists travel the globe -- to deserts, rainforests, and the Arctic tundra -- to explore the secret world of soil microbes -- and what they mean to you. More info: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  4. L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    life expectancy Tundra in turmoil Quantum computer at Los Alamos Fusion on the cheap L o s A l a m o s S c i e n c e a n d Te c h n o l o g y M a g a z i n e | Ju l y 2 0 1 6 1663 July 2016 A masterpiece of Renaissance architecture and a major attraction for tourists visiting Tuscany, the dome of the Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral in Florence is showing its age. Wide cracks along the Last Judgment frescoes that cover its interior hint at greater damage inside its walls. But with the help of Los

  5. O:\ELECTRIC\ORDERS\EA-212-a.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order No. EA-212-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) authorized Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That two-year authorization will expire on August 13, 2001. On June 27, 2001,

  6. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.

  7. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra,more » and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.« less

  8. The Pleistocene biogeography of eastern North America: A nonmigration scenario for deciduous forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.; Iltis, H.

    1998-12-31

    The current reconstruction of the vegetation of eastern North America at the last glacial maximum postulates a very wide zone of tundra and boreal forest south of the ice. This reconstruction requires that the deciduous forest retreated far to the south. The authors believe that this reconstruction is seriously in error. Geologic evidence for glacial activity or tundra is absent from the southern Appalachians. Positive evidence for boreal forest is based on pollen identifications for Picea, Betula, and Pinus, when in reality southern members of these genera have pollen that cannot be distinguished from that of northern members. Further, pollen of typical southern species such as oaks and hickories occurs throughout profiles that past authors had labeled boreal. Pollen evidence for a far southern deciduous forest refuge is lacking. Data on endemics are particularly challenging for the scenario in which deciduous forest migrated to the south and back. The southern Appalachian region is rife with endemics that are often extreme-habitat specialists unable to migrate. The previously glaciated zone is almost completely lacking in endemics. Outlier populations, range boundaries, and absence of certain hybrids all argue against a large boreal zone. The new reconstruction postulates a cold zone no more than 75--100 miles wide south of the ice in the East.

  9. Comparison of methods for leaching heavy metals from composts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciba, Jerzy; Zolotajkin, Maria; Kluczka, Joanna; Loska, Krzysztof; Cebula, Jan

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the determination of total iron, copper, zinc, chromium, nickel, lead, cadmium and mercury contents in the compost obtained from sorted municipal organic solid waste applying the following methods of sample mineralization: 40% hydrofluoric acid with preliminary incineration of a sample, a mixture of concentrated nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids with preliminary incineration of organic matter and a mixture of nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids without sample incineration. The speciation analysis of Tessier was used to estimate the bioavailability of the metals. Elution degrees of the mobile forms of the metals from the compost with 10% nitric(V) acid and 1 mol/dm{sup 3} hydrochloric acid were compared. The contents of the elements in the eluates were determined applying atomic absorption spectrometry.

  10. Modification of the effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation by concurrent chemotherapy infusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, K.K.; Rayner, P.A.; Lam, K.N.

    1984-08-01

    The combined effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) and concurrent infusion of bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, cis-platinum, 5-fluorouracil, actinomycin D, and mitomycin C were studied in the SCC VII/SF tumor, a squamous cell carcinoma and the jejunal crypt cells in the mouse. For the SCC VII/SF tumor, enhanced cell killing was seen with each of the six drugs when infused concurrently with CLDRI; the greatest enhancement was seen with mitomycin C and cis-platinum. For the jejunal crypt cells, enhanced cell killing was seen primarily with bleomycin. The authors results suggest a therapeutic gain with concurrent CLDRI and chemotherapy infusion for five of the six chemotherapeutic drugs studied with the exception of bleomycin.

  11. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  12. Computational Advances in Applied Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Advances in Applied Energy Computational Advances in Applied Energy Friedmann-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf (19.92 MB) More Documents & Publications Director's Perspective by George Miller Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Canadian Hydropower Association

  13. EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC - Mexico | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC - Mexico Order authorizing Credit Suisse Energy LLC to export electric energy to Mexico EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC (2.17 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC - Canada EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-341 Photovoltaic Technologies, LLC

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Y How happy i s the man who f i n d s wisdom, The man who gains understanding She i s more precious than corals, and none o f your h e a r t ' s desires can compare w i t h her, ...

  15. EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) EO 13112: Invasive Species (51.32 KB) More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection EA-2006: Draft Environmental Assessment Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds

  16. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    irecusa.org | LMI Guidelines | 0 www.irecusa.org | LMI Guidelines | i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary iv Content Overview vii Introduction 1 I. Identifying LMI Customers and Designing Facilities to Serve LMI Customers 5 A. LMI Customers 5 B. Designing Facilities to Serve LMI Customers 6 II. Barriers to Adoption and Opportunities for Engagement 11 A. Financial Barriers 11 B. Ownership Barriers and Split Incentives 14 C. Marketing, Education, and Outreach Barriers 15 D. Opportunities for

  17. Equal Employment Opportunity/Workforce Restructuring Laws | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Opportunity/Workforce Restructuring Laws Equal Employment Opportunity/Workforce Restructuring Laws Equal Employment Opportunity laws prohibit discrimination against individuals on the basis of various protected categories including race, sex, age, disability, and veteran status: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965 (Equal Employment Opportunity Act)

  18. Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Monthly October 2000

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Monthly October 2000 vii Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season During the summer and fall of 2000 natural gas prices reached record highs for a nonheating season period. The dramatic rise in prices resulted from an upsurge in natural gas demand, mainly from electric generation needs during a warmer-than-usual spring and summer. The increased demand has occurred while domestic production levels have continued to decrease over the past

  19. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-03-17

    Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  20. National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop Washington, DC April 2-3, 2002 United States Department of Energy November 2002 PRODUCTION * DELIVERY * STORAGE * CONVERSION * APPLICATIONS * PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PRODUCTION * DELIVERY * STORAGE * CONVERSION * APPLICATIONS * PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH vii As we act on President Bush's National

  1. Covariance Applications in Criticality Safety, Light Water Reactor Analysis, and Spent Fuel Characterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, M. L.; Wiarda, D.; Ilas, G.; Marshall, W. J.; Rearden, B. T.

    2014-06-15

    Recently, we processed a new covariance data library based on ENDF/B-VII.1 for the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. The multigroup covariance data are discussed here, along with testing and application results for critical benchmark experiments. Moreover, the cross section covariance library, along with covariances for fission product yields and decay data, is used to compute uncertainties in the decay heat produced by a burned reactor fuel assembly.

  2. Policy Guidance 34B (amendment to 34A).pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy Flash 2016-15 Policy Flash 2016-15 DATE: March 07, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, Pub.L. No 114-113. SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2016-03 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2016-01 provide implementing instructions and guidance for

  3. Microsoft Word - S07409_2010_SER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    vii Executive Summary The 2010 Fernald Preserve Site Environmental Report provides stakeholders with the results from the Fernald, Ohio, site's environmental monitoring programs for 2010; a summary of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) activities conducted on site; and a summary of the Fernald Preserve's compliance with the various environmental regulations, compliance agreements, and DOE policies that govern site activities. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order

  4. Layout 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    vi This page intentionally left blank. vii Contract and Project Management: Corrective Action Plan JULY 2008 Executive Summary Achieving and maintaining excellence in contract and project management is a top priority for the Department of Energy (DOE). To accomplish this goal, the Department has already implemented a series of significant contract and project management reforms, including the conduct of a root cause analysis (RCA) to identify the major challenges to planning and managing DOE

  5. Password Generation, Protection, and Use

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-23

    To establish minimum requirements for the generation, protection, and use of passwords to support authentication when accessing classified and unclassified Department of Energy (DOE) information systems. DOE N 205.16, dated 9-15-05, extends this Notice until 9-30-06, unless sooner rescinded. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2, Chapter VI, paragraphs 4j(2), and 4j(6) and Chapter VII, paragraph 12a(2)(a).

  6. Errata Corrections as of May 8, 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Monthly October 2000 vii Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season During the summer and fall of 2000 natural gas prices reached record highs for a nonheating season period. The dramatic rise in prices resulted from an upsurge in natural gas demand, mainly from electric generation needs during a warmer-than-usual spring and summer. The increased demand has occurred while domestic production levels have continued to decrease over the past

  7. QER Stakeholder Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EL-1 Chapter VII Appendix C ELECTRICITY EL-2 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Appendix C: ELECTRICITY Highlights Investments in transmission and distribution upgrades and expansions will grow. It is anticipated that in the next two decades, large transmission and distribution investments will replace aging infrastructure; maintain reliability; enable market efficiencies; and aid in meeting policy objectives, such as greenhouse gas reduction

  8. Evaluated Mean Values and Covariances for the Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum of 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, Denise

    2014-07-10

    This document provides the numerical values of the evaluated prompt fission neutron spectrum for 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV as well as relative uncertainties and correlations. This document also contains a short description how these data were obtained and shows plots comparing the evaluated results to experimental information as well as the corresponding ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.

  9. Equal Employment Opportunity Poster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equal Employment Opportunity is THE LAW Private Employers, State and Local Governments, Educational Institutions, Employment Agencies and Labor Organizations � Applicants to and employees of most private employers, state and local governments, educational institutions, employment agencies and labor organizations are protected under Federal law from discrimination on the following bases: � RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, NATIONAL ORIGIN Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended,

  10. POLICY FLASH 2016-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 POLICY FLASH 2016-02 DATE: October 16, 2015 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2016, Pub. L. No. 114-53 -- Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L. No. 113-235. SUMMARY: Section 101(a) of the Continuing Appropriations

  11. Policy Flash 2015-05 - Acquisition Letter 2015-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 - Acquisition Letter 2015-02 Policy Flash 2015-05 - Acquisition Letter 2015-02 DATE: December 3, 2014 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Letter 2015-02 - Revision of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 350.1 and Special H Clause SUMMARY: The purpose of Acquisition Letter (AL) 2015-02 is to communicate the revisions to Chapter VII, Risk

  12. Policy Flash 2016-15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Flash 2016-15 Policy Flash 2016-15 DATE: March 07, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, Pub.L. No 114-113. SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2016-03 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2016-01 provide implementing instructions and guidance for

  13. Admirals_Memo_ADR_FY11.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Acquisiton Letter No. AL 2016-03 DATE: March 07, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Acting Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, Pub.L. No 114-113. SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2016-03 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2016-01 provide implementing instructions and guidance for Division D,

  14. TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    01 DATE: October 2, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 -- Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No.112-74 and Related Conference Report SUMMARY: Section 101(a)(4) of the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013, Pub. L

  15. DOE F 3305.2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 (08-93) (All Other Editions Are Obsolete) I. Nature of Action Requested II. Position Status: IV. Position Sensitivity VII. Selectee VIII. ALL NECESSARY MATERIAL SUPPORTING THIS REQUEST IS ATTACHED (as specified on reverse of this form for the type of action requested): Development Program A. SES Appointment Status: B. Current Federal Position: (Non DOE Complete Only Items 1-2) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Position Number Organizational Code C. Current Salary: D. Salary Proposed: ES- E. Security Level:

  16. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  17. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  18. Protecting Civil Rights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rights Protecting Civil Rights Protecting Civil Rights Our Mission The mission of the Office of Civil Rights is to assure equal opportunity for minorities, women, persons with disabilities, people with limited English proficiency, and to develop and administer Departmental policies, practices, and procedures under certain laws and titles. Our Jurisdiction Our office has jurisdiction over Titles VI, VII and IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age

  19. AL. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AL. I Department of Energy Washington, DC 20545 OCT 13 Vii87 Mr. John T. Shields A214 National Fertilizer Development Center Tennessee Valley Authority Muscle Shoals, Alabama 35660 Dear Mr. Shields: As you may know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether

  20. Chapter VIII: Enhancing Employment and Workforce Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -14 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter VIII: Enhancing Employment and Workforce Training QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 9-1 Chapter IX This chapter is devoted to issues surrounding the siting and permitting of transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) infrastructure, building on the general identification of those issues in Chapter VII (Addressing Environmental Aspects of

  1. Investigation of Technetium Redox Cycling in FRC Background Sediments using EXAFS and Gamma Camera Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Lear, G.; Morris, K.; Burke, I.T.; Livens, F.R.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R.

    2006-04-05

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 105 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analogue. {sup 99}Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al., 2005, in press) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of {sup 99}Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of {sup 99}Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in aquifer sediments. The objective of this project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of {sup 99}Tc at the US DOE Field Research Center Site (FRC; Oak Ridge, Tennessee). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We are using a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of {sup 99}Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls.

  2. Final Technical Report to DOE for the Award DE-SC0004601

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-02-25

    Understanding the responses, adaptations and feedback mechanisms of biological communities to climate change is critical to project future state of earth and climate systems. Although significant amount of knowledge is available on the feedback responses of aboveground communities to climate change, little is known about the responses of belowground microbial communities due to the challenges in analyzing soil microbial community structure. Thus the goal overall goal of this study is to provide system-level, predictive mechanistic understanding of the temperature sensitivity of soil carbon (C) decomposition to climate warming by using cutting-edge integrated metagenomic technologies. Towards this goal, the following four objectives will be pursued: (i) To determine phylogenetic composition and metabolic diversity of microbial communities in the temperate grassland and tundra ecosystems; (ii) To delineate the responses of microbial community structure, functions and activities to climate change in the temperate grassland and tundra ecosystems; (iii) To determine the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in soils with different mixtures of labile versus recalcitrant C, and the underlying microbiological basis for temperature sensitivity of these pools; and (iv) To synthesize all experimental data for revealing microbial control of ecosystem carbon processes in responses to climate change. We have achieved our goals for all four proposed objectives. First, we determined the phylogenetic composition and metabolic diversity of microbial communities in the temperate grassland and tundra ecosystems. For this objective, we have developed a novel phasing amplicon sequencing (PAS) approach for MiSeq sequencing of amplicons. This approach has been used for sequencing various phylogenetic and functional genes related to ecosystem functioning. A comprehensive functional gene array (e.g., GeoChip 5.0) has also been developed and used for soil microbial community

  3. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Plamiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the ARC Work Package on 'Uncertainty Reduction Analyses' that has a main goal the reduction of uncertainties associated with nuclear data on neutronic integral parameters of interest for the design of advanced fast reactors under consideration by the ARC program. First, an analysis of experiments was carried out. For both JOYO (the first Japanese fast reactor) and ZPPR-9 (a large size zero power plutonium fueled experiment performed at ANL-W in Idaho) the performance of ENDF/B-VII.0 is quite satisfying except for the sodium void configurations of ZPPR-9, but for which one has to take into account the approximation of the modeling. In fact, when one uses a more detailed model (calculations performed at ANL in a companion WP) more reasonable results are obtained. A large effort was devoted to the analysis of the irradiation experiments, PROFIL-1 and -2 and TRAPU, performed at the French fast reactor PHENIX. For these experiments a pre-release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section files was also used, in order to provide validation feedback to the CSWEG nuclear data evaluation community. In the PROFIL experiments improvements can be observed for the ENDF/B-VII.1 capture data in 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, 97Mo, 151Sm, 153Eu, and for 240Pu(n,2n). On the other hand, 240,242Pu, 95Mo, 133Cs and 145Nd capture C/E results are worse. For the major actinides 235U and especially 239Pu capture C/E's are underestimated. For fission products, 105,106Pd, 143,144Nd and 147,149Sm are significantly underestimated, while 101Ru and 151Sm are overestimated. Other C/E deviations from unity are within the combined experimental and calculated statistical uncertainty. From the TRAPU analysis, the major improvement is in the predicted 243Cm build-up, presumably due to an improved 242Cm capture evaluation. The COSMO experiment was also analyzed in order to provide useful feedback on fission cross sections. It was found out that ENDF/B-VII

  4. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-29

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  5. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  6. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, A. L.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Coon, E. T.; Wilson, C. J.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-04-14

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore » to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  7. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Coon, Ethan T.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. Thus, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth system models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth system models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface–subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurements to achieve the goals of constructing a process-rich model based on plausible parameters and to identify fine-scale controls of ALT in ice-wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze–thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g., troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.

  8. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Coon, Ethan T.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. Thus, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth system models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth system models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface–subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore » to achieve the goals of constructing a process-rich model based on plausible parameters and to identify fine-scale controls of ALT in ice-wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze–thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g., troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  9. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchley, A. L.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Coon, E. T.; Wilson, C. J.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-04-14

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurements to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.

  10. Ecological effects of a major oil spill on Panamanian coastal marine communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.B.C.; Cubit, J.D.; Keller, B.D.; Batista, V.; Burns, K.; Caffey, H.M.; Caldwell, R.L.; Garrity, S.D.; Getter, C.D.; Gonzalez, C.; Guzman, H.M.; Kaufmann, K.W.; Knap, A.H.; Levings, S.C.; Marshall, M.J.; Steger, R.; Thompson, R.C.; Weil, E. )

    1989-01-06

    In 1986 more than 8 million liters of crude oil spilled into a complex region of mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs just east of the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal. This was the largest recorded spill into coastal habitats in the tropical Americas. Many populations of plants and animals in both oiled and unoiled sites had been studied previously, thereby providing an unprecedented measure of ecological variation before the spill. Documentation of the spread of oil and its biological effects begun immediately. Intertidal mangroves, seagrasses, algae, and associated invertebrates were covered by oil and died soon after. More surprisingly, there was also extensive mortality of shallow subtidal reef corals and infauna of seagrass beds. After 1.5 years only some organisms in areas exposed to the open sea have recovered.

  11. Impact of oil in the tropical marine environment. Technical pub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cintron, G.; Lugo, A.E.; Martinez, R.; Cintron, B.B.; Encarnacion, L.

    1981-11-01

    Oil spills have a devastating effect on biologically rich coastal environments. This report investigates this problem, covering damage by oil to biological systems, the use of dispersants (toxicity and considerations for dispersant use), impact of oil and dispersants on coral reefs, impact of oil on seagrass beds and sandy beaches, impact of oil on mangroves (seedling survival and tolerance, regeneration, forest type vulnerability, and cleanup and recovery activities in mangroves), conclusions, and recommendations. The study concludes that coral reefs and seagrass beds may escape significant spill damage if pollution is not chronic and if dispersants are not used. Sandy and rocky shores may be severely impacted but recover quickly. Mangroves are the most vulnerable coastal ecosystem. Recommendations are that oil spill contingency plans must be prepared for all areas, and that the necessary equipment for the plans must be in place.

  12. Subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Bryan, J.B.; Glenn, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Ground are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Attempts to explain the difference in terms of device yield (which was much larger in the Pacific tests than at NTS) have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 41 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  13. COVER

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact S heet: Collaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) The C ollaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) i s a j oint p rocurement activity a mong t hree o f t he D epartment o f E nergy's N ational L aboratories launched i n 2 014 to b uild s tate---of---the---art h igh---performance c omputing t echnologies t hat a re e ssential f or supporting U.S. national nuclear security a nd a re k ey t ools u sed f or t echnology advancement a nd s cientific

  14. PACKAGE INCLUDES:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACKAGE INCLUDES: Airfare from Seattle, 4 & 5 Star Hotels, Transfers, Select Meals, Guided Tours and Excursions DAY 01: BANGKOK - ARRIVAL DAY 02: BANGKOK - SIGHTSEEING DAY 03: BANGKOK - FLOATING MARKET DAY 04: BANGKOK - AT LEISURE DAY 05: BANGKOK - CHIANG MAI BY AIR DAY 06: CHIANG MAI - SIGHTSEEING DAY 07: CHIANG MAI - ELEPHANT CAMP DAY 08: CHIANG MAI - PHUKET BY AIR DAY 09: PHUKET - PHI PHI ISLAND BY FERRY DAY 10: PHUKET - AT LEISURE DAY 11: PHUKET - CORAL ISLAND BY SPEEDBOAT DAY 12: PHUKET

  15. OSTIblog Articles in the carbon sequestration Topic | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information sequestration Topic Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World by Kathy Chambers 17 Apr, 2014 in 17081 Goose-BNL.jpg Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World Read more about 17081 Warmer winters are changing bird migratory patterns, warmer seawater is linked to coral reef bleaching in the Florida Keys and Puerto Rico, and more extreme climate events are affecting society and ecosystems. According to the

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saved by the Bell The bell is about to ring, and these students need to get to Teacher Turtle's class on time! Today, Teacher Turtle is teaching about rising sea temperatures and global warming. She has seen evidence of widespread coral bleaching and more frequent and intense ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation) storm patterns around her home, the Pacific "warm pool."

  17. Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium Air-Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium Air-Batteries Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium Air-Batteries Foam-base graphene keeps oxygen flowing in batteries that holds promise for electric vehicles January 25, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Using a new approach, the team built a graphene membrane for use in lithium-air batteries, which could, one day, replace conventional batteries in electric vehicles. Resembling coral, this porous graphene material

  18. Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical Engineering;

  19. University Launches Website for FIU Research Sponsored by EM | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical

  20. Dispersion Modeling Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Director's Perspective by George Miller Director's Perspective by George Miller Miller-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf (8.58 MB) More Documents & Publications Computational Advances in Applied Energy Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Edison Electric Institute (EEI) 2

    Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Plan Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Plan Guide for the Disabled Veterans' Affirmative Action Program (DVAAP) FY16 DVAAP Plan.pdf (30.36 KB)

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein light- harvesting complex in Symbiodinium dinoflagellates and comparison of its structure and properties to that in Amphidinium carterae. Significance and Impact With the detailed 3-D structure of the complex, we can now study the molecular factors that contribute to highly efficient light harvesting by the organism and better understand how the organism inhibits coral bleaching. Research Details - Homology modeling, using the identified

  2. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE-it gets into DOE's system and becomes a budget line item as well

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG March 14, 2013 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO North Convention Center, Coral AB Room Las Vegas, Nevada The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy (IE) will host an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) Meeting & National Indian Energy Policy Conversation on Thursday, March 14, 2013. Target Audience. IE has solicited nominations for new members to ICEIWG-current, new and potential new members

  3. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent HalidesAB2I5:Eu2+(A=LiCs;B=Sr, Ba)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer the B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.

  4. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facilitys Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  5. Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

    2002-02-26

    Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

  6. Document

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    66 29 CFR Ch. XIV (7-1-04 Edition) § 1614.101 1614.402 Time for appeals to the Commis- sion. 1614.403 How to appeal. 1614.404 Appellate procedure. 1614.405 Decisions on appeals. 1614.406 Time limits. [Reserved] 1614.407 Civil action: Title VII, Age Dis- crimination in Employment Act and Re- habilitation Act. 1614.408 Civil action: Equal Pay Act. 1614.409 Effect of filing a civil action. Subpart E-Remedies and Enforcement 1614.501 Remedies and relief. 1614.502 Compliance with final Commission

  7. Melting of Ice Under Pressure | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Melting of Ice Under Pressure Authors: Schwegler, E., Sharma, M., Gygi, F., Galli, G. The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 Publication Date: August, 2008 Name of Publication Source: The National Academy of Sciences Proceedings Publisher: The National Academy of Sciences of the USA Volume: 0 Issue: 0

  8. Classified Information Systems Security Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-08-03

    This Manual provides requirements and implementation instructions for the graded protection of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information processed on all automated information systems used to collect, create, process, transmit, store, and disseminate classified information by, or on behalf of, the Department of Energy (DOE). DOE N 205.4 cancels Chapter III section 8, Incident Reporting, and DOE N 205.3 cancels Chapter VI, paragraph 4j(2), 4j(6); and Chapter VII, paragraph 12a(2)(a). Cancels: DOE M 5639.6A-1. Canceled by DOE M 205.1-4.

  9. Contractor Human Resource Management Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-09-30

    This directive establishes DOE responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09; Chg 3, 2-23-10; Chg 4, 4-29-13. DOE O 350.1 Chg 5, dated 9-30-2014, supersedes DOE O 350.1 Chg 4. The Order is revised to reflect the cancellation of Chapters 1-3 due to the incorporation of these chapters into DOE Order 350.3; reflect organizational changes; delete reference to the DOE Retrospective Rating Insurance Plan, which is no longer available; remove the CRD from Chapter VII.

  10. NEW - DOE O 350.1 Chg 5, Contractor Human Resource Management Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    This directive establishes DOE responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09; Chg 3, 2-23-10; Chg 4, 4-29-13. DOE O 350.1 Chg 5, dated 9-30-2014, cancels DOE O 350.1 Chg 4. The Order is revised to reflect the cancellation of Chapters 1-3 due to the incorporation of these chapters into DOE Order 350.3; reflect organizational changes; delete reference to the DOE Retrospective Rating Insurance Plan, which is no longer available; remove the CRD from Chapter VII.

  11. Proceedings of US-Japan heliotron-stellarator workshop: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This paper is the second of four volumes on the US-Japan Heliotron-Stellarator workshop. It contains talks on the following: Ripple Transport at Arbitrary Collision Frequency, Transport Scaling in the Collisionless-Detrapping Regime, Transport Analysis for Heliotron E, Transport Analysis for ATF, Simulation Analysis of Heating and Transport, Analysis of W VII-A Data, Numerical Study of Fast Ion Confinement, Benchmarks of NBI Codes for Stellarators, ECH Commissioning and Plans for ATF, and ECH and ICH Startup Analysis. (LSP)

  12. PROJECT RULISON SUMMARY REPORT POST-SHOT A C T I V I T I E S AND. PROGRAMS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SUMMARY REPORT POST-SHOT A C T I V I T I E S AND. PROGRAMS A p r i l 1 9 7 2 Austral O i l Company Incorporated Houston, Texas TABLE OF CONTENTS I. '-INTRODUCTION 11. LITIGATION 111. RE-ENTRY DRILLING IV. ON-SITE RADIATION MONITORING V. SPECIAL GAS ANALYSES V I . WELL TESTING RESULTS & EVALUATIONS VII . PUBLIC. HEALTH & SAFETY EVAL,UATIONS VIII . HYDROLOGIC EVALUATIONS IX . REFERENCES page Number 1 PROJECT RULISON SUMMARY REPORT POST-SHOT ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS I . INTRODUCTION P r o j

  13. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 CFR Ch. XIV (7-1-04 Edition) § 1614.101 1614.402 Time for appeals to the Commis- sion. 1614.403 How to appeal. 1614.404 Appellate procedure. 1614.405 Decisions on appeals. 1614.406 Time limits. [Reserved] 1614.407 Civil action: Title VII, Age Dis- crimination in Employment Act and Re- habilitation Act. 1614.408 Civil action: Equal Pay Act. 1614.409 Effect of filing a civil action. Subpart E-Remedies and Enforcement 1614.501 Remedies and relief. 1614.502 Compliance with final Commission

  14. 10B(n, Z) measurements in the energy range 0.7 to 5.0 MeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Massey, T. N.; Ralston, J.; Grimes, S. M.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-09-03

    Four ΔE E telescopes were used at the WNR (n,Z) station to investigate the production of charged particles from 10B. The telescope consisted of a gas proportional detector and a silicon surface barrier detector. The flux was determined using a 238U fission chamber. A clear separation of the ground state alpha group and first excited state a was not achieved due to the target thickness. Proton emission was also observed. Furthermore, the proton branch was up to an order of magnitude larger than predicted in ENDF/B-VII A simple R-matrix analysis has been performed on the available data

  15. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

  16. Microsoft Word - Vol 2 Appendices TOC.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a Customer Accesses Green Button Data on PGE.com Step 1: Log in to pge.com account with username and password. Step 2: Click on "My Usage" tab. Step 3: Select "Download My Data" Step 4: Select "Export usage for specific days" then choose your date range and click "Export"

    TABLE OF CONTENTS vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 2 Appendices A through I Table of Contents

  17. The Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum: From Experiment to the Evaluated Data and its Impact on Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-06-10

    After a brief introduction concerning nuclear data, prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) evaluations and the limited PFNS covariance data in the ENDF/B-VII library, and the important fact that cross section uncertainties ~ PFNS uncertainties, the author presents background information on the PFNS (experimental data, theoretical models, data evaluation, uncertainty quantification) and discusses the impact on certain well-known critical assemblies with regard to integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation. He sketches recent and ongoing research and concludes with some final thoughts.

  18. Policy Flash 2015-16 - AL-2015-04 - FAL 2015-03 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 - AL-2015-04 - FAL 2015-03 Policy Flash 2015-16 - AL-2015-04 - FAL 2015-03 DATE: August 25, 2015 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L. No 113-235. SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2015-04 has been

  19. X-ray-induced dissociation of H.sub.2O and formation of an O.sub.2-H.sub.2 alloy at high pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Ho-kwang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-11-29

    A novel molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 and a method of producing such a molecular alloy are provided. When subjected to high pressure and extensive x-radiation, H.sub.2O molecules cleaved, forming O--O and H--H bonds. In the method of the present invention, the O and H framework in ice VII was converted into a molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2. X-ray diffraction, x-ray Raman scattering, and optical Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that this crystalline solid differs from previously known phases.

  20. The Geochemistry of Technetium: A Summary of the Behavior of an Artificial Element in the Natural Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Martin, Wayne J.; Zachara, John M.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the chemistry of technetium has only increased since its discovery in 1937, mainly because of the large and growing inventory of 99Tc generated during fission of 235U, its environmental mobility in oxidizing conditions, and its potential radiotoxicity. For every ton of enriched uranium fuel (3% 235U) that is consumed at a typical burn-up rate, nearly 1 kg of 99Tc is generated. Thus, the mass of 99Tc produced since 1993 has nearly quadrupled, and will likely to continue to increase if more emphasis is placed on nuclear power to slow the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of 99Tc and the natural environment, we review the sources of 99Tc in the nuclear fuel cycle, its chemical properties, radiochemistry, and biogeochemical behavior. We include an evaluation of the use of Re as a chemical analog of Tc, as well as a summary of the redox potential, thermodynamics, sorption, colloidal behavior, and interaction of humic substances with Tc, and the potential for re-oxidation and remobilization of Tc(IV). What emerges is a more complicated picture of Tc behavior than that of an easily tractable transition of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) with consequent immobilization. Reducing conditions (+200 to +100 mV Eh) are generally thought necessary to cause reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), but far more important are the presence of reducing agents, such as Fe(II) sorbed onto mineral grains. Catalysis of Tc(VII) by surface-mediated Fe(II) will bring the mobile Tc(VII) species to a lower oxidation state and will form the relatively insoluble Tc(IV)O2∙nH2O, but even as a solid, equilibrium concentrations of aqueous Tc are nearly a factor of 20× above the EPA set drinking water standards. However, sequestration of Tc(IV) into Fe(III)-bearing phases, such as goethite or other hydrous oxyhydroxides of iron, may ameliorate concerns over the mobility of Tc. Further, the outcome of many studies on terrestrial and

  1. from ENDF to ENDL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-02-08

    fete translates nuclear reaction data from ENDF format to Livermore's internal ENDL format. The ENDF format is the internationsl standard data format for nuclear reaction data and it is used in ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3 and other evaluated nuclear data libraries. The ENDF format is complex and difficult to work with. In contrast, the ENDL format is very simple to work with, enabling many application of data in ENDL format within LLNL, as well asmore » external users.« less

  2. RTG resource book for western states and provinces: Final proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Western Interstate Energy Board held a workshop and liaison activities among western states, provinces, and utilities on the formation of Regional Transmission Groups (RTGs). Purpose of the activities was to examine the policy implications for western states and provinces in the formation of RTGs in the West, the implications for western ratepayers and utilities of the RTG formation and potential impacts of RTGs on the western electricity system. The workshop contributed to fulfilling the transmission access and competition objectives of Title VII of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

  3. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belinsky, S. A.; Hoover, M. D.; Bradley, P. L.

    1994-11-01

    This document from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute includes annual reports in the following general areas: (I) Aerosol Technology and Characterization of Airborne Materials; (II) Deposition, transport, and clearance of inhaled Toxicants; (III) Metabolism and Markers of Inhaled Toxicants; (IV) Carcinogenic Responses to Toxicants; (V) Mechanisms of carcinogenic response to Toxicants; (VI) Non carcinogenic responses to inhaled toxicants; (VII) Mechanisms of noncarcinogenic Responses to Inhaled Toxicants; (VIII) The application of Mathematical Modeling to Risk Estimates. 9 appendices are also included. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD

  5. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermore » than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  6. Tc and Re Behavior in Borosilicate Waste Glass Vapor Hydration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Pegg, Ian L.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Shuh, David K.

    2007-07-01

    Technetium (Tc), found in some nuclear wastes, is of particular concern with regard to long-term storage, because of its long-lived radioactivity and high mobility in the environment. Tc and rhenium (Re), commonly used as a non-radioactive surrogate for Tc, were studied to assess their behavior in borosilicate glass under hydrothermal conditions in the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements were made on the original Tc- and Re-containing glasses and their corresponding VHT samples, and show different behavior for Tc and Re under VHT conditions. XAS indicates that, despite starting with different Tc(IV) and Tc(VII) distributions in each glass, the VHT samples have 100% Tc(IV)O{sub 6} environments. SEM shows complete alteration of the original glass, Tc enrichment near the sample surface, and Tc depletion in the center. Perrhenate (Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup -}) is dominant in both Re-containing samples before and after the VHT, where Re is depleted near the VHT sample surface and more concentrated toward the center. (authors)

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-08-28

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

  8. Effects of star-shape poly(alkyl methacrylate) arm uniformity on lubricant properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Qu, Jun; Erck, Robert; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Zhou, Yan

    2016-03-29

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) were prepared and blended into an additive-free engine oil to assess the structure property relationship between macromolecular structure and lubricant performance. These additives were designed with a comparable number of repeating units per arm and the number of arms was varied between 3 and 6. Well-defined star-shaped PAMAs were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) via a core-first strategy from multi-functional headgroups. Observations of the polymer-oil blends suggest that stars with less than four arms are favorable as a viscosity index improver (VII), and molecular weight dominates viscosity-related effects over other structural features. Star-shaped PAMAs,more » as oil additives, effectively reduce the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubrication regime. Several analogs outperformed commercial VIIs in both viscosity and friction performance. Furthermore, increased wear rates were observed for these star-shaped PAMAs in the boundary lubrication regime suggesting pressure-sensitive conformations may exist.« less

  9. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup −} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report

  10. OBSERVATIONS OF OUTFLOWING ULTRAVIOLET ABSORBERS IN NGC 4051 WITH THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraemer, S. B. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Crenshaw, D. M.; Fischer, T. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Astronomy Offices, One Park Place South SE, Suite 700, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Dunn, J. P. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Augusta State University, 2500 Walton Way, Augusta, GA 30904 (United States); Turner, T. J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Lobban, A. P.; Reeves, J. N. [Astrophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Miller, L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Braito, V., E-mail: steven.b.kraemer@nasa.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051. These data were obtained as part of a coordinated observing program including X-ray observations with the Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectrometer and Suzaku. We detected nine kinematic components of UV absorption, which were previously identified using the HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). None of the absorption components showed evidence for changes in column density or profile within the {approx}10 yr between the STIS and COS observations, which we interpret as evidence of (1) saturation, for the stronger components, or (2) very low densities, i.e., n{sub H} < 1 cm{sup -3}, for the weaker components. After applying a +200 km s{sup -1} offset to the HETG spectrum, we found that the radial velocities of the UV absorbers lay within the O VII profile. Based on photoionization models, we suggest that, while UV components 2, 5, and 7 produce significant O VII absorption, the bulk of the X-ray absorption detected in the HETG analysis occurs in more highly ionized gas. Moreover, the mass-loss rate is dominated by high-ionization gas which lacks a significant UV footprint.

  11. Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A.

    2012-07-01

    Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

  12. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Kberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ?U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3? uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3?) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4?. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3? of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  13. Development of SRC-I product analysis. Volume 3. Documentation of procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweighardt, F.K.; Kingsley, I.S.; Cooper, F.E.; Kamzelski, A.Z.; Parees, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    This section documents the BASIC computer program written to simulate Wilsonville's GC-simulated distillation (GCSD) results at APCI-CRSD Trexlertown. The GC conditions used at APCI for the Wilsonville GCSD analysis of coal-derived liquid samples were described in the SRC-I Quarterly Technical Report, April-June 1981. The approach used to simulate the Wilsonville GCSD results is also from an SRC-I Quarterly Technical Report and is reproduced in Appendix VII-A. The BASIC computer program is described in the attached Appendix VII-B. Analysis of gases produced during coal liquefaction generates key information needed to determine product yields for material balance and process control. Gas samples from the coal process development unit (CPDU) and tubing bombs are the primary samples analyzed. A Carle gas chromatographic system was used to analyze coal liquefaction gas samples. A BASIC computer program was written to calculate the gas chromatographic peak area results into mole percent results. ICRC has employed several analytical workup procedures to determine the amount of distillate, oils, asphaltenes, preasphaltenes, and residue in SRC-I process streams. The ASE procedure was developed using Conoco's liquid column fractionation (LC/F) method as a model. In developing the ASE procedure, ICRC was able to eliminate distillation, and therefore quantify the oils fraction in one extraction step. ASE results were shown to be reproducible within +- 2 wt %, and to yield acceptable material balances. Finally, the ASE method proved to be the least affected by sample composition.

  14. Status report on multigroup cross section generation code development for high-fidelity deterministic neutronics simulation system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W. S.; Lee, C. H.

    2008-05-16

    Under the fast reactor simulation program launched in April 2007, development of an advanced multigroup cross section generation code was initiated in July 2007, in conjunction with the development of the high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code UNIC. The general objectives are to simplify the existing multi-step schemes and to improve the resolved and unresolved resonance treatments. Based on the review results of current methods and the fact that they have been applied successfully to fast critical experiment analyses and fast reactor designs for last three decades, the methodologies of the ETOE-2/MC{sup 2}-2/SDX code system were selected as the starting set of methodologies for multigroup cross section generation for fast reactor analysis. As the first step for coupling with the UNIC code and use in a parallel computing environment, the MC{sup 2}-2 code was updated by modernizing the memory structure and replacing old data management package subroutines and functions with FORTRAN 90 based routines. Various modifications were also made in the ETOE-2 and MC{sup 2}-2 codes to process the ENDF/B-VII.0 data properly. Using the updated ETOE-2/MC{sup 2}-2 code system, the ENDF/B-VII.0 data was successfully processed for major heavy and intermediate nuclides employed in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Initial verification tests of the MC{sup 2}-2 libraries generated from ENDF/B-VII.0 data were performed by inter-comparison of twenty-one group infinite dilute total cross sections obtained from MC{sup 2}-2, VIM, and NJOY. For almost all nuclides considered, MC{sup 2}-2 cross sections agreed very well with those from VIM and NJOY. Preliminary validation tests of the ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries of MC{sup 2}-2 were also performed using a set of sixteen fast critical benchmark problems. The deterministic results based on MC{sup 2}-2/TWODANT calculations were in good agreement with MCNP solutions within {approx}0.25% {Delta}{rho}, except a few small LANL fast assemblies

  15. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Patra, Prabir K.; Rödenbeck, Christian; Nemani, Rama; Bi, Jian; Piper, Stephen C.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2016-07-25

    Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear.more » Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena). Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W–63° E), neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50–60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8–11 Tg C yr−2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170–230 Tg C yr−1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by increased fall

  16. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2012-10-15

    Nuclear structure and decay data pertaining to all nuclides with mass number A = 92 (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been compiled and evaluated, and incorporated into the ENSDF data file. All literature available by 15 September 2012 has been considered. This evaluation supersedes the previous publication for this mass chain (Coral M. Baglin, Nuclear Data Sheets 91, 423 (2000) (November 2000 cutoff date)), and subsequent unpublished reevaluations by C.M. Baglin for {sup 92}Kr (January 2004 literature cut-off) and {sup 92}Sr (August 2003 literature cut-off).

  17. SREL Reprint #3319

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Development and characterization of 29 microsatellite markers for the sergeant major damselfish (Abudefduf saxatilis) using paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing Victor J. Piñeros1, Carla Gutiérrez-Rodríguez1, and Stacey L. Lance2 1Departamento de Biología Evolutiva, Instituto de Ecología A.C., 91070 Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802, USA Abstract: We isolated and characterized microsatellite loci for the coral reef fish

  18. Coastal ecosystems of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, R.C.; Markovits, P.S.; Kirkwood, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide training on recent developments in understanding coastal ecosystems in the southeastern United States for Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) field personnel and other natural resource managers in the region. Major emphasis was given to three types of systems: marshes, mangroves, and sea grasses. Other systems such as coral reefs, mud flats, bottomland hardwoods, and estuaries were discussed in less detail. Twenty-three papers were presented during the workshop. One of these was abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA.

  19. Volume Reduction Research and Development Project (VORRP): Utilizing the TRUclean process: (Technical paper), September 2, 1986-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunderland, N.R.

    1987-09-30

    This research was undertaken to determine if the AWC TRUclean process could remove radioactive contamination from differing soil matrices that were submitted by participating sites from around the nation. The TRUclean process removed plutonium from coral derived soil. Interest developed in applying the process to other radioactive contaminants and soil types. Soils from the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado; FUSRAP site at Hazelwood, Missouri; Monsanto-Mound site in Ohio, and the Ft. Dix site in New Jersey were tested. The TRUclean process was able to effectively decontaminate soils and concentrate the contamination into a substantially smaller volume than the original soil. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Nevada Field Office News News Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 Darwin.Morgan@nnsa.doe.gov Kelly K. Snyder, 702-295-3521 Kelly.Snyder@nnsa.doe.gov HYDE PARK MIDDLE SCHOOL WINS NEVADA SCIENCE BOWL FOR MIDDLE SCHOOLS More than 100 students demonstrate their knowledge Hyde Park Middle School emerged undefeated to claim the championship of the Nevada Science Bowl. Twenty-one teams started the day Saturday morning at the double-elimination tournament held at Henderson International School. After a close contest in the final match, Coral Academy of Science

  1. NERSC-9 Nicholas J. Wright, NERSC-9 Chief Architect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Nicholas J. Wright, NERSC-9 Chief Architect NUG mee=ng March 24, LBNL 3/24/16 NERSC Timeline NRP complete 12.5 MW 2015 2016 2016-18 2020 2021 2024 2028 NERSC-8 Cori Phase II NERSC-8 Cori Phase I CRT 25MW upgrade CRT 35+ MW upgrade NERSC-10 Capable Exascale for broad Science Staff move in NERSC-9 150-300 Petaflops NERSC-11 5-10 Exaflops Edison Move Complete 2 APEX 2020 Current Status * 3 rd joint SC/NNSA procurement * ALer Trinity/NERSC-8 (2016) & CORAL (2018) * RFP draL technical specs

  2. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

  3. Genomics in a changing arctic: critical questions await the molecular ecologist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Breen, Amy L.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Olson, Matthew S.; Näsholm, Torgny; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Weston, David J.

    2015-04-20

    Molecular ecology is poised to tackle a host of interesting questions in the coming years. Of particular importance to the molecular ecologist are new technologies and analytical approaches that provide opportunities to address questions previously unapproachable.The Arctic provides a unique and rapidly changing environment with a suite of emerging research needs that can be addressed through genetics and genomics. Here we highlight recent research on boreal and tundra ecosystems and put forth a series of questions related to plant and microbial responses to climate change that can benefit from technologies and analytical approaches contained within the molecular ecologist's toolbox. These questions include understanding (i) the mechanisms of plant acquisition and uptake of N in cold soils, (ii) how these processes are mediated by root traits, (iii) the role played by the plant microbiome in cycling C and nutrients within high-latitude ecosystems and (iv) plant adaptation to extreme Arctic climates. We highlight how contributions can be made in these areas through studies that target model and nonmodel organisms and emphasize that the sequencing of the Populus and Salix genomes provides a valuable resource for scientific discoveries related to the plant microbiome and plant adaptation in the Arctic. Moreover, there exists an exciting role to play in model development, including incorporating genetic and evolutionary knowledge into ecosystem and Earth System Models. In this regard, the molecular ecologist provides a valuable perspective on plant genetics as a driver for community biodiversity, and how ecological and evolutionary forces govern community dynamics in a rapidly changing climate.

  4. Leaf respiration (GlobResp) - global trait database supports Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Warren, Jeffrey; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-03-20

    Here we detail how Atkin and his colleagues compiled a global database (GlobResp) that details rates of leaf dark respiration and associated traits from sites that span Arctic tundra to tropical forests. This compilation builds upon earlier research (Reich et al., 1998; Wright et al., 2006) and was supplemented by recent field campaigns and unpublished data.In keeping with other trait databases, GlobResp provides insights on how physiological traits, especially rates of dark respiration, vary as a function of environment and how that variation can be used to inform terrestrial biosphere models and land surface components of Earth System Models. Although an important component of plant and ecosystem carbon (C) budgets (Wythers et al., 2013), respiration has only limited representation in models. Seen through the eyes of a plant scientist, Atkin et al. (2015) give readers a unique perspective on the climatic controls on respiration, thermal acclimation and evolutionary adaptation of dark respiration, and insights into the covariation of respiration with other leaf traits. We find there is ample evidence that once large databases are compiled, like GlobResp, they can reveal new knowledge of plant function and provide a valuable resource for hypothesis testing and model development.

  5. Integrated surface/subsurface permafrost thermal hydrology: Model formulation and proof-of-concept simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Painter, Scott L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Atchley, Adam L.; Berndt, Markus; Garimella, Rao; Moulton, J. David; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-08-11

    The need to understand potential climate impacts and feedbacks in Arctic regions has prompted recent interest in modeling of permafrost dynamics in a warming climate. A new fine-scale integrated surface/subsurface thermal hydrology modeling capability is described and demonstrated in proof-of-concept simulations. The new modeling capability combines a surface energy balance model with recently developed three-dimensional subsurface thermal hydrology models and new models for nonisothermal surface water flows and snow distribution in the microtopography. Surface water flows are modeled using the diffusion wave equation extended to include energy transport and phase change of ponded water. Variation of snow depth in themore » microtopography, physically the result of wind scour, is also modeled heuristically with a diffusion wave equation. The multiple surface and subsurface processes are implemented by leveraging highly parallel community software. Fully integrated thermal hydrology simulations on the tilted open book catchment, an important test case for integrated surface/subsurface flow modeling, are presented. Fine-scale 100-year projections of the integrated permafrost thermal hydrological system on an ice wedge polygon at Barrow Alaska in a warming climate are also presented. Finally, these simulations demonstrate the feasibility of microtopography-resolving, process-rich simulations as a tool to help understand possible future evolution of the carbon-rich Arctic tundra in a warming climate.« less

  6. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  7. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, Tullis C; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna

    2014-11-07

    Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

  8. Amchitka, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-15

    Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and heavily vegetated drainages. The central portion of the island has higher elevations and fewer lakes. The westernmost 3 miles of the island contains a windswept rocky plateau with sparse vegetation.

  9. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-03-18

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  10. Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

  11. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David; Kicklighter, David W.; Gurney, Kevin R; Burnside, Todd; Melillo, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  12. AmeriFlux US-An2 Anaktuvuk River Moderate Burn

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hobbie, John [Marine Biological Laboratory; Rocha, Adrian [Marine Biological Laboratory; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-An2 Anaktuvuk River Moderate Burn. Site Description - The Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska started on July 16, 2007 by lightning. It continued until the end of September when nearby lakes had already frozen over and burned >256,000 acres, creating a mosaic of patches that differed in burn severity. The Anaktuvuk River Severe Burn, Moderate Burn, and Unburned sites are 40 km to the west of the nearest road and were selected in late May 2008 to determine the effects of the fire on carbon, water, and energy exchanges during the growing season. Because the fire had burned through September of the previous year, initial deployment of flux towers occurred prior to any significant vegetative regrowth, and our sampling campaign captured the full growing season in 2008. The Moderate Burn site consisted of a large area with small patches of completely and partially burned tundra intermixed across the landscape.

  13. AmeriFlux US-An3 Anaktuvuk River Unburned

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hobbie, John [Marine Biological Laboratory; Rocha, Adrian [Marine Biological Laboratory; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-An3 Anaktuvuk River Unburned. Site Description - The Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska started on July 16, 2007 by lightning. It continued until the end of September when nearby lakes had already frozen over and burned >256,000 acres, creating a mosaic of patches that differed in burn severity. The Anaktuvuk River Severe Burn, Moderate Burn, and Unburned sites are 40 km to the west of the nearest road and were selected in late May 2008 to determine the effects of the fire on carbon, water, and energy exchanges during the growing season. Because the fire had burned through September of the previous year, initial deployment of flux towers occurred prior to any significant vegetative regrowth, and our sampling campaign captured the full growing season in 2008. The Unburned site was located in a large area of tundra that was unaffected by the fire.

  14. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  15. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  16. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  17. Molecular accessibility in oxidized and dried coals. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this research project is to determine the molecular and structural changes that occur in swelled coal as a result of oxidation and moisture los both in the presence and absence of light using our newly developed EPR spin probe method. The proposed study will make it possible to deduce the molecular accessibility distribution swelled, {ital oxidized} APCS coal for each rank as a function of (1) size (up to 6 nm) and shape, (2) the relative acidic/basic reactive site distributions, and (3) the role of hydrogen bonding as a function of swelling solvents. The advantage of the EPR method is that it permits molecules of selected shape, size and chemical reactivity to be used as probes of molecular accessible regions of swelled coal. From such data an optimum catalyst can be designed to convert oxidized coal into a more convenient form and methods can be devised to lessen the detrimental weathering process. This quarter we have continued to examine the effect of exposure of light before alkylation versus after O-alkylation of the coal structure. The variation in uptake of spin probe VII (amine group) is depicted in figure 1 for Wyodak-Anderson. Before O-alkylation, a significant decrease occurred in the uptake of VII with increasing exposure to ambient light. This suggests that partial break-up of the hydrogen bond network occurs, making it possible to wash out more of the spin probes. This effect was eliminated if the coal was O-alkylated after exposure to sunlight (Figure 2). The removal of the source of hydrogen bonding is responsible for the lack of spin probe up-take variation with time of exposure to light. Further experiments have shown that the data in Figures 1 and 2 is reproducible with a deviation of less than {+-} 10%. It has also been observed that if Wyodak-Anderson coal is exposed to sunlight before swelling, the oscillatory up-take of spin probe VII as a function of percent pyridine is essentially removed.

  18. Removal of pertechnetate from simulated nuclear waste streams using supported zerovalent iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darab, John; Amonette, Alexandra; Burke, Deborah; Orr, Robert; Ponder, Sherman; Schrick, Bettina; Mallouk, Thomas; Lukens, Wayne; Caulder, Dana; Shuh, David

    2007-07-11

    The application of nanoparticles of predominantly zerovalent iron (nanoiron), either unsupported or supported, to the separation and reduction of pertechnetate anions (TcO4-) from complex waste mixtures was investigated as an alternative approach to current waste-processing schemes. Although applicable to pertechnetate-containing waste streams in general, the research discussed here was directed at two specific potential applications at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site: (1) the direct removal of pertechnetate from highly alkaline solutions, typical of those found in Hanford tank waste, and (2) the removal of dilute pertechnetate from near-neutral solutions, typical of the eluate streams from commercial organic ion-exchange resins that may be used to remediate Hanford tank wastes. It was envisioned that both applications would involve the subsequent encapsulation of the loaded sorbent material into a separate waste form. A high surface area (>200 M2/g) base-stable, nanocrystalline zirconia was used as a support for nanoiron for tests with highly alkaline solutions, while a silica gel support was used for tests with near-neutral solutions. It was shown that after 24 h of contact time, the high surface area zirconia supported nanoiron sorbent removed about 50percent (K-d = 370 L/kg) of the pertechnetate from a pH 14 tank waste simulant containing 0.51 mM TCO4- and large concentrations of Na+, OH-, NO3-, and CO32- for a phase ratio of 360 L simulant per kg of sorbent. It was also shown that after 18 h of contact time, the silica-supported nanoiron removed>95percent pertechnetate from a neutral pH eluate simulant containing 0.076 mM TcO4_ for a phase ratio of 290 L/kg. It was determined that in all cases, nanoiron reduced the Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), or possibly to Tc(V), through a redox reaction. Finally, it was demonstrated that a mixture of 20 mass percent of the solid reaction products obtained from contacting zirconia- supported nanoiron with an alkaline

  19. Novel Imaging Techniques, Integrated with Mineralogical, Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization to Determine the Biogeochemical Controls....

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2005-06-01

    Tc(VII) will be reduced and precipitated in FRC sediments under anaerobic conditions in batch experiments (progressive microcosms). The complementary microcosm experiments using low pH/nigh nitrate sediments from 3 (near FW 009) are imminent, with the sediment cores already shipped to Manchester. HYPOTHESIS 2. Tc(VII) reduction and precipitation can be visualized in discrete biogeochemical zones in sediment columns using 99mTc and a gamma-camera. Preliminary experiments testing the use of 99mTc as a radiotracer to address hypotheses 2 and 3 have suggested that the 99mTc associates with Fe(II)-bearing sediments in microcosms and stratified columns containing FRC sediments. Initial proof of concept microcosms containing Fe(II)-bearing, microbially-reduced FRC sediments were spiked with 99mTc and imaged using a gamma-camera. In comparison with oxic controls, 99mTc was significantly partitioned in the solid phase in Fe(III)-reducing sediments in batch experiments. Column experiments using FRC background area soil with stratified biogeochemical zones after stimulation of anaerobic processes through nutrient supplementation, suggested that 99mTc transport was retarded through areas of Fe(III) reduction. HYPOTHESIS 3. Sediment-bound reduced 99mTc can be solubilized by perturbations including oxidation coupled to biological nitrate reduction, and mobilization visualized in real-time using a gamma-camera. Significant progress has been made focusing on the impact of nitrate on the biogeochemical behavior of technetium. Additions of 100 mM nitrate to FRC sediment microcosms, which could potentially compete for electrons during metal reduction, inhibited the reduction of both Fe(III) and Tc(VII) completely. Experiments have also addressed the impact of high nitrate concentrations on Fe(II) and Tc(IV) in pre-reduced sediments, showing no significant resolubilization of Tc with the addition of 25 mM nitrate. A parallel set of experiments addressing the impact of aerobic

  20. A HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH SEARCH FOR WARM-HOT BARYONS IN THE Mrk 421 SIGHT LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Stocke, John T.; Keeney, Brian A.; Penton, Steven V.; Shull, J. Michael; Yao Yangsen; Green, James C., E-mail: danforth@colorado.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    Thermally broadened Ly{alpha} absorbers (BLAs) offer an alternate method to using highly ionized metal absorbers (O VI, O VII, etc.) to probe the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM, T = 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} K). Until now, WHIM surveys via BLAs have been no less ambiguous than those via far-UV and X-ray metal-ion probes. Detecting these weak, broad features requires background sources with a well-characterized far-UV continuum and data of very high quality. However, a recent Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observation of the z = 0.03 blazar Mrk 421 allows us to perform a metal-independent search for WHIM gas with unprecedented precision. The data have high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N Almost-Equal-To 50 per {approx}20 km s{sup -1} resolution element) and the smooth, power-law blazar spectrum allows a fully parametric continuum model. We analyze the Mrk 421 sight line for BLA absorbers, particularly for counterparts to the proposed O VII WHIM systems reported by Nicastro et al. based on Chandra/Low Energy Transmission Grating observations. We derive the Ly{alpha} profiles predicted by the X-ray observations. The S/N of the COS data is high (S/N Almost-Equal-To 25 pixel{sup -1}), but much higher S/N can be obtained by binning the data to widths characteristic of the expected BLA profiles. With this technique, we are sensitive to WHIM gas over a large (N{sub H}, T) parameter range in the Mrk 421 sight line. We rule out the claimed Nicastro et al. O VII detections at their nominal temperatures (T {approx} 1-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K) and metallicities (Z = 0.1 Z{sub Sun }) at {approx}> 2{sigma} level. However, WHIM gas at higher temperatures and/or higher metallicities is consistent with our COS non-detections.