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Sample records for view history catalytic

  1. Catalytic Self-Decontaminating Materials - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process: Catalytic Reforming Catalytic Cracking Catalytic Hydrocracking Delayed and Fluid Coking Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. 2,668 2,629 2,824 2,727 2,894 2,994 2010-2016 PADD 1 192 183 180 188 193 195 2010-2016 East Coast 175 167 164 174 176 177

  2. Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Process: Catalytic Reforming Catalytic Cracking Catalytic Hydrocracking Delayed and Fluid Coking Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. 2,668 2,629 2,824 2,727 2,894 2,994 2010-2016 PADD 1 192 183 180 188 193 195 2010-2016 East Coast 175 167 164 174 176 177

  3. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History History Print Photos 20th Anniversary Kickoff Brunch, January 11, 2013 ALS 20th Anniversary Celebration, October 4, 2013 Videos ALS Dedication, October 22, 1993 (excerpts) ALS Dedication, October 22, 1993 (full) The ALS Beamline Clock Articles BRIGHT BEAMS: The Advanced Light Source LBL Research Review (Spring 1993) A history of the ALS, From Cyclotron to Synchrotron Interactive Timeline ALS History: The First 20 Years

  4. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Print Photos 20th Anniversary Kickoff Brunch, January 11, 2013 ALS 20th Anniversary Celebration, October 4, 2013 Videos ALS Dedication, October 22, 1993 (excerpts) ALS Dedication, October 22, 1993 (full) The ALS Beamline Clock Articles BRIGHT BEAMS: The Advanced Light Source LBL Research Review (Spring 1993) A history of the ALS, From Cyclotron to Synchrotron Interactive Timeline ALS History: The First 20 Years

  5. history

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    several contributions over SRS's history, including large-scale production of aluminum-lithium alloys; production of kilogram quantities of radioactive waste glass; materials...

  6. history

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  7. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Over 100 Years of Collaborative Energy R&D A mine tunnel partially coated with light-colored rock duct (photo credit: National Archives and Records Administration NETL's long history of leadership in the research and development of fossil energy reaches back to the days of NETL's predecessor organization, the century-old U.S. Bureau of Mines. The Bureau of Mines was a leader in technological advancements that benefitted American industries and consumers. Commencing as a small agency

  8. ESnet History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESnet History About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies Career Opportunities ESnet Staff & Org Chart Contact Us Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net ESnet History View ESnet's 25-year anniversary timeline in PDF. »Download the PDF. (PDF | 500KB) 1976 - MFEnet provides data links

  9. Catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  10. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History View as list Resources Sandia's government ownedcontractor operated (GOCO) heritage Sandia history reports and publications AlwaysNever: The Quest for Safety, Control & ...

  12. Rich catalytic injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  13. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  14. Catalytic cracking process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  15. Catalytic distillation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  16. Catalytic distillation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  17. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  18. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  19. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  20. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  1. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Sunder, Swaminathan (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  2. Catalytic conversion of LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujado, P.R.; Vora, B.V.; Mowry, J.R.; Anderson, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The low reactivity of light paraffins has long hindered their utilization as petrochemical feedstocks. Except for their use in ethylene crackers, LPG fractions have traditionally been consumed as fuel. New catalytic processes now being commercialized open new avenues for the utilization of LPG as sources of valuable petrochemical intermediates. This paper discusses processes for the dehydrogenation and aromatization of LPG.

  3. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  4. history | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    short film capturing highlights of the site's history now is available for viewing on the Y-12 public Web site at http:www.y12.doe.govlibraryvideos70-years-making-world-safer. ...

  5. A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production...

  6. Concentric catalytic combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Laster, Walter R.

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  7. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  8. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  9. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  10. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  11. NERSC History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Timeline History of Systems NERSC Stakeholders Usage and User Demographics Careers Visitor Info Web Policies Home » About » NERSC History NERSC History Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 4236 For more information, read "25 Years of Leadership," a historical perspective written at NERSC's quarter-century mark.»Download (PDF | 32MB) The oil crisis of 1973 did more than create long lines at the gas pumps - it

  12. Our History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our History Our History The Lab has a proud history and heritage of more than 70 years of science and innovation. The people at the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best scientific and engineering solutions to the nation's most crucial security challenges. Los Alamos Gate 1942 Our primary responsibility throughout the decades: national security The primary responsibility of the Laboratory is assuring the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. Though the

  13. Catalytic hydroprocessing of chloropyridinols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.I.; Allen, D.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    The hydrodechlorination and hydrodeoxygenation of 2-chloro-3-pyridinol, 5-chloro-3-pyridinol, and 6-chloro-2-pyridinol were examined using a packed bed microreactor operating at 1,500 psi and at temperatures between 275 and 325 C. A commercial NiMo catalyst was used. Dechlorination to pyridinols was the dominant pathway with some subsequent deoxygenation. The overall rates and activation energies (18--35 kcal/mol) of dechlorination were comparable to the dechlorination rate parameters observed for chlorinated benzenes and chlorinated phenols, indicating that the pyridinic nitrogen has only a minor effect on dechlorination rates. Differences in dechlorination rates between the chloropyridinols were qualitatively explained based on the electron donating properties of the hydroxyl group and steric effects. Such studies are critical for evaluating the utility of catalytic hydroprocessing in waste management since waste streams are likely to contain a variety of contaminants and some chlorinated organics are multifunctional (e.g., chlorophenol).

  14. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants...

  15. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass ...

  16. Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials

  17. Catalytic Solutions Inc CSI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Oxnard, California Zip: 93033 Product: Developer of the breakthrough catalytic coating technology and the Mixed Phase Catalyst (MPCTM), and also manufacturer of catalytic...

  18. Making History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YGG 05-0181 Making History It's hard to imagine . . . . . . an entire city existing in secret. . . . 60,000 acres set aside for one, top-secret purpose. . . . a discovery so huge...

  19. ORISE: History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is a national leader in science education and research, with programs dating back to 1946 and having served as an...

  20. History Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manhattan Project. August 18, 2014 museum plan showing the history gallery Los Alamos, once the site of a boys' ranch school, became the focus of the secret project to develop a...

  1. Workshop History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop History The 2014 event is the seventh joint workshop held by the EFCOG ESH Electrical Safety subgroup. The first "joint" Electrical Safety Workshop was held in the summer...

  2. NERSC History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Console 19 BACK TO NERSC.GOV About this timeline Search Enter search term Go Displaying: All storiesX1 stories matching '' (clear) Close Category Filter Close View Type Standard...

  3. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then click on "Submit Request". Histographs are available as far back as February 2, 1994. Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Day 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

  4. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Status Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then click on "Submit Request". Histographs are available as far back as February 2, 1994. Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Day 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13

  5. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then click on "Submit Request". Histographs are available as far back as February 2, 1994. Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Day 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

  6. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense The Effects of Nuclear Weapons ... States) (1995) 13 The history of nuclear weapon safety devices Plummer, D.W.; ...

  7. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  8. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  9. Views of the solar system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, C.

    1995-02-01

    Views of the Solar System has been created as an educational tour of the solar system. It contains images and information about the Sun, planets, moons, asteroids and comets found within the solar system. The image processing for many of the images was done by the author. This tour uses hypertext to allow space travel by simply clicking on a desired planet. This causes information and images about the planet to appear on screen. While on a planet page, hyperlinks travel to pages about the moons and other relevant available resources. Unusual terms are linked to and defined in the Glossary page. Statistical information of the planets and satellites can be browsed through lists sorted by name, radius and distance. History of Space Exploration contains information about rocket history, early astronauts, space missions, spacecraft and detailed chronology tables of space exploration. The Table of Contents page has links to all of the various pages within Views Of the Solar System.

  10. Catalytic membranes for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2011-04-19

    A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

  11. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print Wednesday, 20 August 2014 07:59 A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ

  12. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. ... organic base catalysts for arene hydrogenation and the hydrotreating of the coal liquids. ...

  13. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. ... organic base catalysts for arene hydrogenation and the hydrotreating of the coal liquids. ...

  14. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. ... Task 2, organic base-catalyzed arene hydrogenation and hydrotreating of the coal liquids. ...

  15. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. ...

  16. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid ... It was found that the rhodium catalyst works well under biphase conditions rather than ...

  17. Catalytic Device International LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pleasanton, California Product: California-based, firm focused on portable, heat-on-demand products. References: Catalytic Device International LLC1 This article is a stub....

  18. Catalytic oxidizers and Title V requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberoi, M.; Rach, S.E.

    1999-07-01

    Catalytic oxidizers have been used to reduce VOC emissions from various industries including printing, chemical, paint, coatings, etc. A catalytic oxidizer uses a catalyst to reduce the operating temperature for combustion to approximately 600 F, which is substantially lower than thermal oxidation unit. Title V requirements have renewed the debate on the best methods to assure compliance of catalytic oxidizers, with some suggesting the need for continuous emission monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the various aspects of catalytic oxidation and consider options such as monitoring inlet/outlet temperatures, delta T across the catalyst, periodic laboratory testing of catalyst samples, and preventive maintenance procedures as means of assuring continuous compliance.

  19. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    July--September 1995 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status report, July--September 1995 You are accessing...

  20. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 40 CHEMISTRY; COAL LIQUIDS;...

  1. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Hsiao, Mark C.; Wallman, P. Henrik; Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    1998-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO.sub.x reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts.

  2. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    Energy-Efficient Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactions. Hydrogenation reactions are very versatile and account for 10% to 20% of all reactions in the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

  4. BioCatalytics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Product: BioCatalytics Inc. provides a broadest range of enzymes for chemical synthesis, especially biomass to biofuel enzymes along with the resources and technology to...

  5. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1998-01-27

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  6. Innovative Catalytic Converter Wins National Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Golden, Colo., July 25, 1996A new catalytic converter design that could dramatically reduce automobile emissions and urban air pollution has been named one of the years most ...

  7. History of Hydropower | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of Hydropower History of Hydropower

  8. Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page C3Bio Header Director Maureen McCann Lead Institution Purdue University Year Established 2009 Mission To

  9. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  10. National Women's History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

  11. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  12. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  13. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  14. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  15. Catalytic hydroprocessing of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, D.T.

    1996-12-31

    Catalytic hydroprocessing is a promising technology for the treatment or recycling of chlorinated organic waste streams. This paper will describe the hydroprocessing kinetics and reaction pathways of chlorinated aromatics and aliphatics. The compounds investigated include chlorinated benzenes, chlorinated phenols, chlorinated pyridinols, perchloroethylene, trichloroethyene, and dichloroethylenes. Experiments were performed over a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in the temperature range of 175{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C. For the chlorinated benzenes, removal of chlorine proceeded at comparable rates for all species from hexachlorobenzene to chlorobenzene. For the chlorophenols and chloropyridinols, dechlorination proceeded at a much higher rate than deoxygenation. Rates of dechlorination of aliphatics were approximately an order of magnitude faster than the rates for aromatics. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion This research, which is relevant to the ...

  17. Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed ...

  18. Comparison of Water-Hydrogen Catalytic Exchange Processes Versus...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Comparison of Water-Hydrogen Catalytic Exchange Processes Versus Water Distillation for Water Detritiation Comparison of Water-Hydrogen Catalytic Exchange Processes Versus Water ...

  19. Nanoporous carbon catalytic membranes and method for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foley, Henry C.; Strano, Michael; Acharya, Madhav; Raich, Brenda A.

    2002-01-01

    Catalytic membranes comprising highly-dispersed, catalytically-active metals in nanoporous carbon membranes and a novel single-phase process to produce the membranes.

  20. Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus (Patent) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus This paper describes a fluidized ...

  1. Improvement of catalytic activity in selective oxidation of styrene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Improvement of catalytic activity in selective oxidation of styrene with Hsub 2Osub 2 ... Title: Improvement of catalytic activity in selective oxidation of styrene with Hsub ...

  2. Women's History Month | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Women's History Month

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: History: History Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS About History Reports Building a Nuclear Ordnance Engineering Lab (slides from presentation to NSF Short Course "The Birthplace and Early...

  4. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  5. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  6. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and optimization of the catalytic reaction. Research conducted by: E. Gross, X.-Z. Shu, S. Alayoglu, F.D. Toste, and G.A. Somorjai (Univ. of California, Berkeley), and H.A....

  7. Catalytic converter for automotive exhaust system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merry, R.P.

    1986-10-14

    This patent describes a catalytic converter having a metallic casing, a unitary, solid ceramic catalytic element disposed within the casing, and resilient means disposed between the catalytic element and the metallic casing for positioning the catalytic element and for absorbing mechanical and thermal shock. The improvement described here comprises: the resilient means being a flexible intumescent planar sheet corrugated with a generally sinusoidal wave pattern along both its lengthwise edges. The corrugations are generally parallel and regular and are comprised of substantially equal ridges and hollows having a perimeter to frequency ratio in a range of 2.44 to 4.88 and amplitude in a range of 12 to 50% of the width of the sheet.

  8. JOBAID-VIEWING USER RECORDS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this job aid you will View To-Do List using Filter and View options, View Completed Work, and View Curriculum Status and Detials areas. 

  9. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  10. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  11. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  12. Department of Chemistry | Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    Functionalization Department of Chemistry Faculty & Research Outreach Programs Graduate Studies Events & Seminars Undergraduate Studies Contact Us Faculty & Research > Research Centers & Programs > Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization CCHF Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization Catalysts are central to the efficient and clean utilization of energy resources, and they impact all aspects of the energy sector. With the University of Virginia as

  13. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  14. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  15. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  16. Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Mapping Helps Optimize Catalytic Reactions Print A pathway to more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other flow-reactor chemical products has been opened by a study in which, for the first time, the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor was mapped in high resolution from start to finish. The formation of different chemical products during the reactions was analyzed in situ using infrared microspectroscopy, while the state of the catalyst along the flow

  17. Catalytic Upgrading Sugars To Hydrocarbons | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sugars To Hydrocarbons Catalytic Upgrading Sugars To Hydrocarbons PDF on catalytic bioenergy process Catalytic Upgrading Sugars To Hydrocarbons (477.56 KB) More Documents & Publications Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Selection Effort Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

  18. History of Women at the Energy Department | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of Women at the Energy Department History of Women at the Energy Department March 27, 2014 - 5:55pm Addthis Dot Harris Dot Harris Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Terry Fehner Terry Fehner Historian, Federal Preservation Officer Women have been making a significant impact in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields for centuries. Join the Energy Department in celebrating Women's History Month by viewing this timeline for a glimpse of the

  19. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History History On January 7, 2011, the President signed H.R. 6523 (111th), the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (http:www.govtrack.us...

  20. National Women's History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During Women's History Month, we recall that the pioneering legacy of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers is revealed not only in our museums and history books, but also in the fierce...

  1. ThreatView

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-25

    The ThreatView project is based on our prior work with the existing ParaView open-source scientific visualization application. Where ParaView provides a grapical client optimized scientific visualization over the VTK parallel client server architecture, ThreatView provides a client optimized for more generic visual analytics over the same architecture. Because ThreatView is based on the VTK parallel client-server architecture, data sources can reside on remote hosts, and processing and rendering can be performed in parallel. As seenmore » in Fig. 1, ThreatView provides four main methods for visualizing data: Landscape View, which displays a graph using a landscape metaphor where clusters of graph nodes produce "hills" in the landscape; Graph View, which displays a graph using a traditional "ball-and-stick" style; Table View, which displays tabular data in a standard spreadsheet; and Attribute View, which displays a tabular "histogram" of input data - for a selected table column, the Attribute View displays each unique value within the column, and the number of times that value appears in the data. There are two supplemental view types: Text View, which displays tabular data one-record-at-a-time; and the Statistics View, which displays input metadata, such as the number of vertices and edges in a graph, the number of rows in a table, etc.« less

  2. BLACK HISTORY MONTH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” created by historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating black history.

  3. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  4. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  5. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  6. History of Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of Wind Energy History of Wind Energy

  7. History of Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of Wind Energy History of Wind Energy

  8. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us » History History The following is a short history recounting the evolution of the project management office within the Department of Energy: The project management office was originally called the Office of Field Management (FM) and was under the purview of the Office of the Chief Financial Officer in the 1990s. In the fiscal year 2000 Energy & Water Development Appropriations, the Senate initiated and the House concurred to eliminate funding for DOE's Office of Field Management.

  9. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Energy.gov » History History What's New in History July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation The ACHP presents DOE and two local partners with the Chairman's Award for Historic Preservation for their efforts to restore and reuse the historic Alexander Inn in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The "Guest House" was built to accommodate officials visiting the Oak

  10. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizuno, Noritaka (Sapporo, JP); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Finke, Richard G. (Eugene, OR)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  11. Production of LPG olefins by catalytic dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujado, P.R.; Vora, B.V.

    1984-09-01

    Catalytic dehydrogenation allows for the production of specific olefins thus avoiding the large capital and operating expenses associated with the recovery and processing of the many by-products from pyrolysis units. The chemistry of the process is discussed along with the process economics.

  12. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  13. Method of making a catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, C.H.; De Palma, T.V.; Dillon, J.E.

    1982-08-10

    Arrangement for resiliently mounting a ceramic monolithic type catalytic converter element in a metal housing with a blanket of knit wire mesh material includes at least one circumferential band of high temperature intumescent material containing ceramic fibers positioned within the wire mesh blanket which prevents virtually all bypass leakage around the element and substantially reduces the temperature of the wire mesh.

  14. Fractionation and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Fractionation and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil ... Deconstruction of Biomass to Form Bio-Oil Intermediates Tt-I. Catalytic Upgrading of ...

  15. A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production | ANSER Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production

  16. Heavy oil catalytic cracking apparatus (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It comprises a catalytic cracking reactor means; a separation means connective with the ... PETROLEUM REFINERIES; CATALYSTS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ...

  17. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  18. Method and apparatus for a catalytic firebox reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance L.; Etemad, Shahrokh; Ulkarim, Hasan; Castaldi, Marco J.; Pfefferle, William C.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic firebox reactor employing an exothermic catalytic reaction channel and multiple cooling conduits for creating a partially reacted fuel/oxidant mixture. An oxidation catalyst is deposited on the walls forming the boundary between the multiple cooling conduits and the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, on the side of the walls facing the exothermic catalytic reaction channel. This configuration allows the oxidation catalyst to be backside cooled by any fluid passing through the cooling conduits. The heat of reaction is added to both the fluid in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel and the fluid passing through the cooling conduits. After discharge of the fluids from the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, the fluids mix to create a single combined flow. A further innovation in the reactor incorporates geometric changes in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel to provide streamwise variation of the velocity of the fluids in the reactor.

  19. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  20. Preface: Challenges for Catalytic Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nova, Isabella; Epling, Bill; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-03-31

    This special issue of Catalysis Today continues the tradition established since the 18th NAM in Cancun, 2003, of publishing the highlights coming from these catalytic after-treatment technologies sessions, where this volume contains 18 papers based on oral and poster presentations of the 23rd NAM, 2013. The guest editors would like to thank all of the catalyst scientists and engineers who presented in the "Emission control" sessions, and especially the authors who contributed to this special issue of Catalysis Today.

  1. Pulsating catalytic combustion of gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gal-Ed, R.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of operating catalytic combustors under pulsating conditions and the circumstances under which acoustic pulsations increase the combustion efficiencies and output of catalytic combustors. An experimental catalytic combustor was developed, and a theoretical model of acoustic motions in non-isothermal, low match number, duct flow was used to predict the acoustic behavior of the combustor. The effects of pulsations were determined by comparing temperature and species concentration data measured during operation with pulsations at different frequencies and pressure amplitudes to similar data measured during non-pulsating combustion. Experiments conducted with lean mixtures of methane or propane with air revealed that acoustic pulsations affected the temperature distribution along the combustor at flow Reynolds numbers less than 17,500. Excitation of pulsations during methane combustion caused shifts in the location of the combustion, and sometimes the onset of extinction of gas phase reactions. This occurred when several catalyst segments were located in the combustion section between an upstream pressure node and a downstream velocity node, defined here as an in phase location. Propane mixtures were used to investigate possible improvements in combustor's performance. Burning propane mixtures on a single catalyst segment at an in phase location showed that the excitation of acoustic pulsations increased the combustion efficiency by 10 to 50%. The changes in the operation of catalytic combustors caused by acoustic waves are explained by acoustic streaming. When the catalyst surfaces are at an in phase location, rotational flows caused by acoustic streaming enhance the reactants and products diffusion rate to and from the catalyst surfaces, respectively, improving combustion efficiency.

  2. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-12-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results.

  3. Control of a catalytic fluid cracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbel, A.; Huang, Z.; Rinard, I.; Shinnar, R.

    1993-12-13

    Control offers an important tool for savings in refineries, mainly by integration of process models into on-line control. This paper is part of a research effort to better understand problems of partial control; control of a Fluid Catalytic Cracker (FCC) is used as example. Goal is to understand better the control problems of an FCC in context of model based control of a refinery, and to understand the general problem of designing partial control systems.

  4. Black History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During National African American History Month, we pay tribute to the contributions of past generations and reaffirm our commitment to keeping the American dream alive for the next generation.  In...

  5. Departmental History Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-03-26

    The order describes the DOE history program and establishes policy and objectives for the preservation of historical records and institutional memory for DOE and its predecessor agencies. Cancels DOE 1324.7.

  6. About SRNL - Our History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From the Director Operational Excellence Leadership Directorates Our History Visiting SRNL SRNL Home SRNL historic image SRNL historic image About SRNL Our History Evolution of SRNL's Department of Energy Role The Savannah River Site was constructed to produce the basic materials necessary in the fabrication of nuclear weapons, primarily tritium and plutonium-239. Five reactors were also built in an effort to produce these materials for our nation's defense programs. In support of these efforts,

  7. PAFC History and Successes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PAFC History and Successes John Ferro Manager Product Development john.ferro@utcpower.com 2 2 AGENDA Company overview and history System description and applications Failure modes and life analysis Summary 3 3 Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand Pratt & Whitney Sikorsky UTC Power Otis Carrier UTC Fire & Security UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION 18 th largest U.S. manufacturer (2009 list, Industry Week) 37 th largest U.S. corporation (2009 list, Fortune) 61 st largest publicly held

  8. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History History The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program was first announced by Vice President Biden as "Retrofit Ramp-Up" on April 21, 2010. The program presented initial awards of $452 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA or Recovery Act) funding to 25 state and local governments to "ramp up" energy efficiency building retrofits. The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program then distributed a total of $508 million to support hundreds of communities served

  9. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History History This timeline features the key innovations that have advanced the solar industry in the United States. Learn more about these key events from 1955 to present. To see more details, either drag the timeline to the left or right or click the (+) icons. Solar Achievements Timeline INSTRUCTIONS Instructional graphic for mouse use. Click and drag screen or scroll mouse wheel to navigate through timeline. 2011 INDUSTRY Graphic of the U.S. Department of Energy logo. A yellow,

  10. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History History 2016 JANUARY Driving Economic Growth: Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing report released 2015 DECEMBER Financing Innovation to Address Climate Change report released Desert Sunlight awarded Top Plant (Renewables) - POWER Magazine JULY Mark McCall hired as Executive Director, Loan Programs Office JUNE Loan guarantees issued for Vogtle (MEAG Power) MARCH Conditional commitment for ATVM loan offered to Alcoa FEBRUARY Powering New Markets: Utility-scale Photovoltaic Solar

  11. Laboratory History | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory History The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has a rich history of renewable energy and energy efficiency research and innovation that spans decades. NREL's Roots: The Creation of SERI NREL was designated a national laboratory by President George Bush on September 16, 1991. But the birth of the organization began more than two decades before. Learn about the global politics, energy landscape, and environmental drivers that led to the creation of NREL's predecessor, the Solar

  12. History | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of SPR Releases History of SPR Releases The following provides a brief description of the times when crude oil has been released from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Emergency Drawdowns: The SPR exists, first and foremost, as an emergency response tool the President can use should the United States be confronted with an economically-threatening disruption in oil supplies. 2005 Hurricane Katrina Sale | 1991 Operation Desert Storm Sale Crude Oil Test Sales: The SPR has also

  13. VOLTTRON: Introduction and History

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Introduction and History JEREME HAACK, SRINIVAS KATIPAMULA, BRANDON CARPENTER, BORA AKYOL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory DOE Building Technologies Office: Technical Meeting on Software Framework for Transactive Energy July 23-24, 2014 July 29, 2014 1 VOLTTRON Team 2 3 Presentation Outline Background and Motivation What is VOLTTRON? Development History DOE Funded Enhancements Open Source VOLTTRON Development Timeline Challenge Approach Impact Bridging operation and planning to enable

  14. Taking the long view

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taking the long view Taking the long view on environmental stewardship A newly articulated mission for environmental stewardship at the Laboratory can be summed up in a simple phrase: clean up the past, control current operations, and create a sustainable future. March 20, 2012 Los Alamos Aerial Aerial view of a canyon in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Outreach P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email "The future viability of

  15. Taking the long view

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012 Los Alamos Aerial Aerial view of a canyon in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Outreach P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505)...

  16. ParaView

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... program in step 4 above. 1. Open ParaView and select File->Connect from the menu. 5. The server config script will start an xterm allowing you to login to the selected system. ...

  17. ARM Orientation: Overview and History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Orientation: ARM Orientation: Overview and History Overview and History Mar 2007 ARM Orientation 2 ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ...

  18. History of Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of Air Conditioning History of Air Conditioning July 20, 2015 - 3:15pm Addthis Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs MORE ON AIR CONDITIONING Check out our Energy Saver 101 infographic to learn how air conditioners work. Go to Energy Saver for more tips and advice on home cooling. Stay up-to-date on how the Energy Department is working to improve air conditioning technology. We take the air conditioner for granted, but imagine what life would be

  19. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History History Although they are tiny, atoms have a large amount of energy holding their nuclei together. Certain isotopes of some elements can be split and will release part of their energy as heat. This splitting is called fission. The heat released in fission can be used to help generate electricity in powerplants. Uranium-235 (U-235) is one of the isotopes that fissions easily. During fission, U-235 atoms absorb loose neutrons. This causes U-235 to become unstable and split into two light

  20. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History History The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers began acquiring land, in the area that became Oak Ridge, in October 1942 for the Manhattan Project. By March 1943, 56,000 acres were sealed behind fences and major industrial facilities were under construction. The K-25, S-50, and Y-12 plants were all built to separate the fissile isotope uranium-235 from uranium-238, while the X-10 site was established as a pilot plant for the Graphite Reactor. Throughout the next six decades the three major

  1. LANSCE | About | History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History The History of LANSCE Since 1972, the 800-million-electron-volt (MeV) accelerator and its attendant facilities at Technical Area 53 (TA-53, often referred to as "the Mesa") at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been a resource to a broad international community of scientific researchers. The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), as it was originally called, hosted about 1000 users per year to to perform medium energy physics experiments. In 1977, a pulsed spallation

  2. Catalytic conversion of sulfur dioxide and trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solov'eva, E.L.; Shenfel'd, B.E.; Kuznetsova, S.M.; Khludenev, A.G.

    1987-11-10

    The reclamation and utilization of sulfur-containing wastes from the flue gas of fossil-fuel power plants and the subsequent reduction in sulfur emission is addressed in this paper. The authors approach this problem from the standpoint of the catalytic oxidation of sulfur dioxide on solid poison-resistant catalysts with subsequent sorption of the sulfur trioxide and its incorporation into the manufacture of sulfuric acid. The catalyst they propose is a polymetallic dust-like waste from the copper-smelting industry comprised mainly of iron and copper oxides. Experiments with this catalyst were carried out using multifactorial experiment planning.

  3. Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol | Department of Energy diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Evaluation and comparison of the measurements of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using the European Particle Measurement Programme (PMP) system and catalytic stripper deer11_jung.pdf (1.44 MB)

  4. Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed state-of-the-art passive catalytic technology designed to reduce NOx released during vehicle cold start portion of the FTP-75 cycle deer11_henry.pdf (1.27 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light

  5. 15.02.10 RH Transparent Catalytic - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Catalytic Nickel Oxide Protecting Films for Photoanodes Sun, K. et al. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films. PNAS 112 ( 12), 3612-3617, DOI: 10.1073/ pnas . 1423034112 (2015). Scientific Achievement Reactively sputtered NiOx layer provides a transparent, anti-reflective, conductive, chemically stable, inherently catalytic coating that stabilizes many efficient and technologically important

  6. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway

  7. Quantum histories without contrary inferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losada, Marcelo; Laura, Roberto

    2014-12-15

    In the consistent histories formulation of quantum theory it was shown that it is possible to retrodict contrary properties. We show that this problem do not appear in our formalism of generalized contexts for quantum histories. - Highlights: We prove ordinary quantum mechanics has no contrary properties. Contrary properties in consistent histories are reviewed. We prove generalized contexts for quantum histories have no contrary properties.

  8. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Next Generation Manufacturing Processes project to develop a unique, fuel-flexible catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultra-low emission, lean premixed combustion of a ...

  9. Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus (Patent) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 42 ENGINEERING; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CATALYSTS; COOLING; PETROLEUM; CATALYTIC CRACKING; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; COKE; ...

  10. Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Evaluation and ...

  11. Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of NO by Hydrocarbons Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis

  12. Inverted fractionation apparatus and use in a heavy oil catalytic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cycle oil boiling range hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof into liquid product fractions, ... Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM; CATALYTIC CRACKING; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; VISCOSITY; ...

  13. Chemistry, phase formation, and catalytic activity of thinpalladium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Chemistry, phase formation, and catalytic activity of thin palladium-containing oxide films synthesized by plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition The chemistry, ...

  14. Comparison of Water-Hydrogen Catalytic Exchange Processes vs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2014, Aiken, SC COMPARISON OF WATER-HYDROGEN CATALYTIC EXCHANGE PROCESSES VERSUS ... and chemical exchange technologies for hydrogen isotope separation are 60+ years old - ...

  15. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to develop a unique, fuel-flexible catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultra-low emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. Fact...

  16. Catalytic reduction system for oxygen-rich exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Hsiao, Mark C.; Wallman, P. Henrik; Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    1999-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO.sub.x reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts.

  17. Catalytic reduction system for oxygen-rich exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1999-04-13

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  18. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program ...

  19. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program ...

  20. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Elliott, D.; Hart, T.; Neuenschwander, G.; Rotness, L.; Zacher, A. (2009). "Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Products." ...

  1. Piloted rich-catalytic lean-burn hybrid combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newburry, Donald Maurice

    2002-01-01

    A catalytic combustor assembly which includes, an air source, a fuel delivery means, a catalytic reactor assembly, a mixing chamber, and a means for igniting a fuel/air mixture. The catalytic reactor assembly is in fluid communication with the air source and fuel delivery means and has a fuel/air plenum which is coated with a catalytic material. The fuel/air plenum has cooling air conduits passing therethrough which have an upstream end. The upstream end of the cooling conduits is in fluid communication with the air source but not the fuel delivery means.

  2. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway...

  3. Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of different fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Bei-Jing; Yang, Fan; Yang, Qing-Tao

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of methane (CH{sub 4}), n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and dimethyl ether (DME) were studied experimentally in a Pt-coated monolith catalytic reactor. It is concluded that DME has the lowest catalytic ignition temperature and the least required H{sub 2} flow, while CH{sub 4} has the highest catalytic ignition temperature and the highest required H{sub 2} flow among the three fuels. (author)

  4. Process and apparatus for preheating heavy feed to a catalytic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Process and apparatus for preheating heavy feed to a catalytic cracking unit Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Process and apparatus for preheating heavy feed to a ...

  5. History of Air Conditioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We take it for granted but what would life be like without the air conditioner? Once considered a luxury, this invention is now an essential, allowing us to cool everything from homes, businesses, businesses, data centers, laboratories and other buildings vital to our daily lives. Explore this timeline to learn some of the key dates in the history of air conditioning.

  6. Y-12's history captured in short film | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    To close out the celebration of Y-12's 70th anniversary, a short film capturing highlights of the site's history now is available for viewing on the Y-12 public Web site at http:...

  7. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  8. History - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Lawrence's original Cyclotron, for which he received a patent and the Nobel Prize. Lawrence's original cyclotron design was limited to energies where relativistic effects were not important. The third generation cyclotron included "sector-focusing" to allow higher energies to be obtained. The 88-Inch Cyclotron was based on Lawrence's design of a sector-focused cyclotron for the MTA project at Livermore. 1500 man-hours of work were necessary to assemble the trim coils which help

  9. Biofuel from fast pyrolysis and catalytic hydrodeoxygenation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-09-04

    This review addresses recent developments in biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading by catalytic hydrotreating. The research in the field has expanded dramatically in the past few years with numerous new research groups entering the field while existing efforts from others expand. The issues revolve around the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Much work in batch reactor tests with precious metal catalysts needs further validation to verify long-term operability in continuous flow systems. The effect of the low level of sulfur in bio-oil needs more study to be better understood. Utilization of the upgraded bio-oil for feedstock to finished fuels is still in an early stage of understanding.

  10. Catalytic cartridge SO.sub.3 decomposer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, Terry R.

    1982-01-01

    A catalytic cartridge internally heated is utilized as a SO.sub.3 decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube being internally heated. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and being internally heated. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety.

  11. Catalytic cartridge SO.sub.3 decomposer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, Terry R.

    1982-01-01

    A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO.sub.3 decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety.

  12. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1985-08-20

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture, comprising and feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in a liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure, consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

  13. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catatlyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

  14. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture, comprising and feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in a liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure, consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

  15. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1984-03-27

    A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

  16. Make the most of catalytic hydrogenations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landert, J.P.; Scubla, T. [Biazzi S.A., Chailly-Montreux (Switzerland)

    1995-03-01

    Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation is one of the most useful and versatile reactions available for organic synthesis. Because it is environmentally clean, it has replaced other reduction processes, such as the Bechamp reaction, and zinc and sulfide reductions. Moreover, the economics are favorable, provided that raw materials free of catalyst poisons are used. The hydrogenation reaction is very selective with appropriate catalysts and can often be carried out without a solvent. Applications include reduction of unsaturated carbon compounds to saturated derivatives (for example, in vegetable-oil processing), carbonyl compounds to alcohols (such as sorbitol), and nitrocompounds to amines. the reactions are usually run in batch reactors to rapidly reach complete conversion and allow quick change-over of products. The paper describes the basics of hydrogenation; steering clear of process hazards; scale-up and optimization; and system design in practice.

  17. Catalytic cartridge SO/sub 3/ decomposer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-11-18

    A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO/sub 3/ decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety. A fusion reactor may be used as the heat source.

  18. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  19. REACTOR VIEWING APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Monk, G.S.

    1959-01-13

    An optical system is presented that is suitable for viewing objects in a region of relatively high radioactivity, or high neutron activity, such as a neutronic reactor. This optical system will absorb neutrons and gamma rays thereby protecting personnel fronm the harmful biological effects of such penetrating radiations. The optical system is comprised of a viewing tube having a lens at one end, a transparent solid member at the other end and a transparent aqueous liquid completely filling the tube between the ends. The lens is made of a polymerized organic material and the transparent solid member is made of a radiation absorbent material. A shield surrounds the tube betwcen the flanges and is made of a gamma ray absorbing material.

  20. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, C.S.

    1986-05-02

    An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  1. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, Clifford S.

    1987-01-01

    An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  2. History Publications | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Out of print, pdf version only. Atomic Shield, 1947-1952. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission, Volume II (pdf) - written by Richard G. Hewlett and Francis Duncan History of ...

  3. A Brief History of CAMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a brief history of cams A Brief History of CAMS The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) is the brainchild of Jay Davis, who envisioned the creation of a multi-purpose ...

  4. NTS_History.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing 1951 - 1963 Battlefi eld of the Cold War The Nevada Test Site United States Department of Energy Volume I Of related interest: Origins of the Nevada Test Site by Terrence R. Fehner and F. G. Gosling The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb * by F. G. Gosling The United States Department of Energy: A Summary History, 1977 - 1994 * by Terrence R. Fehner and Jack M. Holl * Copies available from the U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. S.W.,

  5. The View from HQ

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    A publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs NA-ASC-500-07-Issue 3 May 2007 The View from HQ by Dimitri Kusnezov I have been spending much of my time these days thinking about science, technology and engineering and the role of the laboratories and how that will be reflected in the Complex of the future. This is on my mind for two reasons: one is my responsibility to produce a science and technology roadmap for Complex 2030-Defense Program's vision

  6. The BetterBuildings View

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The BetterBuildings View Newsletter, April 2011, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  7. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. (1996) 36 Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors. [249 refs] Zabetakis, M.G. (1964) 35 Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F. (1977) 32 Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion

  8. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet (2003) 42 Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. (1996) 36 Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J. (1999) 35 Controlled low strength materials (CLSM),

  9. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  11. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  12. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  13. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  14. Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1998-07-28

    A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

  15. Bio-oil Quality Improvement and Catalytic Hydrotreating of Bio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2.3.1.302 Bio-oil Quality Improvement and Catalytic Hydrotreating of Bio-oils - PNNL ... lifetime Define quality metric for oil feed and intermediate streams Understand ...

  16. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst ...

  17. Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site and Catalytic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site and Catalytic Mechanism of Methane and Toluene Monooxygenases Friday, June 22, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Main Conference Room 137-322 Prof....

  18. In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying ...

  19. 15.02.10 RH Transparent Catalytic - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Catalytic Nickel Oxide Protecting Films for Photoanodes Sun, K. et al. Stable ... of 15-nm metallic Ni on quartz substrates Reprinted with permission from Sun, K. et al. ...

  20. Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee

    2007-06-19

    A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

  1. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal ...

  2. Printing 3D Catalytic Devices | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printing 3D Catalytic Devices An error occurred. Try watching this video on www.youtube.com, or enable JavaScript if it is disabled in your browser. Ames Laboratory scientist Igor...

  3. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  4. Dynamics of Competing Reaction Pathways during Catalytic CO Hydrogenation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Ruthenium | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Dynamics of Competing Reaction Pathways during Catalytic CO Hydrogenation on Ruthenium Wednesday, June 8, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Jerry LaRue, Chapman University Program Description Optical femtosecond laser pulses can be used to initiate catalytically important reactions on metal surfaces, such as CO hydrogenation on ruthenium. Using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we selectively probed

  5. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrocarbons | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Argonne National Laboratory 2004_deer_marshall.pdf (554.22 KB) More Documents & Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction

  6. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrocarbons | Department of Energy 3 DEER Conference Presentation: Argonne National Laboratory 2003_deer_marshall.pdf (533.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

  7. Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Startup America Startup America Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00219_ID2414.pdf (629 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryA method for catalytically converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon without requiring

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Catalytic Co - PA 40

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Catalytic Co - PA 40 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Catalytic Co. (PA.40 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.40-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 PA.40-1 Site Operations: Prime contractor for construction of the Fernald facility. Records indicate one time shipment of a very small quantity (4 lbs) of uranium metal to this site. PA.40-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Construction contractor -

  9. Reactive and Catalytic Air Purification Materials - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Reactive and Catalytic Air Purification Materials Naval Research Laboratory Contact NRL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication AirPurification (546 KB) Technology Marketing SummarySorbents for the removal of toxic in-dustrial gases such as ammonia and phosgene. The materials offer reactive and/or catalytic sites within a high surface

  10. Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification This project is developing a precious metal-free passive diesel particulate filter. deer09_fokema.pdf (869.13 KB) More Documents & Publications Active Soot Filter Regeneration Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines Towards Fuel-Efficient DPF Systems: Understanding the Soot Oxidation Process

  11. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  12. Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Tobin Jay

    2013-05-08

    Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

  13. Molecular self-assembly strategy for generating catalytic hybrid polypeptides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Fang, Justin; Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H.; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-04-26

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β- sheets and amyloidmore » fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. Furthermore, the enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality.« less

  14. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  15. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  16. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  17. The view from Kiev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiselyov, S.

    1993-11-01

    This article reports the observations of correspondents for the Bulletin (two Russian journalists, one based in Moscow, the other in Kiev) who investigated the status of the Soviet Union's Black Sea Fleet and Ukraine's status as a non-nuclear-weapons state. After two years of wrangling and two earlier failed settlements, Russian President Boris Yeltsin met with Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk at Massandra in Crimea. On September 3, the leaders announced that Russia would buy out Ukraine's interest in the fleet and lease the port at Sevastopol. The Massandra summit was also supposed to settle Ukraine's status as a non-nuclear-weapons state. Described here are the Kiev-based correspondent's views on the Massandra summit (and its major topics), which was to have been called off by the Russian foreign ministry when Ukrainian Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma resigned.

  18. LANL History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mission » LANL History LANL History LANL History Since its inception in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) primary mission has been nuclear weapons research and development. In executing this mission, LANL released hazardous and radioactive materials to the environment through outfalls, stack releases, and material disposal areas. Additionally, mixed low-level waste and transuranic waste was generated and staged in preparation for off-site

  19. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  20. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  1. Our History | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our History Ames Laboratory was formally established in 1947 by the Atomic Energy Commission as a result of the Ames Project's successful development of the most efficient process ...

  2. Mountain View Grand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain View Grand Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Grand Facility Mountain View Grand Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  3. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Ferry Creek Aerial View

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferry Creek Aerial View Ferry Creek Aerial View

  4. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Kress Creek Aerial View

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kress Creek Aerial View Kress Creek Aerial View

  5. Catalytic Behavior of Dense Hot Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C J; Fried, L E; Yang, L H; Goldman, N; Bastea, S

    2008-06-05

    Water is known to exhibit fascinating physical properties at high pressures and temperatures. Its remarkable structural and phase complexity suggest the possibility of exotic chemical reactivity under extreme conditions, though this remains largely unstudied. Detonations of high explosives containing oxygen and hydrogen produce water at thousands of K and tens of GPa, similar to conditions of giant planetary interiors. These systems thus provide a unique means to elucidate the chemistry of 'extreme water'. Here we show that water plays an unexpected role in catalyzing complex explosive reactions - contrary to the current view that it is simply a stable detonation product. Using first-principles atomistic simulations of the detonation of high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), we discovered that H{sub 2}O (source), H (reducer) and OH (oxidizer) act as a dynamic team that transports oxygen between reaction centers. Our finding suggests that water may catalyze reactions in other explosives and in planetary interiors.

  6. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia

  7. Highland View school | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highland View school Highland View school Aerial showing Highland View school and surrounding homes

  8. Radiation View Factor With Shadowing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-24

    FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors as input data to finite element heat transfer analysis codes.

  9. Method for measuring recovery of catalytic elements from fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail

    2011-03-08

    A method is provided for measuring the concentration of a catalytic clement in a fuel cell powder. The method includes depositing on a porous substrate at least one layer of a powder mixture comprising the fuel cell powder and an internal standard material, ablating a sample of the powder mixture using a laser, and vaporizing the sample using an inductively coupled plasma. A normalized concentration of catalytic element in the sample is determined by quantifying the intensity of a first signal correlated to the amount of catalytic element in the sample, quantifying the intensity of a second signal correlated to the amount of internal standard material in the sample, and using a ratio of the first signal intensity to the second signal intensity to cancel out the effects of sample size.

  10. Drop History? No! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drop History? No! Drop History? No! February 29, 2012 When I was in high school in England, especially in the smaller country schools, teachers were scarce and schedules, therefore, constrained. Further, the English style is for students to choose directions, and therefore subjects, at a relatively early age. So, at age 13, I had to choose between Physics and Chemistry on the one hand, and Latin and History on the other. Of course, I chose Physics and Chemistry, but thereby lost two subjects in

  11. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  12. New process model proves accurate in tests on catalytic reformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ancheyta-Juarez, J. )

    1994-07-25

    A mathematical model has been devised to represent the process that takes place in a fixed-bed, tubular, adiabatic catalytic reforming reactor. Since its development, the model has been applied to the simulation of a commercial semiregenerative reformer. The development of mass and energy balances for this reformer led to a model that predicts both concentration and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison of the model's results with experimental data illustrates its accuracy at predicting product profiles. Simple steps show how the model can be applied to simulate any fixed-bed catalytic reformer.

  13. Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emissions performance comparison of conventional catalytic converter with multi-channel catalytic converter (ceramic fiber insulation layers introduced into ceramic monolith of three-way catalytic converter)

  14. Y-12 and uranium history

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    did happen six days after he was given the assignment. The history of uranium at Y-12 began with that decision, which will be commemorated on September 19, 2012, at...

  15. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  16. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  17. ULTRA LOW NOx CATALYTIC COMBUSTION FOR IGCC POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance L. Smith

    2004-03-01

    Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using PCI's two-stage (catalytic / gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage is a Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{trademark}) catalytic reactor, wherein a fuel-rich mixture contacts the catalyst and reacts while final and excess combustion air cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, wherein the catalyst cooling air mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During the reporting period, PCI successfully achieved NOx = 0.011 lbs/MMBtu at 10 atm pressure (corresponding to 2.0 ppm NOx corrected to 15% O{sub 2} dry) with near-zero CO emissions, surpassing the project goal of < 0.03 lbs/MMBtu NOx. These emissions levels were achieved at scaled (10 atm, sub-scale) baseload conditions corresponding to Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station operation on 100% syngas (no co-firing of natural gas).

  18. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  19. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  20. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation and hydroconversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, James B.; McLean, Joseph B.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1989-01-01

    A process for two-stage catalytic hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent and fed at temperature below about 650.degree. F. into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils at conditions favoring hydrogenation reactions. The first stage reactor is maintained at 650.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-60 lb coal/hr/ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The partially hydrogenated material from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the close-coupled second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at a temperature at least about 25.degree. F. higher than for the first stage reactor and within a range of 750.degree.-875.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and thermal hydroconversion reactions. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, which results in significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of undesirable residuum and unconverted coal and hydrocarbon gases, with use of less energy to obtain the low molecular weight products, while catalyst life is substantially increased.

  1. Incorporation of Catalytic Compounds in the Porosity of SiC Wall...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incorporation of Catalytic Compounds in the Porosity of SiC Wall Flow Filters - 4 Way Catalyst and DeNOx Application examples Incorporation of Catalytic Compounds in the Porosity ...

  2. The Catalytic Subunit of the SWR1 Remodeler Is a Histone Chaperone...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Catalytic Subunit of the SWR1 Remodeler Is a Histone Chaperone for the H2A.Z-H2B Dimer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Catalytic Subunit of the SWR1 Remodeler Is ...

  3. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  4. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: ...

  5. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep; Pfefferle, William

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines

  6. DNA Origami: A History and Current Perspective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Origami: A History and Current Perspective Authors: Nangreave, J., Han, D., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: DNA Origami: A History and Current Perspective Source: Current Opinion in ...

  7. Heating Oil Reserve History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating Oil Reserve History Heating Oil Reserve History Creation of an emergency reserve of heating oil was directed by President Clinton on July 10, 2000, when he directed ...

  8. Tag: History | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Tag: History Displaying 1 - 10 of 119... Category: About Deputy Secretary meets two calutron girls When the Deputy Secretary of Energy, Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, was in...

  9. Component Development to Accelerate Commercial Implementation of Ultra-Low Emissions Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarty, Jon; Berry, Brian; Lundberg, Kare; Anson, Orris

    2003-03-31

    This final report describes a 2000-2003 program for the development of components and processes to enhance the commercialization of ultra-low emissions catalytic combustion in industrial gas turbines. The range of project tasks includes: development of more durable, lower-cost catalysts and catalytic combustor components; development and design of a catalytic pre-burner and a catalytic pilot burner for gas turbines, and on-site fuel conversion processing for utilization of liquid fuel.

  10. Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reductants | Department of Energy Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_marshall.pdf (174.66 KB) More Documents & Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by

  11. Agglutination of single catalyst particles during fluid catalytic cracking as observed by X-ray nanotomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meirer, F.; Kalirai, S.; Weker, J. Nelson; Liu, Y.; Andrews, J. C.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2015-04-14

    Metal accumulation at the catalyst particle surface plays a role in particle agglutination during fluid catalytic cracking.

  12. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Moon-Jung; Lee, Byung Cheon; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  13. Women in Los Alamos History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Women in Los Alamos History Women in Los Alamos History WHEN: Mar 03, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Los Alamos Golf Course Clubhouse SPEAKER: Jill Tietjen CONTACT: Sarah Terrill (505) 709-0089 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Tietjen is a well-known speaker on the topic of gender issues in the work place, and a motivational speaker for young women working toward educations and careers in science, engineering, technology and math (STEM). The community is invited to

  14. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail; Heinz, Robert

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  15. The history of the LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  16. The history of the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-11

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  17. EM Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup’s History

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – In honor of its 25th anniversary, EM launched a new timeline this week that offers stakeholders and other members of the public a first-of-a-kind opportunity to view the nuclear cleanup program’s achievements and related Cold War history in an interactive online platform.

  18. history

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the Albuquerque Operations Office with other NNSA operations offices into the NNSA Service Center located in Albuquerque. OTS was renamed the Office of Secure Transportation...

  19. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Advisory Panel Control Point NTS AEC Commissioners at LASL Bacher Lilienthal Pike Waymack ... Fishbowl Kingfish Fishbowl Starfish Prime at 0 to 15 Sec Maui Station JE62 Fishbowl ...

  20. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Historically Underrepresented Communities Historically Underrepresented Communities The Department recognizes that embracing diversity in all aspects of our operations is crucial to achieving our mission. Diversity is more than simply numbers and statistics, it is a cross-cutting imperative of our people, programs, partners, and innovation at the Department. Everyone deserves equal participation and access to the energy programs of the Department, and, with the support of Secretary Moniz and

  1. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided radioisotope thermoelectric generators for space applications since 1961. These generators provide electrical power for spacecraft by direct conversion of the heat generated by the decay of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) oxide to electrical energy. The first generator was used on the Navy Transit 4A spacecraft launched on June 29, 1961. Between 1961 and 1972, DOE provided power systems for six Navy navigational satellites. In addition, DOE provided power

  2. History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Los Alamos program has supplied a wide range of radioisotopes to medical researchers ... This resulted in the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) construction project, which focused ...

  3. Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W.; Reinhard, Martin

    2002-01-01

    A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  5. Role of surface generated radicals in catalytic combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santavicca, D.A.; Stein, Y.; Royce, B.S.H.

    1984-04-01

    The role of surface generated OH radicals in determining the catalytic ignition characteristics for propane oxidation on platinum were studied. The experiments were conducted in a stacked-plate, catalyst bed. Transient measurements, during catalytic ignition, of the catalyst's axial temperature profile were made and the effect of equivalence ratio, inlet temperature and inlet velocity was investigated. These measurements will provide insights which will be useful in planning and interpreting to OH measurements. Attempts to measure OH concentration in the catalyst bed using resonance absorption spectroscopy were unsuccessful, indicating that OH concentrations are below 10 to the 16th power/cc but still possibly above equilibrium values. Measurements are currently underway using forward scatter laser induced fluorescence which should extend the OH detection limits several orders of magnitude below the equilibrium concentrations.

  6. Catalytic effects of minerals on NOx emission from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, M.Y.; Che, D.F.

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic effects of inherent mineral matters on NOx emissions from coal combustion have been investigated by a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) equipped with a gas analyzer. The effect of demineralization and the individual effect of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe on the formation of NOx are studied as well as the combined catalytic effects of Ca + Na and Ca + Ti. Demineralization causes more Fuel-N to retain in the char, and reduction of NOx mostly. But the mechanistic effect on NOx formation varies from coal to coal. Ca and Mg promote NOx emission. Na, K, Fe suppress NOx formation to different extents. The effect of transition element Fe is the most obvious. The combination of Ca + Na and Ca + Ti can realize the simultaneous control of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions.

  7. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  8. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

    1984-01-06

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

  9. Selective dehydrogenation of propane over novel catalytic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sault, A.G.; Boespflug, E.P.; Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.

    1998-02-01

    The conversion of small alkanes into alkenes represents an important chemical processing area; ethylene and propylene are the two most important organic chemicals manufactured in the U.S. These chemicals are currently manufactured by steam cracking of ethane and propane, an extremely energy intensive, nonselective process. The development of catalytic technologies (e.g., selective dehydrogenation) that can be used to produce ethylene and propylene from ethane and propane with greater selectivity and lower energy consumption than steam cracking will have a major impact on the chemical processing industry. This report details a study of two novel catalytic materials for the selective dehydrogenation of propane: Cr supported on hydrous titanium oxide ion-exchangers, and Pt nanoparticles encapsulated in silica and alumina aerogel and xerogel matrices.

  10. Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-04-04

    Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

  11. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  12. Catalytic efficiency of Nb and Nb oxides for hydrogen dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isobe, Shigehito; Kudoh, Katsuhiro; Hino, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei; Hara, Kenji

    2015-08-24

    In this letter, catalytic efficiency of Nb, NbO, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NbO{sub 2}, and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} for dissociation and recombination of hydrogen were experimentally investigated. On the surface of Nb and Nb oxides in a gas mixture of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} molecules can be dissociated to H and D atoms; then, H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD molecules can be produced according to the law of probability. With increase of frequency of the dissociation and recombination, HD ratio increases. The ratio of H{sub 2} and HD gas was analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. As a result, NbO showed the highest catalytic activity towards hydrogen dissociation and recombination.

  13. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  14. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 21, 2013 Gasification Mike Schultz, PhD., Project PI A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Goal A hybrid biorefinery design that enables the production of jet fuel and other hydrocarbon fuels from waste biomass System Integration, Optimization and Analysis Integration Gasification & Syngas Conditioning Fermentation & Alcohol Recovery Catalysis Catalysis Gasoline Jet Fuel Diesel Butadiene MEK EtOH 2,3BD Wood Stover Switchgrass Improve Economics and Process

  15. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon AdsorberMaterials | Department of Energy 11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace055_peden_2011_o.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea

  16. Hybrid lean premixing catalytic combustion system for gas turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Critchley, Ian L.

    2003-12-09

    A system and method of combusting a hydrocarbon fuel is disclosed. The system combines the accuracy and controllability of an air staging system with the ultra-low emissions achieved by catalytic combustion systems without the need for a pre-heater. The result is a system and method that is mechanically simple and offers ultra-low emissions over a wide range of power levels, fuel properties and ambient operating conditions.

  17. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  18. New Catalytic Approach Builds Molecules with Specific Functionality More

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safely and Efficiently | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) New Catalytic Approach Builds Molecules with Specific Functionality More Safely and Efficiently Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  19. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Mary Biddy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Susanne Jones Pacific Northwest National Laboratory NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the United States Department of Energy under contract

  20. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway Mary Biddy and Abhijit Dutta National Renewable Energy Laboratory Susanne Jones and Aye Meyer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the United States Department of Energy under

  1. Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-Low NOx Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep

    2011-06-30

    Precision Combustion, Inc., (PCI) in close collaboration with Solar Turbines, Incorporated, has developed and demonstrated a combustion system for hydrogen fueled turbines that reduces NOx to low single digit level while maintaining or improving current levels of efficiency and eliminating emissions of carbon dioxide. Full scale Rich Catalytic Hydrogen (RCH1) injector was developed and successfully tested at Solar Turbines, Incorporated high pressure test facility demonstrating low single digit NOx emissions for hydrogen fuel in the range of 2200F-2750F. This development work was based on initial subscale development for faster turnaround and reduced cost. Subscale testing provided promising results for 42% and 52% H2 with NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm with improved flame stability. In addition, catalytic reactor element testing for substrate oxidation, thermal cyclic injector testing to simulate start-stop operation in a gas turbine environment, and steady state 15 atm. operation testing were performed successfully. The testing demonstrated stable and robust catalytic element component life for gas turbine conditions. The benefit of the catalytic hydrogen combustor technology includes capability of delivering near-zero NOx without costly post-combustion controls and without requirement for added sulfur control. In addition, reduced acoustics increase gas turbine component life. These advantages advances Department of Energy (DOE’s) objectives for achievement of low single digit NOx emissions, improvement in efficiency vs. postcombustion controls, fuel flexibility, a significant net reduction in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system net capital and operating costs, and a route to commercialization across the power generation field from micro turbines to industrial and utility turbines.

  2. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING PENETRATING RADIATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    A method of hydrogenating an olefinic hydrocarbon by irradiating a substrate catalyst and increasing its catalytic activity is described. Ferric oxide with about 0.005% by weight of at least one oxide of a metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, magnesium, nickel, zirconium, and manganese incorporated therein is irradiated. Then an alkane is placed upon the surface of the catalyst and irradiated in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Any olefin produced from this radiolysis becomes hydrogenated. (AEC)

  3. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  4. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yi

    2002-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  5. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  6. A History of the Science Education Laboratory in Pictures | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    image Plasma Speaker Lab renovation View larger image The "Loft" View larger image Teaching Lab renovation View larger image Dusty Plasma Lab completed View larger image The...

  7. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  8. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, themore » target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.« less

  9. For current viewing resistor loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Gregory R.; Hass, Jay B.

    2011-04-19

    The invention comprises a terminal unit for a flat cable comprising a BNC-PCB connector having a pin for electrically contacting one or more conducting elements of a flat cable, and a current viewing resistor having an opening through which the pin extends and having a resistor face that abuts a connector face of the BNC-PCB connector, wherein the device is a terminal unit for the flat cable.

  10. Introduction to Y-12's history

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12's History This article marks the beginning of a series that will focus on the history of the Y-12 National Security Complex. Y-12 has employed from 22,000 at its peak to 8,000...

  11. Well Record or History | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Record or History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Well Record or HistoryLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  12. ALS History: The First 20 Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History: The First 20 Years Print Below is an interactive timeline covering highlights of the first 20 years of ALS history. By no means exhaustive, it is meant to provide a broad ...

  13. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  14. History of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This timeline explores the history of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, or SPR, from conception through current events.

  15. Rotary regenerative catalytic oxidizer for VOC emission control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, J.C.; Chen, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Thermal or catalytic oxidation has been widely accepted in industries as one of the most effective technologies for the control of VOC emissions. To reduce energy cost, this technology normally incorporates heat exchanger to recover waste heat from hot combustion exhaust. Among various heat recovery methods, it is known that the regenerative system has the highest thermal efficiency (> 90%). The normal regenerative heat exchanger design is to use ceramic heat sink material packed in a fixed-bed configuration to capture excess heat from outgoing hot combustion exhaust and use it later to preheat incoming cold VOC laden gas stream by periodically switching gas streams using valves. This paper presents a novel design of the regenerative catalytic oxidizer. This design uses a honeycomb rotor with discrete parallel channels as the heat transfer media on which catalyst is coated to promote oxidation reaction. Heat recovery of this unit is accomplished by rotating the rotor between cold and hot flow streams. The thermal efficiency of the unit can be controlled by the rotation speed. Because it can rotate between hot and cold streams at higher rate than that can be achieved by valve switching, the rotary regenerative catalytic oxidizer uses much less heat transfer media than that is normally required for the fixed-bed design for the same thermal efficiency. This leads to a more compact and less costly unit design. The continuous rotation mechanism also eliminates the pressure fluctuation that is experienced by the fixed-bed design using valves for flow switching. The advantages of this new design are demonstrated by the data collected from a laboratory scale test unit.

  16. Plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using porous nickel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oohara, W.; Maeda, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2011-09-15

    Hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H{sup +} and H{sup -} ions, are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a porous nickel plate. Positive ions in a hydrogen plasma generated by dc arc discharge are irradiated to the porous plate, and pair ions are produced from the back of the irradiation plane. It becomes clear that the production quantity of pair ions mainly depends on the irradiation current of positive ions and the irradiation energy affects the production efficiency of H{sup -} ions.

  17. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  18. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes - Towards an economically viable process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.; Brockmeier, F.E.

    1996-07-01

    The ultimate goal of our project is an economically viable pyrolysis process to recover useful fuels and/or chemicals from plastics- containing wastes. This paper reports the effects of various promoted and unpromoted binary oxide catalysts on yields and compositions of liquid organic products, as measured in a small laboratory pyrolysis reactor. On the basis of these results, a commercial scale catalytic pyrolysis reactor was simulated by the Aspen software and rough costs were estimated. The results suggest that such a process has potential economic viability.

  20. Method and apparatus for decoupled thermo-catalytic pollution control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim Z.; Martin, Eric

    2006-07-11

    A new method for design and scale-up of thermocatalytic processes is disclosed. The method is based on optimizing process energetics by decoupling of the process energetics from the DRE for target contaminants. The technique is applicable to high temperature thermocatalytic reactor design and scale-up. The method is based on the implementation of polymeric and other low-pressure drop support for thermocatalytic media as well as the multifunctional catalytic media in conjunction with a novel rotating fluidized particle bed reactor.

  1. Fabrication of catalytic electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte.

  2. An analytical history of EIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, C.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This article traces the development of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) from 1974, the inception of its precursor, an office within the Federal Energy Administration, to its current form as an independent agency within the US Department of Energy (DOE). EIA amalgamated the energy-related activities of over 50 separate agencies, when it was chartered in DOE in 1977, [open quotes]to collect, evaluate, assemble, and analyze energy information...[close quotes] Six tensions have characterized the agency during its history: data quality, the role of modeling, confidentiality of data, resources and requirements, the independence of EIA, and timeliness vs. accuracy. 95 refs.

  3. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  4. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LanzaTech. All rights reserved. 1 A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas BETO's Project Peer Review, March 2015 Alexandria, VA Alice Havill Senior Process Engineer Project Principle Investigator Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Objective: develop a hybrid conversion technology for catalytic upgrading of biomass- derived syngas to jet fuel and chemicals while ensure the cost, quality and environmental requirements of the aviation industry are met System

  5. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels This fact sheet provides an overview of the Next Generation Manufacturing Processes project to develop a unique, fuel-flexible catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultra-low emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. Fact sheet - Enabling Clean Consumption of Low Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas

  6. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  7. Catalyst Cartography: 3D Super-Resolution Mapping of Catalytic Activity |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Ames Laboratory Catalyst Cartography: 3D Super-Resolution Mapping of Catalytic Activity Thanks to a groundbreaking new method, scientists have created the first 3D super-resolution maps of catalytic activity on an individual catalytic nanoparticle while reactions are occurring. Catalysts are used in manufacturing everything from stain remover to rocket fuel; they make production more efficient by facilitating chemical reactions. Each catalyst being studied is only about 200 nanometers in

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis pathway involves rapidly heating biomass with a catalyst to create bio-oils, which can be used to produce biofuel blendstocks.

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis, biomass is heated with catalysts to create bio-oils, which are then used to produce biofuel blendstocks.

  10. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber ...

  11. New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) Light, combined with a novel rhodium catalyst, enables greener production of chemical feedstocks from biorenewables. A key...

  12. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2001-01-01

    A process for production of synthesis gas employing a catalytic membrane reactor wherein the membrane comprises a mixed metal oxide material.

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing

  15. Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction catalyst for NO.sub.x emissions control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furbeck, Howard; Koermer, Gerald; Moini, Ahmad

    2016-04-12

    The present disclosure provides an AgBi catalyst over alumina suitable for performing hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR).

  16. Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith Emissions performance comparison of conventional ...

  17. History of ultrahigh carbon steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, J.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-06-20

    The history and development of ultrahigh carbon steels (i.e., steels containing between 1 and 2.l percent C and now known as UHCS) are described. The early use of steel compositions containing carbon contents above the eutectoid level is found in ancient weapons from around the world. For example, both Damascus and Japanese sword steels are hypereutectoid steels. Their manufacture and processing is of interest in understanding the role of carbon content in the development of modern steels. Although sporadic examples of UHCS compositions are found in steels examined in the early part of this century, it was not until the mid-1970s that the modern study began. This study had its origin in the development of superplastic behavior in steels and the recognition that increasing the carbon content was of importance in developing that property. The compositions that were optimal for superplasticity involved the development of steels that contained higher carbon contents than conventional modern steels. It was discovered, however, that the room temperature properties of these compositions were of interest in their own right. Following this discovery, a period of intense work began on understanding their manufacture, processing, and properties for both superplastic forming and room temperature applications. The development of superplastic cast irons and iron carbides, as well as those of laminated composites containing UHCS, was an important part of this history.

  18. Intensified Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Process with Microchannel Catalytic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Chunshe; Hu, Jianli; Li, Shari; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Wang, Yong

    2009-02-28

    A microchannel catalytic reactor with improved heat and mass transport has been used for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to produce fuels and chemicals. This type of novel reactor takes advantages of highly active and selective catalysts with increased site density so that the FT synthesis process can be intensified. It was demonstrated that this microchannel reactor based process can be carried out at gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) as high as 60,000 hr-1 to achieve greater than 60% of one-pass CO conversion while maintaining low methane selectivity (<10%) and high chain growth probability(>0.9). Such superior FT synthesis performance has not ever been reported in the prior open literatures. The overall productivity to heavy hydrocarbons has been significantly improved over the conventional reactor technology. In this study, performance data were obtained in a wide range of pressure (10atm-35atm) and hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio (1-2.5). The catalytic system was characterized by BET, scanning electron microcopy (SEM), transmission electron microcopy(TEM), and H2 chemisorption. A three dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model were used to simulate temperature profiles in the exothermic reaction system in order to optimize the reactor design and intensify the synthesis process. Intraparticle non-isothermal characteristics are also analyzed for the FT synthesis catalyst.

  19. Cheap carbon sorbents produced from lignite by catalytic pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Schchipko, M.L.

    1995-12-01

    Some data are presented describing the new technology of carbon sorbent production from powdered lignite in the installation with fluidized bed of catalyst. It was shown the different types of char products with extended pore structure and high sorption ability can be produced from cheap and accessible lignite of Kansk-Achinsk coal pit in pilot installation with fluidized bed of Al-Cu-Cr oxide catalyst or catalytically active slag materials. In comparison with the conventional technologies of pyrolysis the catalytic pyrolysis allows to increase by 3-5 times the process productivity and to decrease significantly the formation of harmful compounds. The latter is accomplished by complete oxidation of gaseous pyrolysis products in the presence of catalysts and by avoiding the formation of pyrolysis tars - the source of cancerogenic compounds. The technology of cheap powdered sorbent production from lignites makes possible to obtain from lignite during the time of pyrolysis only a few seconds char products with porosity up to 0.6 cm{sup 3} /g, and specific surface area more than 400 m{sup 3} /g. Some methods of powdered chars molding into carbon materials with the different shape were proved for producing of firmness sorbents. Cheap carbon sorbents obtained by thermocatalytic pyrolysis can be successfully used in purification of different industrial pollutants as one-time sorbent or as adsorbents of long-term application with periodic regeneration.

  20. Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.; Lippert, Thomas E.

    2008-12-16

    A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

  1. Better Buildings Network View | February 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  2. Better Buildings Network View | September 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  3. Better Buildings Network View | June 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  4. Better Buildings Network View | May 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  5. Better Buildings Network View | June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  6. Better Buildings Network View | October 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  7. Better Buildings Network View | October 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  8. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View-- July 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  9. Better Buildings Network View | January 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  10. Better Buildings Network View | February 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  11. Better Buildings Network View | January 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  12. Better Buildings Network View | November 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  13. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View-- May 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

  14. Better Buildings Network View | May 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

  15. View Shed - Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-18

    The View Shed library is a collection of Umbra modules that are used to calculate areas of visual coverage (view sheds). It maps high and low visibility areas and calculates sensor (camera placement for maximum coverage and performance. This assertion includes a managed C++ wrapper code (ViewShedWrapper) to enable C# applications, such as OpShed, to incorporate this library.

  16. West Valley Demonstration Project: A Short History and Status...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project: A Short History and Status West Valley Demonstration Project: A Short History and ... 2013 in Buffalo, NY. West Valley Demonstration Project: A Short History and Status ...

  17. MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Havstad, Mark A.

    2011-08-09

    Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

  18. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

  19. Method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  20. Method For Selective Catalytic Reduction Of Nitrogen Oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  1. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  2. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  3. Benefits of hydroprocessing pressure on fluid catalytic cracking performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, T.A.; Asim, M.Y.; Keyworth, D.A.; Wiseman, S.L.

    1995-09-01

    Hydroprocessing provides a higher quality feed for the fluid catalytic cracking unit. As refiners face deteriorating crude quality and stricter environmental constraints for transportation fuels, hydroprocessing of the FCCU feed becomes more attractive. The benefits of high pressure operation of FCC pretreaters have been poorly defined. Proper selection of the hydroprocessing pressure, hydroprocessing catalyst and operating philosophy can result in increased profits relative to non-optimal operation. This paper first discusses the benefit resulting from FCC feed pretreatment and specifically evaluates for the first time the benefits of hydrogen partial pressure for FCC pretreatment at low, moderate and high pressures at two temperatures. Once the refiner has chosen pretreatment, further optimization of hydroprocessing unit operation and FCCU operation is illustrated.

  4. Selective catalytic synthesis of functional allenes, cyclopentenones and oxolenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darcel, C.; Bruneau, C.; Dixneuf, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    The most powerful method to produce allene derivatives consists in the selective activation of prop-2-yn-1-carbonates by a Pd(0) catalyst, via allenyl palladium(II) intermediate. This strategy has been used for the selective catalytic synthesis of derivatives. The alkynyl cyclic carbonates have the advantage to be readily prepared directly from CO{sub 2} and contain both propargylic and homopropargylic functionalities. Their activation, under mild conditions, by palladium(0) catalysts, associated with the suitable phosphine ligand, can be oriented to selectively prepare either alkynyl {alpha}-hydroxy allenes, 5-hydroxy alka-2,3-dienoates, functional cyclopentenones or oxolenes via cross coupling, mono-carbonylation, dicarbonylation and Heck-Type reactions respectively.

  5. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  6. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  7. Coal hydrogenation and deashing in ebullated bed catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Johanson, Edwin S.

    1983-01-01

    An improved process for hydrogenation of coal containing ash with agglomeration and removal of ash from an ebullated bed catalytic reactor to produce deashed hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, a flowable coal-oil slurry is reacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst bed reaction zone at elevated temperature and pressure conditions. The upward velocity and viscosity of the reactor liquid are controlled so that a substantial portion of the ash released from the coal is agglomerated to form larger particles in the upper portion of the reactor above the catalyst bed, from which the agglomerated ash is separately withdrawn along with adhering reaction zone liquid. The resulting hydrogenated hydrocarbon effluent material product is phase separated to remove vapor fractions, after which any ash remaining in the liquid fraction can be removed to produce substantially ash-free coal-derived liquid products.

  8. Fabrication of fuel cell electrodes and other catalytic structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.

    1987-02-11

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte. 1 fig.

  9. Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G

    2005-11-30

    This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Brnsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with

  10. Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

  11. arc history | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Albany, Oregon History Albany, Oregon History Albany Research Center has a history rich in successful materials research and development. It was on March 17, 1943 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that the U. S. Bureau of Mines had selected a site in Albany, Oregon for the new Northwest Electro-development Laboratory. The original mission of the center was to find methods for using the abundant low-grade resources of the area, and to develop new metallurgical processes using the

  12. The Manhattan Project: An Interactive History

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Manhattan Project, An Interactive History Home The Manhattan Project, An Interactive History Home Department of Energy Home Office of History and Heritage Resources Home DOEHome J.R. Oppenheimer and General Groves Events People Places Processes Science Resources Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer In a national survey at the turn of the millennium, both journalists and the public ranked the dropping of the atomic bomb and the end of the Second World War as the top news stories of the

  13. History of Regulatory Oversight at LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of Regulatory Oversight History of Regulatory Oversight at LANL History of Regulatory Oversight at LANL 1943-1950: Manhattan Project Era Few environmental regulations Best available protection technologies employed, though rudimentary 1950s-1970s: Cold War Era Laboratory moved from townsite to current location Advent of national environmental protection laws Clean Air Act Clean Water Act Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 1980s-1990s: Non-proliferation/Stockpile Reduction LANL

  14. DOE History Timeline | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE History Timeline DOE History Timeline DOE History Timeline The Department of Energy is one of the most interesting and diverse agencies in the Federal Government. Activated on October 1, 1977, the twelfth cabinet-level department brought together for the first time within one agency two programmatic traditions that had long coexisted within the Federal establishment: 1) defense responsibilities that included the design, construction, and testing of nuclear weapons dating from the Manhattan

  15. Employee Women's History Month Celebration (DC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Celebrate Women's History Month with the Department of Energy headquarters, and hear from remarkable game-changing women and leading DOE engagement programs.

  16. Power of the River History Book

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power-of-the-River-BPA-History-Book Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  17. History of Load Participation in ERCOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Mark

    2011-10-25

    Presentation on demand integration by ERCOT for a DOE Workshop. Covers history of load participation in ERCOT from 2002 to present.

  18. Celebrating the History of Women in STEM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Women's History Month, the Energy Department is highlighting the important STEM contributions of women of color. Be sure to follow along on Instagram.

  19. Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  20. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - September 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BB Neighborhood View -- September 2012 (140.07 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July ...

  1. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R.

    1998-07-01

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  2. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    characteristics of combustible gases and vapors. 249 refs Zabetakis, M.G. (1964) 80 Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. ...

  3. July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J. Stepan; Richard E. Shockey; Thomas A. Moe; Ryan Dorn (2002) 51 SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS. KRISHNA,C.R. (1999) 46 Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. Whaley, August 15, 1994 NONE (1995) 40 Human radiation studies:

  4. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the

  5. History of western oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The history of oil shale in the United States since the early 1900's is detailed. Research on western oil shale probably began with the work of Robert Catlin in 1915. During the next 15 years there was considerable interest in the oil shales, and oil shale claims were located, and a few recovery plants were erected in Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, and Montana. Little shale soil was produced, however, and the major oil companies showed little interest in producing shale oil. The early boom in shale oil saw less than 15 plants produce a total of less than 15,000 barrels of shale oil, all but about 500 barrels of which was produced by the Catlin Operation in Nevada and by the US Bureau of Mines Rulison, Colorado operation. Between 1930 and 1944 plentiful petroleum supplies at reasonable prices prevent any significant interest in shale oil, but oil shortages during World War II caused a resurgence of interest in oil shale. Between 1940 and 1969, the first large-scale mining and retorting operations in soil shale, and the first attempts at true in situ recovery of shale oil began. Only 75,000 barrels of shale oil were produced, but major advancements were made in developing mine designs and technology, and in retort design and technology. The oil embargo of 1973 together with a new offering of oil shale leases by the Government in 1974 resulted in the most concentrated efforts for shale oil production to date. These efforts and the future prospects for shale oil as an energy source in the US are discussed.

  6. Radioactivity and health: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stannard, J.N.; Baalman, R.W. Jr.

    1988-10-01

    This book is designed to be primarily a history of research facts, measurements, and ideas and the people who developed them. ''Research'' is defined very broadly to include from bench-top laboratory experiments to worldwide environmental investigations. The book is not a monograph or a critical review. The findings and conclusions are presented largely as the investigators saw and reported them. Frequently, the discussion utilizes the terminology and units of the time, unless they are truly antiquated or potentially unclear. It is only when the work being reported is markedly iconoclastic or obviously wrong that I chose to make special note of it or to correct it. Nevertheless, except for direct quotations, the language is mine, and I take full responsibility for it. The working materials for this volume included published papers in scientific journals, books, published conferences and symposia, personal interviews with over 100 individuals, some of them more than once (see Appendix A), and particularly for the 1940--1950 decade and for the large government-supported laboratories to the present day, ''in-house'' reports. These reports frequently represent the only comprehensive archive of what was done and why. Unfortunately, this source is drying up because of storage problems and must be retrieved by ever more complex and inconvenient means. For this reason, special efforts have been taken to review and document these sources, though even now some sections of the field are partially inaccessible. Nevertheless, the volume of all materials available for this review was surprisingly large and the quality much better than might have been expected for so complex and disparate a fields approached under conditions of considerable urgency.

  7. PAFC History and Successes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History and Successes PAFC History and Successes Presentation at the MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop held Nov. 16, 2009, in Palm Springs, CA mcfc_pafc_workshop_ferro.pdf (1.83 MB) More Documents & Publications MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop Summary Report PAFC Cost Challenges Fuel Cell Development Status

  8. Newmark-Hall synthetic history development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aramayo, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The methodology used to develop synthetic acceleration time histories with spectral content that envelopes the Newmark-Hall spectra is described. Six acceleration time histories are developed for two conditions of foundation and 3 critical damping factors. The target spectra corresponds to the mediam centered probability level.

  9. Atomic power in space: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    ''Atomic Power in Space,'' a history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States, covers the period from the program's inception in the mid-1950s through 1982. Written in non-technical language, the history is addressed to both the general public and those more specialized in nuclear and space technologies. 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Clifton View Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Clifton View Homes’s remodel of a 1962 rambler, on Whidbey Island in Washington State, cut energy costs by two-thirds.

  11. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for biomedical and catalytical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaoxing

    2011-05-15

    Mesoporous silica materials, discovered in 1992 by the Mobile Oil Corporation, have received considerable attention in the chemical industry due to their superior textual properties such as high surface area, large pore volume, tunable pore diameter, and narrow pore size distribution. Among those materials, MCM-41, referred to Mobile Composition of Matter NO. 41, contains honeycomb liked porous structure that is the most common mesoporous molecular sieve studied. Applications of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica material in biomedical field as well as catalytical field have been developed and discussed in this thesis. The unique features of mesoporous silica nanoparticles were utilized for the design of delivery system for multiple biomolecules as described in chapter 2. We loaded luciferin into the hexagonal channels of MSN and capped the pore ends with gold nanoparticles to prevent premature release. Luciferase was adsorbed onto the outer surface of the MSN. Both the MSN and the gold nanoparticles were protected by poly-ethylene glycol to minimize nonspecific interaction of luciferase and keep it from denaturating. Controlled release of luciferin was triggered within the cells and the enzymatic reaction was detected by a luminometer. Further developments by varying enzyme/substrate pairs may provide opportunities to control cell behavior and manipulate intracellular reactions. MSN was also served as a noble metal catalyst support due to its large surface area and its stability with active metals. We prepared MSN with pore diameter of 10 nm (LP10-MSN) which can facilitate mass transfer. And we successfully synthesized an organo silane, 2,2'-Bipyridine-amide-triethoxylsilane (Bpy-amide-TES). Then we were able to functionalize LP10-MSN with bipyridinyl group by both post-grafting method and co-condensation method. Future research of this material would be platinum complexation. This Pt (II) complex catalyst has been reported for a C-H bond activation reaction as an

  12. Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 A presentation about how hydrogen can be reversibly absorbed and desorbed from NaAlH4 under moderate conditions by the addition of catalysts. catalytic_effect_of_ti.pdf (877.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Effects of Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds

  13. Better Buildings Network View | April 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | April 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View April 2015 (155.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | May 2015 Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 Better Buildings Network View | July-August

  14. Better Buildings Network View | April 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | April 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View April 2016 (154.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | May 2016 Better Buildings Network View | June 2016 Better Buildings Network View | January 2016

  15. Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View February 2014 (173.15 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | January 2014 Better Buildings Network View | May 2015 Better Buildings Network View | June 2015

  16. Better Buildings Network View | June 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | June 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View June 2016 (235.96 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | November 2015 Better Buildings Network View | April 2016 Better Buildings Network View | May 2016

  17. Better Buildings Network View | March 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | March 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View March 2014 (129.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | June 2015 Better Buildings Network View | May 2015 Better Buildings Network View | April 2014

  18. Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View March 2015 (264.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | January 2015 Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Better Buildings Network View | April 2015

  19. Better Buildings Network View | March 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | March 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View March 2016 (211.92 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | April 2016 Better Buildings Network View | May 2016 Better Buildings Network View | February 2016

  20. Better Buildings Network View | May 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | May 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View May 2016 (196.19 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | April 2016 Better Buildings Network View | June 2016 Better Buildings Network View | January 2016

  1. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. BB Neighborhood View -- April 2012 (136.63 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - September 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2012

  2. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program - April 2013. BB Neighborhood View -- April 2013 (152.71 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013

  3. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 Better Buildings Neighborhood View, from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. BB Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 (204.44 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013

  4. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. BB Neighborhood View -- January 2012 (214.32 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- February 2012 The BetterBuildings View

  5. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program - July 2013. BB Neighborhood View -- July 2013 (187 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013

  6. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- June 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- June 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. BB Neighborhood View -- June 2012 (150.31 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2012

  7. View from the Bridge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    View from the Bridge View from the Bridge This presentation gives an overview of Caterpillar's R&D focus on advanced diesel engines and exhaust aftertreatment. deer08_utley.pdf (1.36 MB) More Documents & Publications Efficiency Improvement Pathway Development of Advanced Combustion Technologies for Increased Thermal Efficiency Energy & Sustainablility Partnerships

  8. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

    1991-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  10. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called in vitro selection to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  11. Final Technical Report [Development of Catalytic Alkylation and Fluoroalkylation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicic, David A.

    2014-05-01

    In the early stages of this DOE-funded research project, we sought to prepare and study a well-defined nickel-alkyl complex containing tridentate nitrogen donor ligands. We found that reaction of (TMEDA)NiMe2 (1) with terpyridine ligand cleanly led to the formation of (terpyridyl)NiMe (2), which we also determined to be an active alkylation catalyst. The thermal stability of 2 was unlike that seen for any of the active pybox ligands, and enabled a number of key studies on alkyl transfer reactions to be performed, providing new insights into the mechanism of nickel-mediated alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions. In addition to the mechanistic studies, we showed that the terpyridyl nickel compounds can catalytically cross-couple alkyl iodides in yields up to 98% and bromides in yields up to 46 %. The yields for the bromides can be increased up to 67 % when the new palladium catalyst [(tpy’)Pd-Ph]I is used. The best route to the targeted [(tpy)NiBr] (1) was found to involve the comproportionation reaction of [(dme)NiBr{sub 2}] and [Ni(COD){sub 2}] in the presence of two equivalents of terpyridine. This reaction was driven to high yields of product formation (72 % isolated) by the precipitation of 1 from THF solvent.

  12. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  13. Pilot-plant automation for catalytic hydrotreating of heavy residua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, O.; Iwamoto, Y.; Kodama, S.; Takeuchi, C.

    1983-08-01

    The research and development center of Chiyoda Chemical Engineering and Construction Co. has been investigating the catalytic hydrotreating of heavy residua via pilot plant technology. Chiyoda's 52 microreactors. bench-scale test units and pilot plants are each used depending on the purpose of the process development for heavy oil upgrading. The microreactors are effective for catalyst screening. Heavier fractions such as asphaltene and sludge materials often disturbed steady state operation. Many unique devices for the test units and improvement of operation procedures make extended operation easy as well as increasing reliability. The computerized data acquisition and data filing systems minimize the work not only for operators but for all research personnel. Currently, about 40 pilot plant units are continuously running while the others are in preparation. Fully automated operation requires only three for data checking at night. In the daytime, seven operators take care of feed supply, product removal and condition changes. For start-up and shut-down, one operator can handle three microreactos, but only one bench-scale unit or pilot plant. Planning is underway for an improved start-up system for the pilot plants using personal computers. This system automatically sets feed rate and raises reactor temperature. (JMT)

  14. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Chemical Models for Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    2008-12-12

    Bio-oil (product liquids from fast pyrolysis of biomass) is a complex mixture of oxygenates derived from the thermal breakdown of the bio-polymers in biomass. In the case of lignocellulosic biomass, the structures of three major components, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, are well represented by the bio-oil components. In order to study the chemical mechanisms of catalytic hydroprocessing of bio-oil, three model compounds were chosen to represent those components. Guaiacol represents the large number of mono- and di-methoxy phenols found in bio-oil derived from softwood or hardwood, respectively. Furfural represents a major pyrolysis product group from cellulosics. Acetic acid is a major product from biomass pyrolysis, derived from the hemicellulose, which has important impacts on the further processing of the bio-oil because of the acidic character. These three compounds were processed using palladium or ruthenium catalyst over a temperature range from 150°C to 300°C. The batch reactor was sampled during each test over a period of four hours. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with both a mass selective detector and a flame ionization detector. The products were determined and the reaction pathways for their formation are suggested based on these results. Both temperature and catalyst metal have significant effects on the product composition.

  15. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K.

    2014-01-28

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl{sub 2}⋅8H{sub 2}O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  16. A Simple Approach of Tuning Catalytic Activity of MFI-Zeolites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Simple Approach of Tuning Catalytic Activity of MFI-Zeolites for Low-Temperature SCR of NOx Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research ...

  17. Process for catalytic cracking of heavy hydrocarbon feed to lighter products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbst, J.A.; Owen, H.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-05-29

    This patent describes a process for catalytic cracking of a feed of hydrocarbons boiling in the gas oil and heavier boiling range to lighter products by contacting the feed at catalytic cracking conditions and catalytically cracking the feed to lighter products with a cracking catalyst. It comprises: a mixture of separate particles of: a bulk conversion cracking catalyst containing at least one component with an equivalent pore size of at least about 7 angstroms in a matrix, the bulk conversion cracking catalyst having fluidization properties which permit use in a fluidized or moving bed catalytic cracking reactor; a light paraffin upgrading catalyst comprising at least one zeolite having a constraint index of 1--12 and paraffin cracking/isomerization activity; and, a light paraffin upgrading catalyst comprising at least one zeolite having a constraint index of 1--12 and paraffin aromatization activity; and wherein the upgrading catalysts have substantially the same fluidization properties as the bulk conversion cracking catalyst.

  18. Impact of Biodiesel-based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Biodiesel-based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx by NH3 Over Cu-zeolite Catalysts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impact of Biodiesel-based Na on the ...

  19. Catalytic and reactive polypeptides and methods for their preparation and use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic and reactive polypeptides include a binding site specific for a reactant or reactive intermediate involved in a chemical reaction of interest. The polypeptides further include at least one active functionality proximate the bi.

  20. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface Within the area of surface science, one of the "holy ...

  1. System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

    2004-12-01

    Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

  2. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    Precision Combustion, Inc. will develop a unique, fuel-flexible Rich Catalytic Lean-Burn (RCL) injector with catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultralow-emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. This will broaden the range of opportunity fuels that can be utilized to include low- and ultralow-Btu gases, such as digester and blast furnace gases, and fuels containing reactive species, such as refinery, wellhead, and industrial byproduct gases.

  3. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison to Reference Methods | Department of Energy Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_lake.pdf (837.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx

  4. In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Fuel Cells and Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying Jia, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA The development of novel electrode materials is hindered by the lack of fundamental understanding of the precise structural effects on the catalytic activity and

  5. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  6. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass-derived Feedstock (HMF) into Value Added

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemicals and Biofuels - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Catalytic Conversion of Biomass-derived Feedstock (HMF) into Value Added Chemicals and Biofuels Colorado State University Contact CSU About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary A catalytic reaction system by which the biomass-derived feedstock chemical HMF can be upgraded into a higher carbon content

  7. Catalytic Upgrading of Pyrolysis Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Catalytic Upgrading of Pyrolysis Products March 24 th , 2015 Thermochemical Conversion Josh Schaidle NREL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 2.3.1.314 Goal Statement The goal of this project is to design and develop scalable and cost-effective next generation catalysts for ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) to improve the fuel quality and stability of the resulting bio-oil by reducing

  8. grid history | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dc(266) Contributor 31 October, 2014 - 10:58 What do you know about the grid? black out brown out bulk power system electricity grid future grid grid history security Smart Grid...

  9. History of Hanford Site Defense Production (Brief)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M S

    2001-02-01

    This paper acquaints the audience with the history of the Hanford Site, America's first full-scale defense plutonium production site. The paper includes the founding and basic operating history of the Hanford Site, including World War II construction and operations, three major postwar expansions (1947-55), the peak years of production (1956-63), production phase downs (1964-the present), a brief production spurt from 1984-86, the end of the Cold War, and the beginning of the waste cleanup mission. The paper also delineates historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, past efforts to chemically treat, ''fractionate,'' and/or immobilize Hanford's wastes, and resulting major waste legacies that remain today. This paper presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. Finally, the paper places the current Hanford Site waste remediation endeavors in the broad context of American and world history.

  10. Women's History Month 2015 | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chun poses with a picture of her personal hero, Yanmei Li, professor of chemistry at Tsinguha University in Beijing, China. Women&039;s History Month 2015: Cristina Negri 3 of 26 ...

  11. The Manhattan Project National Security History Series

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Manhattan Project National Security History Series 5 Visit our Manhattan Project web site: http:www.cfo.doe.govme70manhattanindex.htm 5 DOEMA-0002 Revised F. G. Gosling ...

  12. History of the DOE Human Genome Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief ...

  13. Coke gasification: the influence and behavior of inherent catalytic mineral matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihaela Grigore; Richard Sakurovs; David French; Veena Sahajwalla

    2009-04-15

    Gasification of coke contributes to its degradation in the blast furnace. In this study, the effect of gasification on the inherent catalytic minerals in cokes and their reciprocal influence on gasification are investigated. The catalytic mineral phases identified in the cokes used in this study were metallic iron, iron sulfides, and iron oxides. Metallic iron and pyrrhotite were rapidly oxidized during gasification to iron oxide. The catalysts had a strong influence on the apparent rates at the initial stages of reaction. As gasification proceeds, their effect on the reaction rate diminishes as a result of reducing the surface contact between catalyst and carbon matrix because of carbon consumption around the catalyst particles; with extended burnout the reactivity of the coke becomes increasingly dependent on surface area. The reaction rate in the initial stages was also influenced by the particle size of the catalytic minerals; for a given catalytic iron level, the cokes whose catalytic minerals were more finely dispersed had a higher apparent reaction rate than cokes containing larger catalytic particles. Iron, sodium, and potassium in the amorphous phase did not appear to affect the reaction rate. 40 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, Alfred G.; Lee, Lap-Keung

    2001-01-01

    A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

  15. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- FRMAC History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office FRMAC History Photo of Three Mile Island Following the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant in March 1979, the President and Congress directed the impacted federal agencies to develop a plan to provide for an integrated federal response to radiological emergencies. It was recognized that when a major radiological incident impacts the public, the state(s) may need federal assistance to characterize and assess

  16. SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the

  17. History of SPR Releases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of SPR Releases History of SPR Releases The Strategic Petroleum Reserve exists, first and foremost, as an emergency response tool the President can use should the United States be confronted with an economically-threatening disruption in oil supplies. A Presidentially-directed release has occurred three times under these conditions. First, in 1991, at the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the United States joined its allies in assuring the adequacy of global oil supplies when war

  18. History and Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » History and Impacts History and Impacts Appliance and equipment efficiency standards have served as one of the nation's most effective policies for improving energy efficiency. The first standards were enacted at the state level in California in 1974. At the national level, the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) was enacted in 1975, and established a federal program consisting of test procedures, labeling, and energy targets for consumer

  19. A History of the Southeastern Power Administration

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Resources » Geothermal Basics » A History of Geothermal Energy in America A History of Geothermal Energy in America Archaeological evidence shows that the first human use of geothermal resources in North America occurred more than 10,000 years ago with the settlement of Paleo-Indians at hot springs. The springs served as a source of warmth and cleansing, their minerals as a source of healing. While people still soak in shallow pools heated by the earth, engineers are developing

  20. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program - October 2012 bb_view_october2012.pdf (136.66 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Decembe

  1. Integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefert, N.; Shamsi, A.; Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.

    2010-01-01

    A review was conducted for coal gasification technologies that integrate with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to achieve system efficiencies near 60% while capturing and sequestering >90% of the carbon dioxide [1-2]. The overall system efficiency can reach 60% when a) the coal gasifier produces a syngas with a methane composition of roughly 25% on a dry volume basis, b) the carbon dioxide is separated from the methane-rich synthesis gas, c) the methane-rich syngas is sent to a SOFC, and d) the off-gases from the SOFC are recycled back to coal gasifier. The thermodynamics of this process will be reviewed and compared to conventional processes in order to highlight where available work (i.e. exergy) is lost in entrained-flow, high-temperature gasification, and where exergy is lost in hydrogen oxidation within the SOFC. The main advantage of steam gasification of coal to methane and carbon dioxide is that the amount of exergy consumed in the gasifier is small compared to conventional, high temperature, oxygen-blown gasifiers. However, the goal of limiting the amount of exergy destruction in the gasifier has the effect of limiting the rates of chemical reactions. Thus, one of the main advantages of steam gasification leads to one of its main problems: slow reaction kinetics. While conventional entrained-flow, high-temperature gasifiers consume a sizable portion of the available work in the coal oxidation, the consumed exergy speeds up the rates of reactions. And while the rates of steam gasification reactions can be increased through the use of catalysts, only a few catalysts can meet cost requirements because there is often significant deactivation due to chemical reactions between the inorganic species in the coal and the catalyst. Previous research into increasing the kinetics of steam gasification will be reviewed. The goal of this paper is to highlight both the challenges and advantages of integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with SOFCs.

  2. Reducing cold-start emissions by catalytic converter thermal management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, S D; Potter, T F; Keyser, M A; Brady, M J; Michaels, K F

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum insulation and phase-change thermal storage have been used to enhance the heat retention of a prototype catalytic converter. Storing heat in the converter between trips allows exhaust gases to be converted more quickly, significantly reducing cold-start emissions. Using a small metal hydride, the thermal conductance of the vacuum insulation can be varied continuously between 0.49 and 27 W/m{sup 2}K (R-12 to R-0.2 insulation) to prevent overheating of the catalyst. A prototype was installed in a Dodge Neon with a 2.0-liter engine. Following a standard preconditioning and a 23-hour cold soak, an FTP (Federal Test Procedure) emissions test was performed. Although exhaust temperatures during the preconditioning were not hot enough to melt the phase-change material, the vacuum insulation performed well, resulting in a converter temperature of 146{degrees}C after the 23-hour cold soak at 27{degrees}C. Compared to the same converter at ambient conditions, overall emissions of CO and HC were reduced by 52 % and 29 %, to 0.27 and 0.037 g/mile, respectively. The maximum converter temperature during the FTP cycle was 720{degrees}C. This limited testing was performed with a nearly-fresh palladium-only catalyst, but demonstrates the potential of this vacuum insulation approach for emissions reduction and thermal control. Further testing is ongoing. An initial assessment of several production issues is made, including high-volume fabrication challenges, durability, and cost.

  3. Micro-channel catalytic reactor integration in CAPER and research/development on highly tritiated water handling and processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demange, D.; Cristescu, I.; Fanghaenel, E.; Gramlich, N.; Le, T.L.; Michling, R.; Moosmann, H.; Simon, K.H.; Wagner, R.; Welte, S.; Glugla, M.; Shu, W.M.; Willms, R.S.

    2015-03-15

    The CAPER facility of the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe has demonstrated the technology for the tokamak exhaust processing. CAPER has been significantly upgraded to pursue research/development programs towards highly tritiated water (HTW) handling and processing. The preliminary tests using a metal oxide reactor producing HTW afterward de-tritiated with PERMCAT were successful. In a later stage, a micro-channel catalytic reactor was installed in view of long term research program on HTW. The integration of this new system in CAPER was carried out along with a careful safety analysis due to high risk associated with such experiments. First experiments using the μ-CCR were performed trouble free, and HTW up to 360 kCi/kg was produced at a rate of 0.5 g/h. Such HTW was collected into a platinum zeolite bed (2 g of HTW for 20 g of Pt-zeolite), and in-situ detritiation was performed via isotopic exchange with deuterium. These first experimental results with tritium confirmed the potential for the capture and exchange method to be used for HTW in ITER. (authors)

  4. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy History of Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA

  5. Y-12 History Center | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 History Center Y-12 History Center Located within the New Hope Center at Y-12, the History Center houses a fascinating collection of informational materials and historical...

  6. Utah Division of State History | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    History Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Utah Division of State History Name: Utah Division of State History Address: 300 S. Rio Grande St. Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84101...

  7. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The History of Ethanol |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The History of Ethanol 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The History of Ethanol 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The History of Ethanol This infographic was created by students from Smithtown High School East in St. James, NY

  8. RVA: A Plugin for ParaView 3.14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-04

    RVA is a plugin developed for the 64-bit Windows version of the ParaView 3.14 visualization package. RVA is designed to provide support in the visualization and analysis of complex reservoirs being managed using multi-fluid EOR techniques. RVA, for Reservoir Visualization and Analysis, was developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with contributions from the Illinois State Geological Survey, Department of Computer Science and National Center for Supercomputing Applications. RVA was designed to utilize and enhance the state-of-the-art visualization capabilities within ParaView, readily allowing joint visualization of geologic framework and reservoir fluid simulation model results. Particular emphasis was placed on enabling visualization and analysis of simulation results highlighting multiple fluid phases, multiple properties for each fluid phase (including flow lines), multiple geologic models and multiple time steps. Additional advanced functionality was provided through the development of custom code to implement data mining capabilities. The built-in functionality of ParaView provides the capacity to process and visualize data sets ranging from small models on local desktop systems to extremely large models created and stored on remote supercomputers. The RVA plugin that we developed and the associated User Manual provide improved functionality through new software tools, and instruction in the use of ParaView-RVA, targeted to petroleum engineers and geologists in industry and research. The RVA web site (http://rva.cs.illinois.edu) provides an overview of functions, and the development web site (https://github.com/shaffer1/RVA) provides ready access to the source code, compiled binaries, user manual, and a suite of demonstration data sets. Key functionality has been included to support a range of reservoirs visualization and analysis needs, including: sophisticated connectivity analysis, cross sections through simulation results between

  9. RVA: A Plugin for ParaView 3.14

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-04

    RVA is a plugin developed for the 64-bit Windows version of the ParaView 3.14 visualization package. RVA is designed to provide support in the visualization and analysis of complex reservoirs being managed using multi-fluid EOR techniques. RVA, for Reservoir Visualization and Analysis, was developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with contributions from the Illinois State Geological Survey, Department of Computer Science and National Center for Supercomputing Applications. RVA was designed to utilize andmore » enhance the state-of-the-art visualization capabilities within ParaView, readily allowing joint visualization of geologic framework and reservoir fluid simulation model results. Particular emphasis was placed on enabling visualization and analysis of simulation results highlighting multiple fluid phases, multiple properties for each fluid phase (including flow lines), multiple geologic models and multiple time steps. Additional advanced functionality was provided through the development of custom code to implement data mining capabilities. The built-in functionality of ParaView provides the capacity to process and visualize data sets ranging from small models on local desktop systems to extremely large models created and stored on remote supercomputers. The RVA plugin that we developed and the associated User Manual provide improved functionality through new software tools, and instruction in the use of ParaView-RVA, targeted to petroleum engineers and geologists in industry and research. The RVA web site (http://rva.cs.illinois.edu) provides an overview of functions, and the development web site (https://github.com/shaffer1/RVA) provides ready access to the source code, compiled binaries, user manual, and a suite of demonstration data sets. Key functionality has been included to support a range of reservoirs visualization and analysis needs, including: sophisticated connectivity analysis, cross sections through simulation results

  10. TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more...

  11. Better Buildings Network View November 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BetterBuildings Network View News From the Field Capturing Efficiency in Residential Real Estate Transactions The U.S. Departmenr of Energy (DOE) has released More Real Estate ...

  12. JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning.

  13. A common-view disciplined oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, Michael A.; Dahlen, Aaron P.

    2010-05-15

    This paper describes a common-view disciplined oscillator (CVDO) that locks to a reference time scale through the use of common-view global positioning system (GPS) satellite measurements. The CVDO employs a proportional-integral-derivative controller that obtains near real-time common-view GPS measurements from the internet and provides steering corrections to a local oscillator. A CVDO can be locked to any time scale that makes real-time common-view data available and can serve as a high-accuracy, self-calibrating frequency and time standard. Measurement results are presented where a CVDO is locked to UTC(NIST), the coordinated universal time scale maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado.

  14. Labs and Field Site Histories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Labs and Field Site Histories Labs and Field Site Histories Labs and Field Site Histories Note: Every effort is made to keep these links current and updated. Yet as many of the links below point to sites not under our direct control, some may stop working without warning . National Laboratories & Technology Centers Operations Offices & Field Sites Ames Laboratory (Iowa) -- History Chicago Office (Illinois) -- History Argonne National Laboratory (Illinois) -- Laboratory History and

  15. Better Buildings Network View | April 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | April 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View April 2014 (130.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Better Buildings Network View | May

  16. Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View December 2014 (252.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 Better Buildings Network View | November 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls -- No. 3

  17. Better Buildings Network View | January 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | January 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View January 2015 (161.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls -- No. 3 Better Buildings Network View | May

  18. Better Buildings Network View | November 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 2014 Better Buildings Network View | November 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View November 2014 (162.63 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Better Buildings Network View | December 2014

  19. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - Summer 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summer 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - Summer 2011 The quarterly update newsletter of the Better Buildings program of the U.S. Department of Energy. BB Neighborhood View -- Summer 2011 (138.07 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- May

  20. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program BB Neighborhood View -- March 2012 (292.36 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- February 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 Commercial Buildings Integration Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review

  1. Women's History Month: Ebony Vauss, Solar Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Women's History Month: Ebony Vauss, Solar Energy Technologies Office Women's History Month: Ebony Vauss, Solar Energy Technologies Office March 25, 2016 - 10:03am Addthis Solar ...

  2. Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and...

  3. OSTI History, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSTI History Accelerating Science Discovery: From the '40s to the Future Timeline History 1940 Answering the Call 1950s Expanding Internationally 1960s Supporting Education 1970s...

  4. Reionization history and CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Kinney, William H.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.edu

    2013-05-01

    We study how uncertainty in the reionization history of the universe affects estimates of other cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background. We analyze WMAP7 data and synthetic Planck-quality data generated using a realistic scenario for the reionization history of the universe obtained from high-resolution numerical simulation. We perform parameter estimation using a simple sudden reionization approximation, and using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique proposed by Mortonson and Hu. We reach two main conclusions: (1) Adopting a simple sudden reionization model does not introduce measurable bias into values for other parameters, indicating that detailed modeling of reionization is not necessary for the purpose of parameter estimation from future CMB data sets such as Planck. (2) PCA analysis does not allow accurate reconstruction of the actual reionization history of the universe in a realistic case.

  5. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  6. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  7. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2008-08-05

    Presentation covers new content available on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center regarding diesel vehicles, diesel exhaust fluid, and selective catalytic reduction technologies.

  8. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Showcases new content added to the AFDC including: Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies, and an upcoming Deisel Exhaust Fluid Locator.

  9. History of Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of Air Conditioning History of Air Conditioning July 20, 2015 - 3:15pm Addthis Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs MORE ON AIR CONDITIONING Check out our Energy Saver 101 infographic to learn how air conditioners work. Go to Energy Saver for more tips and advice on home cooling. Stay up-to-date on how the Energy Department is working to improve air conditioning technology. We take the air conditioner for granted, but imagine what life would be

  10. The History of DEER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The History of DEER The History of DEER Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_eberhardt.pdf (489.95 KB) More Documents & Publications After Petroleum Update on Progress of APBF-DEC EGR/DPF/SCR Demonstration Program at SwRI Fuels of the Future for Cars and Trucks

  11. ALS History: The First 20 Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History: The First 20 Years Print Below is an interactive timeline covering highlights of the first 20 years of ALS history. By no means exhaustive, it is meant to provide a broad overview of the people and events that have helped shape the ALS as well as a sense of the breadth of the science that has been done here. Click on items to see more detail. Slide the blue rectangle at bottom to move forward or backward in time. Color Key: Science Highlights (green); People and Events (orange);

  12. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- August 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. BB Neighborhood View -- August 2012 (133.92 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - September 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- June 2012

  13. Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters ...

  14. Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale...

  15. OpenEI:Neutral point of view | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    point of view Jump to: navigation, search Neutral point of view (NPOV) means that articles and content contributed or edited on the platform must be unbiased. All significant...

  16. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2013 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

  17. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood...

  18. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2013 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood...

  19. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- April 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood...

  20. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- August 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

  1. Better Buildings Network View | November 2015 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | November 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF...

  2. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- June 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- June 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

  3. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood...

  4. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

  5. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- May 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - May 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- May 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

  6. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 Better Buildings Neighborhood View, from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. ...

  7. Better Buildings Network View | January 2016 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | January 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  8. Better Buildings Network View | June 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | June 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF icon ...

  9. Better Buildings Network View | October 2014 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2014 Better Buildings Network View | October 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential ...

  10. Better Buildings Network View | January 2015 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | January 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  11. Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  12. Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. ...

  13. Better Buildings Network View | February 2016 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | February 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  14. Better Buildings Network View | May 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | May 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF icon ...

  15. Better Buildings Network View | March 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | March 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  16. Better Buildings Network View | April 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | April 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  17. Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  18. Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  19. Better Buildings Network View | January 2014 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | January 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  20. Better Buildings Network View | October 2015 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | October 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  1. Better Buildings Network View | March 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Better Buildings Network View | March 2016 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF ...

  2. Better Buildings Network View | June 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | June 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. PDF icon ...

  3. Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2015 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network. ...

  4. Better Buildings Network View | April 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View April 2014 (130.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Better Buildings Residential ...

  5. Better Buildings Network View | May 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential Network. Better Buildings Network View May 2015 (548.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | June 2015 Home Performance with ENERGY STAR ...

  6. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- February 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 Microsoft Word - T4VEICTO2 Sub3Residential Retrofit Program Design ...

  7. Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial...

  8. City of Mountain View, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    View Place: Missouri Phone Number: (417) 934-2601 Website: mountainviewmo.comindex.phpg Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCityOfMountainViewMissouri Outage Hotline: (877)...

  9. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings ...

  10. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atomic Energy Commission A History of the Atomic Energy Commission A History of the Atomic Energy Commission - written by Alice L. Buck Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, July 1983. 41 pp. AEC History.pdf (1.01 MB) More Documents & Publications The History of Nuclear Energy The Manhattan Project Hewlett and Holl - Atoms for Peace and War

  11. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  12. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide on Activated Carbons Impregnated with Sodium Hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Baskova, Svetlana [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Two activated carbons of different origin were impregnated with the solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) of various concentrations up to 10 wt %, and the effect of impregnation on the catalytic performance of the carbons was evaluated. The catalytic activity was analyzed in terms of the capacity of carbons for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conversion and removal from hydrogen-rich fuel streams and the emission times of H2S and the products of its oxidation [e.g., sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS)]. The results of impregnation showed a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of both carbons proportional to the amount of NaOH introduced. NaOH introduces hydroxyl groups (OH-) on the surface of the activated carbon that increase its surface reactivity and its interaction with sulfur-containing compounds.

  13. Two-stage Catalytic Reduction of NOx with Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umit S. Ozkan; Erik M. Holmgreen; Matthew M. Yung; Jonathan Halter; Joel Hiltner

    2005-12-21

    A two-stage system for the catalytic reduction of NO from lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine exhaust is investigated. Each of the two stages uses a distinct catalyst. The first stage is oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} and the second stage is reduction of NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2} with a hydrocarbon. The central idea is that since NO{sub 2} is a more easily reduced species than NO, it should be better able to compete with oxygen for the combustion reaction of hydrocarbon, which is a challenge in lean conditions. Early work focused on demonstrating that the N{sub 2} yield obtained when NO{sub 2} was reduced was greater than when NO was reduced. NO{sub 2} reduction catalysts were designed and silver supported on alumina (Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was found to be quite active, able to achieve 95% N{sub 2} yield in 10% O{sub 2} using propane as the reducing agent. The design of a catalyst for NO oxidation was also investigated, and a Co/TiO{sub 2} catalyst prepared by sol-gel was shown to have high activity for the reaction, able to reach equilibrium conversion of 80% at 300 C at GHSV of 50,000h{sup -1}. After it was shown that NO{sub 2} could be more easily reduced to N{sub 2} than NO, the focus shifted on developing a catalyst that could use methane as the reducing agent. The Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was tested and found to be inactive for NOx reduction with methane. Through iterative catalyst design, a palladium-based catalyst on a sulfated-zirconia support (Pd/SZ) was synthesized and shown to be able to selectively reduce NO{sub 2} in lean conditions using methane. Development of catalysts for the oxidation reaction also continued and higher activity, as well as stability in 10% water, was observed on a Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst, which reached equilibrium conversion of 94% at 250 C at the same GHSV. The Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst was also found to be extremely active for oxidation of CO, ethane, and propane, which could potential eliminate the need for any separate

  14. United States Department of Energy: a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holl, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    This pamphlet traces the origins of the Department of Energy and outlines the history of the Department as reflected in the energy policies of Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan. It attempts to place recent energy policy into historical perspective by describing the evolution of the federal Government's role in energy research, development, and regulation.

  15. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Mayzel, Dina; Prasai, Binay; Wang, Lingyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-05-05

    Alloying palladium (Pd) with other transition metals at the nanoscale has become an important pathway for preparation of low-cost, highly-active and stable catalysts. However the lack of understanding of how the alloying phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of the alloys at the nanoscale influence their catalytic activity impedes the rational design of Pd-nanoalloy catalysts. This work addresses this challenge by a novel approach to investigating the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) over palladium-nickel (PdNi) nanoalloys with well-defined bimetallic composition, which reveals a remarkable a maximal catalytic activity at Pd:Ni ratio of ~50:50. Key to understanding the structural-catalytic synergy is the use of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function (HE-XRD/PDF) analysis to probe the atomic structure of PdNi nanoalloys under controlled thermochemical treatments and CO reaction conditions. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the atomic structure of the nanoalloy particles were generated by reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) guided by the experimental HE-XRD/PDF data. Structural details of the PdNi nanoalloys were extracted from the respective 3D models and compared with the measured catalytic properties. The comparison revealed a strong correlation between the phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of PdNi nanoalloys and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation. This correlation is further substantiated by analyzing the first atomic neighbor distances and coordination numbers inside the nanoalloy particles and at their surfaces. These findings have provided new insights into the structural synergy of nanoalloy catalysts by controlling the phase state, composition and atomic structure, complementing findings of traditional density functional theory studies.

  16. Multi-stage selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    Many studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. Some effort has been devoted to separating the oxidative and reductive functions of the catalyst in a multi-stage system. This method works fine for systems that require hydrocarbon addition. The hydrocarbon has to be injected between the NO oxidation catalyst and the NO{sub 2} reduction catalyst; otherwise, the first-stage oxidation catalyst will also oxidize the hydrocarbon and decrease its effectiveness as a reductant. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is appropriate for diesel engine exhausts since they contain insufficient hydrocarbons for SCR, and the hydrocarbons can be added at the desired location. For lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts, the hydrocarbons already present in the exhausts will make it necessary to find an oxidation catalyst that can oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} but not oxidize the hydrocarbon. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. Plasma oxidation has several advantages over catalytic oxidation. Plasma-assisted catalysis can work well for both diesel engine and lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts. This is because the plasma can oxidize NO in the presence of hydrocarbons without degrading the effectiveness of the hydrocarbon as a reductant for SCR. In the plasma, the hydrocarbon enhances the oxidation of NO, minimizes the electrical energy requirement, and prevents the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. This paper discusses the use of multi-stage systems for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is compared to the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme.

  17. Highlights of Y-12's History | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights of Y-12's ... Highlights of Y-12's History Click a decade at right to show its highlights. Click again to hide. View highlights by decade since Y-12's initial planning and wartime mission starting in 1942 through its current missions today. Click a decade below to show its highlights. Click again to hide. 1940s - An era of intense activity that included construction of Y-12, completion of its World War II mission of separating the uranium 235 for Little Boy - the first atomic bomb

  18. A Brief History in Time of Ion Traps and their Achievements in Science

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Holzscheiter, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    A short history of the development of the ion storage technique for precision experiments is given. This is by no means meant to be a complete review of the field, but the intend is to use a few specific examples to describe how the persistence, ingenuity, and experimental skill of a few people has generated the core of a field which is now growing at an ever faster pace, spreading into new areas, developing sub fields, and allowing a view at nature, using very modest experimental equipment, which by far rivals even the most ambitious dreams of high energy physics.

  19. Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are predicting that this winter's flu season is most likely to peak in February across much of the United States. The scientists can say this because of the model they have constructed. December 24, 2015 Man sneezing Model suggests still time to get your flu shot and be protected. "There's no crystal ball when it comes to predicting disease outbreaks," said

  20. ,"Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input",16,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/2010" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release